June 21, 2019: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 6/21/19 - Last OHD Update: 6/28/19 - 109 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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109 Comments on June 21, 2019: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11922 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Today’s old house photo, the seller I purchased it from called it a silver gelatin print. The back is stamped “Essex Institute” and “Beverly, Mass., Woodbury house, 1650.” The date refers to the build date, I assume the photo was taken in the mid to late 1800’s. Looking for the Woodbury House, the Peter Woodbury house turns up but it doesn’t appear to be the same house (the spacing between windows, doors and even the chimney’s and roof is not even close.) Does anyone recognize this place? I did a quick search but came up empty.

    The Essex Institute, 1848-1992) was a “literary, historical and scientific society”, it merged with the Peabody Museum of Salem to form the Peabody Essex Museum. link

    The second photo has no association with the home photo. The back is written “N.J.” so this would have been taken by Joseph Huebner (either Sr. or Jr.) Studio in Rutherford, New Jersey. The girl remains nameless.

    And lastly, unless you are interested in a property posted, please don’t call or email the agent. Think of it this way, I have over 100,000 readers, if even .5% of you called or emailed, that’s still hundreds of people. I understand if you REALLY are interested in looking to buy but not for a picture or more history. I’ve had a tiny handful of really annoyed agents because of this.

    13
  2. ddbackerddbacker says: 507 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    I wonder if the house was to the people in the photo just an old house (at the time of the photo, already over 200 years old) or did they appreciate its historical significance? If the photographer or the people in the photo were the ones who put the build date on the photo, I like to think the latter. Maybe the Essex Institute had something to do with the preservation of the house or did it just end up with the photo? So many questions.

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11922 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I wondered too! I feel dumb not knowing this, wonder when was the first American localized historical society founded? If there isn’t one already, I’d love for someone to write a book about the impact and history of historical societies, the homes they’ve saved, what they’ve gone through to educate people about why local histories are important…all the things.

      7
      • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1122 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Charleston, SC

        I’ve long wondered about this as well, since I heard years ago that the Preservation Society of Charleston claimed to be the oldest in the US, and they weren’t founded until the 1920’s. It would seem there had to be organized folks somewhere in the 19th century working to save structures that would have been up to 200 years old by then.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preservation_Society_of_Charleston

        2
      • Anne M.Anne M. says: 887 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1972 raised ranch.
        Hopkinton, MA

        Our (private, member driven) local history society was founded in 1951 and it is located in an 1870 two-room school house. There is a small museum with lots of artifacts, maps and records. It is open 1 afternoon a week and by appointment. There are programs throughout the year. We also have a local Historic Commission which is a town board staffed by volunteers. They work with the state & have established 2 different Historic Districts to protect properties from being torn down or substantially altered exteriors – folks can do what they want with the interior 🙁 The Society and Commission work cooperatively. I think many towns in Massachusetts have a similar set-up, not all have established Historic Districts however. We are also fortunate to have an inventory of historic houses in town, first done in 1988 and updated last year. The HC & HS worked together on that project and it is very well done, lots of detail.

        3
      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        There have been books written on the history of American architectural preservation efforts, which I suspect grew up side by side with local historical societies since their goals were so similar in many ways. In terms of the former, I think the basic thesis is that the national preservation movement first began with the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Preservation Society (if I remember the name correctly), which was founded in the late 1850’s with the intent of raising money through a national campaign, buying and rescuing Mt. Vernon from the deplorable condition it had fallen into in the years following Washington’s death (a ship mast replaced a decayed column, for example, and the verandah roof was in danger of collapsing altogether, to name but two of its many problems). Their fund-raising and restoration efforts were interrupted by the Civil War, but resumed after it was over. Gradually, the homes of other historically and/or politically important and usually wealthy white males became the targets for similar efforts, like the Adams homestead in Quincy, MA, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, etc., and these efforts were often led by women’s groups. Eventually, relatively wealthy southern white women who fostered visits to their gardens for women from neighboring towns ended up showing off their houses, which first began in Natchez, MS, when a late frost or some similar natural disaster decimated their gardens. Nonetheless, the women decided to don their grandmothers’ crinoline wedding dresses and show off their antebellum homes instead so as not to disappoint their out-of-town visitors. They ended up creating what became the Natchez Pilgrimage back in the 1920s or 1930s, and used the money they generated to preserving the Natchez mansions of families who could no longer afford to do so on their own ever since the Civil War reduced their once opulent lifestyles to ones bordering on poverty. So, relatively affluent white women, who were socially barred from the working world, used their civic-mindedness and class-consciousnes to play an incredibly important role in the founding and fostering of preservation efforts in the US. Eventually, the whole “business” of preservation became increasingly professionalized into what we know today.

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  3. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Wow, that really is an old house and was already a couple of centuries old when what appears to be a mid-19 century photograph was made. The masonry work on the chimney looks to be in excellent condition suggesting that this house may have already been “restored” at least once in the past when this photo was taken. Thanks for sharing and sharing the historical narrative-it seems there’s a bit of mystery involved but we have some talented history and architecture sleuths here who may be able to sort things out.

    I had a house to share in Springfield, Ohio, located on East High Street where the city’s finest old mansions remain: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/825-E-High-St_Springfield_OH_45505_M37027-21804 Offered at a mere $85,000 for over 6,700 sq. feet, this mid-19th century brick former mansion has some exquisite interior details. Although built in features were common after 1900, these appear to date from the 1880’s or earlier. It is being marketed as a rental property but its too nice for such use, IMO. Springfield, which is north of Dayton, Ohio, is along I-70 one of the busiest Interstate west-east highways. Springfield is home to the Heart of Ohio antiques mall which is football field size; it also has the Springfield antiques extravaganza flea market one of the largest in the country. East High Street even has an F.L. Wright mansion as well as several other millionaire mansions from the late 19th century. South and North Fountain street has an abundance of fine residences including a documented Barber designed home. Last, Springfield has the incomparable Phineas P. Mast mansion, a massive stone edifice from the early 1880’s that takes up a whole city block. (vacant and awaiting restoration) I was very impressed from my visit to Springfield several years ago. East High street is gradually improving and property values are increasing so I was surprised to see a fine brick home like this one at such a modest price.

