December 13, 2019: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 12/13/19 - Last OHD Update: 12/20/19 - 187 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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187 Comments on December 13, 2019: Link Exchange

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  1. CharlesBCharlesB says: 481 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    This week’s house looks like the Munsters’ before Grandpa came into money.

    East Hampton, CT–1845 Greek Revival for $265,000. I always loved these pre-1850 jobs where builders clung tenaciously to 18th-century Puritan design traditions while duding them up ever-so-modestly with pilasters and entablatures and such. This one looks like it had a good 1940s as well with the usual French-door-and-corner-china-cabinet treatment:

    https://www.watchforeclosure.com/foreclosed-homes/connecticut/middlesex/east-hampton/11921430/50-main-st.html

    Hebron, CT (just up the road)–1782 story-and-a-half gambrel for $240,000. To me nothing says ‘olde Connecticut’ like this particular style. This house has ceilings that belong in the Smithsonian; lets hope a new buyer doesn’t pull them down and replace them with sheetrock. On 23 acres:

    https://www.historichomesinct.com/residential/ct/hebron/415-paper-mill-rd-170140807.php

    5
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Charles, both of these are great. I love the large granite fireplace in the first one and the Hebron is so very beautiful. Look at the way that plaster ceiling kind of undulates just amazing, I also like the color, kind of carmine, that they picked out for the woodwork in that room and of course that fireplace neat, neat
      thank you for sharing

      4
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Charles, I also noticed the East Hampton house. Very pretty all around, but I’d likely sell my sister to Somali pirates for that sunroom. The Hebron house is another great one, my concern would not seeing sheetrock in place of the wavy plaster, but people exposing the “authentic” beams that would have been there at the time. Nah, they wouldn’t, and that plaster just goes to show us the truth.

      8
  2. Anne M.Anne M. says: 859 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Just have one beautiful house to share this week! 1854 realtor description says “Italianate with Greek Revival & Gothic elements” $395,000 shame there are not more interior pictures
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/148-Hawthorn-St-New-Bedford-MA-02740/55995210_zpid/
    Good dreams all!

    9
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Wow, Anne, that is a beautiful house! The lack in quantity of interior photos is disappointing, but the lack of quality is even worse – too bad, because it looks to have some breathtaking features… Very careless on the part of the realtor, imo…

      5
      • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
        1930 carriage house
        Bethlehem, CT

        I echo your sentiments completely Barbara. So many features there to wonder about. Considering that on any given MLS board the maximum number on the low end is at least two dozen, I don’t understand why agents, especially with a house as incredible as this one, aren’t putting the maximum number up. I appreciated seeing some of the close up details, but Lordy, they were so blurry I first thought I needed to clean my glasses!

        2
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      How cool and unique is this painting on the mantel! Beautiful house, both inside and out, love the yellow with black sashes.

  3. Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    I’m jumping in early today with a question. I love my little old house, but for some time now have been growing increasingly unhappy living in a community which seems to value McMansions, plastic buildings, treeless lots and electronic message boards over the original period houses and mature landscapes which feed my soul. I’d like to live among people who share my values, or at least in a setting that suits my tastes. With that in mind, I’ve been trying to find properties for sale in registered historic districts, but it seems to be a hit or miss effort, and hasn’t yielded many possibilities…

    My question is this, are there any websites or resources which specifically offer properties for sale in designated historic districts, and how can I find them? I am looking primarily in the northeast, but haven’t ruled out possibilities in Virginia, West Virginia or North Carolina.

    Kelly’s posting yesterday in Darlington, SC, would fit the bill perfectly but for being too far south (need a cooler climate) and a bit too large.

    Thank you all for any suggestions.

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11828 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I’m not going to offer suggestions because I’m not familiar with the best of the best historic districts but there’s an option to search National Register homes (many which are in districts) in the drop downs on the side bar.

      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        Thanks, Kelly – I have tried this and it’s been helpful, but no luck yet and I’d like to accelerate and expand the search, if possible…

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11828 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          What are specific things you are looking for? It may throw a suggestion in someones mind about a particular place.

          • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1800 cottage
            Upstate, NY

            Ah, Kelly – you may be sorry you asked that question! I’ve done a lot of looking and have had time to refine my wish list, so here goes:

            Non-negotiables: Budget capped at $150,000 (more work, less $$), minimal to no updates (won’t spend $ on someone else’s “upgrades”, such as granite countertops, vinyl siding, replacement windows etc, only to be pulling them out), no extreme structural issues, mature landscape (no barren, treeless McMansion lots), pre-1930 construction.

            Preferences: 1860 – 1920, 2000+/- sq. ft., OHW radiator heat, as many original details as possible (although I have a barn filled with everything from antique toilets, my grandmother’s farm sink and a 1920’s Barstow wood/gas stove, to period lighting fixtures, eastlake locksets, linoleum “rugs” and antique fireplace tile).

            Here is what would be the perfect place but for the tiny lot (and its proximity to the unappealing building next door), and the size (way too large, leading to OTT property taxes). Built in 1910 with large bright rooms, lots of attractive woodwork, minimal updates and close enough to move-in ready:
            https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/35871-State-Highway-10-Hamden-NY-13782/30062912_zpid/

    • JosephJoseph says: 412 comments
      1790 Northborough, MA

      Be careful what you wish for.

      That being said, there are over 2000 local historic districts in the US. I couldn’t find an overall listing, but if you can narrow your search areas, there are some, for example, I found one for CT.

      The other issue is whether this will help or hurt property values. Articles about this claim it does – but the data/articles were from 2011. Not sure how true this is. I think it applies primarily to areas that are already desirable for other reasons. Unless you are in a desirable area, I see too many old homes showing 300 days plus on the listing sites.

      Before buying, interview some people to find out what the local preservation commission or group is like to deal with. Some are difficult, some merely incompetent, and there are possibly some good ones. (My property is in a district that manages to cover two of these three).

      2
      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        Thank you, Joseph! I have found the index of historic districts, broken down by state and county – it’s trying to correlate the districts to properties on the market that’s been kind of challenging. The index will often identify the inclusive streets – then I go to Zillow or something and type in the street, but the actual street #’s can vary, and, UGH – there must be a better way – ??

        • JosephJoseph says: 412 comments
          1790 Northborough, MA

          If you can narrow to perhaps counties you are interested in, contact a realtors in those areas about your requirements. You might also find a ‘pocket listing”, or a notification of a good deal that hasn’t hit MLS yet.

          • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1800 cottage
            Upstate, NY

            Yes, Joseph, that will probably end up being my best bet. I’m just surprised that with all the resources on the internet, none correlate properties on the market with designated historic districts… and I guess that same internet has made me a bit lazy, looking for an easy answer…! : )

      • JefsndyJefsndy says: 134 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1915 Craftsman
        Orange, CA

        Joseph- You almost caused my head to explode! The comment about local historic preservation groups-OUCH! I don’t know where you live or what your experience is-but let me share mine:
        1. Historic Districts help and support property value. 100% true.
        2. Preservation does not apply to the interior(unless the property is a listed on its own merit house and the interior is listed-example-Pasadenas Greene & Greene homes). Secretary of Interior protects character defining features-no removing historic fabric and altering the integrity of a historic property.
        3. Historic districts may be eligible for reduced property taxes ( Mills Act etc) Mills Act properties are passed to new buyers. A HUGE incentive in a home sale. Property tax can be an important part of buying a home and where you buy it. A property tax incentive and savings can mean a person can afford to buy. My home value is over $1.2M-my property tax is less than $3500 a year because of the Mills Act.
        4. Caution with the comment “interview some people to find out what the local preservation group is like to deal with” Another huge OUCH. In my historic district where I live-there are two prominent realtors. One HATES the preservation groups because he is not so ethical and supports development and loves ripping off original windows, replacing historic fabric with cheap materials and adding room additions. The second is a preservationist, owns historic property in our town, is active in the community and is 100% supportive of the preservation group. Actually has served as President of the preservation board. So-depending on who you speak to -you could get a completely different opinion. Homeowners that don’t like the local preservation groups are usually those that either got caught doing things to their homes that were not allowed-or want to add on 2000 sq ft to a 900 sq ft cottage. Or they think they should be able to remove a perfect 100 year old stained glass wood window and replace it with a vinyl slider.
        5. Difficult and incompetent is a bit offensive. We work hard in our community, we attend CA preservation conferences yearly, we meet with local subject matter experts, we know our stuff. We are not crack pots that want to control your home-we want to preserve and protect historic resources. Once they are gone-they are gone forever. Like the beautiful china tea set-one cup breaks, the tea set isn’t as valuable. What makes my historic district neighborhood so valuable and special is community involvement, commitment to the protection of our homes, and the pride we all take in doing it right. We share historic resources, old house parts, tools, books, paint colors, we have the best house painters, window restorers, landscapers, contractors. Because we care. Not only for us living here now, but for future generations to move in and enjoy this rich community. Our community attracts people from afar to see our holiday decorations, our quaint homes, our walkable streets and our gardens. Movies, TV etc are filmed here all the time, because it looks original -all because of the hard work of local preservation groups.

