November 1, 2019: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

Added to OHD on 11/1/19 - Last OHD Update: 11/8/19 - 94 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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1) Include the city, state if it doesn't already show in the link. Also include the build date and price. A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful.
2) No tiny URL's. Link to the agents site or a listing site (Redfin, Realtor, Zillow, etc.) No sites that you have to sign in to view the listing.
3) Paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML knowledge needed. :)

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Special thanks to this month's OHD Supporters!
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Red Brick Road Farm
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In memory of John Foreman
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Polyanthus
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And those who have chosen not to be named. Thanks to all!

94 Comments on November 1, 2019: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Super thanks to the OHD Supporters! If you expected to see your name, you have to give me permission. 🙂 Just shoot me an email.

    If you are not a Supporter yet, become one! link. The “extras” are getting your name in the shout out each month, your comment tagged/highlighted, super secret posts and if you do $5/month, no ads. I don’t make a point of asking each link exchange but the link to the Supporter sign-up page is always in the right side bar or toward the bottom if you are on mobile. If you don’t want to do monthly, do yearly or whatever donation you’d like to give. The Supporters are the group of folks that help keep OHD running, seriously have saved my bacon each month when it comes to paying all the costs associated with OHD. The handy new profiles, photo albums, private messaging is one big Supporter gift to everyone that uses it.

    Today’s old house still stands. Link to listing photos. I posted it at one point, not sure why I removed it.

    I had to enable a reCAPTCHA because the site was getting a ridiculous number of spam bot registrations. When you are logging in you’ll see a “I’m not a robot.” checkbox. You have to click that checkbox when logging in, sometimes it’ll even make you go a step extra by checking all the cars, buses or whatever it auto asks for you to click on. If you get a login error, be sure you’ve checked the “I’m not a robot” box.

    The Overseas site is…well, I keep saying not dead but I’ve not posted there in over a month. I’ve lost my “oomph” for it, went missing through my burnout phase. I keep thinking it’ll pop it’s head back out but so far, nope. I’ve tossed the idea that maybe bringing back international posts as Supporter only posts on the regular OHD, thoughts? Edit: I’m moving oversea posts back to OHD although the majority will be Secret Supporter posts, maybe on occasion a public post.

    And one last thing… I’m killing the price reduction posts. The open house one is easy but the price reduction posts are a pain in my pinky toe and the views they get don’t justify the time spent on them. Open house posts will continue each Friday, no more price reduction posts. But I will try to add those homes to the “Featured Homes” slider on the front page.

    That’s all, carry on! 🙂

    Edit, not all: I’m going to (re?) go through the state listings as far back as available (I do this about once a year) so if you see lots of posts from the same state in a day, that’s why.

    6
  2. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 119 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    On the small chance you need to know how the top 1% live in high-end antique homes, I present you with this 1825 (or 1840?) 6100-square-foot home in Leesburg, VA: ten bedrooms, six baths for $3.5 million. Not much description in the listing, but the 100+ photos show an exceptional property. I am guessing one of the outbuildings might be for a full-time gardener or housekeeper? And as an aside, this property might be the most unusually shaped 1.4-acre lot on the market today.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/205-N-King-St-Leesburg-VA-20176/12412442_zpid/

    8
  3. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1046 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1880 Kansas vernacular
    Built of regionally-coveted native stone (but covered in stucco)
    Russell, Kansas
    $75,000

    This modest house is typical of many which were built when the central part of the state was first settled. Though recently updated, this house is fortunate to still retain its original floor plan, back-banded window and door casings, four-panel doors and hardware. Not shown is a staircase with winders. The kitchen is from the 1920’s! Half a block from downtown Russell.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/238-E-8th-St-Russell-KS-67665/91266277_zpid/

    7
    • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Oh my! I would love to curl up on those deep, deep window sills and watch the world go by. Though it would drive me crazy not knowing what’s in the cupboard that got sealed off by the cabinet with the fabulous sink. Great find!

      2
      • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1046 comments
        OHD Supporter

        No need to go crazy… the cupboard by the sink replaces an earlier stairwell to the basement. The deep, deep, window sills are both people- and cat-friendly! I lived here in the 90’s though it looked a lot different then… my colors were dark and brooding and the kitchen still retained its 1930’s linoleum floor. I loved this house; I regret selling it.

