June 28, 2019: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 6/28/19 - Last OHD Update: 7/5/19 - 122 Comments
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122 Comments on June 28, 2019: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11894 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I am really excited about today’s old house photo. 🙂

    This is a Palliser design, the one I believe is illustrated on Palliser’s American Cottage Homes, (link to catalog.) It’s similar to another posted home, in Richford, VT although with some differences. Has anyone found the floor plan for this particular design? I’ve looked through two or three of the catalogs and did not find it.

    Crossing my fingers this was moved to another location as it no longer appears at 37 Lafayette in Bridgeport, CT. I didn’t have time to do any research besides looking through the Palliser’s books so maybe y’all can find info.

    The book recommendation is a Dover reprint of one of Palliser’s books. It’s the one I own. The only review on Amazon is a bad one, I don’t know what he is talking about as this is a decent sized book and illustrations. I don’t yet own the American Victorian Cottage Homes reprint, link.

    The photo of the lady is not associated with the house. Doesn’t she remind you of Jessica Capshaw (link)? Unfortunately no name is written except for the photographers studio.

    13
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6058 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wasn’t there another of these that we saw years ago? Can’t remember where: (somewhere Midwest). The guys who restored it were killed in Mexico – I remember that vividly.

      2
    • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      This has to be my favorite link exchange ever. I’ve been waiting years to see old photo of this house from the pallisers book. I’ve only seen a few but this one has a great resolution. I’ve always been disappointed that the floor plan is so small on the top of the book and did t give a full page.
      Those art glass windows are amazing. The woodwork is spectacular. I love that the fence is painted to match the house and details are picked out in its rich color scheme.

      5
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1159 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      Very nice one!! But “cottages” 😀 That’s mansion size to me!

      1
      • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        That’s always been funny to me. 19th century definition of a cottage is VERY different to ours. To us a cottage is a quaint, small country estate. Giant stone 10,000 square foot mansions were called cottages then if they weren’t in the city. LOL. I think the Breakers Mansion in Newport was called a cottage.

        1
    • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      KELLY!!

      I know this is an old post but I found this house in Scientific American Architects and Builders Edition; Jan 1892, The floor plan for this house and an additional picture. Though its not as good as the one you posted, it’s still fun! I remembered you asking about the floor plan.

      This scan of the catalog has defects and several pictures duplicated.
      https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_P-MwAQAAMAAJ/page/n14

      3
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11894 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Awesome!! Thank you!

        1
        • KenKen says: 17 comments
          San Diego, CA

          Kelly, OHD – I did notice a minor error on the 1892 floorplan from “Scientific American Architects & Builders Edition” compared to the original 1878 floorplan shown in “Palliser’s American Cottage Homes”. If you compare the two floorplans closely you will notice that the parlor fireplace in the 1892 floorplan does not directly align with the fireplaces in the hall, library and dining room. By comparing the 1878 exterior drawing with the 1976 exterior photo, shown in “The Scribe”, you can see that both chimneys were on a direct line with each other; but on the 1892 floorplan it shows the parlor fireplace centered on the parlor wall, making it closer to the front of the house. Actually the parlor fireplace was not centered on the interior wall, but was centered on the exterior wall, since at the rear of the parlor was located a small lobby and bathroom. The side porch was thus located farther toward the rear of the house than seen on the 1892 floorplan. Also, the front bedroom over the parlor was larger because of this and the upstairs bathroom was located a bit farther back, being directly above the first floor lobby and bathroom. These seem like small discrepancies, but are noticeable when you compare the two floorplans closely.

      • JimHJimH says: 4953 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Nice, and a good description on p.2:
        https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_P-MwAQAAMAAJ/page/n11

        1
        • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          This article was fun to read because it describes some of the house and mentions the exterior color being dark red trim and lighter red body. Probably some other accent colors on the house too but so nice to get that much out of it. And how about the studio room being line in stained wood of “a narrow beaded stuff”. So funny. This doesn’t mention this house was Pallisers but said it was erected for the guy you had mentioned months ago J A Bari Esq. as a second owner. Though these articles were often quirky and with errors.

          I can stare at these old pictures for hours and it got me wanting more so I reached out again to the Bridgeport University to see if they have any photos or history on their campus I can review. Even if not online Bridgeport isn’t that far from me and I’d be willing to go through albums. Who knows what type of photos may still exist.

          1
    • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      I have found articles from an online newspaper the University referred me to. I was also referred to another person which I will reach out after this but was excited to share what I’ve learned.

      The newspapers talks about the house during 70s. There are pictures of the exterior of the house in the 1970s in the newspapers as well. It appears at some point, maybe at the turn of the century, there was a round turret room added to the left front corner replacing the dormer that was there so the house is slightly different looking but still retains it’s general shape.

      The sad thing is, it sat vacant apparently for a few years after the Math Department vacated it before being demolished with hopes someone would buy it to restore it. Consequently it was demolished. I guess it stood there by it self for a few years as all the other homes torn down weren’t thought to have historical and architectural significance as this house did. So there was an outcry but no one to rescue sadly. It also said vandals broke in too. No interior pictures yet.

