July 5, 2019: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

Added to OHD on 7/5/19 - Last OHD Update: 7/12/19 - 92 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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And those who have chosen not to be named. Thanks to all!

92 Comments on July 5, 2019: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12224 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Many thanks times over to the OHD Supporters. I’ve had a few new ones since last month, welcome to the OHD club! A couple of you haven’t responded to my email so your name may not show. If you’d like to be included in the monthly shout out, email me. 🙂 Or if you said no before and want to be included now, email me too! kelly@oldhousedreams.com

    I don’t think we’ll ever top last weeks old house photo. At least this one still stands in Beloit, Wisconsin. Built 1890 on 650 8th St. (Wisconsin Historical Society) The street view, this is the only side that we see the most of. The old postcard shown was mailed Nov. 1907. This has a minuscule look of a George F. Barber design but if not, got to be a planbook design because I’ve seen this multiple times.

    The children are not associated with the house photo. I don’t know their names, their expressions are so mature looking in a sad way.

    I’ve neglected book recommendations for a while. I don’t read a lot of house related books, history is where it’s at for me. Is anyone interested in those recommendations for a while? An example, The Radium Girls by Kate Moore. This is about the radium-dial factory girls, many fell ill while working at these factories, it’s horrifying what they went through. The author did an amazing job bringing these ladies back to life. I’m sure it’s at your local library (I recommend the Libby app if your library offers digital books) but it’s available on Kindle, audiobook, paper and hardback.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12224 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Need some help! I’m not sure how many were subscribed to this home so asking for the future owner here.

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/06/21/1856-west-point-ms/#comment-254811

      “I would love to have your readers ideas on new
      exterior colors and ideas on returning the interior to be
      more appropriate for time. I believe the original two room
      home from the 1850 era with a major overhaul in the late
      1800’s. The floor plan is similar to Hopkins floor
      plans”

      Answer here or there, I’ll give her the info/your comment whichever post you comment on.

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    • BethanyBethany says: 3466 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      I was just thinking that I needed a book recommendation to get on my phone for a plane ride coming up–thanks!

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    • hillhousehillhouse says: 90 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1899 Stick
      Bluefield, WV

      The Beloit house has some design similarities to Ross McTaggart’s carriage house at the Cross House.

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    • JimHJimH says: 5391 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The owners of the Beloit house were Edward Orville Powers (1873-1941) and his wife Nellie Sage. Ed was a mechanical engineer with a good job at Besly & Company, a toolmaking firm that still exists. Powers was transferred to Kansas City around 1912 but they moved back to Beloit and bought the brick house at #640, 2 doors down. Ed Powers died at work at age 67; Nellie lived to 89.

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12224 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Thank you!

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        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5547 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          1890 seems a bit early for a house with these minor “Colonial” details but I do feel it dates from the latter 1890’s to around 1905. I also have a hunch the design appeared in a published plan book (David Hopkins?) but do not have a specific design I can share. I have seen several versions of this design in my travels.

          The children are a completely different matter; they are dressed up in their “Sunday Best” for the picture taking. Very poignant and moving image as the stern faces suggest they may have had to take on far more responsibilities than children should at their age. Child labor laws were lax around the turn of the last century with very few job opportunities available for widows or mothers raising children as single parents. Survival required the children to contribute to their own welfare though work that today might be considered inhumane.

          The small boy (not certain about the gender) is barefoot showing soiled feet, makeshift knee breeches, and a lacy top more suitable for a young girl than a boy. The bare wood around the window seen in the background suggests poverty. Life was often perilous for children around the turn of the last century. This picture tells a societal story similar to the Dorthea Lange documentary images captured during the Great Depression 1930’s. Despite our great wealth as a country, poverty has always been a integral part of American society right up to the present day. Thanks for sharing this candid photo.

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          • roxxxroxxx says: 517 comments
            OHD Supporter

            poverty is world-wide and not limited to the United States by any means.

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            • CarebearCarebear says: 1210 comments
              OHD Supporter

              Unfortunately. I am not at the top of the heap, by any means, but I count myself damned lucky, that I have a job that allows me to pay my mortgage and car payment, that has a pension, has health benefits , a union, that I have been able to sock away a little something in mutual funds, IRA’s, and some little investments.

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          • CarebearCarebear says: 1210 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I know that the Victorians and Edwardians dressed their small boys and girls alike, but this is beyond that time. The boy’s hair is short, not long, as maybe his father or grandfather’s would have been, at the same age. He has bare feet, but his sisters don’t-hs clothes look like hand me downs, so why doesn’t he have his sisters’ hand me down shoes?
            When I first looked at this photo, I thought that the younger girl did not want to be dressed up, she wanted to have her play clothes on. The older girl wasn’t happy having her photo taken either, but she was putting up with it. The boy was wondering why he’d been told to hold still. The lack of shoes did strike me as odd. I thought that maybe he’d kicked them off.

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            • Sandy BSandy B says: 863 comments
              OHD Supporter

              2001 craftsman farmhouse
              Bainbridge Island, WA

              I played in bare feet much of my early childhood. It was a way of saving shoes, since we never had multiple pairs like kids do now….and they were always leather, not present day sneaker types. An active little boy may have been, “captured” at play….in play clothes…. and they were lucky to get him in a photo at all.