        11
        • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Thank you for setting my mind at ease regarding that cabinet! I had all sorts of skeletons crawling around in there. Halloween on the brain I guess. That must have been a hard house to leave–how wonderful to have had the chance to be a part of its history.

          2
        • MJGMJG says: 2265 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          I feel your pain Architectural Observer. I too regret walking from my Queen Anne built in 1887. Was a messy breakup but it was for the best at the time. Finding one again in that sort of condition in my state is proving difficult.

          Many CT homes are “colonialized”. Sided white with inappropriate black plastic shutters and that stupid looking black Colonial eagle nailed in the eaves or over the front door. I hate it. I went into beautiful Queen Anne home recently built in 1879 that the interior woodwork was sanded down and pitted on purpose to make it look rustic. The beautiful Eastlake staircase too. Sanded down is ok because it can be varnished again but the pitting from what appeared to be a bee bee gun left me nauseated because that type of effect is damage to the wood.

          To make matters worse they sawed several of the doors in half to make Dutch doors and replaced all of the Eastlake hardware with black colonial iron. I think the worse part of it alll was that it was all in pristine shape before the lovers of colonial country came in with their burlap curtains and cheap stencil swags.

          10
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Nice to see an early house from places that are often underrepresented here and that I know little about. The steer head lintels are a nice touch too! Thanks for showing it.

      2
    • ddbackerddbacker says: 485 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1971 Uninspired split-level
      Prairie Village, KS

      Russell has an old-fashioned A&W drive-in and is famously the hometown of Bob Dole. What a handsome house. Question for you, A.O. If this was yours, would you keep the stucco or remove it and reveal the limestone? It looks like the stucco was nicely done so I don’t think you could go wrong either way.

      3
  4. CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Easton, PA–1910 Pennsylvania Colonial Revival in stone designed by Horace Trumbauer. The kind of house Margaret Dumont would have lived in 72 miles from Times Square priced at $345,000:

    https://www.longandfoster.com/homes-for-sale/204-N-13TH-Street-Easton-PA-18042-283535193

    6
  5. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings All, power outages in the northeast have left my day rather congested, but I still want to share a few houses:

    1902, Bronxville, NY, 2,875,000
    Virtute Et Industria!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7-Valley-Rd-Bronxville-NY-10708/69553159_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=f639a854-7693-489e-9359-f28c0406da10~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1930, Brooklyn, NY, 3,900,00
    This one is a hoot on the exterior
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/276-Dover-St-Brooklyn-NY-11235/30790886_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=afe948af-4d64-49ea-9b9c-0323e110db0b~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1912, Aberdeen, WA, 539,000
    Wicked cool exterior!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/400-W-8th-St-Aberdeen-WA-98520/55048214_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=32c6b0f8-51fa-4ead-b398-f76e1c9c775e~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1910, Westfield, NC, 55,000
    AND they let us see ONE interior shot of the house AND the barn
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4579-Nc-Highway-89-W-Westfield-NC-27053/2082184294_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=4b1306e4-f35b-4255-8891-9bc0f6be7316~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1841, Eufaula, AL, 250,000
    Beautiful old plantation house
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2383-Springhill-Rd-Eufaula-AL-36027/2091973658_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=3816c0b1-c21f-4767-92c8-16ff8a4c8390~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1925, Farmington, ME, 159,900
    Diamond payne windows and built-ins in a modest home
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/122-Stewart-Ave-Farmington-ME-04938/84959306_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=102fab99-3161-4ddb-b86a-a7aa3cec4ac3~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1780, Alstead, NH, 439,000
    24 acres and a nice old home
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/218-Homestead-Rd-Alstead-NH-03602/120332421_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=b8ece069-02f5-4955-abed-3e7d8c9d7da7~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1913, Oyster Bay, NY, 1,650,000
    fireplaces
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/80-Cove-Rd-Oyster-Bay-NY-11771/31160842_zpid/

    1914, Oyster Bay, NY, 649,000
    Interesting Eastlake/Aesthetic style wookwork
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/15-Locust-Ln-Oyster-Bay-NY-11771/31157289_zpid/?

    1927, Baltimore, MD, 589,000
    Stone Georgian Revival
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4303-Rugby-Rd-Baltimore-MD-21210/36590232_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-hdp&rtoken=3b256e4a-cfda-4f91-96c7-75fc6fa83952~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    Cheers!

    5
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Kimberly, you embraced the weird side this week!