      The Scribe Vol. 46 No. 21 pg. 1
      https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/3298
      The Scribe Vol. 46 No. 34 pg. 3
      https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/3415
      The Scribe Vol. 48 No. 9 pg. 5
      https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/3442
      The Scribe Vol. 37 No. 4 pg. 2
      https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/2973
      The Scribe Vol. 47 No. 25 pg. 5
      https://scholarworks.bridgeport.edu/xmlui/handle/123456789/3351

      1
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 898 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Cool! Thanks for the research. Shame the internet wasn’t big back then, I bet someone would have bought it with enough publicity.

        • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          I would actually have considered it even though Bridgeport isn’t high on my list of places to live in CT. This place had so much potential! I really want to find inside photos!

      • KenKen says: 17 comments
        San Diego, CA

        Thanks so much for posting links to those issues of “The Scribe”! A 1913 Sanborn Fire Insurance map shows a three-story octagon shaped addition at the front-left corner of the house, but I wasn’t completely sure what it was until I saw the photos in your links. I’m surmising that the corner addition was added around 1905 after the Barri’s sold the house to the third owners. It appeared to be an attempt to “modernize” the house, although the round turret did clash a bit with the tower.

        • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Oh I’m glad someone got to see my posts on this old string. I love this house. Yeah the round turret although cool was a little disappointing to me because I loved the look of the angle. I mean the round could have been added anytime in the 1880s to 1905 really since you really start seeing it in the late 19th century. It is also possible the Barri owners updated it themselves. I’ve seen many homes altered even only a few years after being lived in in my research. I was hoping JimH had seen this as he is the Sanborn Map wizard. I’ve not had a chance to look through them. Can you post a link to your findings ?

          1
          • JimHJimH says: 4953 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I did see the articles you linked – very interesting! I’d guess some of the stick decoration was removed when the tower was added to make it look more like a chateau. Interior photos before/after the renovation would be fascinating to look at.
            It’s a shame so few of the very elaborate homes from that period survive. It’s stunning just to see Kelly’s photo of that house!

            1
          • KenKen says: 17 comments
            San Diego, CA

            MJG – The photo from the January 1892 “Scientific American Architects & Builders Edition” did not yet show the corner turret in place. The article mentioned that the photo was made especially for “Scientific American”, so it was most likely taken sometime in 1891. I also noticed in the later photos that the corner addition’s windows did not have transoms, so clashed a bit with the original windows in the house.

            • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
              OHD Supporter

              CT

              Ahhhh I remembered wrong. When you said they didn’t have transom windows I was remembering that some of the window transom stained glass was removed over the years before demolition. I had forgotten the turret addition windows were plain one over ones. Nice dude. You like detailed research like me!!!

              1
          • KenKen says: 17 comments
            San Diego, CA

            I found it strange that the first Sanborn Map to actually show the house is the 1913 map. It does not appear on earlier versions from 1884, 1889 or 1904, even though the Seaside Park area of Bridgeport obviously had residences and other structures built there in the late 1800’s.

            • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
              OHD Supporter

              CT

              I didn’t understand why they earlier Sanborn maps weren’t showing that section myself. Especially with some of those larger homes. But I have seen that’s it Sanborn on other maps which is total suck fest because the house I want seems to usually be in the are with no number.

              Look through the Scribes. Were the transom stained glass windows all missing from the addition ? Or perhaps they were removed later. Because I notice later photos from the 70s as each year goes by the windows go missing. I think some people started stealing and vandalizing the house I read.

              Actually yes. If the picture is actuate from the 1890s Scientific American article I gave Kelly, then we can deduce the round room came In late 90s early turn. I doubt it came in the 20s personally as that does seem to be a dying fashion but yeah that happens.

              I need to study your floor plan dissection you discussed.

              1
              • KenKen says: 17 comments
                San Diego, CA

                It appears that the turret addition never had transom windows and was most likely added to enlarge the library and bedroom located above it, as well as to “modernize” the house a bit on the outside.

        • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Also I was disappointed that no photos of the house in the conservatory side after the addition of the round corner. I wondered if they worked with the design or removed it completely. I called many people in this house and no one knows anything. Not Bridgeport University. Not the historical society. And sadly in the newspaper articles, all of them well spent years trying to save it. You’d think someone would have documented the damn thing with pictures at least.

          1
          • KenKen says: 17 comments
            San Diego, CA

            It appears from looking at the 1913 Sanborn Map that the conservatory was removed entirely when the octagonal/round turret was added, since it covered about half of the area where the conservatory was located.

            • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
              OHD Supporter

              CT

              It’s terrible too. Because that appeared to have beautiful art glass windows. But not uncommon for conservatory’s to be roofed over or torn down when updating. I love this house. Someone stated the interior hall had black and gold details picked out in the hall. Incised lines and other details. I love that look. Love the late 1870s and 1880s architecture.

              1
  2. NonaKNonaK says: 253 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Austin, TX

    Down the street from the most recent secret post. Queen Anne built in 1895 by Captain Albert Morris in Reedville, VA. 5 bd 4 ba 3015 sqft. Beautiful woodwork.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/va/reedville/826-main-st-reedville-va-22539–2020774081

    6
    • Sandy BSandy B says: 703 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Beautiful home…..one can easily imagine long ago fun times here. One of my favorite areas of Virginia. I love love the entry wallpaper. I’m getting the itch to wallpaper SOMETHING after seeing so many wonderful examples on OHD…!!

