February 28, 2020: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 2/28/20 - Last OHD Update: 3/6/20 - 127 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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Once There Were Castles: Lost Mansions and Estates of the Twin Cities by Larry Millett
In Lost Twin Cities, Larry Millett brought to life the vanished architecture of downtown Minneapolis and St. Paul. Now, in Once There Were Castles, he offers a richly illustrated look at another world of ghosts in our midst: the lost mansions and estates of the Twin Cities.

Nobody can say for sure how many lost mansions haunt the Twin Cities, but at least five hundred can be accounted for in public records and archives. In Minneapolis and St. Paul, entire neighborhoods of luxurious homes have disappeared, virtually without a trace. Many grand estates that once spread out over hundreds of acres along the shores of Lake Minnetonka are also gone. The greatest of these lost houses often had astonishingly short lives: the lavish Charles Gates mansion in Minneapolis survived only nineteen years, and Norman Kittson’s sprawling castle on the site of the St. Paul Cathedral stood for barely more than two decades. Railroad and freeway building, commercial and institutional expansion, fires, and financial disasters all claimed their share of mansions; others succumbed to their own extravagance, becoming too costly to maintain once their original owners died.

The stories of these grand houses are, above all else, the stories of those who built and lived in them—from the fantastic saga of Marion Savage to the continent-spanning conquests of James J. Hill, to the all-but-forgotten tragedy of Olaf Searle, a poor immigrant turned millionaire who found and lost a dream in the middle of Lake Minnetonka. These and many other mansion builders poured all their dreams, desires, and obsessions into extravagant homes designed to display wealth and solidify social status in a culture of ever-fluctuating class distinctions.

The first book to take an in-depth look at the history of the Twin Cities’ mansions, Once There Were Castles presents ninety lost mansions and estates, organized by neighborhood and illustrated with photographs and drawings. An absorbing read for Twin Cities residents and a crucial addition to the body of work on the region’s history, Once There Were Castles brings these “ghost mansions” back to life.


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127 Comments on February 28, 2020: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    The old house photo, back is stamped: “F. J. Taylor & Co. Copying and Landscape Photographers. Office: 405 Main Street, Cambridgeport, Mass.”

    The family photo has no association with the house, just an unknown family.

    Taking the weekend “off” has been kind of successful, mostly, so going for it again, mostly. Reshares mixed with new posts this weekend. 🙂

    17
  2. JosephJoseph says: 413 comments
    1790 Northborough, MA

    1970s Time Capsule Condo 375K Ramona CA

    Yes, later than we usually see here, but quite a time capsule. Back story is that neither of the two owners of this property used it much, so it retained its decor. Some were mocking it, but apparently it has gotten a lot of activity due to the survival of its decor.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/23645-Country-Villa-Rd_Ramona_CA_92065_M19985-28677#photo26

    News article: https://nypost.com/2020/02/25/groovy-green-time-capsule-home-left-untouched-for-45-years/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_medium=SocialFlow&utm_source=NYPTwitter

    11
    • MarthAllenaMarthAllena says: 92 comments
      1922 Craftsman
      St. Paul, MN

      Not my style of home, but I absolutely love it. Green shag has got to go though. This is awesome! The green carpet is great too is some of the rooms, but no way I would live with old carpet.

      2
      • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        MarthAllena, I don’t like carpet either…and just imagine with a whole house of that shade of green, what a pallor a person would take on. Couldn’t be the most flattering to man or woman.

        2
      • OdieKOdieK says: 106 comments

        The person who installed the wallpaper had amazing skills. Every single piece was centered and nothing was taken for granted here. Perfection like that doesn’t happen every day. This must have been professionally designed and they did a beautiful job. This really is a time capsule and it looks like it was done just yesterday. It must have been cleaned regularly through the years despite the owners seldom making an appearance. Just amazing.

        1
    • Gail M.Gail M. says: 199 comments
      1964 Brutalist midmod condo
      Saint Paul, MN

      This is quite wonderful. It would be like waking up in a garden every day.