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            • JoeJoe says: 756 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1820 Federal
              Baltimore, MD

              My Aunt made matching dresses every year for her two daughters, born June 1955 and May 1958. She did it until the older sister was at least twelve. They wore them on holidays. The younger got her elder’s as a hand me down too! Dressing alike is typical with twins too.

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          • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1700 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
            NC

            They may be facing into the sun, which would make them frown. Maybe dressing up and posing wasn’t in their plans for the day. The youngest one — looks to me like a boy, though hard to be certain — was probably playing barefoot, which I still do at my ancient age; his/her feet don’t look extremely clean. I don’t think those dresses demonstrate poverty at all. They’re of somewhat delicate fabric, indicating other choices for everyday wear, and they’re white, so can be washed or replaced if too stained. The kids are all well fed & look healthy. Wherever they are standing is messy — could be anything from a house to a chicken coop, but to attribute poverty to it is a reach. Find a society without poverty and with opportunity and we can both move there!

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            • Sandy BSandy B says: 863 comments
              OHD Supporter

              2001 craftsman farmhouse
              Bainbridge Island, WA

              I agree with all you said Laurie, too easy to read too much into a photograph….especially that of children..!!

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              • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5547 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1897 Queen Anne Colonial
                Cadiz, OH

                Thanks to everyone for sharing alternate opinions of the kids in the shared photo. Since none of us really knows much beyond what we see in the photo, I believe that latitude for speculation should be allowed. Nothing I wrote was certain; and I suppose a faded and unpainted chicken coop could have been the backdrop rather than a home. I believed everything visible in the photo suggested they were not wealthy. Societal efforts to improve the lots of the poor and working class families at the turn of the last century were well publicized. Then, just as now, there were wide income disparities between wealthy and impoverished families.

                If my comments are too much of a bother to anyone I can only ask Kelly to delete them to maintain goodwill on these pages. My apologies. I’m thinking it might be wiser if I would limit my comments to architectural topics in the future.

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                • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1850 Italianate, classical
                  New Haven, CT

                  John–
                  I totally disagree with what you just suggested and for many reasons, three of which I’ll enumerate.
                  First, any old photograph like this that is presented with no concrete data is essentially a projective test, and the older or more distant it is to our place and our time, the more that gets projected or interpreted into it because it is so much more ambiguous than things that are culturally current to us in time and place. Everybody sees somewhat different things in this photo, and there are ultimately no right and no wrong answers because no one knows for sure anything about these kids. Everything presented by viewers is thus purely hypothetical according to what we see and how we interpret it. The girls may be wearing clothes borrowed from wealthier relatives to have their photos taken, for all we know, and that is why they seem so awkward. Maybe they are feeling ashamed of that fact. They may in fact be poor, be in borrowed clothes, but are well fed because they live on a farm and good food is one thing that there is plenty of. We don’t really know and we probably never will, so anyone’s hypothesis is just as valid as anyone else’s.
                  Second, we’re all here on this website because we are interested in history and all of us want to learn more about it. Possibly, by venturing your opinion, you learned something new based on the alternative interpretations you got back in reply. Maybe someone learned something new based on what you wrote. Whether your interpretations were shared by others is not as important as the fact that this is a forum where anyone can learn something new if they want to and are willing to take a risk in offering an opinion that others may see differently. I certainly don’t think that people here will start getting judgmental about other peoples’ thoughts as long as no one is being overtly, offensively and hostiley racist, sexist, homophobic, ageist, classist, etc. or just plain objectionable and obnoxious on purpose.
                  Finally, you contribute a tremendous amount to the knowledge that so many of us gain from since you so freely offer so much important and solidly-grounded information on this website. You of all people should not feel that you should have to watch what you say or hold back on offering an opinion on something that some other people just might feel differently about or see differently. This website and all its viewers would lose tremendously if you were left feeling that you had to inhibit or censor what you say here on OHD just because others might disagree with your interpretations on any matter that isn’t strictly architectural. Disagreeing with someone is what generates so much of the clarifying information on any topic that gets presented on this website. Anyone with an open mind and a true desire to learn would not want to see this website stifled by anyone fearing that they might offer an opinion that others may not agree with.

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                  • JodiSmithJodiSmith says: 35 comments
                    1952 Raised Ranch
                    Sioux City, IA

                    I’m not going to comment on social class for the picture of the children. I wanted to state that it is harder to hold a smile for the amount of time that it used to take for a picture than it is to not smile. (Ever notice how NOBODY smiles in old pictures?) If you look at the older girl’s hair, it is a little blurred. Possibly from the faintest of breezes blowing the lighter weight of her hair.

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                    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 1109 comments
                      Admin

                      1901 Folk Victorian
                      Chestatee, GA

                      By the year this photo was taken it didn’t require them standing still any longer than a few seconds if that.