  3. CharlesBCharlesB says: 481 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    George Palliser’s house was in the Seaside Park neighborhood in the South End of Bridgeport, laid out by P.T. Barnum himself with a little help from Frederick Law Olmsted. After World War II this community of opulent Victorian mansions on large lots became the campus of the University of Bridgeport, which regarded the old homes as ‘white elephants’ and gradually replaced them with featureless brick boxes.

    This house was called ‘Lafayette Hall’ and housed the Math Department offices. As a young highschooler, I would walk inside the front door and marvel at the beauty. A secretary would usually ask, ‘Can I help you?’ and I would reply, ‘I’m just admiring the architecture,’ and she would act like that was a frequent occurrence and let me wander at will. The copious woodwork was all white ash, chamfered and incised with discrete gold and black paint highlights. The windows had stained glass transoms with painted-glass centers that depicted wildlife scenes. The staircase was a monumental work of art; the floors were parqueted; and the ceilings were coffered. At a time when every architectural history book I could get my hands on talked about the second half of the 19th century as ‘the era of bad taste’ and described such houses as ‘hideous monstrosities,’ I fell in love with Victorian taste and learned that authoritative books could be wrong.

    In 1977 the University announced plans to rid itself of more of the albatrosses they were saddled with and clear the entire block on which Lafayette Hall stood. I was actually inside the front hall of the house that morning with fellow members of the Bridgeport Architecture Conservancy when the wrecking ball struck the first blow. We ran for our lives as the crane operator laughed at our foolishness. The site was turned into a tennis court.

    Anyway, here’s my decidedly unPalliserlike find for this week: a 1960 proto-Bradyesque MCM in Jamestown, NY priced at $199,000:

    https://www.premierlistingsrealestate.com/-/listing/NY-CCBOR/R1205323/110-Pleasantview-Drive-Jamestown-NY-14701?display_page=1&index=4&lpp=20&total_listings=108&ss_id=300737987&from=saved_search

    17
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11894 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      You stood in the house of the old photo?! Take any pics from then? That’s a heartbreaking shame, tell me they at least looted the place before using that ball.

      4
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11894 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        I’m still trying to wrap my head around that someone (plus someones) looked at this and decided it was best to be demolished. I just can’t.

        17
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          It seems criminal that someone would capriciously decide that a landmark home of this caliber deserved to be demolished. But there’s still a sizable segment of the population that sees no value whatsoever in old house and old buildings. If it isn’t new, it isn’t worth keeping. I’m in awe at the complexity and detailing seen on the Palliser mansion. Those Gargoyles or Dragons used for crockets at the ends of the rooflines are spectacular. I would have gone to considerable effort and risk to save at least a specimen or two of these art works but I’ve witnessed demolition scenes and any outside interference is decidedly not welcome. It’s almost embarrassing that an institution of higher learning was responsible for the tragic loss of this iconic home. Had I not witnessed this kind of mindless destruction myself during the 60’s and 70’s I’d probably find it hard to believe. At least we still have the pictures but far too many structures worth preserving now exist only in faded photos. Sad.

          16
      • CharlesBCharlesB says: 481 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
        NY

        Yep, very same house. There was an Italian-born local architect who was there with his camera snapping photos but I don’t know what became of those. And no, I can vouch for the fact that not one iota of that beautiful woodwork and stained glass was saved–all smashed to smithereens and hauled off to a landfill, perhaps meant to serve as a lesson to the ‘hysterical’ people who would dare stand in the way of progress. But I’m happy to report that the University, after being on a 75-year demolition spree, just beautifully restored one of its remaining old mansions that had been derelict for years. I hope they do more.

        13
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11894 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Seriously? Those [redacted]! It’s good about the other one, is a pic of that available online? Or even street view, I’d like to see the one they restored.

          1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6058 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Horrific; and far from uncommon. I grew up in a town which routinely smashed great old buildings to bits. Even as a young kid, it broke my heart every time. Back then, (70’s – 80’s), NOTHING was saved.
          https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51P4ncyl17L._SX466_.jpg

          THIS > learned that authoritative books could be wrong

          I’ll bet those moments you had inside that house are strong memories; and you are lucky to have them. Jealous. There were a few which captivated me that I managed to see inside of as a kid before they were later piled onto the landfill.
          https://flic.kr/p/i7yY15

          Sad thing is, to this day, most cities and towns have no protections for our irreplaceable, antique, architectural heritage. Houses all over my town are being gutted to the studs and turned into Kardashianated, tract house themed, monstrosities as I type this. Sick of it…….

          15
          • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
            1930 carriage house
            Bethlehem, CT

            Even with historic districts in place, protection is shaky. I used to serve on a historic district commission in an adjacent town before I moved to my current home. This is a place renowned for its charm and history. Yet, one of the first things that came for approval was a deck on the side of a colonial home on Main Street. No. You may not have a deck, you can put in a patio. A suburban deck is not appropriate, and boy, did I have to fight for that.

            Soon after, someone wanted to put decorative Victorian scroll appliques on window lintels of a 1740’s home. I was overruled in my objection, since the prevailing thought was, oh–they’re removable. It was unbelievably frustrating.

            10
            • RosewaterRosewater says: 6058 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1875 Italianate cottage
              Noblesville, IN

              dwr, I would be happy if we could simply prevent flippers from gut renovating antique houses around here. This is a snake flag town in a snake flag county in a snake flag state; so “don’t tread on me” is nearly impossible to get past. The local historic society here has been organized and active for over thirty years; yet has been unable to get one single ordinance passed to prevent gut flips, or anything else. It’s crummy.