      2
  3. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 101 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    This is not a house for sale—though it was for sale between 1997 and 2011, after it had been purchased by Preservation Virginia in the late 1990s as a short-term solution as they sought the right long-term owner. Instead, this is the extraordinary story of the saving of Wilton—a stunning 1763 Flemish-bond brick plantation home in Hartfield, Virginia—in such a way as to retain the authenticity of the structure via the work of so many incredible craftsmen. Best of all, people can rent out this historic home—for a few days or a week or more—and I note that its location is circa 25 miles from Williamsburg. As an aside, my wife and I were potential buyers of Wilton back in 2005, though we decided against the purchase based on the considerable work that needed to be done. The current owner was willing to do that work, and his efforts … are a triumph. See for yourself.

    https://wiltonhousevirginia.org/

    16
    • JimHJimH says: 5148 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Lovely old place, and a fine restoration. Thanks!

      3
    • MWMW says: 905 comments

      Wow, this is one of the best posts ever. That is a very intriguing and inspiring video to watch. The house and project itself sound amazing. Tons of credit to the current owner to not only restore it to an extremely admirable level of historic integrity, but also to integrate realistic functionality, and to then be willing to rent it out and share it with people in such a truly altruistic way. Maybe I will rent this house for the week next time back in the area to visit family. $295/day? I’ve paid more than that for some very forgettable hotel rooms. This place is kind of crazy good to be honest.

      7
    • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Great Post Sonofsyosset…Thank-you…! During my time in Virginia, I became familiar with a few of these beauties, restored and unrestored and wanted every one. I’m looking into spending a few days at Wilton in May, thanks to your post…👍

      2
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 509 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thank you for this video, SonofSynosset!! I don’t normally get emotional about a house, but I was actually in tears of relief that this home had been so beautifully restored using the knowledge of so many talented people.

      I loved hearing/seeing the history of the house and gave thanks to the Ballantynes for their wonderful efforts in preserving it as best they could with their limited resources. I shudder to think what could have happened. The video was certainly a huge help to me with respect to restoring and maintaining the integrity of a 1763 house (or any house) that had seen good times and bad and was on the verge of “disappearing” from the landscape. (Again, bless the Ballantynes!)

      Mr. Foster and his team has done a remarkable job and I thank him for the video. I doubt very much that I will ever find myself in Virginia, but, hell, I can still dream!

      I would love to see more such videos of old houses being brought back to life in such a splendid fashion because every old house has its own unique history which needs to be preserved as well as the house, itself.

      2
  4. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings all, here is what sparked my interest this week:

    First, two modern beauties from Ojai:

    1962, Ojai, CA, 2,950,000

    Lovely, open and modern

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1312-Rugby-Rd-Ojai-CA-93023/16312704_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=659778b9-8014-40ab-b7a5-926f3c0f51cf~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1960, Ojai, CA, 2,882,000

    From the listing: “Designed in 1960 by the noted Ojai firm of Chalfant Head & Associates, the house centers on a dramatic great room featuring a distinctive fireplace, two glass walls facing the mountains to the northeast and a boldly sloped diagonal beam. Extensive use of redwood paneling throughout the house adds warmth and character”

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1312-Rugby-Rd-Ojai-CA-93023/16312704_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=659778b9-8014-40ab-b7a5-926f3c0f51cf~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

  5. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Another modern from the east coast in a very special area (to me):

    1962, Williamstown, MA, 899,000

    From the listing: “The residence (circa 1962) was designed for the current owners by Jacek von Henneberg, of Henneberg & Henneberg, Cambridge MA, an award winning architect formerly of the renowned Architects Collaborative under Walter Gropius. The house sits within the wall that was the original foundation for Harley Procter’s (Procter & Gamble) estate in 1902.”

    I love the location and the town of Williamstown (Clark Art Institute, Williams College and its theater and art museum and loads of great architecture, along with neighboring North Adams (MASSMoca).

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/280-0-Stone-Hill-Rd-Williamstown-MA-01267/2083110641_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=0c9e27a4-a781-4272-84c7-0ee2ebc9aa4d~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Forgot to add this to the Williamstown house listing:

      http://www.thetrustees.org/places-to-visit/berkshires/field-farm.html

      Featuring an unparalleled view of Mt. Greylock, Massachusetts’ highest peak, the Guest House at Field Farm is a refreshing change from your usual bed & breakfast. Edwin Goodell, Jr. designed the 1948 Bauhaus-inspired house for Lawrence and Eleanor Bloedel, avid modern art and furniture collectors of the time. Modern artwork adorns the interiors, and the surrounding landscaped gardens boast thirteen sculptures, including works by Richard M. Miller and Herbert Ferber. The house itself is almost a museum of modern furnishings, featuring reproduced Eileen Gray tables and George Nelson saucer pendant lamps in the Master bedroom, and a Noguchi coffee table, Kagan sofas, and a reproduction Eames chair in the living room.

