February 14, 2020: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 2/14/20 - Last OHD Update: 2/21/20 - 147 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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The Victorian House : Domestic Life from Childbirth to Deathbed
The bestselling social history of Victorian domestic life, told through the letters, diaries, journals and novels of 19th-century men and women. The Victorian age is both recent and unimaginably distant. In the most prosperous and technologically advanced nation in the world, people carried slops up and down stairs; buried meat in fresh earth to prevent mould forming; wrung sheets out in boiling water with their bare hands. This drudgery was routinely performed by the parents of people still living, but the knowledge of it has passed as if it had never been. Running water, stoves, flush lavatories -- even lavatory paper -- arrived slowly throughout the century, and most were luxuries available only to the prosperous. Judith Flanders, author of the widely acclaimed 'A Circle of Sisters', has written an incisive and irresistible portrait of Victorian domestic life. The book itself is laid out like a house, following the story of daily life from room to room: from childbirth in the master bedroom, through the scullery, kitchen and dining room -- cleaning, dining, entertaining -- on upwards, ending in the sickroom and death. Through a collage of diaries, letters, advice books, magazines and paintings, Flanders shows how social history is built up out of tiny domestic details. Through these we can understand the desires, motivations and thoughts of the age. Many people today live in Victorian terraces, and so the houses themselves are familiar, but the lives are not. 'The Victorian House' will change all that.
Click the title or image to view or buy on Amazon.


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147 Comments on February 14, 2020: Link Exchange

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Hope y’all don’t mind today’s recycled old house image. Posted back in the Sept. 29, 2017 link exchange.

    Edit: I’m going to attempt to take the weekend mostly off so am getting some posts ready and resharing a few oldies. I assume Cora has a life on the weekends so comments may be a tad slow between approvals, patience is appreciated. ๐Ÿ™‚

    19
    • CoraCora says: 2058 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      I’m around this weekend! Will post comments intermittently. ๐Ÿ™‚

      3
    • JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The photo could be John Larsen Holm (1839-1912) of Deer Creek IA, with his wife Elina and their six children, plus two older children of his deceased brother who had lived next door. Northwood is the closest town to their farm, about 7 miles, but I don’t see the house at that location now.

      2
  2. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings All!

    1951 (Colonial Revival) and 1937 (log cabin), Franklin, VA, 995,00

    listed on the National Register of Historic Places (wherein lies a very detailed description of the property and its buildings).
    From the National Register:
    Integrity: Woods Hill has served as a private residence for the Rawls family throughout its history. The landscape design has seen no changes made except those created by loss of trees to hurricanes and the loss of many of the dogwoods to disease. The dwelling’s exterior has had no alterations except for the addition of the fourth chimney and the new windows in the second kitchen. The interior also remains entirely intact except for the cathedral ceiling in the second kitchen and the sliding wood and glass doors on the first floor and second floor porches instead of screen. In the log cabin, a window was changed to an exterior door, the exterior of the lean-to is now board-and-batten, and the roof is now tin. The flower house had several small side rooms demolished and the windows on the east wall were changed. No other changes have been made to the buildings since the owners moved in. It is interesting to note that Charles Gillette and Alan McCullough were working at a special time in our country’s history. Men had come home from World War II, the economy was picking up, and many small towns and communities were thriving. It was a time of peace and hope. Together Charles Gillette and Alan McCullough designed gardens and homes for these families to raise their children and to be involved in making their communities a better place in which to live.

    https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/13001161.pdf

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1501-Clay-St-Franklin-VA-23851/235986991_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=9a354a0b-4f6f-481d-9f58-0eb1eb4c71af~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    7
    • AVoegAVoeg says: 92 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Craftsman, Prairie WI

      Ah, be still my heart. So much rich woodwork in here. Love the tile surrounds on the fireplace in the bedroom with the striped sofa. I wonder if the ceiling has been dropped in that bedroom. Above that beautiful spider web stained glass window there appears to be two pieces that look like wood brackets? That spider web window isn’t a typical of Queene Anne’s, is it? Interesting place, for sure!

      2
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        “Spider web” designed windows if symmetrical harken back to the Colonial era and were sometimes found on Georgian style higher-end homes. They reappeared a century later in Queen Anne style Victorians as “Colonial” accents as well as full Colonial Revival style homes.

        5
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      A few more pix, and info from Jim:
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/07/09/1892-kingston-ny/

      3
    • MichaelMichael says: 2626 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Quite a stunning house, Kimberly. Thanks for sharing. T love all he beautiful woodwork in this house.