        10
        • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1800 cottage
          Upstate, NY

          Jefsndy, it sounds like you have the good fortune to be in a very active and committed historic district! That is wonderful, and I just wish you were in New England – and that I could afford a house in the million $ plus range, as there’s a beautiful untouched property on the Hudson River that is likely to lose all of its historical integrity once sold. I.e., it will likely be eviscerated and slathered in white and gray paint with replacement windows and a granite and stainless steel kitchen.

          I, too, have had encounters with less than competent/committed historic district board members – this attitude seems to arise because people are just not aware of the value of the historic integrity of their homes – they believe replacing windows and adding vinyl siding increases property value, and resent being told otherwise. It’s very difficult to get a like-minded group of people together, and even then, somethimes impossible for them to work together.

          So, to reach my point, I think I understand what Joseph was saying, and his advice seems valid, not necessarily an across-the-board condemnation…

          2
          • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1800 cottage
            Upstate, NY

            OK, too late to edit – after re-reading the comments above, maybe I did misinterpret what Joseph was saying, so apologies to everyone. When I read “difficult”, I imagined it from my own perspective, which is strongly preservationist. “Difficult” to me would mean trying to be too accommodating – but I suppose some districts could be unnecessarily onerous in their requirements…

            Either way, the advice is still sound – check it out before you buy, and make sure you are prepared and willing to abide by the restrictions of the particular district which you are considering.

            Now, back to my original question…

            • JosephJoseph says: 412 comments
              1790 Northborough, MA

              Well maybe you’d like the one in town. I’d pay the moving expenses to send them to you.

              Tax abatements? Surely you jest. No, just essentially the town voting itself preservation easements on certain homeowners with nothing in exchange. Note that I purchased prior to these rules, and would not have purchased had they been in place.

              And no, I wasn’t committing any of the “sins” you mention.
              Advice from these “experts”? Which ones – the one who thinks her house is one hundred years older than it is? The one who had me come over to look at their dining room because they couldn’t figure out where a sideboard would go (I suggested the 12 foot long blank wall, which they apparently hadn’t considered).

              And of course when something major affects the aesthetics of the area “Oh, we can’t do anything about that”.

              I don’t resent people wanting to preserve historic houses and areas. I do resent the ones who want to do it on someone else’s dime.

    • Slroulette23Slroulette23 says: 156 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Barbara,

      On each page, to the right, there is a filter category for searching. I put in some of your requirements and came up with 20 homes, some still for sale, just in NY alone. You can search by state, price, years built, square footage. It’s a great tool and I use it all the time.

      Good luck with your search!!

      Best regards.

  4. JulieJulie says: 330 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora from New Zealand,

    I am just about packed for my flight to the U.S. Sunday night (15 hours non-stop just to get to the U.S.) to stay with my Mom and visit family for 5 weeks followed by over two weeks in a cabin on 35 acres of forest an hour north of Anchorage, Alaska. I will be going from summer to winter in the space of a day.

    This first home is an 1860’s former gold miners cottage somewhere between Queenstown and Arrowtown in the Central Otago region of the South Island. Most of those old miners cottages were very small but this one has been enlarged and sits on beautiful grounds with gorgeous views. It has a valuation of $US 593,232.00.

    https://www.nzsothebysrealty.com/purchasing/property/SAT10274/90-whitechapel-road-arrow-junction/

    This circa 1930’s home in the Wairarapa town of Masteron (about an hour and a half from the capital of Wellington) has been in the same family for 45 years and it really exudes warmth and character with lots of nice touches and antiques – it has a real feel good factor. Lots of timber features throughout and well established gardens. Buyer enquiries over $US546,636.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3646656/residential/sale/38-cornwall-street-masterton

    Early 1900’s villa in Kuripuni, Masterton. Beautiful native timber features, fireplaces and bay windows throughout plus a pool. Priced at $US382,513.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3678412/residential/sale/86-high-street-masterton

    I am pretty stunned about two things regarding this property – it’s valuation which is $US587,363.00 and the fact that it is somebody’s holiday home and not a permanent residence. Blairlogie Homestead, near Mastetron, was built in 1895, has 7 bedrooms and is on almost 25 acres of gardens and forest. You even get a tennis court and pool. Wood panneling, pretty staircase and attractive decor throughout. I could definitely call this place home!!!

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3675809/rural/sale/832-blairlogie-langdale-road-masterton

    4
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Julie, I always love your descriptions, they make me want to dive in.
      I wish you well on your trip, and enjoy your Alaskan cabin time!

      • JulieJulie says: 330 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1997 1 storey contemporary

        Thank you very much, Kim. Being with my Mom, who is not well, is so important to me. She is so happy and excited. I was there last year/beginning of this year too. My husband arrives in Alaska the day before me. Being in a little cabin in Alaska and spending lots of time exploring the scenery and wildlife is paradise to us.

        6
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      Great listings, as usual! Enjoy your time with your family, that is a real disconnection to go from NZ to Alaska! So cool and exciting for you!

  5. MrMikeMrMike says: 67 comments
    Chicago, IL

    Hello all,
    I came across this one yesterday, in the Logan Square historic district here in Chicago. It’s the 1897 home built by a furniture merchant, has been owned by the same family since 1962. Apparently it was subdivided into apartments but it sure looks to have a lot of its originality intact. $1.5mil.
    https://www.redfin.com/IL/Chicago/2234-N-Kedzie-Blvd-60647/home/13419705

    6
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Interesting house for sure, Kimberly. What gives me pause though is, what’s original here and what’s a recreation? New but nicely done front door, and then my first thought was—something about that arched trim and keystone likely would not have been there. Then I swooned over the kitchen and thought, WOW! So original. Upon closer inspection, hmm. A pot filler? It’s all beautifully done, and I’d be quite happy there but it’s sort of the Disney version of an old house, IMO.

      4
      • AVoegAVoeg says: 92 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Craftsman, Prairie WI

        Recreation or not, the kitchen and bathroom are definitely swoon-worthy. And that stained glass on the front door has me drooling. At least it wasn’t totally HGTV’d!

        2
        • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
          1930 carriage house
          Bethlehem, CT

          At least it wasn’t HGTV’d is right, AV! I think it’s a worthwhile discussion to have though especially from people who love old houses. Obviously, that gorgeously designed fence is taking cues from the period but is way too fancy for the place. I misspoke when I used the words recreation for this house, the whole place was likely much simpler than what we currently see. This homeowner has taken some higher design standards from more opulent houses and given them a spin here. That arch into the dining room appears non-original, but still quite nice. That bathroom stained glass is lovely but never would have been there. When is over-improving a simple house too much? It’s something I find fascinating. I certainly have my own opinions, I am curious as to what others think.