      1
      • Anne M.Anne M. says: 880 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1972 raised ranch.
        Hopkinton, MA

        On my bucket list to stay here for an autumn weekend. I have renewed my membership to the Trustees faithfully in the hope that it would happen but it hasn’t yet! Oh well, something to look forward to.
        Great find on the Williamstown house as well, Kimberly my appreciation for MCM grows weekly!

        1
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Great house in a lovely setting, Kimberly! Williamstown is just magical, and if you play your cards right you may get to see some of the finest summer theater performances in the country.

  6. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1914, Woodstock, NY, 585,000

    Nice church remodel! From the listing: “Gothic entry doors , tin walls and ceilings, lime stone and walnut fireplace mantel , from the Paramount Theatre in NYC.”

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1215-Oella-Ave-Ellicott-City-MD-21043/82306716_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=709f54c4-1010-4a9a-8996-be4fe7c3dac4~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1930, Rochester, NY, 144,900

    From the listing: “Home was built by original owner in 1930; area has historical roots. Over 200+ built in cabinets, closets, and storage galore. Spacious great room w/ vaulted ceiling”
    Lots of unique detail such as the colored tile on the entryway, many interesting handmade cabinets and built-ins, vintage kitchen appliances

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/20-Tone-Ter-Rochester-NY-14617/30968727_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=16505ec0-696e-4de0-b06a-c28ea4195023~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    3
  8. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1860, Mount Upton, NY, 139,900

    Unadilla River front home on 2.5 acres. shingled house in an appealing red clay color, cozy home with beamed ceilings and wide plank floors, enjoyable kitchen, though appears tight on work space

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/587-County-Highway-18-Mount-Upton-NY-13809/31626182_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=54b8a2fe-7202-49f9-a8d3-772571ccad67~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    2
  9. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1910, Sewickley, PA, 899,000

    From the listing: “home designed by and originally owned by architect A. H. Spahr. Period details include: high ceilings, plaster walls, gleaming hardwood floors, spacious rooms, and beautiful woodwork.”
    I love to see what architects design for themselves to live in

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/527-Cochran-St-Sewickley-PA-15143/11480662_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=7155de56-0e84-4204-8fbb-26f269df17a2~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1
  10. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1912, Altadena, CA, 1,350,000

    From the listing: “A Henry Greene designed cottage located in Wild Wood Park at the end of E. Palm St (one of the original four Valentine Cottages). This rare architectural find embodies the many romantic aspects of the Arts and Crafts movement. Resting on nearly a half acre of Oak Tree studded grounds with river rock walls & detailing, this home affords remarkable character and detail throughout with original hardware, fixtures, and fine woods. Expansive living room with G&G signature fpl, wood beamed ceiling, French doors & windows. FDR with fireplace and wood paneled walls.”

    http://ohp.parks.ca.gov/pages/1067/files
    /CA_Los%20Angeles%20County_Walter%20D.%20Valentine%20Cottage%20B_Nom.pdf

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1419-E-Palm-St-Altadena-CA-91001/20916972_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=326bc268-568c-4f0b-8a2d-055ae9e3dfaa~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    5
  11. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    (and later on today, I hope to put together something from someone dear to my heart)smile

    Here is the last house listing I have to offer today:

    1804, Ellicott City, MD, 250,000

    Stone house in “shell condition”. In a row of separate stone homes up on a hill.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1215-Oella-Ave-Ellicott-City-MD-21043/82306716_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=709f54c4-1010-4a9a-8996-be4fe7c3dac4~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    2
  12. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    And here is the fun share I have been looking forward to sharing with all of you:

    This past weekend, while over at my family home, I had some time to myself and pulled a few books off of the shelf. One was Old Virginia Homes. Inside I found an old envelope for photos and in that I found a number of old house photos with the name of each house written in my grandmother’s hand. This made me smile, for here is where I get my interest in looking at old houses! Here are a few photos from her collection, only on one do I see a date stamp of May ’66.
    I have included links to my profile page photos (hope that will work, but… it looks like all the links are of the same address, so this may become a fun game to see if you can guess what is what until you look at the outside links) which has copies of her photographs, and also modern day links to the houses.