    11
  4. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

    I’ve been contemplating a move south of Miami for work – and exploring mid-century houses down there. The following are an interesting mixture that manage to blend indoor and outdoor living as one. Most incorporate a lanai-like element but it seems that lanai’s aren’t as common in today’s architecture as they were 50 years ago.

    The first, and most expensive at $1.4M has a very Java/Polynesian inspired roofline. The lanai areas are separate but equal to the house. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/11313-SW-69th-Ct_Miami_FL_33156_M59040-88555#photo21

    The second at $1.324m has a rock & post-and-beam modernism. I probably would have enjoyed it before the renovations, but that lanai is unique and welcoming. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/11313-SW-69th-Ct_Miami_FL_33156_M59040-88555#photo21

    The third is the cheapest at $900k, and I can’t tell if there are anything that separates the lanai from the house – so maybe no aircon, but those ceiling fans are sure running! Plus, the previous owners try to blend the indoor/outdoor by using carpet in the wood covered parts of the lanai. Could be interesting with the right decoration. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/7345-SW-133rd-Ter_Miami_FL_33156_M60032-15962#photo3

    The last is less lanai and more tree-house. The gardens are very nice and the house takes advantage of the views. $1.3M and has a japanese/Indonesian vibe especially in the living area. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/17010-SW-77th-Ave_Palmetto-Bay_FL_33157_M54492-26758#photo25

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  5. natira121natira121 says: 678 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    Kelly,

    I found this:

    https://beverlyhistory.pastperfectonline.com/photo/79C7481C-3487-4E8C-BEC9-721799343540

    5
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11922 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thank you! That’s a shame, “…it is not believed to be standing at this time.”

      I’ll just copy this too, extended family members posting in front! Cool!

      “A b&w photograph of the c1650 Woodbury House in Beverly with members of the extended family posing in front. This clapboard covered structure with a central chimney and entrance is not the Peter Woodbury House. Its location is unknown and it is not believed to be standing at this time. This image was taken from negative number 5354 of the Essex Institute’s Collection of Negatives of Historical and Architectural Subjects in Salem.”

      3
  6. CharlesBCharlesB says: 481 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Stratford, CT–The c. 1757 saltbox Capt. James Booth House, priced at $207,270. Captain Booth (1734–1809) commanded a company of mounted coast guards during the Revolutionary War. His grandson Isaac Patterson Booth (1796–1879) ran a distillery on the property and planted a Yulan magnolia (Magnolia denudata) that is still thriving today:

    https://www.redfin.com/CT/Stratford/27-Nichols-Ave-06614/home/164828671

    1
  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1835 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings!

    1975 Modern by “two prominent Colleagues of Frank Lloyd Wright”, Canaan, NY, 1,400,000
    From the listing: “that roof-line is a paean to nature” Love that. Not exactly what I would choose first for a house, but it is a great space-really it would be a honor to live in such a structure. I am more inclined to the guest house with the shed roofs. Some of the angle shots in remind me of Avant-Garde film. There was one in particular-I should know the name-with angled walls, really a set. There is some nice photography of this house.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/121-Top-Of-Dean-Hill-Rd-Canaan-NY-12029/30000909_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=e8dc5b7f-7367-45b3-aac8-fdc27b763f43~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8&mmlb=g,57

    1805 Greenwich, NY, 149,000
    From the listing: “1805 Stoops Hotel. This tavern is on the National Register of Historic Places. Located next to the early home of Susan B. Anthony, this large post and beam structure is filled with the air of 200 year old style and grace. Recently used as a studio, it has been structurally cared for, and awaits its next role. It does not currently have a kitchen”
    I love that this house has not been fussed with/modernized, but has been cared for and allowed to be itself. It would be fun to design a kitchen to fit comfortably within this structure.
    https://www.coldwellbankerprime.com/p/2839-State-Rt-29-Greenwich-NY-12834/dmgid_133552332

    1856 Frederick Clarke Withers, Newburgh, NY 12550, 649,900
    Handsome large brick house. My apologies if this one has been viewed before, but I love it and want to make sure it did not get missed.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/60-Balmville-Rd-Newburgh-NY-12550/31840719_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=559e2db3-2ec1-4b72-9742-e8924a549035~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8
    More Withers:
    https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/4136

    1895 Queen Anne, Middletown, NY 215,000
    I am attracted to the blue and green used on the exterior. Beautiful stained glass which is rather elegant. Nice molding, pocket doors, fancy wallpapers (downstairs). I like the simplicity of the kitchen, though it might be nice to see the cabinetry mimic the pattern in the doors the house.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/48-Highland-Ave-Middletown-NY-10940/31787965_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=964869e2-d3fb-4dd7-856b-13440880ab0c~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1875 Italianate, Penfield, NY, 560,000
    I love the exterior with the fancy details above the windows, nice front entryway with great details, nice chimneys and cupola, I would like to have a close look at them.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1883-Penfield-Rd-Penfield-NY-14526/31006447_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=2b428c5c-4ba0-4dff-821a-78606b40f473~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1930 Tudor Revival, Saranac Lake, NY, 110,000
    This house needs some love
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/78-Church-St-Saranac-Lake-NY-12983/215814055_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=4392190c-2878-4c51-8489-4c4eff4ac17d~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1925 Tudor Revival, Mount Vernon, NY, 445,000
    I am posting this one for the entrance hall woodwork, wall paper, leaded windows.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/176-Pennsylvania-Ave-Mount-Vernon-NY-10552/32949560_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp&rtoken=3d76113b-c532-4dac-80cf-d5a181546769~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    5
  8. RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Here comes the rain again. https://youtu.be/TzFnYcIqj6I Don’t know about you, but our weekend weather outlook in central Indiana is more of the SAME; rain, rain, rain: so I hope everybody posts lots of great finds this week, as I’m sure I’ll have lots of time to enjoy them. Heheheh. 🙂

    Here are some quality distractions to take away the blustery blues.