          2
          • JimHJimH says: 5116 comments
            OHD Supporter

            You only have to see the 2007 street view to know that the period details on the exterior are reproduced, and no doubt the interior has been recently redesigned as well. The remodeled house looks a lot better, though this type of “restoration” isn’t authentic unless it’s derived from photos or drawings of the original.
            https://goo.gl/maps/i5UdsNwgBSQDEvX77

            1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      I love the dialogue on this house. I too, in my unlearned way, thought it over the top for a smaller home, when compared to the Greene and Greene—which led me to find interest here.
      Thank you for the discussion

      2
    • SharonSharon says: 636 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Feeling this one in the pit of my gut. I have ZERO issues with what they’ve done here. Sometimes you just have to MAKE your dreams come true!

      1
  6. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    and another bargin:
    1900, Aberdeen, MS, 29,900
    This looks like a Kelly house to me, Lots of pretty fireplace mantels and tile, a couple of those big old sinks
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/201-E-Jefferson-St-Aberdeen-MS-39730/2083201597_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=7670992b-6a64-4ab8-b387-6800928fe9aa~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    3
  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1880, Greenville, NY, 269,000
    I find the date listed as odd as it looks like a much earlier house. Was there nostalgia in the 1880s for a brick Federal? I like all of the fireplaces and deep set windows
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3658-County-Route-26-Greenville-NY-12083/30501048_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=944671da-e60b-406b-b2c1-60a3085aadd8~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    2
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Quite a little charmer, the way that simple facade has such a nice repetition of arches. I don’t think you have to push this one too much, it’s simplicity is what’s appealing to me.

      2
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2217 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      I like it! Esp. the staircase & the library. Nice!
      Forest Hills Gardens has a whole bunch of neat looking homes, at least from the exterior (since I haven’t been inside them).

      1
  8. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    And now for something entirely different:

    PBS 2013 Tales from the Royal Bedchamber
    I watched this show recently on my local PBS and thoroughly enjoyed it. Not only do we get to see some amazing architecture, along with the interiors and those State Beds, but also the wonderful history of how the royal bed has changed over time, from public to private. nice
    https://www.pbs.org/show/tales-royal-bedchamber/

    8
  9. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    And now to satisfy my modern side:

    1960, Los Angeles, CA, 1,495,000
    There are about 4 or 5 of these smaller modern hillside homes in a row. I wish the realtor gave us some background on how they came to be and who designed them. What I like about them is the massing of windows, balconies and the large over hanging roofs. Inside, kitchen cabinetry, metal fireplace, open plan, book shelves and the view from those windows. I wish I could let my jade plants run wild outside too.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3112-Fernwood-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90039/20747442_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=e01e9f84-ffc7-4d59-87f1-1e78cf851894~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    5
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Whoever lives here has a great eye. The architecture is always going to be good, but I do love the fact that it’s just a bit cluttered by contemporary standards. Amazing collections of stuff that fit this house like a glove. The strong use of color as you enter is also another wow.

      3
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      rad!!

      1
  10. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Kelly,
    I was just looking at two CT properties you shared and now do not see them…I liked them both and especially the granite fireplace in the first and the big brick and stone cooking fireplace in the second.
    What happened to your post?

  11. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    Hello all—we’re supposed to get more snow today, and I’m already feeling like I’ve had enough. You posters more northern than I am are surely laughing. In any case, I’m bouncing around a bit because there’s fewer new locally, but let’s dive in.

    An interesting carriage barn conversion in the downtown Newport, Ri area for 1.48 million. The build date says 1680, but i’d take it with a grain of salt. This artist owned property is a highly appealing hodgepodge that I’d be quite happy with, except for that price tag.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/32-Green-St_Newport_RI_02840_M48210-33821

    A very plain Jane vernacular Victorian with a given build date of 1930 in Monroe, Ct listed for $180k. Given the fish scale shingles on the exterior and the front porch detailing, I’d certainly place this easily closer to the turn of the century or before. This is just an honest little house being marketed as a tear down, the almost two acre lot is worth the price alone. I just hate seeing something like this honest little no nonsense house be torn down for some vinyl box. Checkout that turn of the century bath modernized in the 50s, nice try, fellas!

    Here’s a 1760 Farmington, Ct Colonial listed for $349k. This is a great location in a village setting, but just a few minutes to major arteries. It’s got a quirky yet very appealing NON-OPEN floor plan that I think makes a ton of practical sense. Kudos again to any agent who gives you a space plan to review in the listing photos. The vintage feel of the kitchen only adds to it’s charm.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/117-Main-St_Farmington_CT_06032_M49550-52454

    Here’s an old favorite that’s been on OHD before.

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/02/22/c-1880-norwich-ct/

    It seems that the current owners plans have changed and the house just got put back on
    the market. There are only 3 pictures so, use the old link to get a better sense, but it appears as per the listing, 2 additional bathrooms and a laundry room have been rough plumbed as well as an electrical upgrade. Looks like the plan is to finish off the attic and the tower. Once again, bad agent for not including more photos. It’s now on the market for 110k, 50 thousand more than they paid for it 8 months ago. The “high end” appliances and cabinetry that are supposed to convey with the property better be damn good!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/93-Union-St_Norwich_CT_06360_M48212-27305

    And here’s my goofball listing of the week. A 1945 “colonial” on 10 acres in Patterson Ny listed for $245k. So here’s the thing. I am wild about the stone, always makes me a happy camper to see that. That roof line though. Was this a nod to flat roofed moderns at the time? That family room with the round windows makes me almost think this was an intentional design decision and not just a poor choice by the builder. Are those gun ports in the stone from a room we can’t see? I do love the feel of that family room, it kinda makes the whole house. If it were mine, it would get a proper at least 10/12 roof pitch. Again, an oddball with promise.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/460-Birch-Hill-Rd_Patterson_NY_12563_M35910-66499

  12. MikeMike says: 365 comments
    1886 Queen Anne Victorian
    IL

    Came across this spectacular house this morning, I think it is one of the best houses I have seen in a long time. It is in Kinderhook NY, and is listed for $1.19m; 1885 Second Empire in great condition. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/20-Broad-St-Kinderhook-NY-12106/30012341_zpid/?

    1
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Ha, ha – this is one of my favorites – glad to see it shared again!

      2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Mike. Very nice. So much to consider. The exterior is so white, and I wonder what the original pallet was?

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5116 comments
      OHD Supporter

      A fine house with its Second Empire remodeling, but it was probably more unique in its 1785 Palladian form with Chinese Chippendale railings all around. The original owner Peter Van Schaack (1747-1832) was a brilliant attorney banished to England in the Revolution for his Loyalist stand, but his money and connections brought him back, with plans for his fashionable new home.

      https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ezYuICq1ZV4/T0LfuPPTpPI/AAAAAAAAUhI/iA5NfLAL8vY/s1600/The+Van+Schaak+House+Kinderhook.jpg

      2
      • MikeMike says: 365 comments
        1886 Queen Anne Victorian
        IL

        WOW Jim, did not expect that! I saw the 1785 build date on the listing, but I assumed it to be a typo and estimated the date as 1885. This house certainly doesn’t need any work, but if it did, I guess a decision would have to be made as to which period to restore it to. There is a house in my town that started out as a Queen Anne in the 1880s/90s, and then a few years later, received a sort of Craftsman/Prairie style makeover. When a couple bought it about 15 years ago, they took it back to the original Queen Anne based on photos at the Historical Society; many of the neighbors were not happy about it, thinking that they had spoiled the original house.