    Abijah Morgan House, Bronxville, NY

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    “…the country was in the midst of the Great Depression. Up to half of the homes in Bronxville were in foreclosure and available for sale. Frieda, as she rode the bus, took special notice of the Abijah Morgan house, the oldest home in Bronxville, at the northeast corner of White Plains Road and Pondfield Road. In 1937, the asking price of the home from the bank was $12,000, and with help from her family, Frieda and Arad were able to purchase the house.”

    http://myhometownbronxville.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8514:the-legacy-of-frieda-riggs&catid=5:bronxville-govt-hist&Itemid=5

    https://bronxvillehistoricalconservancy.org/our-mission/a-lasting-legacy/

    Van Cortlandt Manor, Croton-on-the-Hudson, NY

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Cortlandt_Manor

    Odell house, Greenburgh, NY

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    This house I think has been talked about before on OHD. I think it is sad that this house has had such a sad road and was in such a state back in May of ’66 too.

    https://www.odellrochambeau.org/

    https://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/westchester/greenburgh/2019/07/10/town-greenburgh-own-and-repair-revolutionary-war-odell-house/1692225001/

    Thomas Paine Cottage, New Rochelle, NY

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    http://www.thomaspainecottage.org/

    Widow Haviland Tavern, Rye, NY

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widow_Haviland%27s_Tavern

    Hammond House, Mount Pleasant, NY

    It is one of the oldest houses in Westchester County, and one of only two remaining tenant houses from the Philipsburg Manor

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammond_House_(Eastview,_New_York)

    Phillipsburg Manor Mill

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/7647/?profiletab=photos

    https://hudsonvalley.org/historic-sites/philipsburg-manor/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philipsburg_Manor

    The only picture included in my OHD picture collection that is not included is the large stone mill in Yonkers-it looks like it is still around, I could only find a link to the Italian restaurant that resides there today.

    3
  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    This one was featured back in 2017 as a fixer upper: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/917-W-4th-St-Marion-IN-46952/80726178_zpid/ ($18,700) in Marion, Indiana. It looked pretty good and restorable back then-but today? (will require a personal inspection to ascertain current condition) Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/N5XKPk58XksPTk3a8

    2
  14. Just came across this stunning 1880s house in Vermont.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/122-River-St-Richford-VT-05476/115796837_zpid/

    I can’t believe it’s been on the market for 833 days! The woodwork is gorgeous, and everything is in amazing shape. It’s a steal at $350k!

    4
  15. ddbackerddbacker says: 507 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    Ugh… another great Kansas City mansion in peril of tear-down.
    https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article240654681.html

    • natira121natira121 says: 660 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      I’d sure like to hear opinions on this.

      It sounds to me like they could afford to have the work done, and even if it needed to be nearly gutted to remove asbestos, black mold, and all the plumbing, the shell would STILL be better than anything built today. Not to mention that it’s likely most of the interior fitting could be re-used.

      It’s certainly a beautiful, stately home, and I’d love to see pictures of the inside.

      1
      • natira121natira121 says: 660 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1877 Vernacular
        Columbia River Gorge, WA

        Found the listing:

        https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/236-W-54th-St-Kansas-City-MO-64112/2351579_zpid/?

        And now I don’t know what to think!

        1
        • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1013 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1800 cottage
          Upstate, NY

          Well, when you start gutting a big old place like this, it would probably not be unusual to find asbestos and lead – but to my mind that’s another reason AGAINST gutting a historic house! Because, as we all know, asbestos is NOT a problem until it is disturbed. So, now they’re trying to correct one mistake with another, and in the process another antique property risks consignment to oblivion.