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  2. CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Circa 1840 Greek Revival in Charlotte Center, New York, in the famously beautiful and unspoiled Chautauqua County countryside, for $22,900:

    https://www.watchforeclosure.com/foreclosed-homes/new-york/chautauqua/sinclairville/11804281/7011-rood-rd.html

    http://app.chautauquacounty.com/hist_struct/Charlotte/7011RoodRoadCharlotte.html

    …and one of those weirdly wonderful Ohio Italianates, circa 1860, in the historic lake port city of Sandusky (the city whose skyline is comprised of giant towering roller coasters) for $59,900:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/519-Huron_OH_44870_M46733-12052?ex=OH2435827434&view=qv

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5547 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Of the two houses, I’d probably take the Sandusky, Ohio Italianate because it still has many great period details. Chautauqua County (farmhouse) will require deep pockets and lots of reconstruction to resemble its original configuration. The path to rehabilitation should begin with a thorough cleanup then proceed with a detailed restoration plan.

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    • CarebearCarebear says: 1210 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks SO much, CharlesB. I just spent the past three hours, or more, going over Chautautqua County maps from your link. Seeing on the maps, so many familiar names…Eggleston, Pratt, Edwards, Calflisch, Croscutt, Damkuts. And looking at the old roads, to see if I can figure out the ways to my old haunts, some of which are on roads that didn’t even exist!

      The farmhouse on Rood Rd, will need a lot of work, and sadly, it is so like so many other old farmhouses in the area. Farmers have fallen on hard times, and its hard to keep a famliy business afloat, let alone keep up with maintainance on the house. So sad.

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      • CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
        NY

        I don’t think it was a lack of maintenance in this case–the historic house link, which shows it to be in fairly excellent repair, is only a couple of years old. It looks more like the handiwork of a home remodeler, who only got as far as the demolition phase. On the plus side, the area has a large Amish community with a cadre of excellent, conscientious carpenters and a network of suppliers for things like hand-planed clapboards and windows made exactly as they were made in 1840. Much of the damage appears to be plaster surfaces, and sheetrock is cheap.

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    • ScottScott says: 349 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      That Italianate sure is a pretty house.

      Are those interior shutters integral to the window casing? They look like they might be original to the house.

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      • CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
        NY

        I once lived in an 1871 Italianate in nearby Cleveland that had the exact same type of interior blinds, made of whitewood (tulip poplar) and grained to match the rest of the woodwork. They were original and a folded neatly into a recess at the side of the enframement. Another feature of Northern Ohio homes of this period is the exterior door you can see in photo 11 of the listing. It has a decorative cast-iron screen over a casement window that can be opened on hot summer days, bringing Lake Erie breezes indoors to cool things off (the large openings in the ironwork seem to tell us they weren’t overly concerned about bugs in those days).

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  3. BethanyBethany says: 3466 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    This home is not for sale; I just feel the need to vent my outrage in a community where it will be supported LOL. My hometown of Wheaton, IL is at it again, issuing permits to developers who regularly raze old homes in order to build McMansions which use up the whole lot on the lots in the oldest part of town. This house was in the same family for decades, but changed hands about 5 years ago and the new owners are selling out to the notorious bad-guy developer and the city keeps allowing this. I know the home has been updated beyond what some of us would prefer, but it is still a beautiful 120 year old home on a huge lot which will be knocked down in the next couple months. This is just a couple blocks from the house where I grew up (thankfully on too small a lot to hold any interest for the developers). I will be in town next week and plan to walk over and say goodbye to this lovely old lady. Here is the listing:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/828-N-Wheaton-Ave_Wheaton_IL_60187_M86531-05751

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12224 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Ugh. It’s still a nice home, way too nice to be demolished. I understand demolishing a shack or a badly built/updated home (small rooms, odd layouts) but that house? Nuts!

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    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 443 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Beyond our love for all things historic, doesn’t this smack as just…wasteful? I almost wonder if we could incentivize developers somehow to retain an old structure because it was also the green thing to do. Do we really need another vinyl McMansion in the world that will have to be replaced in 40 years because it wasn’t meant to stand the test of time? I feel your pain, Bethany.

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5547 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Sad to hear about the McMansion phenomenon of teardowns happening in Wheaton. There’s a somewhat well known George F. Barber design in Wheaton (327 Main?) prominently featured in the (Daughters of) Painted Ladies book that was then painted in brilliant artistic colors but now in streetview looks to be losing some of its wonderful gingerbread details: https://goo.gl/maps/VKWuBMWYjeEnmyfA8 I can only hope the missing pieces have been replaced. There’s another example of this Barber design in Elgin, IL, but I do not have the address for it. Perhaps because there are still a lot of old houses to be found in Illinois, locals do not place a high value on them. The danger inherent in such a lackadaisical attitude is that in time what was once plentiful will become scare. The loss of historical homes is forever while McMansions are ephemeral and not designed to last for ages.

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        • Tony BianchiniTony Bianchini says: 64 comments
          Alvord, TX

          I feel it may be prudent to comment that the street view you sent is from Aug 2017. If one goes around the corner in street view, the image is dated a year later and the home appears to be in the beautifully painted condition you describe. It was also evidently re-roofed in that interim period.