              3
              • MJGMJG says: 1726 comments
                OHD Supporter

                CT

                So sad. I’ve seen it too. Houses in historic districts that are allowed to put vinyl siding on the house and cover over details. Vinyl replacement windows that replace stained glass windows. Plastic replacement railings on porches or deck railings that stay unfinished and turn gray on once elaborately carved porches. What’s the point of being in a district that’s called historic. Its totally useless.

                1
    • JimHJimH says: 4953 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks for your memory, CharlesB. I’m glad you got out of the way of the wrecking ball! Cool house in Jamestown also.

      The owner after George Palliser was wholesale merchant John Atherton Barri (1855-1939), named on the photo with his wife (and cousin) Jennie Howe and her mother Azubah Towne Burgess, a 3-time widow who died there in 1897. The Barri’s sold the house and moved to Springfield MA around 1905.
      Barri’s mother was also a Howe, the sister of Elias Howe Jr. who invented the modern sewing machine and manufactured them in Bridgeport. The first statue erected in Seaside Park near the house honors Howe for his contributions and Civil War service. (Barri’s father is honored with a small gravestone at Gettysburg.)

      http://ctmonuments.net/2009/08/elias-howe-statue-bridgeport/
      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/40303559/john-atherton-barri

      Interesting page on the homes of P.T. Barnum:
      http://www.schoolfieldcountryhouse.com/the-house/2018/2/19/the-greatest-showmans-showplaces-the-homes-of-pt-barnum

      5
    • KenKen says: 17 comments
      San Diego, CA

      CharlesB – Thank you for your detailed description of the interior of the house and the stained-glass windows. I’m sure the place must have been stunning when it was new! What a shame that nothing was salvaged prior to demolition.

  4. evelynwalkerevelynwalker says: 89 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Oakland, CA

    5 bedrooms, 4.5 bathrooms in South Boston, Va. Such perfection should be a B&B. $349,000.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1014-Washington-Ave_South-Boston_VA_24592_M50839-70383?view=qv

    5
  5. CarolynCarolyn says: 293 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    Alright, not an OLD house but good for some Friday entertainment. Besides, it may give some of you decorating ideas! LOL!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4006-Timber-Falls-Ct-Houston-TX-77082/28538540_zpid/?fbclid=IwAR1GidhKJYrPEH_jeXXH5_UCXhjHPQn6syIBVeBhXMAFIGE4xlzKwD4mEbw

    9
  6. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 68 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    All are Albany, NY area
    C.1780 originally 126K, now on auction.com with opening bid of 35K. In the Stockade section of Schenectady, NY. Lots of detail left (fireplaces, wall panels, trim, etc) good bones but needs a lot of work. Could be a grand dame again. 5374 sq ft, 4bd 3.5 bath.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/205-Union-St_Schenectady_NY_12305_M39919-03346#photo0

    C 1915 wrap around porch, lots of unpainted trim, built ins, fireplace, open staircase. corner lot. 200K
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1095-Ardsley-Rd_Schenectady_NY_12308_M47291-74894#photo0

    C1760 Gentlemen’s farm, Delamont-Wemple Farm on the National Register of Historic Places. Georgian Brick Colonial, situated on 60 pristine secluded, private acres. Nicely updated with keeping original character mostly intact. Garage, nicely landscaped and great barn also. 650K
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/322-Wemple-Rd_Rotterdam_NY_12306_M32908-82546?view=qv

    C.1760 (Multi family unit now) Premier historic Stockade property,the governor Yates mansion, Samuel Fuller architect, on over a half acre with views of majestic Mohawk River. Massive brick structure with many period colonial appointments,deep moldings,built in cabinetry,wood panelling,mantels,refinished oak hardwoods throughout. Two story owners unit with new kitchen&baths,stone terrace,high ceilings,library.Hundreds of feet of terraced rear lawns behind high brick wall. 899K
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/17-Front-St_Schenectady_NY_12305_M46701-08375?view=qv

    C1870 Take a look for the plaster work alone. WOW Gilded Age 9,576 sq ft Italianate Mansion overlooking Troy’s Washington Park. 40’+- Living room/Ballroom; Ornate carved crown moldings, scrolled 13′ ceilings. Originally the Uri Gilbert Mansion. 1.4 Mil
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/189-2nd-St_Troy_NY_12180_M30440-20133?view=qv

    12
    • FallsgirlFallsgirl says: 22 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Gilbert, AZ

      The Gilded Age home is a visual representation of an Edith Wharton novel….the furniture simply must pass with the house….what did the original owners do for a living to pay for all of the beauty of this home and how many people were required to keep it running?

      7
      • JimHJimH says: 4953 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Uri Gilbert (1809-1888) was a major manufacturer of mail coaches, rail cars and streetcars, sold around the world. In the 1880 census, he’s with his wife, 2 daughters, and 4 Irish female servants.
        https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86572265/uri-gilbert

        It’s a fantastic house! I like the restrained elegance of the brownstone façade with the iron balconies. Given the choice, I’d probably take the farm and want to backdate it a century or two.

        2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1533 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980/2010 board & batten modern

      Pete, you have some great finds here! Some day I want to make down to the Stockade. Thank you!

    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1760 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      Love the first house. Grand dame indeed…all the raw materials are there.

    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2240 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Wow, great finds! I esp. like the last two, each for different reasons. Lovely!