          Yes, I realize none of us has first-hand knowledge of the facts here, however, this story is becoming far too familiar in our HGTV world. I hope someone manages to put the brakes on this one…

          8
        • ZooZoo says: 530 comments

          I hate to be enormously cynical, but it appears the new owners intended to tear the house down when they bought it. From the photos, it looks completely renovated and in move-in condition. Why would they start gutting it if they didn’t intend to tear it down? There was no need to gut it, and of course, if, as they claim, they love old houses and have renovated others, they MUST have known they’d find asbestos and lead inside a house of this age!! So that gave them an excuse to tear it down!
          I don’t know why people do this, but when you have a lot of money, you think you can do anything you want! If the house is in a perfect location for this couple, but a bit too small, or doesn’t have the right sized media room or kitchen or whatever they think they want, they probably felt they had a right to create it, and if that weren’t possible, they’d tear the place down and build to their exact specifications.
          A cousin lives in a very, very wealthy zip code, and she rescues animals that are abandoned there. She said the very wealthy people there will decide to go on vacation, can’t be bothered to put their pet into a kennel, so will just drop the dog or cat off in a park. They do this with very expensive pure-bred dogs, which my cousin rescues more often than you can imagine!! Wealth is not all that it’s cracked up to be! It gives people, apparently like this couple, free reign to think they can do whatever they want, no matter the consequences. Sad, but true.

          1
    • JkleebJkleeb says: 283 comments
      Seattle, WA

      I would hope they’ve spoken to several contractors about the problems—speaking from experience fear of asbestos and lead can be used to really charge a lot for abatement that can sometimes be completed far more reasonably.

      5
  16. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1013 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    Here is an interesting house in Midland Park, NJ, known as the Myers-Masker House, which I don’t believe has been shared before. (If so, apologies.) It is listed as a 1795 Colonial, however is a fairly appealing amalgamation of 18th, 19th and 20th century features – plus attached carriage house – for $775,000:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/179-Park-Ave-Midland-Park-NJ-07432/37965216_zpid/

    3
  17. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1013 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    In the historic village of Sharon Springs in upstate NY, here is a $20,000 fixer. Despite a listed build date of 1890, it looks to be a Greek Revival with Italianate features, including an attractive staircase which is not shown to its best advantage in the photos. The plumbing is noted as non-functional, but it does have electric baseboard heat. The most pressing issue, however, is apparently the laid stone foundation which is reportedly being undermined by run-off from the upward sloping back yard.

    I toured this house this week, and except for the attractive staircase, hardwood floors, many original windows and tin ceiling in the kitchen, it is essentially a blank slate. It is a foreclosure and several offers have reportedly been submitted, however, the bank is apparently accepting “best and final” offers through Monday, 3/2/2020, in the event anyone is interested.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/120-Willow-St-Sharon-Springs-NY-13459/32527533_zpid/

    6
  18. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    For all you antique barn lovers……this is a wonderful, fun site to visit. This is when I miss most not living near the East Coast. Most would make spectacular homes if you didn’t need an actual barn reconstructed on your site.

    https://www.antiquebarns.net/

    6
  19. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    And one of my favorites is back on the market, a 1740’s gambrel-roofed cottage in Bantam, CT, which the listing says has a rare porch, on almost 7 acres at $585,000. I love the wide plank walls and minimal way the owners have furnished this jewel. It speaks to me in a quietly serene voice. (And I’m ready to go look for some green/white striped wallpaper…!!!)

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/77-Cathole-Rd-Bantam-CT-06750/197802296_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-propertyalertnew&rtoken=825c9a47-933c-434a-8900-549ca513cc8a~X1-ZUxys7xro5c0zt_6ttic&utm_term=urn:msg:20200225184221b2a221009f9dc900&utm_content=image

    5
    • JimHJimH says: 5148 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’ll pass on the designer wallpaper, but it’s tastefully done and still feels like an old house.

      I was curious about the meaning of Cathole Road, so I looked it up!

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathole

      2
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Sandy, I too took note of this house going back on the market. It’s owned by Annie Kelly, a Los Angeles based decorator, and design writer and her husband Tim Street-Porter one of the best architectural photographers in the business. This house is better featured in their book, Litchfield Style. I am surprised that they didn’t use more pictures from the book itself. I keep hoping to run into them at a party or event at some point, as it is a very small world out here, but alas—it hasn’t happened.