    I have edited and posted another RAD home to my Flickr. This was a contributor / reader share from WAY back. I’m almost sure it was from the former “just John”; but perhaps not; so if it was your share, please say so! This house has something for everyone – guaranteed! If you love vintage, mid-mod, kitchens and baths, don’t miss it! Of all the amazing details, the real kicker is the stuuunnnniing, BLUE VITROLITE and exquisitely tiled bath, including otherworldly fabulous wall paper and fixtures. Truly amazeballz.
    As always; click the little TVplay icon, top right-ish for easy viewing. You can go through the pix individually after to leer at particular fabulousness.
    https://flic.kr/s/aHsmEq72S4

    The quality in that house VERY MUCH reminds me of this gem we saw a while back:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/03/19/1921-memphis-tn/

    I keep thinking I might like to lease my house and move down to more Southern, sort of between here and there, Indiana, to be closer to my family, and the lake. There are some deals down there to be had! Accordingly, I was looking at areas in and around Bedford, IN this week. The only thing I found that interested me personally turned out to be an old OHD post from 2014 that I missed. It’s a STUNNER – last listed at $50K no less. It’s in Tunnelton which is quite remote; showing currently off market; but man-o has it ever got me thinkin. I’ll be stopping by to have a look on my way down to the lake for the 4th weekend.

    OHD from 2014 / bracketed Victorian / Bedford – Tunnelton, Indiana 1892 / was $50K!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2014/06/25/1892-bedford-in/
    Not sure if all can view; so here is an old Trulia listing, (sorry – all I could find). Kelly’s pix are so much better.
    https://www.trulia.com/p/in/bedford/121-sunset-st-bedford-in-47421–2049349999
    What a difference perspective and good photography make!
    https://flic.kr/p/2ghLyPL
    I’m NUTZ for this place!

    Here are three more great houses in Bedford to enjoy seeing!

    Magnificent, Zook tier, inter-war, Tudor has marvelous scale, solidity, and original detailing all marvelously preserved. I’d have that insanely generous and gorgeous porch back to tiled plant space, (and you know there is great tile under that carpet); but it’s hard to argue with it as a vast, fully livable, addition to the overall living space. Either way it is beyond rad. Incredible place overall.
    ZOOK QUALITY, inter-war, Tudor / Bedford, Indiana / 1928 / $330K
    —– Turns out, B.H. has a nice viewer.
    https://www.berkshirehathawayhs.com/homes-for-sale/329-Hill-Drive-Bedford-IN-47421-272193057

    Bedford stone, almost Storybook, little stunner has GREAT original details, and not too dang bad, contempo-pop interior.
    Bedford, IN / inter-war – Storybookish / 1925 / $300K
    https://www.berkshirehathawayhs.com/homes-for-sale/1601-16TH-Street-Bedford-IN-47421-271954215

    I don’t often care for contempo-pop interiors; but this example adds just enough originality like the wallpapers, tile, quality paint, etc., to really make it sing. The kitchen is new, but they didn’t go overboard, and it looks great. Unfortunately the windows and exterior are contemporary; and though quality, not appropriate – as you may expect. I really love the fireplace and it’s location.
    Late and somewhat transitional Folk Victorian / Bedford / 1910 / $290K
    https://www.berkshirehathawayhs.com/homes-for-sale/1602-14TH-St-Bedford-IN-47421-272721382

    ++++++++++++
    Love Tudors? Who doesn’t! How about the real deal!? Check out this old episode of a BBC doc. series, (in four part YT videos), featuring an intimate look at some FINE, private, British, manorial homes; including the AMAZING, linked, genuine Tudor, pile of piles. It is BEYOND gorgeous on top of possessing extremely good, and extremely well preserved, architectural features. Guaranteed to stun and amaze!
    https://youtu.be/xKFmi14QLTI
    https://youtu.be/UCp6tArX9PY
    https://youtu.be/aiX7GrShaGQ
    https://youtu.be/bHjDTAkzXAI

    Stay dry! 🙂

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    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Great post!!!
      I was struck by the photos of Monteigne in Natchez, MS, and wonder if you or anyone else has a photo of the house as it originally was before it was greatly revamped in the 20th C. I had seen such a photo somewhere a long time ago, and although I have been to the house in person, did not realize or remember that large Italianate wing that appears in your large frontal view of the house on the right side of it. However, that side wing very much reminded me of the original photo of the picture of the main section of the house that I saw many years ago. Do you or does anyone know where a photo of the original house (or anything in writing that describes the house’s evolution) might be found? I’d really like to look such materials over just because I thought the original house looked so interesting, and wanted to better understand how it looked when first built.
      Many thanks to anyone who might respond!!!

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        AJ, when I first clipped the house I spent some good bit of time looking for pix of Montaigne. I most especially was hoping to find an image of the stair to compare the two. Didn’t find much at all; likely as it has always remained a private home in fine condition.