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6058 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thank you Pete!

      The two, double width, townhouses were a delight to see. I prefer the superb Neo-Classical details of the house in Schenectady, as well as it’s rad terraced garden with brick garden building. Nice! The Troy house is outstanding for it’s STRIKING locale on that great park, with all those other GREAT townhouses, and all that MARVELOUS brick. Wow. A vision to really transport one back in time. Jeez. The full lot width, beefy, carriage house and ancillary rooms had me gasping! Verrrry nice.

      1
    • BethHBethH says: 227 comments
      1999 Dutchess County, NY

      The 1915 house is sweet – just (IMO) begging for a little color and pattern! We were just in Schenectady a couple of weekends ago, to go to Proctor’s Theater (absolutely beautiful place). I was pretty surprised by downtown Schenectady, which I remember from years ago as being very run-down and emptying out. It’s been beautifully refurbished and really looks like a little gem of an upstate city. I really didn’t get to see the neighborhoods surrounding the area as it was rainy and dreary that day, but it looked like an area I wouldn’t mind relocating to!

  7. Leah SLeah S says: 176 comments
    OHD Supporter

    TX

    This little dog trot from my neck of the woods would make a great weekend escape.

    Ca 1880 Wiergate, Tx. $199,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/0-Hwy-255-Wiergate-TX-75977/2085224251_zpid/

    9
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1533 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980/2010 board & batten modern

      I would like to spend with this house.

      1
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1760 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      Lovable place. Turn off your cell phone when you arrive & say there’s no service there. (Maybe there isn’t.) Great place to relax.

      1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Wow! There aren’t too many of these early dogtrot type cabins/houses left in Texas anymore. They were among the earliest types of pioneer Texas homes after the basic primitive log cabins of the first pioneers. 1880 is pretty late for a dogtrot type home; many were built from the 1830’s until after the Civil War in areas where finished lumber was available. The $199,000 price tag seemed reasonable until I saw that it comes with 9.74 acres and lake views. Now I consider it a real bargain considering what comes with the house. Some country primitives would go well with a house of this kind. I would be challenged to leave it unpainted but perhaps some clear preservative would be an acceptable compromise between leaving it bare or painting it. If the exterior were constructed of Cypress wood, it could endure without any protective coating for hundreds of years. However, as far as I can tell, the entire house appears to be of Southern Yellow Pine; therefore, some protective preservative would extend the life of the materials. Thanks for sharing.

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6058 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wow! That is remarkable. Outstanding:especially where it sits. VERY nice. Would be amazing to see someone re-create the (missing) original fireplace with appropriate antique brick. Super cool. Hope it gets posted. VERY rare. Thank you Leah. Good eye!

      If it was mine, I’d replace every one of those windows with floor to ceiling replicas. Imagine it! 🙂

      3
      • Leah SLeah S says: 176 comments
        OHD Supporter

        TX

        I thought the same thing, Rosewater! It desperately needs the fireplace recreated. I wonder if the lost chimney was originally brick or if it was “stick and mud daub” (which could explain why it was lost in the first place ?).

        1
  8. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1980/2010 board & batten modern

    Greetings All:
    1900, Plymouth, MA, 500,000
    Lovely cabin atmosphere and neat Hoosier in the kitchen
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/86-Manomet-Ave-Plymouth-MA-02360/57210565_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=077dcc06-0fe8-4e99-af29-c3acdbe22ae0~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1870, Savoy, MA, 79,900
    1870 seems a bit late for this house, and if it is the correct date, why would the realtor call it One of the Original homes of Savoy? The town was settled in 1777 (Wikipedia). This house north of the town center next to the Savoy State Forest, a forest that is also right behind our family land and contains some 10,450 acres. I hope this home will be saved.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savoy_Mountain_State_Forest
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/59-Harwood-Rd-Savoy-MA-01256/61310038_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=3891a18b-deca-4da8-925b-d8e407b2b723~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1890, Chester, MA, 685,000
    Summer camp where Jacob’s Pillow founder and dancers used to stay.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-Johnson-Hill-Rd-Chester-MA-01011/81825314_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=5d2ce7d9-e257-42ba-964e-acedd2945251~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1880, Rockport, MA, 599,000
    Posting for the unusual stairway coming into the living room. Neat paneling and ceilings too. And who wouldn’t want to play so near the ocean?
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3-Gott-St-Rockport-MA-01966/56958748_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=733ec3ff-a4dd-4a9c-bac8-bd2fd1e45067~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1871 Italianate, Salem, MA, 1,550,000
    I am in love with the front façade
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/329-Essex-St-Salem-MA-01970/56121328_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=78e78c67-8adc-43be-be7c-39f98df0559b~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1836, Wevertown, NY, 599,000
    Posting for the old stove in shots 7 & 8
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/58-Dillon-Hill-Rd-Wevertown-NY-12886/32926359_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=e3215326-794d-439d-a07f-baba33762ee8~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1850, Queen Anne, Warrensburg, NY, 149,900
    Posting for the lovely woodwork and fireplace
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3927-Main-St-Warrensburg-NY-12885/59942602_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=a7c1fcd2-dfd5-4b25-b135-9d87df26ec4c~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1876 Cabin, Huletts Landing, NY, 1,998,000
    Lovely cabin and outbuildings on Lake George, lots of character, neat wood stoves that heat the cabin, Neat room with antique sleighs, lots of books and a ceiling decorated with paddles
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2326-Lands-End-Rd-Huletts-Landing-NY-12841/2084357453_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=42442274-8552-48b2-b25f-fa736061b85a~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    9
    • Anne M.Anne M. says: 786 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1972 not a dream.
      Hopkinton, MA

      Great selection of houses, Kimberly! Love the Brookside Lodge – the price is really great too. The Salem house is so quirky & charming and shows how really good photos can enhance a listing exponentially!