      As an aside, Their book The Los Angeles House has some of the most amazing photos I’ve ever come across of Frank Lloyd Wright’s La Miniatura in Pasadena before the giant addition was added. She decorated the house for one of the former owners when it still WAS La Miniatura! Two of my prized possessions are photos I took with an old digital camera of that house before all the renovations. When trying to blow up the shots, they became all pixelated and rather abstract. I should try and post them on my profile at some point, they’re pretty cool.

      4
  20. Anne M.Anne M. says: 880 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Here’s a few to add to the great shares already posted!
    1850 in Chelsea, VT for $239,000- stumped as to what this might be called. Check out the antique stove in the kitchen:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/281-Vt-Route-110-Chelsea-VT-05038/2099567875_zpid/
    1820 in Middlebury, VT for $550,000 very few pictures, sadly. Has a cottage and a separate apartment:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/51-Seminary-Street-Ext-Middlebury-VT-05753/299442330_zpid/
    1869 Georgian in Winchendon, MA for $489,900 – incredible landscaping, great kitchen, huge pantry and fabulous solarium
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/224-Glenallen-St-Winchendon-MA-01475/57682528_zpid/
    1850 Greek Revival in Hubbardston, MA for $339,900 – very elegant
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2-Brigham-St-Hubbardston-MA-01452/57604223_zpid/
    Have a nice weekend!

    4
    • JkleebJkleeb says: 283 comments
      Seattle, WA

      All are great shares and have elements I really like, but I think the Middlebury house is really interesting. If the photos are current, there seems to be many original details to love.

      1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Anne, love your shares this week. Old kitchen stove is wonderful, and the Middlebury looks to be such a great house, I LOVE the wallpaper, especially in the stairwell.

      1
  21. JkleebJkleeb says: 283 comments
    Seattle, WA

    Ellington, NY, 1849 Greek Revival, $174,900
    The exterior of this smallish farm house packs a lot of style into the facade with great ionic pilasters, pedimented gable and heavy entablature. The interior is quite simple (with the exception of furnishings). Signage visible in street view on some listing photos indicate that at one time this was the home of the “Carriage House Cinema”.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/770-W-Main-St-Ellington-NY-14732/2083328586_zpid/?

    4
  22. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    1740 restoration dream on almost 2 acres in Hebron, CT listed at $150,000. This is a significant house with some great photos of early construction. Looks to me like someone has cared for preserving what basically is a shell. It has a fairly new roof and the original windows are 12/12. What a joy would be to able to bring it back with love.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/169-Main-St-Hebron-CT-06248/58098059_zpid/

    7
  23. nicnic says: 77 comments

    This MCM in Greenwood, IN was a share some time ago when it was listed as an Endangered House. It has now been saved. This article details the work they did to historically restore this FLW approved design including work with the original suppliers and the architect’s son. We can all celebrate another save!

    http://www.dailyjournal.net/2020/02/27/historic_mills_house_finds_new_life_in_greenwood/

    3
  24. TGrantTGrant says: 867 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    Frank Loyd Wright designed house in Chicago for the amazing price of $175,000. Still has its original pedestrian and vehicle gates as well as carriage house. A very interesting and liveable design at that.
    https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/il/chicago/12147-south-harvard-avenue/pid_19547549/

    2
  25. JimHJimH says: 5148 comments
    OHD Supporter

    For those who haven’t followed the story, the Little House in Louisville GA, one of Kelly’s Georgia orphans, has been adopted to be restored by friends of OHD. Kelly deserves an assist on this one for keeping hope alive for almost a decade!

    Cheers to the new owners, and the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation!

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2020/02/21/1876-gothic-revival-louisville-ga

    14
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Jim, when I visited the FB page…the posts seemed weird and somewhat personal-were these perhaps old diary entries from previous residents? Guess I need to go back and re-read. It’s good to see this long suffering historic home finally getting the attention it deserves.

    • natira121natira121 says: 660 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      I love that you mention the attic! This is perhaps one of only a few sites where people get excited by unfinished attics

      The rest of the house is nice too.

      3
    • JimHJimH says: 5148 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Beautiful and wonderfully well-preserved! Built for bank president Frank A. Massie (1855-1936). It’s perfect for someone who just wants to paint and decorate without all the heavy restoration.