      That Brooklyn house, shakes head. Few do gaudy as well as Brooklyn has, and for so long! We turn up our noses to you Long Island come latelys! I can say this because I have deep roots there, lol. The 1913 Oyster Bay is trying for the weird coolness of the St. Augustine house from last week, and missing the mark, in my humble opinion. What the heck, Aberdeen? Strange proportions, but the more I look at it, it’s growing on me. The Baltimore house reminds me of a college friend’s neighborhood. There were just scads of well preserved early 20th-century neighborhoods all OVER like that we used to walk around and smoke many Parliaments while discussing important LIFE events! Not exactly, The Wire.

      2
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        Great comments DWR! At this hour, we are still without power at home. We’ve got lots of candle action and the woodstove going. The Brooklyn is actually reminding me of the other weird LI I shared a few weeks ago. I am curious about this area. Oyster Bay is where my husband hails from. Ha! I like the Parliament remark, you obviously had a sophisticated period.

        2
        • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
          1930 carriage house
          Bethlehem, CT

          Thanks, Kimberly. It was one heck of a storm last night. As much as I love a stormy night, that was not one that was gonna allow that much sleep. Catdog was howling and would not settle down. I think we only lost power for about 4 or 5 hours. It’s the worst feeling. Hang in there. Remember that storm a few days before Halloween about 5 years back? We were without power for 12 days. I thought I was going to strangle every family member that came near me.

          The abandoned Brookhaven one, you mean? Long Island can be lovely and horrible at the same time. Like many places. Oyster Bay I always thought was kinda fancy, but I really can’t say I know it. My step-grandmother had a place in Setauket (Poquott) a little further, mid-north shore. Kinda wish we had held on to that. Nice village feel still. If you are traveling into Manhattan every day, I’d rather be in Westchester, but LI has a lot to like, especially being on the water. That does make up for a lot.

          I’m terribly sophistimacated. You, of course, picked that up from my tone and what I thought of as fancy cigarettes back in the day, yes? Lol. I was gonna say Gauloises, but those were for when we were REALLY trying to impress others.

          2
          • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1936 Cabin

            For NYC commuting my grandfather had the Tuckahoe station the same I used when there for spring break. It was down the hill from there house. I miss that connection and them.

    • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      GoodLordKimberly does it again! Awesome and fun!

      1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2261 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Okay, my faves of the batch… I’d happily take either the 1913 Oyster Bay house, or else the 1927 Baltimore. The exterior of this particular 1913 Shingle doesn’t do anything for me, but its interior is cool! And the 1927 stone Colonial is right up my alley, inside & out!

      2
  6. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    Ridiculously windy afternoon to you all, I am happy to report that the power is back! On to this week’s new stuff on the market in the Connecticut Hills and beyond!

    Our first is an 1886 Gothic/Stick former church in Torrington, Ct for the bargain price of $62,700. As it’s a foreclosure it’s going to need a little love. I see so much to like, the very light-handed stained glass, those enormous pocket doors! It appears that it had been a performance venue for the last 10 years or so, and boy do I wish I had known about it, I would have been down there to listen to music in one of those wing chairs. Click on the pictures in the second link to see what was happening here in a former life.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/59-Barber-St_Torrington_CT_06790_M38040-88226

    https://www.yelp.com/biz/studio-59-torrington

    Now, this is an interesting 1963 built contemporary in Oxford, Ct listed for $450k. This is another stick with me, and I’ll tell you why I’m showing it. It’s beautifully sited on over 45 acres in an excellent commuting location. This awesome hip roofed ranch was built and designed by the owner, a carpenter, and his family is now selling. It is an extravaganza of wood, stone, and brick with count ’em, 5 fireplaces! Though he seemingly wasn’t formally trained he had an incredible eye. Unfortunately, it didn’t seem to extend to windows. I wonder if it’s the case of, few extra from this job a few extra from that job. No matter, the house needs some gentle guidance, but the bones are all here. If I had all the money in the world, I’d go black steel casements and open up those sliders in the living room to the ceiling. I feel like some liberty could be taken with the baths and kitchen because they weren’t really the focus here. Sand and oil the wood, clean the stone and brick and you have something unique. The enormous barn with car lift and pond are pretty great features too.