        As an aside, I did recently come across an old image of the stair from a house called “Chatsworth” in Baton Rouge, which I was previously unaware of. It’s a stunner!
        The stair:
        https://i.pinimg.com/originals/2e/e8/15/2ee815640fe7a0d1140badb4137632d2.jpg
        The house:
        https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c7/b7/10/c7b710fec24630a74ebff6c899282104.jpg

        1
        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          I think a photo of the Montaigne stairway appears in a book titled “Natchez” BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER THE REST of the title or the author. I bought a copy and if I remember it correctly, I think it pictured Montaigne on the cover, so if you want to do a google or amazon.com search on it, I think you can find it pretty easily. I’m in Virginia for a spell and the book is in my home in New Haven, which is why I can’t give you more info on it right now or scan you an image.
          I’ve investigated Chatsworth previously given my love of Louisiana French colonial and Louisiana and Mississippi antebellum architecture and the evolution of the first into the second. Those are the only 2 photos of Chatsworth that I have ever seen. If you google it, one entry will tell you that Jim Blanchard disassembled it before it was demolished for a rebuilding of a levy in 1930. Jim Blanchard (unless there were really 2 people by that name who were both affiliated with that house) is in fact a contemporary renderer of incredibly well-researched and accurately-drawn pictures of extant and no longer extant buildings (primarily houses) of LA and MS. He was the person that the google entry attributes to dismantelling Chatsworth before it was demolished. But I think the writer of that statement conflated him with the person who has made an incredibly realistic drawing of Chatsworth from surviving documentation about it. That Jim Blanchard has an extensive website that contains virtually every house he ever reconstructed on paper, so I’d strongly suggest you google him if you want to see his image on Chatsworth and lots of other incredible LA and MS homes that both exist today and that no longer exist. He utilizes a truly scholarly approach in his work of trying to document in great detail and with great accuracy these houses. You can also just google Chatsworth and you will find his image of Chatsworth under that, but it won’t show you all the other amazing house drawings that he has created. I wish there were more like him around and am always trying to identify them if they do exist.
          A man named Boyd Cruise was doing similar work a generation ago and a book or two of his creations has been published, but I’m not so sure he was quite as scholarly in his approach as Jim Blanchard is. But Boyd Cruise seems to be the one who really began this tradition of bringing the architectural past alive again by re-creating it through a well-researched artistic medium. If I had the talent they have, I might have pursued that very career choice myself. Jim Blanchard actually occupies and works out of one of the garconnieres at Houmas House, or at least he did a few years ago. His books are definitely well-worth getting.
          Boyd Cruise and Jim Blanchard followed in the footsteps of Marie Adrian Persac, a French emigre to New Orleans right before the beginning of the Civil War. Primarily a cartographer but also a very good architectural artist, he drew gouache drawings of many houses that were for sale in New Orleans. Many of these drawings are now in the New Orleans notarial archives. Persac also did incredibly detailed plantation paintings, particularly along the Mississippi River. Some were of the plantation homes he stayed in while working on his great map of the MS River from Natchez to New Orleans, documenting all the land boundaries and names of the plantations on the MS River, and indicating by color (pin or yellow) usage whether they were sugar or cotton plantations. A book was done on him maybe 20 years ago, but the exact title and names of the authors escape me right now, but I recall that a Mrs. Bacot was one of them. Finally, another period documentarian of some of these houses was a French priest (Father Paret, I am nearly positive of his name) who was assigned to (I think it was) St. Charles Bororemo church on the MS River in (I think again) St. Charles Parish. He did a number of fairly primitive but useful drawings of many of the houses along the MS River that existed during his tenure there in the 1850’s. His drawings were found and published maybe 15 years ago and I again cannot remember the title (it was possibly “Plantations on [or along] the River”) or the editor(s) of the book, but it was very interesting also and documented some of the many now-gone plantations that once existed along that part of the River Road. The LSU Press may well have published the book(s) on Persac and/or Paret, so you might want to check their website out if you want to see but cannot find the books via google or amazon.com. In a total geographic but not temporal shift, I’ll mention that (I think) the German artist Edward Beyer visited primarily Virginia right before the Civil War, painting (for later engraving, in most cases, but not all) natural sites, popular recreational retreats, towns and even plantation houses in great detail. A book has been published on him and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts had a major exhibition on his work a few years ago that might still be available on their website, if you think you might be interested in seeing some of the plantation houses he painted. Whatever, if anything, you decide to pursue, Good luck!

          1
    • ScottScott says: 339 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      Hey, Rose, sorry to hijack your thread, but you’re a flickr user and I’m nor. Is there a way for someone without an account to message someone who has posted a picture? I stumbled across this photo https://www.flickr.com/photos/29445095@N05/44780982800 and can ID it for the photographer.

      Hijack over.

  9. JulieJulie says: 343 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora/Hello from New Zealand,

    This 1880’s home in the posh Auckland suburb of Remuera was originally a farmhouse but the current owners have rebuilt it from the foundations up and the result is something straight out of a magazine. I am in love with the Chinoiserie wallpaper, library, and french doors opening onto the verandah which overlooks this very private property. It is a Deadline Sale and has a council valuation of $US3,193,000.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3573160

    3 storey 1930’s Mediterranean style home in the Auckland suburb of Epsom. It looks like something you would see in southern California. Beamed ceilings, large stone fireplace with wooden surrounds, wood flooring and a pool. But the windows remind me of what you would see in older homes and apartment buildings in China – a bit strange given the style of the home. But it is nice and something different although Auckland’s rainy climate is hardly Mediterranean. It is For Negotiation and has a council valuation of
    $US1,630,000.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3553879

    1936 Art Deco home in the Auckland suburb of Greenlane. It was probably a showstopper back in the day because of it’s size and rounded curves which would have been very modern then. Note the original Art Deco leadlight windows, lighting fixtures and bathroom. It is a Deadline sale and has a council valuation of $US1,241,500.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3576577

    Very pleasant two storey 1920s home in the leafy Auckland suburb of Mt. Eden. Lots of leadlight windows (and bay windows) that look out onto the private, treed section. It is for Tender and has a council valuation of $US1,943,000.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3578760

    4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Oh my gosh Julie, house 3 is a knockout! While not exactly a purist’s Deco; the place is no less fabulous for the current owner’s additions. All that wonderful, reproduction, FLLW glass is SUPERB. That den with the ceiling fixture is O M G.

      Thank you. 🙂

      7
  10. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1738 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    Sad that the Woodbury house is gone. Wonder when. Already so old when the photo was taken & it seems pretty well cared for — roof & chimney look pristine. Horrid to think how many houses that happened to & more bound to come. I wish historical societies were more powerful. I like seeing the whole family there, hardworking folks.