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          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5547 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1897 Queen Anne Colonial
            Cadiz, OH

            Thanks for sharing the later streetview. Indeed, it looks like things have been patched up and some colors returned to this fine home. James Jereb, was the artist-painter on the Painted Ladies era (1980’s) incarnation producing what I consider to be one of the best boutique color combinations ever selected for a Victorian house. Scant information about Jereb is available today but I did find this Chicago Tribune article from 1987: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1987-11-22-8703280400-story.html Another online entry suggests Mr. Jereb may have chosen a new path for his artwork and is now working full time as an artist involved in “Star Dreaming” http://www.stardreaming.org/about.php Since the Painted Ladies book images are copyrighted, I could find no online links showing the Wheatland house during the 1980’s. Victorian Homes magazine, now defunct, also did an extensive article on the house showing its lovely interior. (beautiful stained glass windows)

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      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1228 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        dwr7292, those were my thoughts exactly, but I fear that common sense and environmentally responsible behavior are often lost in the mad rush to make money for too many people. I’m not sure what the solution is, because a developer who would destroy a fine old house like this would most likely – if forced to keep it – gut the interior and destroy its integrity, anyway…

        One thing we can all do is try to gently educate those within our sphere of influence, and support associations and sites such as OHD in spreading the appreciation for wonderful old structures and architecture…

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    • JoeJoe says: 756 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1820 Federal
      Baltimore, MD

      Hi B o,
      I intend no disrespect when I ask this, I’m confused that a bad guy developer would pay so much for a house he is going to tear down. Clicking on the link takes me to a house that just sold for $650K which is on a .56 acre lot. From the listing on Realtor.com, to which the link took me, the neighborhood median price is $450K. What is the developer going to build that would justify that land expense? Unless said developer has bought a whole lot of other adjacent properties, at very low prices, it just doesn’t make sense.
      I am sure there must be something about the area that I don’t know anything about. Can you explain why this developer would want to do this?

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      • BethanyBethany says: 3466 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1983 White elephant
        Escondido, CA

        I think the missing puzzle piece is that this is the very most desirable part of town in an affluent Chicago suburb, and the home that will be built on the lot will sell for around $1.5 million eventually. That’s why they tear down normal houses like this.

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    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1700 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      It’s hard to picture how anyone thinks a new cracker-jack house could possibly improve on the lovely place there already. What a huge misjudgment and shame!

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    • housefroghousefrog says: 57 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I understand your pain, the Squire Watkins Inn in Dillsboro, NC built in 1883 is owned by a business man who builds big box hotels and the house is falling into such decline. The rumor is the house will be torn down. I so hope someone will save it.
      657 Haywood Rd
      Dillsboro, North Carolina 28725
      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/657-Haywood-Rd-Dillsboro-NC-28725/2107040909_zpid/

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  4. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 128 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    I am not sure if this listing has been posted before—this home has been on the market for over eight months—but here is a special 1843 six-bedroom 10,000-square-foot Greek Revival in Orwell, Vermont, on 238 acres for $2.5 million. My guess is that at least some of you are familiar with the book Adventures with Old Houses, in which Richard Jenrette writes about his purchase of, restoration of, and furnishing of a half dozen or more spectacular antique homes. Jenrette would have loved this property, though he might have been puzzled as to why the same photo of a very nice two-tone wood-floor hallway is pictured three times.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/183-Route-22a-Orwell-VT-05760/2088778016_zpid/

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  5. HJHJ says: 2 comments
    1895 Victorian
    Worden, IL

    This house belonged to my parents for over fifty years. It has many original features. Currently for sale at a bargain price. Perfect for a Bed and Breakfast business! http://www.sharonpratt.com/index.cfm?page=7332&id=184096

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  6. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 443 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    Happy Summer afternoon, all!

    Two for you today, in the incredibly unimaginably, green as Ireland rolling hills of Connecticut.

    This 1782 Colonial listed for 575k in Southbury, Ct isn’t for the purists, given all the stylistic changes over the years, but it is what I imagine set designers in 30’s and 40’s Hollywood imagined New England to look like. Level as a pancake grounds, barns, pool and tennis court surround the house. Just a pretty place with a lot of potential to really be a showstopper in the right hands. Is it just me, or does everyone imagine putting a wood roof on any Colonial home they see?

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/127-Mansion-House-Rd_Southbury_CT_06488_M45809-78849?view=qv

    On the opposite end of the spectrum is this mid-century two story in Bristol, Ct listed for 189k. It just got marked contingent, but it’s worth a look anyway. Nice simplicity and isn’t that carport just calling out for some breeze block screening? We have a dearth of mid-century feeling homes in Connecticut, most were building traditional ranches, Capes and Colonials during the time period. I always think whoever built something like this– a trendsetter ahead of the pack. Those exposed rafter tail ends on the back balcony scream to me to be to be picked out in an accent color like a Mondrian painting or the Eames residence. It is also possible I am overthinking this little house!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/30-Eastwood-Rd_Bristol_CT_06010_M43966-79688#photo9

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  7. Liz SLiz S says: 3 comments
    Christiansburg, VA

    Linville, VA
    1788
    $399,000

    A national and state-registered historical home, with a name! Mannheim’s stone portion of the house was built in 1788, and was expanded with a Greek Revival style wood-frame around 1855. The owners have restored many period features.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/4713-Wengers-Mill-Rd_Linville_VA_22834_M54268-57011?ex=VA635899478

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mannheim_(Linville,_Virginia)

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    • SalleeSallee says: 22 comments
      1893 cottage
      MS

      Beautiful home and views with a laundry shute to boot!