      1
    • MarthAllenaMarthAllena says: 92 comments
      1922 Craftsman
      St. Paul, MN

      1294 Bohland Place Saint Paul MN, 55116
      1946

      My Grandparents had this house built. My grandfather’s good friend was the architect. Unfortunately a lot has changed. None of the original windows remain. Two bathrooms are original. the fireplaces are original just painted and the wood paneling in the den. The front facade was the stone covering the main floor and the rest was clapboard. The garage was converted into a family room in 2008 with a master suite addition above it. I have original photos. If you check out my profile you can see two of them.

      https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1294-Bohland-Pl_Saint-Paul_MN_55116_M79084-06206#photo1

      3
  3. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1910, Syracuse, NY, 329,900

    This one at first had me curious for the mix of stone and brick on the exterior, then inside I found an unusual stone fireplace with what appear to be vents, rather surreal. In the kitchen oversized hinges (and I start looking for hobbits). I am also curious about the person who designed these fanciful elements and who lived there.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/100-Dewittshire-Rd-Syracuse-NY-13214/31725683_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=05538c77-caa1-4845-acc0-c8244743994b~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    9
  4. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1900, Cheektowaga, NY, 29,900

    I am intrigued by the exterior bracketing and long gable on the porch. It is kind of Tudor meets prairie.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/380-Pine-Ridge-Rd-Cheektowaga-NY-14225/30291311_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=58211a74-327f-4f45-a646-59de4eb946a3~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1
  5. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1817, Latrobe, PA, 99,900

    I love how original and rustic this log home is, offering a lot of chances to live there, but not take it over.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/77-Lightcap-Rd-Latrobe-PA-15650/10750729_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=7b2ed00e-3f96-47f9-b0d3-24be4caa8314~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    5
  6. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1951, Glendale, CA, 1,395,000

    From the listing: โ€œ In 1951, Mr. and Mrs. McKently commissioned architect Boyd Georgi to design a contemporary home for their family. Boyd was attracted to this project by their two stated goals, a modern design on the smaller of the two parcels that would allow them to preserve the larger lot as a private garden next to the historic Verdugo Adobe. Today, this preserved 4 bedroom and 3 bath mid-century home and its two parcels are still under the stewardship of the McKently family. The living room is the heart of the house with its original mahogany built-ins and trim, free standing fireplace with a chair-high hearth, and the wall of glass looking out to the lush gardens.โ€

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2223-Bonita-Dr-Glendale-CA-91208/20819494_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=9e13312d-f34c-46c0-ac3e-73e98ab4b917~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    7
  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Now for something fun and beautiful

    1960, Palm Springs, CA, 1,095,000

    From the listing: โ€œBuilt by W.G. Hercules in 1960โ€ฆ1960 Frigidaire ”Flair” range original to the home, original cabinet finishes, floating fireplace, sunken living room, wet bar, white rock walls in living room & front exterior, original atrium, in-floor planterโ€
    Slide 8 shows a Nutone radio built into the wall-pretty. This one is so exciting and I like how this one is decorated by the current ownerโ€”and that the history of the house is there.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1430-S-Paseo-De-Marcia-Palm-Springs-CA-92264/18028176_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=c45e81eb-b766-4abc-80ff-021986132385~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    That’s all from me in the sunny but frigid East. I look forward to what every one else has seen and will share this week. Cheers!

    12
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Desert living in wintertime cannot be beat! TY Kimberly. ๐Ÿ™‚

      2
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      I think this is my favorite this week, Kimberly—but it may have to do with the weather here. The cerused oak cabinets in the kitchen is a finish I want to try. Brings so much out of the oak in a way not usually seen.

      2
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        Yes, I like those cabinets too. And I agree with both of you about the weather. In March a business trip will take me to CA, and I am looking forward to a bit of California spring. Nice, no ice, no cold. Smile

  8. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 101 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    Pilgrim century home in Seekonk, MA, just across from Providence, RI: four bedrooms, two baths over 2339 square feet on .86 acres for $445,000โ€”so $190 per square foot.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/385-Jacob-St-Seekonk-MA-02771/56872118_zpid/

    3
  9. JosephJoseph says: 413 comments
    1790 Northborough, MA

    https://www.trulia.com/p/nh/keene/48-elm-st-keene-nh-03431–2003284890

    Keene NH, 1857 235K

    The old cape in Swanzey that appeared this week got me looking at properties in the area. I used to visit this area quite frequently.

    This house has been turned into rental units, which may be a plus or minus. It looks like you could do something interesting with the attached barn, but it’s the front porch detailing that is so eye catching.

    Fitzwilliam NH, 1820, 280K

    This one in nearby Fitzwilliam may have appeared before, but has now had a significant price reduction.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/nh/fitzwilliam/106-state-route-119-w-fitzwilliam-nh-03447–2284815054

    Given the number of bedrooms/baths in the listing, this may have been (or could be) a B&B if you’re inclined to that sort of thing.

    1795 colonial (with later Greek Revival and Victorian enhancements) 895K

    And if you’re really ambitious, you could take on the Fitzwilliam Inn.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/nh/fitzwilliam/62-state-route-119-w-fitzwilliam-nh-03447–2286097920

    This was one of our regular stops for lunch when day tripping in the area, and we even had a number of holiday dinners here when it was under the original ownership. Subsequent owners did a lot of updates to make it more functional. My take is that the immediate town doesn’t generate enough business; I think a serious restaurateur could take advantage of the upgrades and make this a destination restaurant.