    A handsome Chinese Chippendale house, built 1859 in Anderson SC and moved by subsequent owners several miles southeast to Greenwood. Chinese Chippendale outdoors; inside it’s well preserved Greek Revival. On 23 conservation-easemented acres (yes!!) for $1.2 million. Worth it. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/109-Friendfield-Ln-Greenwood-SC-29649/233706290_zpid/

    Halifax VA $125,000, built 1949. It has no outstanding architecture; I find its simplicity and lack of pretension attractive. It is inviting, part of the post-war building boom with a little something extra. Some polishing up would produce a little gem. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5208-Halifax-Rd-Halifax-VA-24558/116139302_zpid/

    9
  11. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 933 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thought I would get houses posted today but trying to get an outdoor project done before the weekend. Will be back to posting once the rain starts, Sunday perhaps. 🙂

    5
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1738 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      You’re getting rain down there, huh? The last 3 Big Storms predicted, we got all battened down & ready for wind, hail & rain — and nothing happened. Zero. It always just skins north of this little town & I end up watering the garden anyway. Nuts!

      1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2207 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Rosewater mentioned the rain, too. This has to be the wettest spring we’ve had in a long time. Friends from England were here last weekend & what did it do? Rained. Grrr. They then went down to NYC, and what did it do? Rained. Well, the grass is super-green, at least… But the poor mail carriers, roofers, farmers, etc.

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        The farmers are hurting this year, Cathy. It’s not good. We’ve been lucky here North of Indianapolis because the big storms have been spaced far enough apart that serious flooding has not yet been an issue. Farther South in Kentucky-ana and Southern Illinois it’s been pretty bad, and fixin to get worse. I feel sincere sorrow for all the folks dealing with major flooding all over the place this year. On the bright side, the “Wisconsin weather”, (my mother’s term), we’ve had has been a pleasure. I’ve hardly run the AC at all: much preferring to throw up all the windows and enjoy the free, fresh, cool, air. 🙂

        2
  12. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 101 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    If you have dreams about really old houses, this home is about as good as it gets in the northeast US: the 1637 George Hubbard House in Wethersfield, CT. The 3600+ square-foot house is built around the original 18’ by 22’ one-room structure and now includes two master suites. The house is on .75 acres and lists for $519,000. And if you still need a reason to open the link, may I note that images 14-17 show one of the finest keeping rooms (and cook fireplace) you are likely to find anywhere. The kitchen is also very nicely done.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/481-Main-St-Wethersfield-CT-06109/59017551_zpid/

    12
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 844 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      We have a builder here in Lancaster County PA who builds new homes to look like this one. They cost close to twice the asking price for this one, and don’t have the water views. All of which is to say if this style warms the cockles of your heart (what is a cockle?) it looks like a good value to me.

      1
      • SarahSarah says: 68 comments
        1974 Ranch
        Decatur, IL

        Hi, John. A cockle is a small mollusk — like oysters, scallops, ans as in the song “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive-o…” (because you wanted them alive so you didn’t get sick from eating them). As far as being “warmed the cockles of my heart”, I had to look that one up. “…It is probably also the origin of the saying that something gives us that “warm and fuzzy feeling”. The cockles of the heart are its ventricles, named by some in Latin as “cochleae cordis”, from “cochlea” (snail), alluding to their shape. The saying means to warm and gratify one’s deepest feelings….” Hope this helps.

        3
  13. RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Name that light fixture – please! 🙂

    Was having a poke around the new listings in Indiana this week, (pretty dry). Came upon this okay place up in North Manchester. The house itself is meh; but there is this wild chandelier in the front bedroom up on 2. I’ve never seen anything like it! I have seen double lamps with those tall, cylindrical, hurricanes before; but never a chandelier with 8 of them! Looks like it has been converted. Maybe it’s some sort of 60’s reproduction / adaptation? Definitely worth seeing: and hopefully someone can explain what it is! 🙂 Whale oil originally?

    https://photos.zillowstatic.com/cc_ft_1536/ISq9k3k8wt4b990000000000.webp

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/IN/85740239_zpid/22_rid/1700-1920_built/42.004407,-82.694092,37.514083,-90.197754_rect/6_zm/18_p/1_fr/?

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  14. Anne M.Anne M. says: 887 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Hello, everyone! Lots of old houses for sale in Massachusetts –
    The M.Root Tavern, 1738, Montague for $399,000 – the front door is amazing:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/17-Old-Sunderland-Rd-Montague-MA-01351/56984327_zpid/
    An 1845 Greek Revival in Sandisfield with 240 acres and a 3 br guest house $995,000 –
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/82-Hammertown-Rd-Sandisfield-MA-01255/56814563_zpid/
    Beautiful 1901 in West Boylston for $749,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/58-Scarlett-St-West-Boylston-MA-01583/57672268_zpid/
    1912 colonial in Springfield for $319,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/268-Washington-Blvd-Springfield-MA-01108/56232655_zpid/
    An 1899 in Petersham for $550,000 with 3.1 acres
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/28-N-Main-St-Petersham-MA-01366/57632873_zpid/
    A 1950 ranch in Northampton for $449,000 – check out the red kitchen!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/613-Westhampton-Rd_Florence_MA_01062_M37213-83696?view=qv
    A 1964 Modernist house in New Marlboro for $1,325,000 comes with a bunkhouse and a guest cottage + 58 acres
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/651-Hayes-Hill-Rd-New-Marlborough-MA-01230/2087820173_zpid/

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    • JulieJulie says: 343 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1997 1 storey contemporary

      The M. Root Tavern exudes history and has so much appeal to me because of that and it’s features. The Sandisfield home is also a winner – it has a peaceful simplicity to it and as a nature lover being able to look after and preserve 240+acres would be a privilege I wouldn’t mind having (I have 10 acres now and three ponds plus a waterfall) but this property is on a whole other scale and well worth the asking price, in my opinion. Thanks for sharing.