    The house reminds me of a very humble version of Dorothy Rodger’s book “The House In My Head” which is a fascinating read for anyone interested in a house memoir.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/103-Maple-Tree-Hill-Rd_Oxford_CT_06478_M42341-16442

    Moving on—I am going to share a real fixer-upper with you, so purists, skip this one. I looked at it last week in open-mouthed horror when I saw the first listing picture. At its core is a 1760 Colonial and this is listed for $225k in Newtown, Ct.

    I circled back around because it’s nigh impossible to find this combination of size, acreage and a Fairfield County location at this price. There’s so much to work with here I see. Those awning windows at the back are the first thing to go. Someone with a little vision could do some magic here. Even that suburban kitchen could be fine with a make-under. A proper restoration won’t ever happen, but a comfortable house is all here. And then come the pictures of a bridge over a stream to a very special barn. I’ve been having barn envy along with wallpaper envy as of late.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/96-Taunton-Hill-Rd_Newtown_CT_06470_M35052-81951

    Sweet little 1925 Tudor Revival cottage in Bethel Ct, listed for $333k. Much like the one I posted a few weeks back, So much happening on the outside, the inside lacks a bit. Besides the outside, the most interesting thing is that cool basement fireplace. I see poker games and Prohibition hooch.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1-Fleetwood-Ave_Bethel_CT_06801_M34786-64865

    A 1924 Colonial Revival is a bit unusual with its asymmetry. A very handsome porte-cochere and other details. A friend bought this place with big intentions, but life lead him elsewhere. I was told that the front entrance into the office off the main road was done especially for the lawyer who had the place built. This is Watertown, Ct and listed for $389k.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/96-Middlebury-Rd_Watertown_CT_06795_M35520-85070

    A !750 Half Cape with additions in Warren, Ct listed for $185k. While someone got a little too happy with the white paint inside, I was happy to see a wood roof go on this house a few years back. Rare to see at this price.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/37-Cornwall-Rd_Warren_CT_06754_M38229-93431

    A 1922 Stone house with an interesting pent roof detail. Copper shingles, people. This was someone’s expensive yet rustic low-key country escape, in New Hartford, Ct listed for $799k. I was puzzled at first by some of the pictures. Digital renderings are a new thing in this market, and boy oh boy, I hope whoever buys this place doesn’t follow the agent’s suggestions. I like the kitchen renovations, but the baths are just a little too much. The Franklin stove in the attic has a few stories, I’d guess.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/295-Stub-Hollow-Rd_New-Hartford_CT_06057_M45302-10559

    Lastly is this 1903 towered Queen Anne in North Salem, Ny listed for 1.4 million. It’s been not overdone, which is hard to find in the area, but their asking price is…ambitious. Especially considering the picture windows you’ll want to rethink. But it is a pretty house with the original carriage house. Lots could be done here.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/116-Titicus-Rd_North-Salem_NY_10560_M30948-95602

    4
  7. prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1933 Tudor Revival condo in Skokie, IL $249,000

    Coved ceilings in the main area, some arched doorways and built-in bookcases, cool entryway floor, and a few lovely art glass windows.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8037-Kenton-Ave-1S-Skokie-IL-60076/3537095_zpid/?

    1
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      If you squint, I think a lot of this could be worked with. WHAT THE HECK happened to that fireplace? You can’t just paint over rock, people. No sneering, but that grasscloth is back. I like it, and it seems cheap.

      • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Ha, I know! It’s like they just wanted to gaze at the nice rectangular hole without any of that fussy mantel business going on. At least they didn’t rip it out–someone with much dedication should be able to restore it to being.

  8. RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Hey everybody! 🙂

    I’ve been thinking about mentioning this for a good long while now, and have decided it’s long past time to address this little issue; and it really is trivial. So here’s the thing: My name is Jeffrey, (legally, baptized and confirmed), always heretofore referred to as “Jeff”, as you do. However, for the past 4.5 years-ish I’ve been introducing myself as, and responding to, the name “Jay”, (actually spelled J., but made easier for the incredulous by the more phonetic “Jay”). The reason for doing that was an accommodation to my dude, who had a very, VERY bad “Jeff” in his life previously; so much so that he refused to ever utter the name, regardless of the person referred to. Heheheh. He’s a Millennial, so go figure. Anyway, once we hooked up permanent, I decided to make the switch. I’m still Jeffrey, which I don’t mind; but ixnay on the effJ. Now – my family and those from way, way back – still call me Jeff, and I let it slide; but otherwise I am insistent on Jay if not Jeffrey. I never liked being called Jeff anyway; and my favorite color is blue – so. 😉 I guess it’s just been a bit awkward for me for awhile since some of y’all have known me as Jeff for years; and switching might seem a little weird. We’ll shit, I am a little weird, (as many of you already know 😉 ), so what the hay. I’m still with my dude, and that’s not likely to change: and besides, as mentioned, I like being called J.. 🙂