    3
  10. AVoegAVoeg says: 92 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Craftsman, Prairie WI

    1886 Victorian in Evansville, WI.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/137-W-Main-St_Evansville_WI_53536_M77925-27590#photo0

    On the interior, you’ll find beautiful, original woodwork, very unique trim, and inlaid flooring patterns. Original window shutter blinds in many rooms. Some beautiful stained glass windows above the stair case that I wish the agent would have highlighted more in pictures. She did mention it in the description. There are some original built ins in the kitchen, and though the kitchen is painted and some updates have been made, I think it looks very nicely done and it just might be my favorite part of the home. An original claw foot tub remains. I am a little confused about the partition wall in what I believe is the upstairs bath, and the transom window that seemingly leads to nothing.

    The 2013 street view shows a very different exterior.
    https://www.google.com/maps/place/137+W+Main+St,+Evansville,+WI+53536/@42.7803734,-89.3029255,3a,42.4y,170.31h,91.77t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1shHJite7rXmnl_QkEhHokow!2e0!5s20130801T000000!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x8806313593176ee5:0x216e36c22ee00d65!8m2!3d42.7800794!4d-89.3029546
    Looks like the owners did some serious restoration on this one, and it looks amazing. A little jog around the street view shows a nice looking neighborhood with other historic homes.

    1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Appears to be a George O. Garnsey design. Garnsey, (1840-1923) who was Chicago based, was an early editor of the National Builder magazine and sold a plan book and featured frequent adds through that publication for a number of years. Although not as prolific as George F. Barber or David S. Hopkins, Garnsey did have a long career. Nice that the more recent owners have removed the cement shingle siding to reveal the original version. Nice period details inside as well. Thanks for sharing.

      2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Love the exterior with its current colors.

  11. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    First, I need to preface this with a disclaimer that it is not my intent to introduce any politics into this discussion-from the Indiana Landmarks and other online sources is news of a recent Federal executive order that existing buildings to be remodeled as well as new government buildings are to be based on Classical Architecture: https://www.fastcompany.com/90461907/a-classical-design-mandate-would-be-terrible-for-workers Not sure how certain it is for this order to be enforced it may be the proverbial flash in a pan or merely a small historical footnote pertaining to Fed. Government architecture in our present era. The AIA (American Institure of Architects) has already gone on record as being against it.

    I’ve personally always admired the ancient Greek and Roman inspired public buildings such as courthouses and Federal Buildings. We have a monumental main Post Office building in our downtown (Fort Worth) opened in 1933 and designed in the Beaux Arts style by a local architect who incorporated Texas Longhorns and Panthers (Fort Worth is sometimes called Panther City) in the decorative details: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Post_Office_(Fort_Worth,_Texas)#/media/File:PostOffice1.jpg I could live with new buildings built on a similar scale and design but the marble interior details and massive columns would today cost far more than more restrained modern designs. I can also imagine if the order were strictly enforced that clever architects would create parodies of Classical architecture using plastic and other artificial materials to comply. Just thought I’d share this tidbit for those with any interest. Again, please do not address politics, but focus on the concept of Classical Revival for modern government buildings. Good idea or bad idea?

    5
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1123 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      I thought this was a joke when I first saw it mentioned, or some type of disinformation hoax. Enough reliable sources have published it and commented on it that it must be real. Here’s the text is anyone is interested in it…
      https://architexturez.net/system/files/Draft_of_Trump_White_House_Executive_Order_on_Federal_Buildings.pdf

      My personal opinion is that good architecture is always relevant to time and place, and mandating a style is ridiculous. The GSA and other agencies should primarily be focused on maximizing the utility, efficiency, and value in their construction guidelines. Here’s another question: Should government buildings maximize efficiency by minimizing costs with the most utilitarian design possible or should they serve as a point of inspiration to the citizens they serve even if it means spending more construction or maintenance money to execute a complex design?

      10
      • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
        1930 carriage house
        Bethlehem, CT

        I completely agree with your comments, John. I too thought it was a joke when I was first told about it. I think given our current budget and deficit, we need to be mindful of overspending. Good architecture doesn’t have a style, but building the lowest common denominator seems ill-advised. I would say. Something that is cost-effective, but beautiful can still be built with an eye toward frugality.

        7
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        This. It’s one of the few subjects I’ve ever disagreed with Tucker about. His recent discussion on the topic lampooned a building I actually find fascinating, relevant, and frankly thrilling. I can NOT imagine having some post, post modern, be-pillared knockoff in it’s place. Yes many brutalist horrors were constructed for the government in the past; but arriving at such a conclusion, to me, seems foolish. Best stick to wall architecture concerns – IMO. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        https://www.google.com/search?q=eugene+oregon+federal+courthouse&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiH-Nur8NLnAhWEAp0JHS3PATwQ_AUoA3oECBUQBQ&biw=1366&bih=632

        3
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Thanks for sharing your thoughts. In my humble opinion, since our national debt perpetually seems to expand like our Universe, the intelligent approach to building new or remodeling existing government buildings would be to maximize cost efficiency. Because new Government buildings are subject a competitive bidding process, unless a specific design is a prerequisite, the design should be left up to the chief architect for the project and reflect his or her vision and design sensibilities while meeting the specifications of the project. There’s nothing wrong with Classical Revival/Beaux Arts design-it has stood the test of time and projects an image of enduring permanence. But we now live towards the end of the first quarter of the 21st century.