        2
        • JimHJimH says: 5116 comments
          OHD Supporter

          The older house is really just a historical footnote at this point. Because it’s in Kinderhook with its colonial history, the 1785 date and name survive though very little of the original house is even recognizable. The history of the B&B there doesn’t even mention the remodeling, which was done for Albany jeweler James Mix Jr. in the mid-1860’s.

          http://www.vanschaackhouse.com/history.html

  13. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 96 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    The 1843 Stillman Kelley house on one acre in the Quivet Neck section of East Dennis (listing says South Dennis, but this property is walking distance from my house here) has six bedrooms, three baths and almost 3000 square feet (plus a 30 x 40 barn) for $1.1 million. The property conveys with some of the original Stillman Kelley furniture, an massive cast-iron stove, and Stillman Kelley’s journals.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/78-Sea-St-South-Dennis-MA-02660/55880289_zpid/

    1
  14. RosewaterRosewater says: 6530 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    In a recent thread, I noticed a comment by a “longtime lurker” lamenting the dearth of kitchens we see in old houses which retain most, if not all, of their original, period characteristics and design. While that is mostly true; we have been lately blessed with the opportunity, (Thanks’ OHD Goddess!), to see some great examples which buck the norm and fulfill her wish. Why, just today, Kelly has posted a house with one of the most impressive examples of that sort of kitchen I’ve ever seen. If that is your bag, you certainly won’t want to miss that post.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/12/13/c-1900-queen-anne-in-bath-me/

    Most folks do not want to play “Ma Kettle”, standing over her wood/coal stove in her primitive, “outdated”, kitchen, unadapted to today’s expectations and needs; and I completely understand that sentiment.
    https://resizing.flixster.com/BD1gzFQ7MhkK2fpJuoTZa27Z_aw=/1806×2408/v1.bjs3MzIzMDM7ajsxODI3ODsxMjAwOzE4MDY7MjQwOA
    I am the LAST person in the world to ever advocate living in a “museum” in some sort of “purist” extreme – far from it in fact. What I am saying is that there are many better ways to go about adapting kitchens in old houses than expensive, post modern, HGTV, gut jobs; which will meet our needs, and also make us better stewards of antique houses.

    I’d like to open up a discussion here about the benefits of preserving and restoring original kitchens in old houses; and how best to modify, adapt, and enhance them to meet those post modern needs while still retaining and enhancing those authentic, antique characteristics.

    If you have thoughts on this subject, please respond. If you have links to great kitchens which have been changed for the better in this regard, please post them.

    I’ll be posting some examples I know of, and some of my own thoughts, in the next couple of days as time allows. For now, enjoy having a peek at this phenomenal example of a great old/newer kitchen in a phenomenal old house which used to be on OHD. It was one of my finds years ago; and remains one of my favorite old houses ever.
    https://suburbhunting.blogspot.com/2015/08/2015-faraon-stsaint-joseph-mo-64501.html
    Below linked, BTW, is an original, (to the house), fixture, found in a small hall connecting the suite of kitchens and service rooms in that house. It dates from the EXTENSIVE, period, Arts and Crafts re-do some will very much enjoy seeing, or revisiting! 🙂
    https://flic.kr/p/njfsic

    As an aside; If you’re in the mood for a delightful little rabbit hole of great fixtures and fittings of all sorts; check out the whole gallery here:
    https://flic.kr/s/aHsjYpe7MY

    9
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      That is a fascinating collection of photos, Jay – you have amazingly eclectic tastes!

      I am a fanatic for the beauty and functionality of period kitchens, and have a huge collection of photographs – albeit not in a “linkable” format. My favorite resource is the late Jane Powell’s “Bungalow Kitchens” – or, for a newer take on period style, Peter LaBau’s “The New Bungalow Kitchen”. As I’m sure you know, the examples they depict would do beautifully in almost any later period house, not just “bungalows”.

      My own house was built as slave quarters in 1802, and remodeled in the 1920’s to include hardwood floors and a ton of chestnut woodwork and built-ins. When I bought it, however, the kitchen was a poorly laid-out mish-mash of 1980’s appliances and rough-cut board and batten walls – although with one wall of chestnut built-in cabinetry. I ripped out all but the cabinets, and installed a salvaged porcelain farm sink and a restored 1934 Magic Chef gas range which works like a charm.

      I’m hoping your request for comments receives lots of input, Jay. The “kitchen issue” is one of my main peeves in otherwise beautifully original old houses. and seems to be a huge stumbling block for many people attempting to undertake a sensitive restoration…

      2
      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        Kelly, when you have a free moment, could you provide a brief tutorial in posting photos to our profile page? I tried a couple of times, but was only able to put up one picture. In responding to Jay’s request, I’d like to be able to add some kitchen photos, if possible… Thank you, Kelly!

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11828 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          When you are on your profile page and have clicked “Photos” you have two options, photo or album. “Photos” will just show your photos uploaded so you want to either click “New Album” if you want to upload your photos in a brand new album or click the album you’ve already created to uploaded more photos to it.

          For a new album, after you click “New Album” a popup will appear, enter an Album title then ‘Add Photos’. When you click ‘Add Photos’ you’ll get the upload popup, navigate to the folder your photos are in and select the photos you wish to upload (you are able to upload multiple photos, depending on your operating system depends on how, Windows it’s holding down the Ctrl button and selecting with your mouse, I don’t know if you are on phone or Mac.) After you’ve selected your photos click ‘Open’ or whatever the verification button says to upload. It’ll show the thumbnails that have been uploaded, ‘Album Cover’ means you can choose what main photo thumbnail will show to people when they view your albums, that’s optional. When you are done click ‘Add’ and it’ll create the album. Give it time to reload, page will refresh and show your newly created album and photo uploads.

          To upload to an existing album, you’ll click the album name/thumbnail, once the page refreshes you’ll see a cogwheel to the right of your album name, click the cogwheel to see ‘Edit Album’ option. You’ll see a box where you can upload your photos, ‘Add Photos’, same as above. After you’ve uploaded your photos, ‘Update’.

          1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6530 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Oooohhh, Barbara; sounds amazing! 🙂

        What is it the kids say? “Reduce, re-use, recycle.” Not only are you creating a space which compliments and enhances your antique home, those things you mentioned are very collectible and will only increase in value as years pass. Aside from their aesthetically pleasing design; they are rock solid, quality, built to LAST; and made at a time when pride was taken in ones product, and “functional obsolescence” was unimaginable.

        >favorite resource is the late Jane Powell’s “Bungalow Kitchens” – or, for a newer take on period style, Peter LaBau’s “The New Bungalow Kitchen”.
        EXCELLENT suggestions. A great resource for ideas in changing any vintage or antique kitchen; or as is most common, removing aesthetically / functionally deficient kitchens and re-creating something of lasting quality and value.

        >fascinating collection of photos
        Barbara, that is a mere smidge of the pix I’ve clipped and collected for years. Updating that gallery is on my long term list. Unfortunately that list is EXTENSIVE. Heheheh. 🙂

        1
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 826 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      I’ve beat this drum a bit before, but it’s worth considering the rather wonderful results one can achieve in a vintage kitchen by keeping what is there and supplementing with non-fitted furnishings. Example: Sturdy work table in the center instead of granite topped island. Free standing hoosier type cabinets instead of fitted cabinets. Shelves on the wall (the original cup-board). Etc. And the bonus is that the original kitchen, now functional, is preserved for future owners.

      4
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Jay, this is great as I find the original kitchen and their stoves close to my heart. The old show from PBS regarding a period life for modern folks to make their way thru say using a turn of the last century house, yes reality TV, but I had to try and endure to see.
      Now I am now faced with a very original space started somewhere in the 1930s (family cabin). I look forward to finally experiencing this place as an adult. I collect cookbooks and cooking history, so this topic is fascinating.
      Jay, I so look forward to your further discussion here-go for it. Smile

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6530 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Thanks’ Kimberly. 🙂 I SO envy your opportunities with that GREAT old cabin. You’re gonna have some fun there for sure. WORK – yes, and lot’s of it; but reward, reward, reward.

        2
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 826 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        Hi Kimberly, since “chit chat” is approved for weekly shares, I just had to mention that I share your interest in old cookbooks. I particularly like the ones from the depression era, some of which were written for newbie home-makers — many of whom, now in reduced economic circumstances, may never had to cook before in their lives and for whom the kitchen was a place where formerly one went to give menu instructions to the cook. Additionally, these books offer unusual “thrifty” recipes which to our modern tastebuds sound quite odd. I enjoy trying them. If you’re interested I’ll try to find my favorite and will post the title and author.