      2
    • MJGMJG says: 2031 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      This house is AMAZING!!!! I wish I could bookmark it. The amount of preserved detail is astounding and in great shape. So many times, this type of fretwork gets bumped and missing pieces and broken. OR, it became unfashionable and ended up torn out and trashed. UGH, why does it have to be in MO. If I could affordably move this to CT…. mmmmmm

      I’d change nothing but the kitchen would be a gut job but all else is just paint and paper!

      1
  26. How do I post my 1827 home on this site?

    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1013 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Just copy and paste a link to the real estate listing, with a brief blurb noting price, style and location – and any other noteworthy facts or features.

  27. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Incredible house! The survival of the several complex pieces of interior fretwork is nothing short of miraculous. Beautiful stained glass in this house as well. I like almost everything about this house. In looking at Glasgow, its population is right at 1,100. I also noted that it’s perched on the steep banks overlooking the Missouri River between Kansas City and Jefferson City, the state capital. (this house is well above any flood plain) It also has the River Villa bed & breakfast (the house you shared might also make for a superb B & B operation) and the towered Karbelle Mansion. The downtown, although consisting of just a few blocks, is well preserved and picturesque. (I spotted one metal storefront by the Mesker Bros. firm) In summary, this is the kind of not quite mansion level house that nonetheless is very impressive and many of us here would love to call a house like this our home. Ornate is the best word to describe it. Many thanks for sharing this exquisite example.

    2
  28. 402 W Chicago Blvd. Tecumseh, MI

    https://www.realestateone.com/home-for-sale/402-W-Chicago-Boulevard-Tecumseh-MI-49286/3269017-MIAA?pres_agent=337733

    Right out of Architectural Digest Magazine in Tecumseh’s historic district, this beautiful Greek Revival, built by Elisha Anderson around 1840, has a very interesting story to share. In her beautiful current state, she has been carefully restored from top to bottom, with the utmost care and preservation of ‘Early Year’ modifications, filled with uniqueness, character, and LOVE abound! In earlier days, rumors of the Underground Railroad, the Anderson twins tunnel, and the inspiring on-site medical achievements of the late Dr. Hamilton are amazing retrospecs. All the glory now returned, one will find over 2500sqft. of pure beauty throughout, 3-4 Bedrooms, 2 full Baths, 12 ft. Ceiling heights, Hardwood floors, Wood beams, and Craftsman style Trimwork. Her original Surgical Cabinet is proudly displayed in the back foyer and antique Light Fixtures illuminating throughout. A stunning Cherry cabinet Kitchen w/an oversized Island, Tile Floors and Soap Stone Countertops will surely catch your eye, along with custom Drapery, basket weave Tile Floors, Skylights, and her amazing Fireplace and light-filled Cupola. Detached Garage, Fenced-in Corner Lot, charming Porches front and back. A new Chapter is ready to begin with you!

    2
  29. ScottScott says: 339 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    Hey, gang. At the risk of trodding in something I shouldn’t, is there a reason so many listings have the comments disabled? Perhaps this was previously discussed and I missed it.

  30. RustyNHRustyNH says: 11 comments

    Quick question – why are comments closed so often lately?

  31. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 555 comments

    Magnificent Italianate on over 7 acres in KY
    Anyone care to hazard a guess as to build date?
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/425-N-Maysville-St-Mt-Sterling-KY-40353/233961600_zpid/

    1
  32. Mark H.Mark H. says: 17 comments
    1933 Cape Cod
    Kansas City, MO

    Wonderful and unique 1925 brick and stone tudor revival for sale in Kansas City, MO, in my neighborhood – $420k. It was built by a stone mason and feels a bit Germanic to me. I love the owls on the weather vane atop the turret. A must-see house!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/7346-Oak-St_Kansas-City_MO_64114_M78574-14841

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Seems more Tudor revival to me than Germanic although some of the original Tudor era structures incorporated older Gothic motifs. Despite the eclectic later decor inside, the Tudor design flavor remains. I like the diamond paned leaded windows and this one also has the popular heraldic designs tying it closer to antique originals. While the cat-slide roof on the front was popular for Tudor revivals, especially for the mass produced “Stockbroker” Tudors of the 1920’s, turrets were not common. Perhaps someone had some lingering nostalgia for the by then obsolete turreted Queen Annes from a couple of decades earlier. I suspect this well built example was architect designed as it exhibits a lot of design character unlike the mass produced versions.