      1
  15. Anne M.Anne M. says: 887 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    A couple more:
    A 1906 in Springfield, MA for $350,000 with gorgeous wood:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/55-Maplewood-Ter-Springfield-MA-01108/56219224_zpid/
    1936 in West Springfield 11 rooms, on a large lot $725,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/290-Rogers-Ave-West-Springfield-MA-01089/56241082_zpid/
    1880 in Leominster, MA for $439,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/90-Orchard-St-Leominster-MA-01453/56701393_zpid/

    2
  16. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    Regarding the 1650 Woodbury house in Beverly, MA: 1650 may well have been when this house began the incarnation that had expanded to the house we see in the mid to late 19th century, but it is extremely unlikely that it was all built in 1650. The Mayflower had only arrived in 1620, and the Puritans who founded Salem, from which Beverly eventually emerged as a separate town once it had enough people to form its own congregation (that is generally how towns became established as independent entities from the geographically larger towns of which they were originally a part) was not even founded until 1629 or so. Usually houses started as one or two thatched rooms with a fireplace at one end, and gradually expanded over time as the family became wealthier and could afford to build onto their initially very modest dwelling. This house may have evolved in that way, but it is so symmetrical and appears to be two rooms deep, so my initial impression was that it was more likely built all at one time, probably in the late 18th Century, or possibly even later (the simple Greek Revival entry, although it certainly could be an addition to an earlier structure, looks like it could be early to even mid 19th Century). There’s also the possibility that an older house is hidden by this newer front in an ell-like structure attached to the back of this house. Having lived in New England for many years, I’ve been in many houses like this one and know just how deceptive their external appearances can be in terms of their initial founding dates. And it’s all complicated by the fact that “traditional” New England farm houses like this one were built to the same basic plan for generations with so little consideration being given to stylistic concerns or fashion that it can be very hard to tell their age from their appearance alone. But what we are looking at here did not emerge fully blown and complete in 1650 and what dates to 1650 may not even be shown in this photo.
    As an aside, the Essex Institute has preserved many old Salem houses as part of its collection and their professional staff could likely give the most credible building date of this house and the year the photo was taken.

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      This discussion has been had before when this house was previously shared: (unless it was a very similar house also claiming a very early build date). I agree with your assessment of this house, and would agree that the same would hold true for any other early American building which some would claim to be quite that old. Well said. Thank you for taking the time.

      3
  17. VictoriannWyVictoriannWy says: 24 comments
    1885 Not sure see pic
    Evanston, WY

    https://app.dsmobileidx.com/1509661/258/#s=Details&m=%7B%22propertyId%22%3A1063155741%7D

    This home has been on and off the market for years in my town. If I had the capital to spare I would snatch it up myself. But I already have a money pit I am invested in.

    Kelly, you don’t have a lot of Wyoming properties. You should add this one.

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Here is the current, active listing:
      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1049-Center-St-Evanston-WY-82930/114597666_zpid/

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        In the mid 1970’s when I was a young 20-something buck and working for my Grandfather who owned and operated the old (former Union Pacific) Railcar Repair shops on the Union Pacific line, I called Evanston, Wyoming, my home for four winters. Don’t think you could legitimately call summers there by that name considering its almost 7,000 feet up in the Uninta Mountains-just checked the temps in Evanston and it’s 42 F. right now on June 23)

        In any case, Evanston was founded by the Union Pacific in 1868, Soon after, a large brick round house and rail car repair shops led to the establishment of a town. (it was named after a Union Pacific surveyor named Evans) Lots of history there-nearby coal deposits and Chinese laborers brought in many workers in that industry and a thriving China Town grew on the outskirts of Evanston near the coal mines. A rare historic Joss House survives from the days when the large Asian population worked the mines and built the railroad. Front Street, which is nearest to the U.P. railroad line, still featured several blocks of old saloons and fraternal club watering holes when I lived there. Upon a revisit a decade ago, I found nearly all the old saloons gone and the former colorful entertainment district quite sedate. Here’s a link to a local history site showing Evanston in its halcyon railroad and mining days: http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/evanstona.html

        I vividly recall there were many old houses remaining from the 19th century and at my Grandfather’s railcar repair facility, besides its large collection of still working 19th century heavy machinery, there was a fire station barn with its horse drawn fire engine still intact inside. Nevilles’ Hardware, (the building still stands) hadn’t changed hardly any from its 1880’s appearance inside when I lived there-at the time, its was still owned and operated by the original family. Here’s some Evanston photos I took during my revisit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157621690105545

        This house is known as the A.V. Quinn House (Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._V._Quinn_House ) is among the now few survivors from Evanston’s glorious past. It looks fairly intact inside and has been in use as a Bed & Breakfast establishment. The town is located on the important east-west Interstate 80 that connects Chicago with Sacramento, CA. Travel through the region can be precarious in the winters (I recall it dropping down to the minus -30’s one winter when I was there) and the Interstate closes to traffic during blizzard conditions. If you are ever traveling in the region, Evanston is well worth a stop to visit and explore.

        3
  18. nailwhacker Petenailwhacker Pete says: 69 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10-Indian-Carry-Rd-Upper-Saranac-Lake-NY-12983/2084366698_zpid/
    189K The Chapel at Indian Carry was built circa 1888 by Champlain Presbytery. 4 acre lot. stained glass windows. Someone with imagination can make this into a great home in the woods.

    8 Franklin Ave. Saranac Lake B&B anyone? 650K
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/30428716_zpid/44.358039,-74.070082,44.295411,-74.186812_rect/12_zm/3_p/1_fr/
    Franklin Manor is a historic Saranac Lake property built in 1896 by D.W. Riddle as the old Wilkshire Manor Cottage. The manor has had many different uses over the years, In addition to being a cure cottage and a private residence, it was the Carmelite Monastery from 1952 until 1998, and is now The Franklin Manor Bed and Breakfast. The home features fourteen bedrooms, eight full bathrooms and two half baths.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1133-N-Fountain-Ave_Springfield_OH_45504_M44380-76952#photo0 85K C.1912 Craftsman. Odd exterior with intact trim, floors and built-ins. 4 gas fireplaces

    2
    • Anne M.Anne M. says: 887 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1972 raised ranch.
      Hopkinton, MA

      That chapel! What a wonderful place, thanks for sharing it.