        1
        • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1936 Cabin

          John, I am glad you share the interest. My collection is at around 3 to 400 books. I have a section just on history and I am curious on your interest on the depression.

    • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Jay,

      I’m glad you posted this! I have posted pictures of my kitchen in various stages over the past 18 years, with information written for each. I’ve spent the last 18 months rebuilding a good portion of the house, including the kitchen, pantry, bathroom, and living room, mostly by myself, and re-using as much of the original materials as possible. I’m not quite finished: I’ve got trim work to do in all the rooms. The kitchen will have old growth fir trim.

      I wanted to keep the farmhouse vibe, but a bit more rustic, with less paint and more wood, though I happen to love the look of painted rough wood as well. I think I’ve succeeded nicely, but I’d sure love to hear what everyone here thinks!

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/2486/?profiletab=photos

      3
      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        Great pictures, Natira! Your kitchen is obviously a work of love, and looks like a wonderful, cozy and comfortable place to spend time – and I think it’s great that you’ve done it yourself with so many salvaged and re-purposed items.

        2
        • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          Thanks so much, Barbara. I had a ball! I admit to getting VERY tired of doing demo and heavy construction, but the decorating part was so much fun! My husband works a lot, so was unable to help much, but he did the plumbing, wiring, and some of the heavy demo that I couldn’t reach. He had fun telling his co-workers what I was doing, but got kinda disgusted that they didn’t believe him unless he had pictures to prove I was pouring new concrete footings, or framing 27 feet of exterior wall, or whatever I was up to on any given day.

          This isn’t my first old house, but it’s defintely my absolute favorite. I’ve had a ball finding out wbout the home’s history, and am tickled to be it’s fourth owner. I was also ridiculously thrilled to discover it was originally only one room, which I had suspected, but couldn’t prove until I tore the wall out between the bedroom and the living room, and discovered the same planks as the 1900 addition, and the ca. 1900 newspaper on the backs of them. Very cool!

          I’ll be posting more pictures after the holidays, including the awesome cupboard bed I built!

          1
          • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1936 Cabin

            Natira, I so enjoy seeing the pictures of your house. I love the stairs, and it would be an honor to use them every day. I look forward to seeing more that you have done. Smile

            • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1877 Vernacular
              Columbia River Gorge, WA

              Kimberly,

              Unfortunately, those stairs are not in my house! I WISH! No, they are just a wonderful example of a good morning staircase. I covet them, very sinfully *grin*

              1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6530 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Julie, you are my hero! I absolutely love and applaud your spirit and ingenuity getting through your kitchen job.
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/640×480-007810.jpg
        Love it! That’s the DIY spirit! 🙂
        When I bought this house, all of the plumbing was shot and unusable, and the bathroom was a disaster zone. I LITERALLY showered in the back yard under a cold water hose for the nearly two months it took me to make it work. I was Luaura Ingalls Wilder schlepping my bucket from the one working tap to fill the toilet. Heheheh.

        Your kitchen turned out beeeeaauuuuuutiful. Those floors are like butta! I have no doubt there is a very good deal of elbow grease into achieving that divine finish. Nicely done.
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/kitchennorthafter-scaled.jpg
        Your Hoosier turned out amazing. $50 BUX! VERY nicely done indeed. 🙂 I’m impressed with the character and quality of the patina on all of the wooden surfaces which you’ve achieved there. Looks super rich; and more impressively, as if they are all old finishes, well loved and polished for 100+ years. Not an easy result to achieve. You rock! 🙂

        OMG – gorgeous – wow =
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/GoodMorningStaircase.jpg
        I’d have clipped that stair too. It’s really special.

        2
        • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          Thank you so much, Jay! You have no idea how good it makes me feel when folk here on OHD like what I’ve done…. especially since many people thought I was NUTS to even think about taking on the project by myself.

          Your bathroom comment made me laugh for a couple reasons: I’ve been accused of being LIW incarnate, and I absolutely delighted in taking a bath in my tub before I framed the exterior bathroom wall…. that was SUCH a wonderful soak!

          My kitchen floor….. looks better in pictures than in person. It’s got the well-used look I was going for, but knowing what I know now, I NEVER would have urethaned it! I’m not going to strip it though….. I’m just going to keep scrubbing the hell out of it. Eventually it will have that wonderful scrubbed board look I so cherish. Yes, I’m one of those odd persons who enjoys scrubbing floor on hands and knees.

          The Hoosier is an absolute godsend! I bake quite a bit, so it’s essential, really. I actually found a possum belly table on craigslist last year, for FREE, and refinished it for my daughter… she bakes more than I do!

          Regarding wood finishes (And thank you SO much for that particlar comment): I have my own version of “shabby chic” Instead of chippy paint layers, (which actually can be cool looking, but how the HELL do you keep it clean!?!?) I use stain and urethane (Yep, on furniture, but never again on floors). Used lumber, nails, chips, dings and all. Enough sanding so it’s not dangerously splintery, or dry scraping if my poor right wrist will allow that, then stain and/or clearcoat.

          When I finished the big base cabinet and put on the maple plank top, I was SO surprised that it oiled up so dark! It’s the local Big Leaf Maple, and I’d not worked with it before, though I have worked with hard rock maple, which doesn’t take stain or oil well AT ALL, But Man! That maple soaked up the mineral oil and is just as dark as the old growth fir!

          And just for you, I’m gonna post some close-ups of some juicy details. *grin*

          1
          • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1877 Vernacular
            Columbia River Gorge, WA

            Details posted! And just in case everyone hasn’t figured this out yet, if you click on the pictures to look at them, they have a little write-ups, as well as a place to make comments. And the pictures look much better large!

      • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 155 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Your kitchen has gotten well deserved praise, but where, oh, where is the love for your garden? It’s gorgeous! A charming home all around!

        • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          Oh! Thanks so much! Honestly, due to all of my construction efforts, the gardens have been a bit neglected. I sure look forward to spending time outside once winter is over! I’m planning a major re-do of my extensive veggie garden, weeee!

          • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 155 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Hehe, if that’s what neglect looks like, you can come shower it on my garden anytime you like =D

            I’m currently in backyard skating rink mode, but looking forward to giving my garden some serious love this spring.

    • BethanyBethany says: 3495 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      The 1904 house I grew up in had 50’s metal kitchen cabinets, red formica countertops edged in steel, and retained some of its original wood cabinetry which my mom had painted and stenciled but at least it was there. Sometime after I moved out, so early 90’s, my parents updated the kitchen, retaining an old-fashioned look but losing some character in the process–white wood cabinets with plain countertops, new doors for the original cabinetry (they did save the original doors though). My reason for posting this comment is to say that, to be fair, sometimes “real” people who live in old houses and love them just have to make some changes to be practical and live their lives. The thing people often don’t know about metal cabinets is that they get RUSTY in certain climates. Very rusty. And the original doors to the old wooden cabinets had warped and didn’t close properly. Of course, these are fixable problems but as a regular family living in a regular old but not fancy house, they did what they felt they needed to do to be comfortable. Of course I now wish they had restored and not replaced, but as a clueless 20-something at the time, I said nothing. Most people who change outdated kitchens are not evil, they are just living their lives.

      5
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6530 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        >Most people who change outdated kitchens are not evil
        Hope I never implied that they were. Sometimes it’s just frustrating when you see rooms of real worth and value ripped out and replaced by some expensive fad which will likely have little or no additional value in a few years at re-sale. I try very hard to moderate my ire when I see that happen: and I NEVER look at flip threads. Heheheh. 😉

        I have some ideas swimming around in my head about how we, as old house lovers, can help to red pill the thousands of
        > “real” people
        who visit this site all the time, about the value of many old kitchens and baths they may find in their dream homes. HGTV has spent the past two decades brainwashing people into destroying perfectly solid, aesthetically irreplaceable, antique and vintage, “period valid”, kitchens and baths in order to please their advertisers who would HAPPILY sell you all of the bright shiny, (functionally, and aesthetically obsolescent), things they glorify. Kitchens especially have become status symbols in MANY people’s minds. — I was, but will pass on getting into the psychology of all that.