        There’s ample evidence that today’s architects have the same degree of artistic vision and design sensibilities of their predecessors. Climatological and energy efficiency considerations are critically important in our current era and surely will be so in the years to come. Those considerations affect design so mandating a particular design style places it above other valid considerations. We’ve had examples of ugly architecture in past decades (Brutalism, for example, but even it has some admirers) so the perfect building requires good universal design as well as efficiency in function and attention to construction costs. Public and institutional buildings should also be built with longevity in mind for public use. Such technological innovations as 3-D printing for construction and pre-assembled components may point out a direction for the future.

        While the current virus outbreak is tragic, it was intriguing to read in the news where China is responding to the health crisis by constructing two large hospitals in an astonishing 10 days. By contrast, personally, we suffered the inconvenience of apartments construction right next to us for an entire two years.

        Ideally, government buildings of the future should be the best we can build at the lowest practical costs. As I mentioned, this oddball stylistic design mandate will not stand the test of time.

        5
        • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Victorian Farmhouse
          Lancaster, PA, PA

          By and large I believe that buildings should reflect the era in which they are built. Anything else is an imperfect copy, filtered by time, of an imagined past era. While I like Colonial Revivals, Tudor Revivals, etc. these homes by and large are hardly like their historical ancestors. They were modern homes with modern conveniences which adapted stylistic decoration from another era.

          5
        • I’m shocked at the comments on this topic (but then again, I’m not).

          So what you’re are saying is—to maximize costs/efficiency and to match the stylistic standards of the day, the next buildings should have vinyl windows and vinyl siding? Laminate flooring and gray paint? Gasp! I thought those were looked down upon here?

          Good thing our “ancestors” didn’t feel that way—I love walking into the county courthouse and being amazed at the beauty. It’s a place of permanence for sure. Wasn’t that the goal of this initiative?

          Greek and Roman buildings are thousands of years old and our “replicas” are beautiful!

          We spend like $2 billion each year maintaining empty buildings, yet we can’t make a handful of new ones each year look impressive? $2,000,000,000. Two thousand million.

          2
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            As for buildings either governmental or built for public use, the standard process is to submit bids that meet the basic construction/design criteria published for the building(s). Typically, the received bids are examined, then discussed by the appropriate committee(s) followed by putting the selected candidates through an executive approval process. If this means that vinyl siding and cheap windows are approved, then yes, that will be the result. It doesn’t necessarily mean that I personally like it.

            Downtown Fort Worth is dotted with imposing public buildings designed since the 1970’s by the architectural firm of Washington, DC based David M. Schwartz. https://www.architectmagazine.com/practice/architect-david-schwarz-receives-university-of-notre-dames-2015-richard-driehaus-prize_o Although his firm’s designs seldom break new ground for design originality, it reinterprets historicism-based on good architecture of the past-very well. Our Bass Performance Center has received much acclaim from day one and is expected to remain a major downtown landmark for generations. I personally believe that for architecture to remain useful it must grow, change, adapt, and evolve to meet current human needs. By restricting its design range to a single architectural order-Classical-I think that short-changes its potential.

    • I’m in Fort Worth, too! I’ve always loved our Post Office, it’s such a gorgeous building.

      2
    • I like the idea—the old buildings we have were designed in this style for a reason. I don’t care for the later styles, for a reason.

      Here is one great link to read for anyone looking for info on this history—can quickly peruse for the main points, or read in-depth:
      https://seventhcoalition.wordpress.com/2016/09/30/classical-western-influence-in-american-government/

      An even quicker read:
      https://www.aoc.gov/capitol-hill/architecture-styles/neoclassical-architecture-capitol-hill

      I haven’t read any of the details of the new mandate, but it’s my understanding that if a building is GOING to be remodeled, it include these elements, not “existing buildings to be remodeled”—just a little clarification to your verbiage that seems to hint that everything must be redone.

      I can definitely see your being worried about a cheap appearance and also costs. I’m sure modern techniques and materials could work OK. How often are these buildings built or remodeled? Would be a great topic to research!

      4
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        As an example with which most of us are likely familiar, the neo-classical John Russell Pope National Gallery of Art stands next to the I.M Pei East Wing on our National Mall. One is a classical revival, the other a building fully of its day and age. Is one better than the other? Not for me to say, but it does show that modern architecture when done well can stand up to and perhaps even surpass copies of historical styles.

        2
  12. RyRy says: 13 comments
    NC

    Finding good old homes in the NC mountains can be a bit of a struggle – many of the pre-1950s bungalows and farmhouses weren’t very fancy to begin with and often were left to fall apart or get updated beyond recognition, and although Asheville has a plethora of vintage homes that look gorgeous on the outside they’re wildly expensive and almost always HGTV-ified. But sometimes you find a hidden gem or two.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/131-Dale-Adams-Rd-Sugar-Grove-NC-28679/102329925_zpid/?