      2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Fountain Street (north and south) has an amazing collection of late 19th and early 20th century homes like the Craftsman style home you shared. Some are truly grand and are equal to the quality of mansions found on Springfield’s fabled East High street. At least one George Barber designed home is on North Fountain: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/14954186844/in/album-72157648433023988/ When old house properties come on the market in Springfield, I’m frequently amazed at how affordable they are. Wittenburg University, a top ranked liberal arts college, is just off North Fountain street. Many of the older homes there have survived due to being used for university housing. Overall, I found Springfield to be a very nice town with affordable old houses.

      1
  19. JoeJoe says: 750 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1820 Federal
    Baltimore, MD

    Kelly posted a house today that was previously posted on OHD. it is 857 W Hill Rd, Wallingford, VT 05773. Jim H had made a comment on it Sept 16, 2016 referencing gunstock corner posts. Not understanding what that was, I looked it up. I found out what it was, but also found the web site for a truly early house, 1680, in Gloucester, Massachusetts that is in surprisingly original condition. thought others might enjoy seeing it, so I am posting it here. http://www.williamhaskellhouse.com.
    It isn’t for sale, but it is available to rent for events. I have no idea if it has been on OHD before.
    * the sources I found said that gunstock posts are those that are noticeably flared with the narrow end at the bottom.

    1
    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      The info provided on the William Haskell House website is extremely interesting (look at the top of it for “History,” “Structure,” etc to get the really detailed stuff) and well-researched, hence the 1680 dating of the house seems very credible. I was very curious about when the sash windows might have been added to this house, and the writers even addressed that point. IMO, definitely well-worth a read for those interested in “First” or “Pilgrim” Period or Century houses. That various additions were put up and then removed and added to other houses was particularly informative and shows just how mobile, evolutionary and de-evolutionary houses (and parts thereof) were in earlier periods of American housing history. Thanks for putting it up!!!

  20. JoeJoe says: 750 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1820 Federal
    Baltimore, MD

    For the antique stove lovers, link to a green enameled stove up for auction in two days on Monday, June 24, 2019.
    https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/72931880_enameled-glenwood-cast-iron-stove-green-enameled-stove

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6658 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Cool. Thank’s Joe. The condition of the firebox, (mostly unshown), would be the critical bit where condition would matter much to anyone wishing to utilize the stove for anything beyond purely decorative purposes. Sight unseen – mmmmmm yeah: and then shipping! Heheheh. Fun to see though! Real purrrty. 🙂

  21. LesFosselLesFossel says: 80 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1815 Cape

    The photo shows a mid-18th century house with a Greek Revival doorway. Note that there is no paint on the house – a common occurrence on colonial era New England country houses until the 20th century
    The chimney is original.
    Note the narrow mortar joints, which is clear indication of the use of lime mortar.
    Note the lack of flashing, another clear indication of undisturbed 18th century work.
    The joint between the bricks and wood shingles didn’t leak because soft brick and lime will absorb a great deal of water and wood swells when wet.
    Note the horizontal board at the lower end of the chimney which covered the last course of shingle nails below the chimney. Usually there was a drip course of shingles that extended out for about a 1/3 of the width of a brick to help deflect water from the lower joint.
    Incidentally, early shingles used 1 nail per shingle, not two. In Maine, I have only seen white pine shingles used on early roofs – not white cedar.
    Les Fossel

    2
    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      That analysis of the chimney and roof flashing were extremely helpful–many thanks. I mistook that horizontal board immediately below the chimney to be flashing, so that thru me off in dating it, but your explanation of the bricks and that board was very enlightening and greatly appreciated!

  22. CoraCora says: 2061 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1920. Here’s a worn beauty in Savannah in need of restoration and love. Has the potential to rival it’s neighbors if properly restored. $199K

    Savannah, GA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/215-E-40th-St-Savannah-GA-31401/2083945307_zpid/

  23. Oklahoma Houses By MailOklahoma Houses By Mail says: 85 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Tulsa, OK

    When bad things happen to good houses. This house had restoration potential and it looks like someone maxed out their Home Depot credit card! This listing includes before photos.
    I’m sorry I waited so long to go get photos. It sold last summer for $93,000
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1423-NW-31st-St-Oklahoma-City-OK-73118/21851009_zpid/?fbclid=IwAR3ns39iJ9sirvr4wCz2cNvro2mPjWWiJdD8vyy-MII0exm2XVuxnI6g8EY

    You can see the original house as it appeared in a lumber dealer catalog shortly after it was built in 1914. It was built from a stock plan that was the design (design 492) of Henry L Wilson http://www.flickr.com/photos/ffshoe/48114546692/?fbclid=IwAR2g2KtXAwicLQe4F1amT_BqSRWcNRy5-gBh4OZQlLfREFocpdO7W46CrJM

    1
  24. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

    Sitting in my back yard today and thinking how this time of year makes my home look even better than usual. While I don’t plan to sell my house (ever!) I do want to take pics. If you are vaguely thinking about selling your house in the next year get some good pics this time of year. While winter has its own beauty, exterior shots houses tend to look better in the summer.

    1
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1019 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      You are absolutely right, Chris – good advice! And, feel free to share the photos – I think Kelly would probably put them on the link exchange…? My gardens look best in June, and I’ve thought of sharing pictures…if only someone else would break the ice for me! : )

      • ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

        Thanks Barbara. I keep seeing pics Jan-March where where are only snow and ice pictures and think to myself… they are really missing out by not showing the summer pix but people don’t think to take any.