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    • Sandy BSandy B says: 863 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      I toured this house about five weeks ago……..I certainly wish it had been presented then as neatly and nicely as these photos show it. It is an interesting house with several levels of construction making it a bit of a puzzle to negotiate.

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  8. JulieJulie says: 391 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora/Hello from New Zealand

    Forgive me Father, for I have sinned. I am guilty of Envy: 1924 brick church in the South Island town of Lawrence.Character features include original arched stained glass windows, high vaulted wooden ceilings and wood flooring.The master has original ceilings and the closet used to be the confessional.The guest room was originally the Vestry and the kitchen is located where the altar used to be. I will be in this neck of the woods in a couple of weeks and I will definitely find where it is, drive to it, park for a little bit and dream because my husband is still working so moving all the way down there is out of the question for now.$US218,101.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3568956

    Large, rambling 1920’s home in Dunedin with outstanding views of the Pacific Ocean. It has some nice original features – lots of original woodwork and many large windows looking out to a crescent shaped beach. It just needs someone with vision to create a good living space out of it’s current higgeldy-piggledy layout. I think it’s a real gem. Negotiable from $US623,409.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3544410

    Superb renovation of former 1890s general store in Outram which is about half an hour from Dunedin. I love the country kitchen with it’s huge window over the sink where you can look at the pretty rural views while doing the dishes (I have a big bay window over my kitchen sink and it definitely helps make dishwashing more bearable). There are also no near neighbours(YAY!!!) Enquiries over $US429,471,00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3554801

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    • JkleebJkleeb says: 319 comments
      Seattle, WA

      The Dunedin house is the one out of all your posts I like the most! I could work with the unusual layout given the view and the woodwork.

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  9. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1700 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    Shaker farmhouse, 1770, in Stephenstown NY, right near the Mass. border, on 173 acres. Well furnished for its type & period, and in gorgeous country. $1,095,000. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/56-Goodrich-Hollow-Rd-Stephentown-NY-12168/32270264_zpid/

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  10. Anne M.Anne M. says: 980 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Hi, all! Kelly’s post today of the George F. Barber house of a house I saw for sale when I visited Lake Winnipesaukee a few months ago. This house is not too far away from today’s post and sits atop a large hill across the street from Squam Lake (where On Golden Pond was filmed) it is an 1895 in Holderness, NH and the price is $665,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/974-Us-Route-3-Holderness-NH-03245/92842680_zpid/
    I took some photos from street level but you can’t really see too much. I also took a picture of this building which was not for sale at the time – it is an 1860 church, now being used as a theater. It is not very big but it is right on the channel between Big Squam & Little Squam (hence the price) and is selling for $674,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/40-Nh-Route-113-Holderness-NH-03245/2084097463_zpid/
    A 1765 in Wallingford, VT with 56 acres for $185,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/857-W-Hill-Rd-Wallingford-VT-05773/75458150_zpid/
    An 1833 in Peterborough, NH for $349,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/36-Union-St-Peterborough-NH-03458/125863946_zpid/
    Also in Peterborough, original house built 1790 with addition in 1925.This was the home of the inventor of the board game Monopoly and served as the model for the game Clue $1,980,000.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/21-Gray-Hill-Rd-Peterborough-NH-03458/124630954_zpid/
    And finally, this 1906 stunner with 17 acres in Princeton, MA for $499,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/20-Worcester-Rd-Princeton-MA-01541/57634641_zpid/

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    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1228 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      These were surely some incredible houses in their day! I’d give a lot to be able to see their original interiors – and then mourn the heartbreaking loss…

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    • Leah SLeah S says: 160 comments
      OHD Supporter

      TX

      The 1765 house in Wallingford, VT tugs at my heartstrings. I hope a proper steward buys it, instead of someone wanting it only for the dreaded “starting over” alluded to in the realtor description. I still can’t get over the fact that people in some parts of the country actually have the opportunity to restore and live in a home of this time period. Sigh.

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    • nhguynhguy says: 65 comments
      1880 Victorian-Bungalow
      NH

      Hi Anne,
      Thanks for posting here, so I was made aware of your historical society. I received a nice note back from Linda C. a few days ago. Thanks for paying my gift forward to another historical society.

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    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2223 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      I have yet to look at the rest but have to say the Wallingford house is wonderful! A pure preserved house, and somewhere on the property, an old log cabin.

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  11. JkleebJkleeb says: 319 comments
    Seattle, WA

    1961 Mid-Century, Spokane, WA $525,000
    I think this house is an absolute gem—original owner and the house includes much of the original furnishings with a commanding view of downtown. I would love to be able to change a few things, but not much. In another older description the house was described as a Jim Logan home. I can’t find him listed as an architect so perhaps he was the builder.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1203-W-Glass-Ave-Spokane-WA-99205/23512247_zpid/?