    I’m almost certain that I shared this home here before a year or two ago, but it’s up for relisting and looking a bit worse for the wear. No interior photos, either, which makes me a little worried, because from what I recall it had a very lovely studio in the outbuilding and was very well cared for.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/683-W-Us-Highway-19e-Byp-Burnsville-NC-28714/2081119906_zpid/?
    The wood interior of this home is very, very cozy. Unfortunately it’s on the big four-lane highway that passes through the area, although it doesn’t see too much traffic since the area’s somewhat rural (Google Maps only pulls up the correct address if you leave out the “Bypass”).

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3211-Us-19e-Hwy-Spruce-Pine-NC-28777/2083190511_zpid/?
    A nice little stone ranch, although I don’t think it’s all entirely original.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/26-Sunnybrook-Dr-Spruce-Pine-NC-28777/120990678_zpid/?
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/178-Bakers-Ln-Bakersville-NC-28705/114817336_zpid/?
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7540-Linville-Falls-Hwy-Newland-NC-28657/236561526_zpid/?
    Three bungalows with decent bones. The last of the three is on the National Historic Register.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/622-Sunset-Dr-Burnsville-NC-28714/107099554_zpid/?

    WOW. I’m not sure what style this would be classified as, but it’s a gorgeous stone 1950s house with a MATCHING TILE AND WOOD BATHROOM AND KITCHEN. There’s probably not another one like this in the entire WNC region. My favorite of the bunch, by far.

    3
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1801 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Love the last one too and their collection of jugs. I love the corner windows.

      • RyRy says: 13 comments
        NC

        I have to confess that when I have my own place, I’ll probably end up filling it with pottery just like that house’s owner did! Burnsville is just a fifteen-minute drive away from the historic Penland School of Crafts, and there are more potters and other fine artists than you can count who’ve settled in the surrounding area after coming to study there. Asheville’s not too far either, so if you’re artistically-inclined it’s an amazing place to live.

        1
  13. RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Here are a few for Architecture lovers – (who don’t care about asking prices). ๐Ÿ™‚

    HOUSE 1.
    “The Hinsdale Castle”, Probably the most iconic home designed by R. H. Zook returns to the market in Hinsdale, Illinois. It is an absolute marvel. Many new, quality pix are mixed in with the older ones this time; including a very special look up into, and from the top of, “the tower”, with it’s genuine, period, hippie grafiti.
    If you’re a weirdo about spiders – skip this one. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    1932 / Roscoe Harold Zook MASTERPIECE / Hinsdale, IL / absolutely priceless
    https://www.movoto.com/home/815-the-pnes-hinsdale-il-60521-461_10503864
    Or
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/815-The-Pines_Hinsdale_IL_60521_M73256-93399#photo82
    Very good article:
    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1985-09-22-8503040709-story.html

    House 2.
    House 2 is a sublime, North Shore, mid-mod par excellence; with brilliant updates for the most part; exquisitely presented to make lovers of such domiciles swoon.
    YES PLEASE! Sigh..

    1973 / Top-Shelf, Architect Designed, Late Mid-Mod / Winnetka, IL / $1.7M
    https://www.movoto.com/home/40-longmeadow-rd-winnetka-il-60093-461_10633549

    House 3.
    An absolutely outstanding home, which has been ridiculously over-improved for it’s market with all manner of things HGTV makes people with too much $ / credit think they want. I’ve shared it before with the first listing, and the second. A cautionary tale: it has been on the market for 1 3/4 years total thus far. It’s well worth a looksie despite the oopsies.

    1902 / Fab, transitional mash up / South Bend, IN / $1.1M
    https://www.movoto.com/south-bend-in/1249-e-jefferson-blvd-south-bend-in-46617/pid_n7ft9bcedh/for-sale/

    House 4.
    Son of Culbertson, (I believe), New Albany, Indiana. It was a YMCA or men’s club, or some such, as you will clearly see. Heheheh

    Victorian house + night club, (or what have you) / New Albany, IN / AUCTION
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/904-E-Main-St_New-Albany_IN_47150_M96129-50363

    Cheers everybody! ๐Ÿ™‚

    7
  14. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    Evening all, from the frigid hills of Connecticut! Here’s what’s new in my area this week. All Colonials, one cautionary tale.

    First, this honest 1742 Saltbox in Bantam, Ct listed for 290k. Fairly original, it’s been upgraded with central air, electric, and a new roof. I want to say I am love with it, but something isn’t quite ringing my bell. Lovely land.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1240-Bantam-Rd_Bantam_CT_06750_M41751-45735

    A rambling 1890? Federal that’s been added on to a bunch. I love its street presence. What grabbed me here are the barns. Just so much here to work with. Is that a mahogany Chris Craft in the barn? This is Oxford, Ct and it’s listed at $400k.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/312-Chestnut-Tree-Hill-Rd_Oxford_CT_06478_M47073-17670?ex=CT2912712509