      3
    • natira121natira121 says: 602 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      That Weverton house has been updated quite a bit, but it’s charming! That range in the kitchen is priceless!!! And that twig fence, holy cow!

      Nice bunch of listings, thanks

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6058 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Yawn… Can’t wait to have time to look through all these tomorrow, Kimberly. 🙂

      1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      I like the Warrensburg, New York, house. Beautiful interior, and its on a large acre plus lot. Nice old carriage house as well. I noticed that streetview wasn’t included on the listing but a look at the house in Streetview perhaps indicates why: https://goo.gl/maps/7Pf8h9rJ5mbzVqQ28 Looks like a very busy street in front of the house (well, it is Main street, after all) but the town of Warrensburg looks picturesque. Not sure where the 1850 build date comes from but there are numerous mid 19th century Greek Revival homes still seen along Main so this house may have started out as a Greek Revival and was later Queen Anne’d. I was surprised to see a brick mantel inside that appears to be from the 1880’s. Brick mantels (especially in the Colonial Revival style) became very popular after 1900 but this example is from the older Modern Gothic/Queen Anne design vocabulary. Can’t say I’ve seen another one like it before. Thanks for sharing.

      1
    • BethHBethH says: 227 comments
      1999 Dutchess County, NY

      I just came past the Warrensburg house this weekend, and I’ll be going past it again in two weeks! It’s right on the main drag in Warrensburg, which is a mix of some beautiful old houses and commercial properties. It’s not far from a drop-dead gorgeous B&B that’s been beautifully restored. The town is close to Lake George, which is a big tourism destination in the summer. (Bonus – we always know we can get cellphone service when we get to Warrensburg… because a bit further north, into the Adirondack Park, no service for a couple of hours!)

      1
  9. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 445 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    Hi All–

    Two more modest homes in Connecticut this week with fairly modest price tags. I think both have extreme potential to be pushed. Great bones for someone with imagination.

    First is a riverfront 1939 stone and clapboard cottage, 299k in Gaylordsville, a subsection of New Milford, Ct. The masonry patios and garden potential are outrageous. Dutch doors, old latches and a kitchen with yellow Formica that deserves to be kept. Think about what could be done here.

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/57805867_zpid/41.650468,-73.377944,41.566141,-73.531752_rect/12_zm/1_fr/

    Next is a little 2 bedroom 1956 mid-century modern in Newtown, Ct listed at 269k. This one may require some rose colored glasses, but bear with me. I almost skipped this one by, because it looks like a trailer that lost it’s hitch. The exterior needs some rethinking, as a flat roofed contemporary shouldn’t have shutters and window boxes.

    What makes this one crazy cool in my opinion, is the mashup of a rustic beamed interior and what appear to be antique french tile floors against a decidedly modern flow and openness to the outdoors. The kitchen seems to retain it’s original cabinets. Some judicious updates, maybe some hardwood floors in place of carpet and appropriate windows could make this stunning. And then you’ve got a great pool and private acre. I even kind of dig the furniture. I’ll be watching to see if there’s an estate sale there in the future, that Foo dog lamp is calling my name.

    https://www.movoto.com/newtown-ct/35-obtuse-rd-newtown-ct-06470/pid_tgvqdhp59g/for-sale/

    4
    • Sandy BSandy B says: 703 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Love the Gaylordsville house…..and especially the kitchen. You’re so right, the yellow Formica…and…the range…MUST be kept.
      Thanks dwr..!!

      1
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1760 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      I fell hard for the Newtown house. Gorgeous materials that meld beautifully together, different as they are. It looks to have good flow & light throughout. My only problem would be the walls on the shower stall, which would make me terminally dizzy. The property is lovely enough to deserve this house.

    • BethHBethH says: 227 comments
      1999 Dutchess County, NY

      I just love the address for the Newtown house – “Obtuse Road”!

  10. dunamovindunamovin says: 133 comments

    Seneca,SC 1920’s farmhouse, $149.9 Private fishing hole, 15.15 acres. No restrictions, no zoning, bring your horses, raise cattle or farm. Sadly no interior pictures of the house. Half hour drive to Lake Hartwell State Park. 45 minutes to I-85, between Atlanta and Charlotte.

    https://www.xome.com/homes-for-sale/126-Snow-Creek-Seneca-SC-29678-291710939

    1
  11. DJZDJZ says: 202 comments
    1947 cape cod
    Glen Burnie, MD

    This is a heartbreaker for me as a young architect lover, The Coronado Lodge, I was 17 when this place went up for sale for 1.00, but it needed to be moved. This building was a beautiful example of 1930’s craftmans architecture. I remember walking into the front entry and seeing the open craftsman staircase with the mission style light fixture. It was one of the magical memories I ever had, its like the place spoke to me and I could see all the stories from the past. The guard was able to let me look further up the stairs to see the extra rooms and, I don’t know what came over me but I could still smell the floral rose scent to this day that I smelled on the second floor, even though the place has been boarded up for 12 years prior. The beamed ceilings and period light fixtures were still in place, had some amazing built ins on the main floor and in the bathrooms, not to mention the awesome tile work and fixtures. Ill always remember this place. This is the reason why I am passionate about older places and buildings, we need to preserve our past and not destroy it. The place was torn down 2 days after I was in it. I don’t think anyone went inside to salvage the built ins, windows or light fixtures, but I cried when it was torn down. If you drive past it today all you’d see is a chained off entry and a empty field.