    1908 Arts and Crafts (with more English than American inspiration perhaps), Spokane, WA $1,150.000

    This was designed by Kirtland Cutter, a well know architect working in the Northwest and West Coast early in the 20th Century and is well preserved. Unfortunately, all the windows have been replaced with what appear to be vinyl windows. This is especially jarring against the oak woodwork.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/709-W-Sumner-Ave-Spokane-WA-99204/23521367_zpid/

    1804 Federal (with changes overtime), Eastport, ME $259,250

    Home is sold furnished and the photos capture my idea of what a comfortable life living in Maine would be all about (but what do I know since I haven’t been there, however I will be visiting for the first time soon in large part by becoming inspired through OHD). I hope the cat comes with the house or at least gets to take the chair it has obviously claimed with it.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/28-Washington-St-Eastport-ME-04631/121782087_zpid/?

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  12. Sandy BSandy B says: 863 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    $789,000…..41 acre property is a ready-to-go farm with a charming 1840 house in a beautiful part of Virginia between Charlottesville and Culpepper. Would have been perfect for my raising children days when I’d have a 1/4 acre garden, and we’d load up the kids and go to Eastern WA to pick peaches or tomatoes, etc. Of course we’d get home late and everyone would crash while I dealt with boxes of stuff to can…..some years over 400 qts……!!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/101-Longshot-Ln-Rochelle-VA-22738/79166325_zpid/

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  13. CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Beacon, NY–Zorro’s hacienda (1930), priced at $221,000:

    https://www.watchforeclosure.com/foreclosed-homes/new-york/dutchess/beacon/11804721/843-wolcott-ave.html

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  14. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 68 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    How about making money while living in an beautiful old home? 4 unit plus owners apt. Love that fireplace with tile. Really nice double front doors and foyer. 1880 brick Victorian on corner lot in nice area. Previous owner must have spent a bit of money on this home as it has radiant heating. 229K
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/215-S-William-St_Johnstown_NY_12095_M41334-68101?view=qv

    large, 3600 sq ft 1896 Victorian with original woodwork. Built-ins, paneling,even a wood ceiling treatment. Large stained glass panels in great carved stairwell. Love the interior but something looks amiss with exterior. 199K
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/100-S-William-St_Johnstown_NY_12095_M48843-37867?view=qv

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  15. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1228 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    Here is a charming unrestored 1860 house on 8 acres bordering the Hudson River, plus 5 acres in an underwater land grant which includes the remnants of an old ice house. Located in Catskill, NY, and priced at $1.8 million:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/220-Hamburg-Rd-Catskill-NY-12414/215835192_zpid/?

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    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2223 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      How cool to have a place that close to the Hudson. Would love to see more pictures of the house,like what is the kitchen like, perhaps relatively untouched like the rest of the house?

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      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1228 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        I am twenty minutes away from this property, and may take a ride to see it. I would pay to see the kitchen, and if I can come up with more pictures I’ll forward them to Kelly…

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  16. Sandy BSandy B says: 863 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    1810 Greek Revival in Johnson, NY for $199,900, on 16 acres. No photos of the interior of the main house, which apparently has been stripped to the studs, but with all original millwork, windows, pocket doors, etc. kept intact. The former carriage house has been restored and is interestingly move-in-ready. Looks as though the owners live in this space. Lots of potential to bring this house to glory again…!! It seems so common that good folks with wonderful restoration intentions perhaps just get tired or run out of funds…..or both.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1782-S-Johnsburg-Rd-Johnsburg-NY-12843/32926261_zpid/?

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  17. JimHJimH says: 5391 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1925 “Mediterranean” – Greensboro NC – $1.65mm
    Built for/by architect Harry Barton on the lake, it’s expensive and a tad over-improved imo, but really nice!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/104-Kemp-Rd-W_Greensboro_NC_27410_M56145-99468

    https://preservationgreensboro.org/exuberant-mediterranean-inspired-residence-to-be-on-tour-of-historic-homes/

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  18. CharlesBCharlesB says: 479 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Post-Colonial cape in the center of the little NE Connecticut town of Eastford–looks like somebody did a nice restoration of the exterior. Priced at $59,900:

    https://www.redfin.com/CT/Eastford/211-Old-Colony-Rd-06242/home/54414240

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  19. KWWhiteKWWhite says: 1 comments
    1925 Italian Renaissance
    Knoxville, TN

    Italian renaissance style historic home in prestigious Sequoyah Hills, Knoxville, Tennessee located at 539 Cherokee Blvd. Built in the mid-1920’s by and for E.V. Ferrell, Sequoyah Hills original developer. All updates and additions true to original home. A MUST see to appreciate! Listing price $980,000.00 on 1.7 acres. (MLS #1085208)

    https://www.bhhsdeansmithrealty.com/desm/?p=findahome.asp&page=search&selected=qck&mlsid=4031&targetmls=4031&mlsnumber=1085208