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/d7/0f/f5/d70ff5f7560e5f4e23ee47db5afa43c4.jpg

    Aneehoo. Now for the good stuff! One of the folks I subscribe to on Flickr has very recently uploaded a gob of pix of this great big old house / B&B he stayed at recently which is in an astounding state of preserve, containing a whole host of rad bits to see. He’s a nut for fixtures; fittings; plumbing; and 19th century tech – n such; like moi. So if you want to see some great plumbing and bits – check out his gallery!

    https://flic.kr/s/aHsmHZpTV9

    Cheers everybody! Jay 🙂

    12
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Oops, I’ve called you Jeff since I can remember! Ok then, Jay! 🙂

      1
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Well Heya, Jay! And here all this time, I’ve just been calling you Rosewater. I’m Don, by the way. When I first signed up I was listed that way, but when things shifted I don’t know what happened. Anyway, I don’t believe I’ve ever seen quartersawn Southern yellow pine. It might be fun to try and duplicate with a faux finish on something. I wonder if in many ways industrial design reached it’s zenith a 100 years back. So many rabbit holes to fall down through.

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Heya, Don! I’ve never tried faux bois; but it looks like fun, (if tedious and time consuming). All of the original pine doors and trim in my house were either treated thusly; or just very, very, poorly stained. Either way, I won’t be attempting to replicate that mess. Heheheh. 19th century tech is my most favorite aspect of old houses; and that place in Hannibal, MO seems to be loaded with it. Would love to see that place. Cheers!

        1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Jay, many thanks for the proper name. I’m not sure when I first ran across your name but now I know and will honor Jay as I properly should. I still love all the wonderful stuff you find and share no mater what your name is. Take care.

      BTW, I think that Classical Revival house could be a George F. Barber design. No matter, it is super well preserved inside. Thanks, for sharing, Jay!

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        John, you are an absolute treasure. You also qualify for the call me whatever you want club. Speaking of sharing great stuff; I look forward to going through your most recent Flickr uploads. I’ve been absolutely consumed with finishing my latest projects here at home; most especially the middle bedroom where there is a giant hole in the ceiling, and it’s heating season! D’oh! Hoping to get that finished this weekend. Heheheh.

        IF YOU HAVE NEVER VISITED JOHN’S VAST COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL PHOTOS OF ANTIQUE BUILDINGS FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTRY – DO NOT MISS IT!

        https://flic.kr/ps/aVUfg

        2
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          Jay, I’m deeply humbled. I’m steadily adding photos from my September trip to five Midwestern states in 8 days..yeah, pretty crazy, I know. But unless we find a way to sell our Texas home (trying for 12 years and counting!) that was our final road trip. I just edited the Carthage IL photos today and I’m trying to finish up the Keokuk Iowa photo titles and narratives. Be sure to click on the photos for expanded size. I have a large volume of Galesburg, IL photos-there’s some very impressive architecture in that town, Stay tuned, and my sincere thanks for the kind words.

    • Randy CRandy C says: 428 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2015 Reverse Ranch 1/2
      Olathe, KS

      Wow, Jay. Thanks for posting these. I’ve never seen such a complete collection of originally preserved items in one house before. This place is a treasure. I go to Hannibal every fall with my Chevelle Club to support their annual show. I will definitely look this place up next fall and hope they will let me in to view the common areas and maybe any “un-occupied” rooms they have at the time. Hell, I might even just book a room since I’ll be staying at least one night anyway. I would love to see this in person. Thanks again and a shout out to your other half. Good thing he didn’t run the other way when he met you, Jeffrey!

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        I say book the room, Randy! That’s the kind of place I’d pay a premium to stay in if they’ll let me poke around the attics, basement, and barns. 19th century tech is my favorite aspect of old houses; and those are the best places to find it; and THAT is just the sort of house likely loaded with gobs of unseen goodies.