        Anyway: I look forward to this whole kitchens and baths deal becoming a running theme around here; and hopefully some folks who would have “ripped out and replaced”, because “that’s just what you do”, will see that there are many times other options which can be just as exciting, AND SAVE THEM $$$$$$! Heheheh.

        Cheers Bethany! 🙂

        1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1141 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thank you for the Ficker photos! Just beautiful!

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6530 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Cheers Carebear! I will be updating that album with GOBS more goodies very soon; and will post the link when I do. So pleased you enjoyed seeing some of the things which make me say wow. 🙂

        You might also enjoy this album of fireplaces and stoves. I have GOBS more of those as well. Heheheh. 😉

        https://flic.kr/s/aHsjTvk6Fw

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      I don’t know if you’re familiar with Paige / Farmhouse vernacular (on instagram mainly, but there’s a website too: https://www.farmhousevernacular.com/ ) and as they’re about to re-do their kitchen, she’s looking for a period sympathetic kitchen but with modern conveniences. Browse her website. They ripped their 80s fitted kitchen and now want a kitchen with free-standing furniture. Her approach is interesting.

      PS : she also has a youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkx82bdlBc68Ty4EfDeCn1Q and recently did 2 videos about Victorian kitchen)

    • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 155 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Great find! That buffet with the window over it is wonderful. A very charming house and if there are hardwood floors under all that carpet, it’ll be perfect! My grandma had that exact flooring in her kitchen. Love it.

  15. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    A timely discussion, Jay. I will think on this some because I agree and Kelly gently swatted me by not posting a comment of mine today that was critical (but I thought polite) of a home that had lost its original kitchen that had once previously been posted.

    I think even in preservation-minded circles there is a tendency to let kitchens and baths slide, and I think it’s a matter of education and restraint. The house I’m in currently is a bit of a jumble, but since it was never meant to be a house, I’ve given myself a lot more liberty. I’ve found a rather modest Victorian that I have my eye on that hasn’t really been altered since the 40s. They did add some upper Home Depot type cabinets at some point, but only a few. There was a movement within the kitchen design community a few years back to revive “unfitted kitchens.” I don’t see it as much anymore, but it was a smart idea of not relying on everything being built in. Hoosier cabinets work surprisingly well, even today. Open shelving, all the rage at the moment does indeed have its place. I am attracted to kitchens from the 30s through the 50s, modern enough for me, but still feeling appropriate for many old houses. Generally maybe the first big remodel in many places. I think a work table or even a big butcher block on legs can substitute for what everyone seems to want, a center island.

    I think investigating vintage appliances can go a long way toward getting if not a period-correct feel, a vintage flavor. This E-book looks like a cool way to give a contemporary fridge the look of an icebox. I think we need to remember to scale back sometimes, nobody needs the last word on every trend. Review and see what’s useful from before you were around. I’ll see what else I can dig up, I have a lot of thoughts on the subject as a whole.

    https://www.oldhouseguy.com/store/products/e-book-convert-modern-refrigerator-antique-icebox/

    The Portland house that you and I both commented on from last week’s roundup had an outstanding kitchen, modern but not overly so. I’ll go back and find the link later.

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 914 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      This was the reason why, I felt it was judgmental toward people you know nothing about.

      “And that these owners only spent a few years in the house, knowing full well that that kitchen had functioned perfectly well for so long.”

      2
      • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 446 comments
        1930 carriage house
        Bethlehem, CT

        And as I said, you gently swatted me by not posting it. You have your reasons. I just don’t see how being slightly critical and having people learn that many of us like what they ripped out which was actually quite lovely and functional was necessarily a bad thing. I also softened it in the full text, but no matter. The idea that maybe if more knew an old kitchen was actually an asset to many looking for an old house, maybe people would think twice before ripping out something original. I mean no disrespect, Kelly. My flippancy often gets me into trouble.

        7
        • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1800 cottage
          Upstate, NY

          I very much agree with your point of view, dwr. It seems that many people make decisions today – such as when it comes to decorating or modifying their homes – based upon gaining the approval of others and meeting the expectations of others when it comes to resale value. If they have the chance to learn the value of what they have, I hope that some people, at least, might think twice before destroying it…

          6
  16. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/185-Washington-St-Norwich-CT-06360/61992096_zpid/
    $309,990 built 1870
    Convers House
    I love the 7 sided porch and Gothic gables and the tiled fireplace. Victorian houses amaze me.

    4
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2217 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Oh, wow, thanks for posting this one. Esp. because my paternal great-grandparents owned a Brownstone *very* nearby, at 210 Hancock Street. My father (who lived Upstate) spent time there and often spoke of it, esp. his Christmases there. I have some photos of him as a little kid in front of it in the early/mid 1920’s, but I’ve never seen its interior. Hoping it’s (still) as nicely fitted out as this house is!

      1
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      I swooned! It’s so gorgeous, I love brownstones rowhouses (i have a 300p book about brownstones and rowhouses!)

  17. Slroulette23Slroulette23 says: 156 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Curious…does anyone else find themselves stating outloud, “that’s a late 19th century stick Victorian…” or “what a stunning Greek revival…” completely annoying your family while all they are wanting to do is finish the movie in peace? I’ve found that since I’ve discovered this site, that is all I do! The houses have become the stars in the movies we’re watching!

    7
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11828 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Yes! Was watching Outlander last night and kept annoying my husband “That’s the wrong house for that period! Wrong colors! Wrong woodwork! Look at that trim, that’s not historically correct!” Another one the other day, “They didn’t have Queen Anne homes during the Civil War!” “She called it a Greek Revival, that’s Classical Revival!” My husband just laughs.

      7
      • Slroulette23Slroulette23 says: 156 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I’ll google homes from shows and movies that I like. Most of them I’ve learned are sets and not real homes…so disappointing! However, if you’re going to build a set, why wouldn’t you make it accurate to the time period, ie; your civil war/queen Anne example? That all being said…happy to know I’m not alone in bugging my loved ones with my OHD obsession!

        4
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11828 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          I know! The Queen Anne they blew up so why the heck not make it something that would have been accurate?!

          In Outlander I read the reason for the inaccuracy, they wanted to make it appear richer than it would have been for real in that time period (everything was a set.) But you could have done that and been historically accurate too.

          3
          • Slroulette23Slroulette23 says: 156 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Absolutely! This site you’ve created boasts an abundant selection of examples!

            Pointing out inaccuracies is something else I do that ruffles the feathers of my family. This is not reserved for just houses for me! Lucky them!!

            1
            • Slroulette23Slroulette23 says: 156 comments
              OHD Supporter

              I believe it vital to add an amendment to my above statement regarding pointing out inaccuracies. I would say about 9 times out of 10, I have no idea what I’m talking about! 🙂

              6
      • CarebearCarebear says: 1141 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I’ll say, “That looks like a Barber!” and people look at me like I’m nuts.

        1
      • CarebearCarebear says: 1141 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Is the new season of Outlander on already????

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 914 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          I don’t know, we just started watching it a couple of weeks ago, we are currently on season 3. I’m not a fan of the show, Claire is too infuriating! Lol

          • CarebearCarebear says: 1141 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I have read the books, and am not airing for the next one. I hope it won’t be like Game of Thrones, where the tv writers wrote faster than George RR Martin, and finished the series before him! Outlander does differ from the books a bit. They’ve left out some details that really make no difference. The author gets very wordy. She’ll go on for dozens of pages when just a few would do. But, it’s an interesting story, all the same.

    • JeanJean says: 112 comments
      1975 Traditional
      Athens, GA

      Yes! The older I get the more I prefer the backgrounds to the people in the foreground! Way more interesting.