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  20. CoraCora says: 2077 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1909, on the NRHP. I just can’t believe the price on this one. 7 bedrooms – it’s huge – and so classy. The exterior is reminiscent of the old west (think: The Alamo) and the interior is fabulous with it’s unique doors and arches, woodwork and stained glass ceiling. $199K

    Newton, IA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/629-1st-Ave-E-Newton-IA-50208/125378907_zpid/

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  21. sergeserge says: 1 comments
    1882 Italianate
    Kingsville, OH

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/5993-Lake-State-Rd-193-St_Kingsville_OH_44048_M37574-64525?view=qv I was hoping you would share this with others on Old House Dreams. This is the only link I had. I just bought this house and I would love to get feedback and suggestions as well as any history. Thank you! – Serge

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    • StevenFStevenF says: 785 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      Congratulations on your new home, Serge, which has tons of curb appeal! I’m no expert, but from reading many posts on this site, I’ve learned that a lot of Italianates were built with painted woodwork. This, you may not need to strip back the painted wood. I’m sure you’re dying to know what the condition of the floors under the carpeting is. Hopefully, the carpeting has kept them in good condition. It’s a lovely house and I’m sure you’re excited.

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    • JoeJoe says: 756 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1820 Federal
      Baltimore, MD

      Hi Serge,
      You are a lucky man! That house looks great. Depending on what you want in a house, there is so much that can be done. On the other hand, you have a really great house just the way it is. Barring anything that must be done, as an antique furniture refinisher and woodworker, I would want to know what the floors look like under the carpet and if the painted woodwork is a desirable hardwood. These things can easily be checked without chemicals, sanding or mess.
      *For the carpet, I would start in the corner of any room and pull. By pinching the pile with fingers or if necessary a pair of pliers. You can protect the carpet pile from the pliers with a cloth between them. Under the carpet will be both tacking strip along the walls and padding all over the floor.Pull some padding, but don’t take up the tacking strip until you are sure that you are taking all of the carpet up. If the wood looks good, I don’t mean clean or with a good finish, you are likely to be in luck. Floors may be in good condition in one spot while being a disaster in others. Floors will often give you some of the house’s history. because there will be signs if walls were moved or taken down, (the flooring may be poorly patched in that spot). If you ask the current owner, they are more likely to know than anyone. Carpet can be reused as an area rug and padding has all sorts of uses.
      The following info is for you if you like to do work on your house yourself. If so you are in for a treat with this house, (as well as possible moments of despair).
      *For woodwork, a simple series of scrapes in the direction of the grain with a flat piece of metal held perpendicular to the surface, not at an angle, will quickly take the paint down to the wood. Do it in an inconspicuous spot, and if you don’t like what you see, patch the paint. You can use anything that has a flat metal edge from a kitchen knife to, a small inexpensive scraper from the hardware store, to a high end scraper. Once you reach the surface of the wood, you can wet it down to see the grain. If you like it, try sanding the spot with a small pieces of wet or dry sandpaper which has been dipped in water. Paint thinner works better, but I said no chemicals. You can clean the sandpaper to prevent its clogging by dipping it in your lubricant to rinse out the debris. You can use the wet or dry paper scenario with any wood surface that you want to clean. Use the highest grit, finest, first to see how well it works. You can always go to wet sanding with a coarser grit if the fine doesn’t do the job, but a good sanding job for finished wood requires that you use progressively finer grits on the entire surface that you are going to be finishing until you get to the richness of the wood that you are looking for.
      When testing, I would start with 320 grit or 220 if needed. When finish sanding furniture, 80 grit is the maximum grit I use, progressing through 120, 220, and 320 when working on fine woodwork. Some areas may need 80 grit while others may only need a finer one. You will learn a get a sense of it as you go. Floor sanding companies rarely go past 80 grit to 120. They start with very coarse grits and remove a lot of wood.
      Best of luck with your new home, as my father would have said, “persistence gets the job done” If things don’t work out the way you want them to, you can always try something else.