        **** For lovers of the details, fancy and otherwise: if you haven’t already found “Big Old Houses” = DON’T MISS IT!!

        START HERE = http://bigoldhouses.blogspot.com/

        Toward the end = http://bigoldhouses.com/

        1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Jay, that flicker post, I had a big grin on my mug the whole way thru!
      TY

      1
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1197 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Well, Jay, I am glad you took the time to set the record straight. In reading and responding to your posts, I’ve also always thought of you as “Jeff”, although couldn’t recall why, so am glad to be avoiding future blunders…

      Now, as far as that incredible B&B, I’m about speechless – even on this site, it is so rare to find such an assemblage of unique and original details! Of everything I’m lusting after, those gorgeous thermostats top the list. Thank you, JAY. : )

      1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2261 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      J or Jay (or *maybe* Jeffrey) – Thanks for the explanation & backstory. But have to admit I was a tad confused as to how & why your favorite color being blue tied in with being called J/Jay – seemed like a non sequitur to me, until… I opened the link to see the gorgeous… ta-da, now it makes perfect sense! – blue jay. Good mnemonic device.👍🏼 As to J itself being used as a first name, no prob IMO; hey, while teaching (I’m retired) I knew of a child whose first name was Z. Just Z. (At least it was easy for him to spell as a little kid, and as an adult makes signing checks, for credit, or any paperwork easier/shorter.😉)
      Tangentially, going back to the blue jay… There’s a hedge between my backyard & one of my NDNs; in the winter if that hedge is snow covered, and if a blue jay and a male cardinal both happen to be perched in the hedge… so pretty, with their bright, saturated colors contrasted against the snowy hedge.

  9. JakeJake says: 19 comments
    1951 Ranch
    MO

    Hi Jay- My dad is a Joseph Wayne and goes by J. Wayne. He can’t stand it when people call him Jay! LOL! The Rockcliffe album is fabulous. Many years ago I lived in Hannibal and when the mansion was still a tourist attraction, I spent many hours in there learning all I could about the house. It has a very interesting and sad history. The home was built and the husband died shortly after completion. The window wouldn’t live in the house after his passing. She had another home on the property rolled (house loaded on logs and rolled) and placed next to the big home. The mansion sat just as she left it for many years thus preserving all of it’s magnificent period fixtures. You should go see it, it’s incredible!

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wow. Super cool history on that one. Thanks’ Jake! Your dad sounds like a righteous dude BTW. Wish my dad had a sense of humor. Heheheh. 😉

      I linked to this place recently, but in case you missed it; check out “Ravenswood”, another remarkably well preserved, top-shelf, house filled with gobs of rad stuff:

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/rinabobina/sets/72157605343744374/
      Google it for the 411, if interested. It’s a very interesting story.

      Cheers! J

      1
      • SharonSharon says: 603 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 Contemporary
        Sedalia, MO

        I’ve been admiring Ravenswood photos for years. Up the highway from us. Sad that they don’t do tours anymore. My picks from the pix are the Art Nouveau bust on the mantle and the Arts and Crafts light fixture above the kitchen table. Treasures for sure.

      • JakeJake says: 19 comments
        1951 Ranch
        MO

        Ravens wood is fab !!! My dad has always had a great sense of humor and is a very cool dude. He just turned 84 and still works full time just bc he loved to work! Sorry your Dad isn’t the same! I’ll loan you mine if you ever need 🤓

  10. JakeJake says: 19 comments
    1951 Ranch
    MO

    P.S. First post should have said WIDOW not window and forgot to say that Rockliffe sits high on a bluff that overlooks the Mississippi River. Fabulous views from the balcony of the house off the master bedroom.

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      I had more time this morning to look at the Rockcliffe Mansion photos. There’s a fairly extensive write up about the 1898 mansion on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockcliffe_Mansion In reviewing the photos, I noticed two pieces of furniture-a settee and a chair that I’m 99% sure are by NYC maker George Hunzinger in photos 3962 and 3961. The exotic Moorish mantel on page two of the photos is one of a kind and likely the product of a famed designer/maker. There’s also a massive ebonized bed (photo is blurry) that I believe could be by NYC’s Herter Bros. firm. The bathroom articles and fixtures were the best money could buy at that time. All in all, Rockcliffe represents the pinnacle of luxury at the end of the 19th century and undoubtedly the mansion outshined all other residences in the town when it was completed. It was pleasing to learn that the family continued to live in the grand mansion until the 1920’s so there were probably many happy times there. If I’m ever in the Hannibal area again, I’ll have to take a first hand look at Rockcliffe myself. Thanks for sharing the photo link.