      1
    • natira121natira121 says: 645 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      ALL the time! Sometimes I watch movies JUST to check out the archtecture.

      I used to annoy everyone with horse related comments…. “that’s NOT the same horse” or “that’s not a breed that was in that country then” or “that’s the wrong period saddle”

      Now I can annoy people on two completely different subjects! LOL!

      5
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1141 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’ll say, “That looks like a Barber!” and people look at me like I’m nuts.

      1
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      I totally do that too! When we started watching “how to get away with murder”, i found the Queen Ann super gorgeous. I told my bf: i think it’d date around 1895. I googled it and boom! 1895! https://www.seeing-stars.com/Locations/HowToGetAwayWithMurder.shtml

      1
  18. mariebushmanmariebushman says: 236 comments
    1919 Bungalow
    Richmond, CA

    Yes, kitchens in old houses can work if the layout is good and you love to cook. I have a 1919 bungalow that had a mishmash of redos over the years. I would have loved to have kept the original cabinets, but they had been cut down to accommodate the many layers of flooring that had been added. I would have had to spend many more dollars to have them raised and made useable. Also the layout was so bad, I almost hated to cook, but that wasn’t an option. So, I kept some of the older features of the kitchen, like the cold closet, original molding and bead board, we even added molding where it had been ripped out by previous owners. I used the same style of cabinet doors in my redo. Also redid the windows, which had been replaced over the years with aluminum sliders, for custom wood windows that matched the originals. I also added a banquet with window seating. Love my new, old kitchen and it’s hard to keep me out of it!

    5
  19. CoraCora says: 2059 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Here’s a groovy little 1959 gem in La Mesa. Fantastic funkiness. $640K

    La Mesa, CA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7102-Stanford-Ave-La-Mesa-CA-91942/17000270_zpid/

    4
  20. JimHJimH says: 5116 comments
    OHD Supporter

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4995-County-Hwy-6-Middletown-NY-12459/2082383954_zpid/

    This modest Greek Revival home for $60K at New Kingston NY was built for shoemaker Richard Miles Faulkner (1823-1901) after he bought the lot for $100 in 1855. The house has a saltbox form owing to a lean-to addition at the rear. Faulkner’s shoe shop is thought to have been the small space next to the garage which retains its original door and window matching the house. The house isn’t large or fancy and it needs some work, but it’s as homey as can be.
    The property was owned by Faulkner and later daughter Rosena for almost a century, then purchased by cousin Guy Faulkner and his wife Ila Baker in 1946 for $600. In an article to honor Ila’s 100th birthday in 2017, she said “I’ve lived here 71 years, and can’t imagine living anywhere else.” She died before the article came out, 10 days short of 100 years.

    https://www.catskillmountainnews.com/articles/ila-faulkner-to-mark-100th-birthday/

    A few months back, Kelly posted the 1850 Isaac Birdsall House across the road, also part of the historic district, and owned by a Faulkner relative:

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/04/16/1850-greek-revival-new-kingston-ny/

    4
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      This is a sweet little house, with its original-looking 6/6 windows, winding staircase, and old, no-frills kitchen. An added bonus is the wonderful vintage wallpaper shown in photo #14…

      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        Agree with Barbara on her notes. I do so love the small ” modern” stove and intrigued be the older wood stove. Love the older womans story. My grandmother lived to 105 and had stories to tell. Smile
        Thanks Jim

        1
        • My great grandmother had a brand new electric stove which her children gave her right next to the wood burning stove that she actually used until she passed in the early 1960s. My great aunt took the stove to her house and it still had paper inside the oven from when it was bought in 1948.

    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 448 comments
      OHD Supporter

      What an absolutely adorable little house! Love everything about it and can see why Mrs. Ila Baker had lived there quite happily for 71 years and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. Thanks for the article about her. I love knowing who lived in these homes for years and years. Lately I seem to have gone from swooning over the massive to paying more attention to the smaller cosy homes like this one. Happily here at OHD I get both.

      1
  21. It’s time to find new owners for our 1884 Carpenter Victorian located in Edwardsburg, MI a small quaint town in SW Michigan just 2 miles from Granger, IN and a short 20-minute drive to South Bend, IN and only 1 1/2 hrs to Chicago. Lovingly restored paying attention to every detail, even a “secret” door! Approximately 3,000 square feet on just over an acre with the original barn and an inground pool. All for $394,900 https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/26850-Barber-St-Edwardsburg-MI-49112/106277839_zpid/?rtoken=62fdbde8-b105-4b7b-9225-7a05e62f9ce4~X1-ZUyylvi6p2np55_5i26a&utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sellerlistingreport-hdp&utm_term=urn:msg:20191214130157aa8a9852c71922d8&view=owner

    2
  22. prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 155 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1931 Art Deco? Art Moderne? in Evanston, IL $759,000

    The outside is fabulous. And it looks like it has its original steel windows! There’s a cool concrete (?) fireplace mantle in the living room. Lots of modernization inside, but door trim and archways have original stairstep design intact. Both bathrooms still have their wall tiles but new fixtures.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3545-Golf-Rd-Evanston-IL-60203/3519978_zpid/

    6
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2217 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      What a neat house! Not my usual ‘thing’ but I really like it. Its exterior makes me think of the “skyscraper” genre of Art Deco. (And I think I want those raspberry upholstered chairs & footstools in the LR; they look very comfortable.)

      1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Such a neat exterior, hard to think there is enough windows from that opening shot. Imo the interior has been modernized/homogenized a bit, but wouldn’t it be fun to step it back a bit to reflect the exterior design.

      2
    • It looks influenced by Bauhaus to me. Maybe Art Deco?

      1
  23. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1825-Mill-Rd-West-Falls-NY-14170/30271614_zpid/
    Our house is located just 20-25 minutes to Buffalo, NY that is enjoying an economic resurgence. Located in the historic hamlet of Griffin Mills, it is just 3 miles east and west to villages that have shopping, restaurants, and all sorts of cultural events.Western NY is a great place to live, full of history with first class amenities.

    9
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 933 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      What a lovely house, loaded with interesting details and furnishings – for instance, the sweet little parlor stove in photo #10… Aerial photos seem to show a beautifully landscaped setting full of trees in a classic New England style community – and I especially like the tennis court!

    • MWMW says: 902 comments

      Very charming inside and out! Taxes seem surprisingly low for NY (guess it depends if $3,300/yr or $1,300/mo is correct, guessing $1,300/mo unfortunately) and the HS is rated 9/10? Hmmm, might want to think about this one.

  24. dontoedontoe says: 1 comments

    Wow check out this 1884 beauty it’s in Edwardsburg, MI, I can only dream!
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/26850-Barber-St-Edwardsburg,-MI,-49112_rb/106277839_zpid/?view=public

    1
  25. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    To add to Jay’s thread on original kitchens, I have been an admirer of this house Kelly posted for a long time:

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2014/11/29/1888-stockbridge-ma/

    Lovely old home. I wonder what the kitchen and summer kitchen look like today. I loved reading about its history on the attached written history from one of the owners who was selling the house given to the new owners. How special.

    1
  26. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Also on the kitchen, some short films advertising the modern kitchen from a short while back:

    https://instantwatcher.com/a/title/171127

    This kind of stuff just mesmerizes me

    2
  27. 301 Grove Street, Elmira, New York. Mansion built in 1880’s and eventually converted to a nursing home with an addition. Incredible woodwork and architectural feature. Priced to sell at $159,000 https://www.pyramidbrokerage.com/properties/listings/details/G5664/301-grove-street-elmira-ny-former-barton-s-nursing-home

    2
  28. 1757 Steel Hill Rd, Van Wyck, SC 29744 $150K
    This 1906 house has a beautiful backyard. I’d like to go see it because of those trees alone.The house needs a restoration. This just looks like a farmhouse to me. A one-story Queen Anne style maybe, minus a wrap around porch?