  33. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Sure, my best guesstimate is 1875 to 1885 with it most likely a year or two on either side of 1880. I’m assuming the exotic Moorish/Eastlake porch ornamental trim is original. Charles Eastlake’s influential book Hint’s on Household Taste wasn’t published stateside until 1872 and it took a few years for his geometric based design ideas to take root in American architecture. By the late 1880’s the Eastlake ornamental fad was fading. The staircase balusters look 1870’s but the newel post looks 1880-ish so was likely a later stylistic upgrade. Hence, my guesstimate. Beautiful home, by the way. Thanks for sharing.

    1
  34. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    I’ve changed my mind completely about whether a building is too far gone to be saved…..!!. I’ve been watching Restoration Home on Prime Video…..WOW….. basically old ruins saved (not easy or quick in all cases) restored and made into beautiful homes by folks young and “older” determined to save British built history. I’ve watched several episodes and have a new perspective….. fascinating. I highly recommend it.

    3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Compared to our fast paced American throw away culture, the British and Europeans often have a different mindset and display more respect towards historic homes and buildings. They also seem to have more patience as well as pride in employing traditional craftsmanship. I recall when I worked on a custom finishing project back in 1999 in the five star rated 1885 Driskill Hotel in Austin, Texas, a lady specialist in marble inlay flooring was brought over from Scotland to create and install a lavish custom marble floor. Here’s a view of the ornate floor in the mezzanine: https://driskillhotel.com/meetings/venues/mezzanine/ Too bad that people with skills in traditional building trades are often difficult to find nowadays. Fewer still are able and willing to take on a badly deteriorated but architecturally/historically significant structure and bring it back to what it once was without excessively modernizing or compromising its integrity. We need a new younger generation of Americans to help save our built heritage of the past or otherwise all that we love and respect here is destined for eventual oblivion.

      • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        As my oft declared mantra, “the success of historic preservation is all about education……the younger the student the better.”

        2
      • GearGirlGearGirl says: 201 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

        I *LOVE* the Driskill!! I’ve stayed several times. Twice I booked the bridal suite for Halloween and dropped Halloween themed 👻☠️🧛 Mardi Gras beads from the balcony to people below. That suite is perfectly positioned, corner of Brazos and 6th!!

        So much fun!

        2
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          I worked there for 2 weeks finishing the custom made (in a Georgetown cabinet shop) mahogany check-in counter in the summer of 1999. It was a minor part of a $35 million dollar renovation of the Hotel. A shame that a lot of the old parts of the Hotel had been gutted out decades ago and then modernized only to be gutted again and made to resemble its earlier appearance. A family of stained glass artisans from Fredericksburg, TX had just completed a heavenly stained glass dome that took two very carefully coordinated fork lifts to gently lift into place above the lobby. All of the people I met on the job site were among the best in their respective fields. I took great pride in my own work on that project but after deducting motel bills, meals, and operational expenses, the money was fair but not nearly as much as expected.

          1
  35. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Does someone want to go on a scavenger hunt? I’m looking for a video where the builder/owner went through nearly each room describing their home. Pretty sure it was on YouTube but could have been the other one agents use (starts with a V.)

    This one in question:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2011/06/01/1971-new-traditional-phoenix-az/

  36. CoraCora says: 2056 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1957. Has had some remodeling, but much 50s charm remains; especially in the bathrooms. $220K

    Wichita, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/201-S-Bonnie-Brae-St-Wichita-KS-67207/77311717_zpid/

  37. CoraCora says: 2056 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1922. $141K
    There’s something I’ve just got to know…

    WHAT IS THAT STRUCTURE IN PHOTO # 21???

    Wichita, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1120-N-Bitting-Ave-Wichita-KS-67203/77334830_zpid/

  38. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    Cora, looks to me it may be a backyard incinerator.

  39. blynnblynn says: 3 comments

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/306-O'hara-Ave-Bisbee-AZ-85603/7389910_zpid/?view=public Priced at $371,500
    Bisbee, Arizona is a historic mining town like no other and this home is conveniently close to everything. The circa 1901 house is rich in history with only 3 previous owners. It has newer supports in both attic and basement with a solid concrete foundation. Many high-value improvements have been made while maintaining/reclaiming historic essence. Please see link for additional information.

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