    http://www.whatwasthere.com/browse.aspx#!/ll/41.620864,-87.08852/id/61310/info/details/zoom/14/

    6
  12. Anne M.Anne M. says: 786 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 not a dream.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Such a great array of houses this week Kelly, thanks!
    An 1800 Cape in Harvard, MA for $380,000 – interior is a blank slate but exterior is very charming:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/62-Still-River-Rd-Harvard-MA-01451/173940273_zpid/
    A 1912 Bungalow in Westminster, MA for $275,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/56-Main-St-Westminster-MA-01473/57679919_zpid/
    An 1880 in Leominster, MA for $439,900 (I can’t remember if I shared this last week, forgive the duplication if I did)
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/90-Orchard-St-Leominster-MA-01453/56701393_zpid/
    A 1922 house in Hardwick, MA for $250,00 with 17 acres & a pond – not many interior photos but what is there looks nice
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2193-Barre-Rd-Hardwick-MA-
    01037/121252111_zpid/
    An 1878 Italianate in Enfield, CT for $185,000 needs work but there is a lot to love here:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/329-Hazard-Ave-Enfield-CT-06082/58134666_zpid/
    A spectacular 1850 Gothic Revival in Tiverton, RI with 22 acres for $1,595,000.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/285-Stone-Church-Rd-Tiverton-RI-02878/89086744_zpid/

    2
  13. KyleKyle says: 22 comments
    1911 Edwardian flat
    San Francisco, CA

    I know northern California can be a bit pricey compared to some of the areas usually featured on this site but this is actually a good deal for the area for what you get. It’s so rare to find the old Sonoma County feel because everything was really developed in the 70s and 80s but occasionally you find these little gems.

    1920’s Cabin, Camp Meeker, CA $349,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/173-Redwood-Ave-Camp-Meeker-CA-95419/15812933_zpid/?

    4
  14. prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1916 Lead, SD for $95,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/53-1st-St-Lead-SD-57754/234429913_zpid/
    Very blue, but looks to have original bathroom, windows, and some lovely woodwork. And only $95,000!

    1
  15. ScottScott says: 326 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    Any Gothic Revival fans here? Check out Cedarhurst, an 1857 brick beauty in Holly Springs, Mississippi. It has been in the same family since 1901(!!!), and is a 5 bedroom, 5,000 square foot giant on 10 acres. Something is funny on the rear, but I can’t decipher it from the listing photos. At any rate, it could be yours for $219,000.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/490-Salem-Ave_Holly-Springs_MS_38635_M71219-61314

    9
    • gordygordy says: 79 comments
      Canandaigua, NY

      there are 30 photos on realtor’s listing page.

    • FlaOHDJunkieFlaOHDJunkie says: 150 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1902 FL

      Beautiful house Scott, I think the rear of the house is an add on or enclosure. A profile can be seen in pic 2. Would be very interesting to see if there are any original pictures since the family has been there over 100 years. Many lovely features.

      1
    • SalleeSallee says: 22 comments
      1893 cottage
      MS

      Someone help me. I need to know what was used to connect the oil light to the fan in the dining room photo. I would like this in my kitchen. This is a wonderful home. Red glass always takes my breath away when I see it in an old home. It worked as a form of privacy glass, very expensive due to the gold compounding. Thanks for sharing this one.

      1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Beautiful formal example of a Gothic Revival cottage here. A.J. Downing would have approved, I’m sure, but he had already lost his short life in a tragic boating accident years before. The what appear to be cast iron filigree and iron porch posts are extraordinary. I’ve personally only encountered something similar before near State College/Nittany (name of the town) in Pennsylvania. Here’s some photos I took: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157618669117473 Sadly, it is my understanding this former Inn was razed-truly a shame because I strongly felt upon personal examination that it could and should have been restored. Glad to see that this fine home appears to be in good condition. The red flashed glass inside was popular during the 1850’s and was often enhanced with wheel cutting designs through the red layer into the clear. Not much inside this house to tie it to the Gothic Revival style but the exterior is almost a textbook example of 1850’s Gothic Revival. I appreciate you sharing this uncommon find.

      2
    • Leah SLeah S says: 176 comments
      OHD Supporter

      TX

      Thanks for sharing, Scott.
      Cedarhurst has fascinated me not only because of the beautiful architecture, but because it was once the home of author Katherine Sherwood Bonner, who led quite the untraditional life for a woman of that time and place. If anyone is interested, more information can be found here:
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Sherwood_Bonner_McDowell
      https://www.mswritersandmusicians.com/mississippi-writers/katharine-sherwood-bonner-mcdowell

      1
  16. HistoricHomesCapeCodHistoricHomesCapeCod says: 2 comments
    1827 Federal Cape
    Sandwich, MA

    Ship Captain’s home in Yarmouth Port, MA on Cape Cod. This c.1700 home has a one room schoolhouse in the back! $487,000, 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. https://www.planomatic.com/212057

    4
  17. JimHJimH says: 4953 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Forestburgh NY – $475k
    In 1893, some prosperous New Yorkers bought 6800 acres of forest and created the Hartwood Club. This house was built in 1895 and both the club and house are fully intact. It’s sweltering today and that lake looks pretty nice!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/195-Baer-Rd-Forestburgh-NY-12777/208779714_zpid/

    8
  18. Barbara VBarbara V says: 882 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    Here is Rushmore Farm, in Athens, NY – a striking 1754 stone house on 97 acres of lush landscape and intriguing outbuildings for $795,000 – on the National Register: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8748-Route-9w-Athens-NY-12015/30491464_zpid/?