    Lastly is a cautionary tale. First of a homeowner who has just completely overvalued their home. This is a 1739 Federal in Bethlehem, Ct listed for $625k. The family from out of state who bought the house 19 years ago paid $305k for it. After a thorough remodeling and redecoration, it was listed in 2009 for 1.1 million. The house had a florid Victorian look to it inside that didn’t match the exterior. It has been on and off the market all this time with every agent under the sun. Now at almost half the original list, the owners have tamed the Victorian decor, but have HGTV”D it with gray and white paint everywhere. I just don’t think they understand WHY the house isn’t selling. I almost want to go knock on their door and explain what people looking for an old house want! This is The Joseph Bellamy house and it was a seminary school for many years. The barrel-vaulted master bedroom was once the main classroom. Why on earth the current listing agent hasn’t mentioned this is beyond me. And not having a picture of the facade? Strange. It’s a lovely house that will continue to sit because no one is taking the time to present the house in the best possible way. It’s making me want to get my real estate license again and give it another go, lol.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/53-Lakes-Rd_Bethlehem_CT_06751_M39795-93145

    6
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1016 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks for sharing the cautionary tale! I have absolutely no sympathy for people who tart up houses in a manner inconsistent with their inherent architectural style and then expect to be handsomely rewarded for their “vision”. Sometimes a brutal dose of reality is needed. Sadly, the recent HGTV-inspired modifications just might make the place sell, but times are weird right now so nothing is a sure bet.

      I hope that this will serve as an object lesson for anyone even thinking of imposing stylistically inappropriate aesthetics on a house. Your chances of resale will drastically improve if the house doesn’t have a superficial and/or psychotic personality!

      9
    • hillhousehillhouse says: 69 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1899 Stick
      Bluefield, WV

      Magnificent place, Chestnut Tree Hill. I want to preserve it exactly as it is. Although I know it needs maintenance, its “general flavor of mild decay” like “the wonderful one-hoss shay” is so evocative. And what is the Brit sports car behind the barn-housed motorboat? A Riley?

      1
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      Hey DWR, maybe you should dust off that real estate license. There’s a guy in Tidewater Virginia who has built a nice niche business by billing himself “The Old House Man.” You could concentrate on brokering only old homes which interest you. It seems like there are plenty of them in Connecticut, including that great Chestnut Tree Hill one you shared.

      3
      • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
        1930 carriage house
        Bethlehem, CT

        I’ve thought about it, John. I actually billed myself as an old house specialist, and it did get some business because of it, my bread and butter was the standard suburban 4 bedroom 2.5 bath Colonial everyone seemed to want around here. I switched companies just before the time of the real estate crash and was working more in a second home market, so I went back into the design world to make a living. I see that I can get my license in MA online and have it become reciprocal in CT. Might be worth the effort again, as I feel like many old houses here seem to go through multiple agents.

        2
  15. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 69 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/303-Hurley-Ave_Kingston_NY_12401_M49997-99252
    6 beds, 3.5+ baths, 5,274 sq ft,21.7 acres lot. 1669 historic stone farmhouse on the Suydan Farm. One of the original Dutch farmhouses of the Hudson Valley. Owned by the DeWitt family for over 200 years. “Modernized for comfort” but has retained wide floorboards, rustic ceiling beams and five working fireplaces. A separate three-bedroom, 1.5-bath guest house, an expansive two-story barn, a sun-drenched pergola and patio area, and an in-ground pool set next to a 960 sq ft barn. Bonus is Esopus Creek frontage (one of the top trout spots in NY) $$$$2,900,000

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/287-Marcotte-Rd_Kingston_NY_12401_M46541-87530?view=qv 3 beds, 2 baths, 2,649 sq ft, 15.3 acres lot $995,000 1815 stone house and compound. Exposed beams, custom stonework, original wide plank floor, built-ins. 15 acres of lawns, field and woods. Simply stunning grounds include fruit trees, arbors, berries and sculptures, listed on national garden tour. 2 story 1300 sq ft guest house, heated in ground pool and a vintage chicken coop and gazebo.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/19-Hone-St_Kingston_NY_12401_M41694-65415?view=qv
    5 beds,1.5 baths, 2,786 sq ft, 9,148 sqft lot. Victorian with original front doors, wrap-around porch, an oversized foyer with original paneling and stained glass windows. 10-foot ceilings, front and back parlors plus a grand dining room, front and back staircases. Ornate iron radiators, built-in cabinetry, working pocket doors, and carved railings, corbels. $419,000

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/16-Riverview-Cir_Poughkeepsie_NY_12601_M36438-06215?view=qv 3 bed, 2 bath, 2,000 sq ft, 0.78 acres lot C.1863 A bit of history: This was the gate keepers house for the FDR estate. Like the outside, but with not enough or decent pictures, not sure about interior. 325K

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/41-Highland-Ave_Middletown_NY_10940_M43760-77764?view=qv 4 beds, 3.5 baths, 4,508 sq ft, 0.65 acres lot $249,900 C.1800 12′ ceilings on main floor, original mahogany trim, hardwood floors throughout, ceiling medallions in every room, built-ins, ornate moldings, rounded doors and trim and circular grand staircase made of black walnut, covered front porch with ornate spindles, rear deck, 2 story carriage house. Needs better pictures that do not make the exterior look like it should be in a Hitchcock movie.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/5090-County-Highway-6_Middletown_NY_12459_M48906-64606?view=qv 4 beds, 2 baths, 2,172 sq ft, 1.3 acres lot, C.1850 $249,000 Hamlet of New Kingston Greek Revival. All original woodwork & floors throughout. 2 story, gable-roofed frame building with a decorative, recessed center entrance flanked by sidelights with fluted Doric columns. Includes a rustic barn and a separate small workshop, full basement with a laid stone foundation. Eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Some good property history included in pics.