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  22. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    Serge–
    Just from looking at the house, it looks like you got a lot of the original house intact and well-preserved, particularly in so far as the woodwork and other detailing is concerned. The front and back porches both look to be original, although they may not have painted white in the very beginning. The iron cresting on the front porch is very often missing from the original houses, so you are lucky that this remains intact.
    I have spent very little time in Ohio, and do not know how typical the roof on the house is for Ohio in 1883, which seems like an accurate building date for the house. The front 3rd floor or attic window is not at all common on houses like this where I leave in the northeast, but the fact that the facade of the window is brick and that the brick is seemingly identical to the rest of the house causes me to suspect that it may be original to the house, as may be the roof. However, I suspect that many houses like this were built with mansard roofs and wonder if this may not have had a mansard roof at one time with more windows, which may have made the 3rd floor more usable when it was first built as those rooms could have been bedrooms and storage rooms. Are there stairs going up to the 3rd floor and are they fairly fancy? If so, then I would more strongly believe that there was a mansard roof at one time and that it may have been burned off by a fire or was removed for other reasons and that the current roof is a replacement roof that was less full in accommodating 3rd floor rooms than the mansard roof was. If you have a local historical society, see if they can help you find more information on the house, such as old photos of it, old panoramic or “bird’eye” view maps of the town that it might appear on in 1883 or thereafter, who built it, etc.
    The inside seems pretty intact although a lot of the woodwork may not have been originally painted (or was false-grained to look like a more expensive wood than is really there), just as the newel post of the stairway is not painted. Pulling up some of that wall-to-wall-carpet will reveal more about the newel post than is visible now due to the apparent depth of the carpet, as well as what the floors look like and if they are decorated in some way or made out of very good wood. You might prefer to show the old wood floors to what is covering them now. The newel post is very nice and should never be painted in the opinion of most people, given how beautiful the wood and carving are.
    The mantel is likely made of slate and may be painted to look like a fancier and more expensive stone than slate. It looks like it is original to the house and most people would also say to not paint it but to try to restore it to how it originally looked.
    I assume that the stone or concrete-looking thing near the road is an old carriage block to help women get into carriages or help people mount their horses. However, I haven’t seen one quite like that so that is just my guess.
    Other people may say different things or even contradictory things to what I have said about the house, so don’t be surprised if that is the case. If either your town or the state of Ohio has architectural historians or preservationists available, definitely ask what services they provide and see if they can give you information about the house also.
    Good luck–it looks like you’ve got a solid house that should be in good shape for another 135 years as long as it is maintained correctly!

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    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Addendum to above–
      I’m not sure if the fronts are original or not–I tend to think not since people usually only had large glass windows in their doors if they had a set of solidly wood outside doors in front of them, at least in 1883.
      If the roof is the original one, the house would probably be classified as Italianate based on the style of the porches and all the brackets under the eaves, as well as the rounded arch over the attic or 3rd floor window and the other window lintels. If it had a mansard roof originally, it would most likely be considered Second Empire for that reason, or possibly Franco-Italianate since it combined 2 different styles together.

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  23. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12224 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I don’t remember which link exchange someone talked about this home but, officially demolished now. It’s irritating to see what appears to be some detailed stone work being obliterated in the demo photos.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/milwaukee-county-executive-chris-abele-tears-down-26-million-home/ar-AADsscR#image=AADss9e|5

    If there’s such a thing as ghosts, I hope they haunt the [redacted] out of that guy.

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  24. MerwinMerwin says: 1 comments
    1920 Craftsman
    WA

    https://www.skylineproperties.com/listings/listingdetails.php?id=1476132

    $688,800, Seattle, Washington

    1920 Craftsman – surrounding property was a fruit orchard on the shores of Lake Washington near Seattle. We have restored her to her former beauty and planted 150 trees on the lot including Apple and Cherry. We love the vast front porch, the original windows, of which several still open, all the glorious hardwoods, original fireplace and vintage tile. Also features a circa 1940 cabana, which features a masonry fireplace, grill and smoker. We’ve added some custom tilework and a hot tub. This is a perfect example of the traditional, grand craftsman and she is much loved. Thanks for your consideration. Love this site!

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  25. 67drake67drake says: 288 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    If this has been posted, sorry, but worth seeing!
    $119,000 in Strum Wisconsin, build date listed as 1910. About 100 miles too far North for me. I’m happy in my small town, but this one makes it tempting to move!
    Servants quarters on 3rd floor. 5 acres. Lots 0 woodwork!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/W19154-County-Road-H-Strum-WI-54770/105118779_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-image&rtoken=291e9037-2e2d-49f0-b371-11f1d1b8fadc~X1-ZU12j4hc7ufw7ih_1brbr

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  26. 67drake67drake says: 288 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    I posted this one here a week or two ago, but there were only 2 or 3 interior pictures as I remember. Now they have about 30. Looks like the typical kitchen and bathroom updates, but it looks like most of the woodwork survived. Nice staircase and leaded glass too.

    $69,900 in Richland Center Wisconsin. 1906 build date

    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Richland-Center/562-E-Kinder-St-53581/home/89528400

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  27. JulieJulie says: 52 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Am I losing my mind or was there a house posted here this week with a big beautiful double staircase that’s not available anymore? I came back hoping to find it again to show to a friend and can’t seem to locate it now. Did I dream this and think I just saw it here in real life??? Lol

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  28. MJGMJG says: 2397 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    I missed this nice house! This black and white photo is a prime example of how the original design overall can be altered by something that is seemingly small as a new railing installation.

    The original railing is small and the balusters are tiny. If you look at the modern picture of the house today, the house is dwarfed now and the porch appears smaller because the new railings, though up to code and standard railings for any house, but not designed to fit this overall house. Its an illusion probably done that way by the original architect. The architect probably intentionally built the railings lower and smaller to make the porch and house look bigger and stronger. Similar to the reason some homes interior staircases that go up three stories, the railings get lower as they go up to give the allusion to height from the bottom floor. This also happens on second story porches and third floor balconies sometimes. AND DANGEROUSLY! Smart thinking though for perspective.

    Same creative thinking why the Greeks built the Parthenon with no straight lines. To give the appears of straight line.

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