    5
  19. JimHJimH says: 4953 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1828 – Milford NY – $51k
    A stone Federal house in Otsego County, possibly the early inn conducted by Eli Rose in the hamlet of Milford Centre near the Susquehanna. It looks to have some structural issues – the rear wall has been replaced – but it sure is pretty.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2570-State-Hwy-28-Milford-NY-13807/2110983406_zpid/

    2
  20. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1887. So, this home is in one of my favorite small towns in Kansas. Yates Center is a farming community about halfway between Emporia and Pittsburg. It’s quiet, simple; almost like stepping back in time a bit. I always thought I would retire in Yates Center someday.
    This is a sweet, well-kept old home at a great price. There are a few modern features but much of the old details have been preserved. I’m jealous of it’s next owners. $95K

    Yates Center, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/501-N-Main-St-Yates-Center-KS-66783/91306274_zpid/

    2
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 882 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      This seems to be a comfortable old house – some more distant shots of the interior would help to understand the layout. I like the unusual stair configuration…

  21. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1159 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    Hi Everyone! It was my youngest sister’s wedding on Saturday. We had a massive heatwave last week in France (reminder: AC is not a thing in France). It was 40°C (104°F), ufff…

    I wanted to share with you some pics of the town hall where they got married (in Étampes, 1 hour south of Paris). It dates back to the 15th-16th-19th centuries.
    https://www.instagram.com/p/BzVI15ZIvw1/ (public account, no IG login required).
    Feel free to check my other photos if you wish. That was a great and perfect wedding despite the heat and sweaty guests 😀

    8
  22. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 68 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    Came across some pictures of this fantastic abandoned Art Nouveau manor in France:
    https://imgur.com/gallery/LMWHz5c
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/SoulphotographyBE/photos/?tab=album&album_id=518714201609044
    and a fun site to visit as well as great shots of this manor:
    https://www.lostfordecades.com/en/manoir-colimacon/

    2
  23. hezziehezzie says: 1 comments
    TN

    1912 – $149,00, Sweetwater. TN

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1409-Monroe-St_Sweetwater_TN_37874_M73452-02652

    This beautiful home I have been looking at online for a little while and I have even driven by to look at it. So much potential! All that lovely space! It will need some repairs and i believe the land behind it is for sale (seperately) too.

    2
  24. 67drake67drake says: 266 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    $114,900 for a brick home in Richland Center Wisconsin. Probably built around 1900.
    Looks like a good amount of original woodwork and floors left. Decent size lot for being in town. Nice looking house

    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Richland-Center/883-Church-St-53581/home/57731616

    1
  25. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1980/2010 board & batten modern

    I am so excited. Marcel Breuer 1956 MCM. 3,800,000. Just look at the free standing fireplace, I want to go up and touch it.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/144-Gallows-Ln-Litchfield-CT-06759/197799341_zpid/

    1
  26. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Beautiful Queen Anne Victorian for sale at a reasonable $175,000; 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 3,696 square feet on historic Rensselaer Street in the lovely town of Bucyrus, Ohio: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/432-E-Rensselaer-St-Bucyrus-OH-44820/97120947_zpid/ We visited Bucyrus a few years ago and found many charming old houses and buildings in town. The then brand new Holiday Inn Express was a pleasure to stay at and centrally located. Zillow says this listing was posted 21 hours ago so it’s fresh to the market. Lots of nice period details in this 1906 Queen Anne style home. Here’s an album of photos we took in Bucyrus: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157680886647193 If anyone has questions about Bucyrus, Ohio, or the region, I’ll be happy to try to answer them.

  27. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    One more Ohio house today offered at $270,000 from the town of Xenia, (just east of Dayton) https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/209-E-2nd-St-Xenia-OH-45385/58541385_zpid/ This 1881 Modern Gothic style house is also listed as Victoria’s Bed & Breakfast; 6 bedrooms, 5 and a half baths, woodwork in Oak, Walnut, Butternut, and Cherry. 6,905 sq. feet according to the listing. Limited number of photos, but there is a Facebook site for the B&B: https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Travel—Transportation/Victorias-Bed-and-Breakfast-134765769890681/ Streetview shows a nice residential street and dense landscaping. Google images displays a few interior photos. Built in 1881 for a local Banker, John Allen, who was also in the Ohio House of Representatives.

    1
  28. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1100 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Charleston, SC

    Here’s a beautiful 1895 Classical Revival mansion outside of Sumter, SC. It contrasts nicely with the ’70’s time capsule house in the same area that Kelly just posted for OHD Supporters. $595,500.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/40-S-Lafayette-St-Mayesville-SC-29104/69173292_zpid/

    4

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