      1
  11. Anne M.Anne M. says: 951 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    A few from Massachusetts & a few from Vermont today:
    1890 Colonial Revival in Haverhill, MA for $489,900 – dining room & light fixtures are definitely worth a look:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/289-Mill-St-Haverhill-MA-01830/56050502_zpid/
    1721 Cape in Scituate, MA for $430,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/52-Old-Oaken-Bucket-Rd-Scituate-MA-02066/57226536_zpid/
    1913 3-family in Worcester, MA for $350,000 photos must all be from the first floor:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/20-Stoneland-Rd-Worcester-MA-01603/56733583_zpid/
    1885 Queen Anne in Poultney, VT for $109,900 – gorgeous exterior, just needs paint!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/291-Bentley-Ave-Poultney-VT-05764/75454876_zpid/
    1850 Stone Gothic Revival in Cavendish, VT for $368,000 – modern interior, the exterior is worth sharing! pictures of the house in winter and summer:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/126-High-St-Cavendish-VT-05142/303987477_zpid/
    This one was a supporter post a while ago, thought I’d post because the price has been reduced $1.7 million!!! 1843 Greek Revival in Orwell, VT with 236 acres for $1.2 million
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/183-22a-Rte-Orwell-VT-05760/2082220677_zpid/
    Have a nice weekend, everyone! Happy dreaming!

    6
    • MJGMJG says: 2265 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Nice collection. I do love the 1885 house in Vermont. Though a some of the rooms inside have been changed ripping out the original doors and wood. Sad face.

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        The Queen Anne in Poultney, Vermont, has been featured here before. (private post from May 2014 so I cannot link to it) Therefore, I assume it has not changed too drastically. The staircase is a work of art. But Poultney is remote and has a population of only 3,339. It was home to Green Mountain College, a private liberal arts college that closed in 2019. Nonetheless, the exterior of the house is about as ornate as one could find and if picked out in period colors would be a outrageous display of lavish Victorian exterior ornament. One good thing for potential buyers is a steady decline in the asking price. Thanks for sharing, Anne.

        3
  12. 1910 Home in Tonawanda NY. Tonawanda is located along the Niagara River between Buffalo and Niagara falls NY.

    This home features the original windows, including a leaded glass stained glass window in the living room. Hardwood floors in Living Room and Dining room feature a darker inlay.

    View is from the 2nd Fl patio.

    https://www.colleencollier.com/ListingDetails/257-Niagara-Street-Tonawanda-City-NY-14150/B1222210

    2
  13. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 1009 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    We were looking at used appliances and noticed Heartland is discontinuing their appliances. Anyone else hear about this?

    https://www.heartlandapp.com/

  14. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    We picked up a Heartland stove tonight, maybe someone can help us figure out what these hook things are on the side. It’s the left side of the stove, where the hood thing sits on top of the stove itself. Excuse the ick, not cleaned it yet (bought it used.) It’s only on the left side (left looking at it), they are not on the right at all.

  15. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    I guess it all depends on how “authentic” you want a new/old style kitchen to be. In the current (Dec. 2019) Old House Journal, there’s an extensive article about a kitchen in the home of a vintage reproduction wallpaper designer (www.trustworth.com) living in a c. 1910 Shingle/Colonial in Plymouth, MA. His goal was to recreate a c. 1910 kitchen using original pre-WWII appliances where possible. The wallpapers are antique in style as well. The kitchen is period perfect yet doesn’t lack for anything in appliances or amenities. One Appliance source cited is Antique Appliances in Clayton, Georgia: https://www.antiqueappliances.com/ There’s probably a niche market for reproduction antique style appliances but the start up costs for such a venture are likely formidable.

    It’s a given that the resources for restorable antique appliances is decidedly finite. Folks follow trends and there was a lot of pent up demand during the WWI years. When appliance makers switched from making armaments during the War years to domestic appliance production, everyone had to have the shiny new enameled refrigerators, ranges, and dishwashers. For a few years, I bet one could pick up antique appliances from the pre-WWII years for almost nothing if you could beat the scrap metal dealers to them first. Now, those coveted post War appliances are pretty scarce and considered antiques in their own right.