    1
  29. tcmchickietcmchickie says: 152 comments
    OHD Supporter

    TX

    Circa 1885
    $119,000 6 beds, 3 bathrooms in 4,793 sqft
    Syracuse, NY

    I know it is very bad form to make negative comments on decor choices, so if we could avoid that but still talk about what might be original to the house, (woodwork, trim, etc.) particularly in the 1st floor rooms, I’d be very grateful since I have an untrained eye that struggles to sort out what would be typical for a house circa 1885 and what might be a later addition. Thank very much.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/749-W-Onondaga-St-Syracuse-NY-13204/31683264_zpid/?

    3
    • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 155 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Wowsers!! What a find! The proportions and craftsmanship of the woodwork in the stairs and hall look “right” for that period… but I have no clue if any were originally painted like that. My guess is that the finish was similar to the paneling in the dining room before it got gussied up? Hopefully more knowledgeable folks will chime in on this one. The owners certainly had a bold style! Nobody on this site will complain about boring neutrals and white woodwork for this one 😉

      2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5471 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Real estate agents often refer to highly individualistic homes of this sort as being very “personalized” because it reflects the tastes and visions of specific owners. There’s a chance that someone will tour this house who shares the exact tastes and vision of a previous owner who obviously spent a lot of time, effort, and money to leave their personal mark on this house. However, for the general house buying public this house may not meet their expectations and/or personal decor or design choices.

      As for what may be original and what may not be, there are too many non-original details and finishes to reach any final conclusions about the changes this house has seen in more recent years. Archimedes Russell (1840-1915) was a Syracuse based architect who designed residences and institutional buildings regionally. He was also a professor of architecture at Syracuse University from 1873-1881. This Queen Anne house as featured, would not date back to 1885 but probably a decade later because of the Dutch (Colonial) Gambrel shaped gable and Colonial Revival motifs. It’s possible though, that an older house was substantially updated in the mid to late 1890’s to the form it now has. In summary, this house is highly personalized and to take it back to a semblance of what it might have originally looked like (without a period photo to reference) would require a lot of work.

      Colors can greatly alter the impression of a house-therefore going back to more period friendly late Victorian colors could change the exterior personality. If the budget allows, a good interior designer with extensive experience in period interiors could sort out and combine details for a more cohesive theme throughout the house. Of course, if your tastes exactly match those of the previous owner that did the complete makeover, congratulations, you’ve found your dream home.

      1
  30. This gorgeous Gothic Revival just recently went on sale in King Ferry, NY, which is about 20 miles north of Ithaca in the heart of dairy farm country and a quick drive from Wells College and MacKenzie-Childs Pottery. The build date says 1830 which seems early for this type of architecture; however, there may be an older frame underneath, as many of the Victorian houses in our area are built around earlier federal-era houses or even 18th century log cabins.

    https://www.howardhanna.com/Property/Detail/8847-State-Route-90-N-N-Genoa-NY-13081/RochesterNY/R1237866

    1
  31. CoraCora says: 2059 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1895. Has had some updating but still worth a share. Beautiful floors, and a historic photo included. $472K

    Sun Prairie, WI:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6502-County-Road-Vv-Sun-Prairie-WI-53590/2081724477_zpid/

    2
  32. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5471 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Not very often do I find a Texas house I feel is worthy of showing but this nice towered Queen Anne in the town of Hubbard, Texas appears to fill the bill: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/200-NW-4th-St_Hubbard_TX_76648_M79139-26456?ex=TX2855911187&view=qv From c. 1900 and priced at $300,000. Three bedrooms, two baths, with lovely landscaping. Hubbard is about 72 miles due south of Dallas in an area where late 19th and early 20th century homes can still be found in the smaller towns. Country music legend Willie Nelson is from nearby Abbott, about 21 miles away. Here’s the streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/SsbSYrEWwDewFGTHA I suspect this is a plan book design but I do not immediately recognize the design source. The house is tastefully decorated with period antiques providing an air of authenticity.

    2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Very nice John, thank you!

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      beautiful! love that 2nd story porch, i like the paint scheme, and great features inside!

    • tcmchickietcmchickie says: 152 comments
      OHD Supporter

      TX

      South of Dallas Fort Worth has some amazing houses! I live about an hour north of Hubbard and the big houses here were built in the boom era of cotton (1870-1920). But then the great depression hit, cotton became less desirable, and people moved away to bigger cities for better paying jobs, and the land these houses were built on didn’t have the kind of value that property closer to big towns had and the old houses were saved from the wrecking ball simply by being out in the sticks. We even have a G.F.Barber here (unmistakable painted bright pink with white trim!) I have a folder in my Facebook pictures of the houses that are in my little town of population 30,000-ish: https://www.facebook.com/cbrowncoyne/media_set?set=a.450486926116&type=3 (one of the pics is the local library and I think it’s labeled as such)

  33. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    This is what I am watching tonight, Saving Brinton, about the early origins of film. What does this have to do with old house dreams? It is about preservation and about people and society long gone and those that brought the houses and a small town in Iowa alive.

    http://brintonfilm.com/

    2
  34. GardenStaterGardenStater says: 255 comments
    1865 Gothic Revival
    Charlotte, NC

    I don’t normally post links, but I just came across this place. Holy smokes, is it gorgeous!
    1900 Victorian (Queen Anne? Not sure) in Richmond, IN. Only $134,900.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2035-E-Main-St_Richmond_IN_47374_M36908-21556?ex=IN2800916587&view=qv

    3
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1171 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      nice! love the lincrusta’d half-landing with a bench!

      2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5471 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Richmond, IN is not particularly known as a hotbed of preservation trades but in the most recent issue of Indiana Preservation (Nov./Dec. by Indiana Landmarks) the owner-restorer of this house was highlighted in an article and cited as a bona fide preservation contractor specialist. I think that he would frequently concur with those here who take a purist approach to old house restoration and that is largely reflected in this house.

      I personally like Richmond and have a good friend there who lives in a historic home he is patiently restoring. I could even see myself and my spouse living there but the town is not without its problems. What Richmond needs the most are preservation minded people to come and put down roots in this old town which has a rich history and still retains some great period architecture. Real estate prices are still depressed in some areas and neglected ratty rentals may be sitting right next to a landmark quality home. I fault the City government for lax rental property ordinance enforcement but if you’re interested, please visit the small city and form your own impressions. Some small but positive changes could result in great improvements. If Richmond ever gets its proverbial act together, real estate values can only go up. Here’s a sample album of Richmond photos I took with some from this past September: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157683331173794

      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/35019014484/in/album-72157683331173794/
        John this is so sad, it looks like the house ran into the side of the building. I do not think I can un-see that. Smile, your words, as always add so very much to the conversation.

        1
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5471 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          Kimberly, It’s obvious the commercial building owners wanted to create some architectural “drama” and went to some amount of trouble to create this result. I’m not sure how the building inspectors allowed it to go forward but for some reason, they did. Theoretically, if someday the building owner wished to, he or she could could deconstruct the commercial building from around the c. 1880 house and restore the house to a semblance of what it may have once been. However, given how many period homes in Richmond await caring new owners, this very odd combination of old and new is likely to remain for the foreseeable future.

          • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1710 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1936 Cabin

            That is interesting hearing your take on it. My thought was something else, something like a lovely old art deco building with neat tile inlay in between brick with a false mansard roof attached to the front elevation along with fake siding (an unfortunate thoughtless update I have seen).

  35. This gorgeous 1860 fieldstone house is called Ingleside. It is about 3 miles from Aurora NY and overlooks Cayuga Lake. Bordered by farmland on 3 sides. The real estate listing has some fascinating historical information. I would dearly love to tour it, I keep hoping they’ll do an open house! We have a lot of fieldstone houses around here as well as cobblestone and brick. There are several houses of this material within about a 3 mile radius on the same road as this house, because the quarry was local and indeed is still visible in the winter (it’s now part of Quarry Ridge Winery).

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3602-State-Route-90-Aurora-NY-13026/30044202_zpid/

    1

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