    6
  16. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 69 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/904-Carbon-St_Syracuse_NY_13208_M49588-37867#photo0
    Finally posted some interior pics.. 1880 Victorian, 5 beds, 2.5 baths, 3,728 sq ft, 0.35 acres lot $158,900. Loads of original woodwork, flooring and trim. These pictures are from 2011 listing. The (pre-auction) current exterior with no interior pictures is at https://www.zillow.com/homes/904-Carbon-St-Syracuse,-NY,-13208_rb/31655799_zpid/
    $162,492

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/12-Brattle-Rd_Syracuse_NY_13203_M48648-79053?view=qv in foreclosure C. 1905, 4 bed, 4.5 bath, 3,748 sq ft, 0.58 acres lot $279,900, Needs some minor repairs that can be seen. 4 fireplaces. Had been listed for 650K in 2012

    2
  17. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 69 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    My last post for tonight: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/301-Stolp-Ave_Syracuse_NY_13207_M36595-41186?view=qv
    5 bed, 3.5 bath, 3,032 sq ft, 6,653 sq ft lot. C. 1917 Colonial $214,900 original moldings, some sconces/chandeliers, dark stained wood doors w/ brass/glass knobs intact, original hardwoods throughout (great shape), coffered ceiling & paneled walls in dining rm & great rm w/ built-ins & fireplace.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/210-Barrington-Rd_Syracuse_NY_13214_M30915-56435?view=qv Cute 2 bed, 1 bath, 1,070 sq ft, 7,442 sq ft lot. C. 1930 Mediterranean. Metal windows, original bathroom. Unusual metal louvered porch

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1419-James-St_Syracuse_NY_13203_M42417-92495?view=qv 1927 tudor mansion 7 bed, 5.5+ bath, 6,100 sq ft, 1.04 acre lot. $475,000. Listed in 2015 for 975K. Two story foyer, OMG woodwork & doors, stained & leaded glass, 5 great fireplaces, elevator. Master suite has 11 ft ceilings. Heated 6 car garage. Original Eagan Homestead. In foreclosure now with a pending offer.

    4
  18. hillhousehillhouse says: 69 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1899 Stick
    Bluefield, WV

    More likely a post-war MG with that cowl design.

    1
  19. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    The listing says 1890, but bits of it look older; as if it were added on to. Lots of nice details left to enjoy. I’m always fascinated with giant, clean, unfinished ancient attics. $169K

    Orange, MA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/301-S-Main-St-Orange-MA-01364/56141439_zpid

    3
  20. Anne M.Anne M. says: 881 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1897 Queen Anne in Springfield, MA for $249,900 – all around gem, it has been on the market for a while, but I don’t remember seeing it before. Some great stained glass
    https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/ma/springfield/107-dartmouth/pid_32274465/
    1915 Colonial Revival in Salem, MA for $539,900 walking distance to the harbor
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/194-Lafayette-St_Salem_MA_01970_M43808-62297?ex=MA2909610631
    1841 Cape in Upton, MA for $340,000 exterior is wonderful, interior has lots of charm
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/152-Main-St-Upton-MA-01568/57659750_zpid/
    1899 in Petersham, MA for $539,000 The Clarence Fiske House 3.1 acres & abuts conservation land
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/28-N-Main-St-Petersham-MA-01366/57632873_zpid/
    1725 cottage in Newport, RI for $599,000 love the exterior color & front steps, interior is warm & inviting
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/15-Willow-St-Newport-RI-02840/65802421_zpid/
    1750 in Brewster, MA (Cape Cod) for $350,000 I had posted this one a few weeks ago & noted it was contingent, but that must have fallen through. A great price for a house in Brewster
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/101-Tubman-Rd-Brewster-MA-02631/56766172_zpid/

    2
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Well of course, my favorite is gonna be Newport. Apparently, I have a decided wish to clock my head against a beam several times a day. I don’t usually care for a blue house, but this one works brilliantly.

      3
  21. EricHtownEricHtown says: 397 comments

    A good weekend to all! I was looking at houses in central Mississippi and ran across this totally out of place, yet totally stunning 1930 Tudor with all the bells and whistles. $1,475,000 and 7500+sf in Jackson.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/114-Woodland-Cir_Jackson_MS_39216_M78594-38208?ex=MS641604015?view=qv

    5
  22. JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1827 Ruby NY $379K

    This humble little house has no style to speak of, and has been badly altered inside, but the barn works, the dog loves the pond and I’m keeping the knotty pine!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/240-South-Ruby-NY-12475/2082214728_zpid/?