    I’m somewhat ambivalent about trying to recreate a period perfect looking kitchen. (first, its downright expensive) I do lean towards recapturing the flavor of period kitchens where its practical. Period looking cabinets can go a long way towards the right look for the period you are trying to recreate. Same for the plumbing fixtures and hardware. Wall papers recapture the flavor of the times and the aforementioned article cites some examples. Bradbury x 2 has recently come out with some 1950’s and early ’60’s inspired wallpapers so there’s a fair amount of resources available for making your kitchen reflect the period you’re aiming for. In the cited wallpaper designer article, much of the period atmosphere comes from the use of period utensils, glass articles like bowls, cups, and plates as well as select kitchen antiques like old flour, sugar, or coffee tins. All it really takes is a good understanding of the period you’re trying to recreate and some creativity. A real Federal or Colonial Period home would obviously not have any period references for period kitchens but still the look of the period can be carried into the kitchen. Modern appliances can be covered up or clad in wood with period appropriate looking hardware.

    Professional vintage kitchen designer Carla Pearlstein in Portland, OR, turned her personal project in recreating a 1860’s Italianate flavored kitchen into a career: https://www.oldhouseonline.com/kitchens-and-baths-articles/period-perfect-victorian-kitchen Here’s her professional website: https://www.restoringhistory.com/

    3
  16. 67drake67drake says: 284 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    $135,000 in Shullsburg Wisconsin. Listed build date is 1949. Looks more like around 1900.
    Shullsburg is one of those old small towns in the middle of nowhere, but have done a decent job of keeping their little downtown area up and running, instead of empty storefronts like in many other towns.
    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Shullsburg/135-W-Water-St-53586/home/88738551

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      I think you’re spot-on about the construction period. The newel post, windows, and door casings are characteristic of the period between 1900 and 1910. No moldings or trim that were being used in the 1940’s (a slack period for American house construction especially during the War years) looked like the materials seen here. It is possible, of course, that the house went through some major upgrades during the late 1940’s which could help explain the alleged date.

  17. CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Ripley, OH–‘Silver Point,’ an 1841-2 Greek Revival with a later Second Empire Mansard roof. Built for Samuel Hemphill, reputed to be the wealthiest man between Pittsburgh and Cincinnati, in this historic Ohio River port town. Priced at $175,000:

    https://www.redfin.com/OH/Ripley/402-Main-St-45167/home/63715219

    1
  18. CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Westfield,NY–Circa 1900 Adirondack Rustic on 55.4 acres priced at $129,550. The spectacular view overlooks the vineyards where some of the nation’s best Riesling and Pinot noir are grown and the sapphire-blue lake from an elevation of 1351 feet:

    https://www.redfin.com/NY/Westfield/6640-Mt-Baldy-Rd-14787/home/118010538

    1
  19. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1197 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    A bit late for a new share, but I just stumbled upon this two for one listing in Amenia, NY, which includes a seemingly untouched 1860 Italianate and a 1919 stone house. Both have separate systems on a 1.7 acre lot surrounded by stone walls and mature landscape, recently reduced from 395,000 to $299,000:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4879-Route-22-Amenia-NY-12501/83936772_zpid/

    Oh, bummer, looks like there’s an offer pending – but take a look anyway…

    2
  20. CoraCora says: 2060 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. Such a forlorn, but lovely lady. A little spit and polish – I think she could be stunning again. Still has the wood slat siding, and the windows appear to be original as well. Fingers crossed someone preservation-minded buys this one. $70K

    Gloster, MS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/455-E-Railroad-Ave-N-Gloster-MS-39638/2082930406_zpid/

    1
  21. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Not an especially prosperous looking community (downtown streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/72qB2wsCYdP97iRr6 ) The population trend has been in decline-in 1890, there were almost 1,300 residents now down to 960. Demographics-wise, it is a minority majority town but that is not uncommon in the deep South. One big plus (but not from an economic perspective) is that the railroad tracks that bisected the town have been taken up making what may have been a noisy location now quiet and with a nice open view. Should it be allowed, it would benefit the community to perhaps create lush flowery landscaping in the median where the old tracks used to run.

    As for the house, it’s a decent turn of the last century home, largely intact, that needs some TLC. Properly restored with added central air and heat it could be a very comfortable home again. The problem is attracting someone with adequate funds to a community in decline. All it takes is one inspired individual, a couple, or a family to lead by example and reverse the trend of decline. Even the downtown could be spruced up some and perhaps could be revitalized to some degree. There’s always hope, right? Thanks for sharing.

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