    1
  23. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    A late mid-century (1970) modern has amazing glass and a design which still looks fresh today. Original owners and seemingly little altered since built. 1970, Jackson MS, 399K: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2018-Dale-Rd_Jackson_MI_49203_M35877-21459?ex=MI2627550777

    5
  24. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    One more that just popped guys—6 units, but from the exterior shots alone, I would imagine at least some original material is extant. This is an 1897 Mansard roofed Stick Victorian with ORIGINAL ROOF CRESTING in Winchester, Ct for 129k.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/53-Park-Pl_Winsted_CT_06098_M93743-65323

    5
  25. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. Here’s a beauty in the Riverside neighborhood in Wichita. Gorgeous Craftsman details. $255K

    Wichita KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1032-W-Riverside-Ave-Wichita-KS-67203/77334772_zpid/

    3
  26. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1897. Fancy! What do y’all think of the round bed that fits perfectly in the tower room? Lots of intricate millwork. The barn loft is fantastic. 5 acres to boot. $425K

    Mitchell, IN:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/477-Woods-Ln-Mitchell-IN-47446/221149199_zpid/

    6
  27. SammygirlSammygirl says: 21 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I am fairly new here but have been looking at old houses for a very long time! What do you guys think of this place? e.g. do you think it is all original? what would you do to it? what style is it? priced well? i know there are not many interior photos ๐Ÿ™

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/437-Remington-Ave-Thomasville-GA-31792/92457501_zpid/

    4
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Welcome, Sammy! This house was posted a week or so ago, and I just love it. It’s a real mishmash of styles. It’s got a lot going on and was probably built by an ambitious local builder. I think it was Kimberly, one of our finders of unique things, that posted it. Anyway, the tiles on the solarium roof are almost undoubtedly Ludowici tiles that were made in a town not too far away, made famous by that industry. (The town changed its name to Ludowici.) I even love all the kooky drapery. Whoever gets this house is getting a real charmer. As for price, I have no idea if it’s worth it, but it’s a unique one for sure. It’s so hard to understand local factors in pricing, so I would just give up on that and enjoy the houses.

      4
    • MJGMJG says: 2024 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      The realtor is calling it a shingle style which is definitely not accurate at all. There aren’t even any shingle on it. It’s easy to just call it Victorian. LOL. Its built durin that era and is a mixture of designs.

  28. JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1872 Second Empire – Wenonah NJ – $425k

    Just listed: Dr. George W. Bailey House, one of the first resort houses built at Wenonah. Not enough photos but the interior tour is sublime, and I’m barely out of the front hall!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1-S-Clinton-Ave_Wenonah_NJ_08090_M60926-23652

    5
  29. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    https://www.xome.com/homes-for-sale/734-Patterson-Gap-Rd-Rabun-Gap-GA-30568-276384517

    Built 1986, $795,000 in Rabun Gap, GA. Not so much an old house, just an interesting attempt at a “castle” with a draw bridge to the front door. You may be one of the few in the world with a fish shower head.

    2
    • MJGMJG says: 2024 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Wow that’s a freakin cool house! Not something I would buy but nice to see people doing something different.

      2
    • hillhousehillhouse says: 69 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1899 Stick
      Bluefield, WV

      Gorgeous brickwork on the main block. Rabun County is one of the most beautiful parts of Appalachia, and the site of the Foxfire book series, and the Foxfire Museum.

  30. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. This tiny church makes me so sad. I want it it be a church again, although that will likely never happen. It looks like they just had church yesterday…but what little information on I could find online makes me think it’s been closed for years. Could be a neat little country home – comes with 4.3 acres. $90K

    Danville, PA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10-Bill-Hime-Rd-Danville-PA-17821/2081003379_zpid/

    2
  31. Hi! Wanted to share our craftsman home that we’ve decided to sell! Here’s the link. I believe this is a version of “the Herndon”. It was built in 1918 and is approximately 1965 square feet! My mom has tried hard to keep the home safely updated without interfering with the beauty of three home!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/201-Greenridge-Rd_Federalsburg_MD_21632_M58961-50359?cid=txt_shares_rdc_ldp

    3
  32. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1008 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    Here’s a house in Windham, NY, which I’ve admired for years, never realizing it was a George F. Barber. Quite lovely inside and out, despite a painful, albeit typical, kitchen update, and an ill-fitting fireplace. Built in 1887, and offered at $1.15 million:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/45-County-Route-79-Windham-NY-12496/2081025367_zpid/

    1
  33. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1008 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    A little late in the week to be leaving this, but just in case anyone’s interested, the Second Empire in Middletown, NY, which was posted on OHD a year ago is back on the market with a $45,000 price reduction and several more exterior photos-

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/01/17/second-empire-middletown-ny/

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/41-Highland-Ave-Middletown-NY-10940/2132780459_zpid/

  34. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1016 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I can’t wait until tomorrow to share this house which just came on the market today, one of my top five favorites in Omaha (with lots of original features and a fascinating history):

    1889 Queen Anne, Omaha, Nebraska, $385,000.
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/3524-Hawthorne-Ave-Omaha,-NE,-68131_rb/75895039_zpid/

    I was in this house in the 1970’s when it was in nearly original condition. It’s had some updates since then ๐Ÿ™ , but still retains a lot of originality.

    2

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