  25. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1078 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    This is a 1962 tri-level MCM home with lots of original details and features. My neck of the woods.
    Ionia, MI.
    $189,900.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Ionia_MI

    1
  26. CoraCora says: 2061 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1918. Don’t know what style this is, but it’s lovely. I particularly like the kitchen. Expensive, but probably average-priced for San Francisco. $1.6mil

    San Francisco, CA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1328-York-St-San-Francisco-CA-94110/15152614_zpid/

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      All the historic details inside date from the late Victorian era. I think the house nominally is a Queen Anne cottage; therefore, I believe this house and the next door neighbor’s actually date to around 1900 but possibly as late as 1906 or shortly thereafter. (post earthquake) Might also be an even older house that was rebuilt after the 1906 quake. While not an extraordinary home by San Francisco standards, the asking price isn’t unusual for SF’s unique residential market. It’s not far away from Noe Valley and even a decade ago homes there were selling for up to $3 million. A friend of mine who bought a house with his wife in the late 1970’s for $80,000 was offered $2 million as is in 2006 for an 1880’s house that needed updates but he and his wife declined because they both loved the neighborhood. Basically, nearly all of San Francisco’s homes exceed the million dollar mark. Those with great views and on-site parking sell for substantially more. A buyer literally has to be a millionaire to afford a home there.

      1
  27. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

    1950’s house with water view in North Carolina. 260k. Realtor calls it Contemporary but that doesn’t do it justice.

    At some point (I’m guessing the ‘70’s) the husband said to his wife “Honey, can I put in a bar?” See pic 7. Wife says “Of course you can, I want my special room, too.” See pic 26. Zoom in to the sign in this pic.

    Honestly, it looks like a lot of fun and I can imagine all the laughter and love from that home. Oh, speaking of love check out pic 27.

    There must be someone who would love to live in a dive bar – and this can be your dream!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/139-Soundview-Dr_Hertford_NC_27944_M50261-52351#photo0

    3
    • Randy CRandy C says: 447 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2015 Reverse Ranch 1/2
      Olathe, KS

      This was a fun one for sure. I got caught admiring the bar when my other half got a glimpse.
      Me: But Honey, we have the perfect basement.
      Her: Yes we do, and with that she shut the screen down on my laptop……..

      Thanks for sharing. It was really fun for a little bit.

  28. 67drake67drake says: 269 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    $49,900 in Elroy WI. A farm house on 3 acres that leaves me thinking- I wish I had more pictures! Looks like it could be a bit of a time capsule.

    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Elroy/W8928-Tiedtke-Rd-53929/home/167127428

    5
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Seems like a bargain for a two story farmhouse and about 3 acres. That old cookstove in the kitchen caught my eye. It may indeed be a time capsule type home.

      1
    • SarahSarah says: 68 comments
      1974 Ranch
      Decatur, IL

      Neat house — needs some love. Photo #16 made me think of Andrew Wyeth’s painting Wind From the Sea — my personal favorite of his work. https://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/arts/bs-ae-dc-art-shows-20140719-story.html

    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      I seriously doubt 1900. This house has clearly been through some significant changes over time. However, the cornice under the seeming Italianate roof clearly suggests a building date that could be as early as 1850 but not as late as 1900, altho I know nothing about when the town this house is in was founded. The Greek Revival porch, if original (and that is a big “if”) would also suggest a significant pre-1900 building date. The most difficult-to-date feature of all is the metal cresting on the roof of the porch–that clearly looks 2nd Empire time-wise and therefore pre-1900. Yet, on the inside, all the wooden trim, the windows and the open-floor plan of the entry merged with the living room definitely look 20th C. In short, someone deliberately mixed up old elements with new ones in 1900 if that is indeed the true building date, and further changes likely subsequently appeared even later. But putting iron cresting on any new house in 1900 would seem ridiculous, so I don’t know what to say… A true mystery here, IMO….

      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        My above comment is to OHDdrooler’s comment, not Sarah’s… not sure if I bungled this or my computer or the internet did, if it doesn’t come out where it is supposed to.

    • JimHJimH says: 5156 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Indiana SHAARD survey says it’s an ~1865 brick with limestone Italianate, “one of the town’s finest residences of the period – nice detailing.”
      The Sanborn Maps show the house was there pre-1886 and that’s the 3rd or 4th porch it’s had, including an iron porch in 1899. The current one is from after 1914, with detailing matching the “Craftsman Colonial” mantel and built-ins inside. Probably the cresting and maybe the columns came from an earlier porch.

  29. klarsen1839klarsen1839 says: 71 comments
    NC

    I have a random question for all my old house lovers – I came across this renovation of an old worker’s cottage in New York. In one of the photos of the kitchen, you can see a small hole in the wall along the floor beside a door. I can’t find any mention of it in the article or photo captions. Can anybody help me figure out what this hole is? At first I thought it was a milk door, but there’s no door and I don’t think that wall is an exterior one (though without a floorplan, it’s hard to say exactly.) Any thoughts to what else it might be? Or am I wrong and is it definitely a milk door sans door?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/t-magazine/workstead-cottage-gallatin-new-york.html

    • JimHJimH says: 5156 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’d guess there’s a recently installed heating duct there, instead of a floor grate (trip hazard) in the kitchen. Everything else in that photo is new except the floor.

      • klarsen1839klarsen1839 says: 71 comments
        NC

        Well I guess that would make sense. It just seems like a fully recessed hole in the wall, which I would think was deeper than you’d want a vent but *shrug.* But you’re right that as most everything else in the whole house was completely gutted, it would make sense that that hole isn’t actually anything historic to the house and probably a new addition.

    • ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

      I’m guessing kitty access to a litter box….

      2
    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      I wonder if this is a cat or small dog walk-through to the kitchen from the room on the other side of the wall (I doubt this is an outer wall since the hardware on the door appears so meager). Assuming the owners wanted to keep this door shut but did not want a pet dog or cat scratching up the door up to indicate that it wanted in or out of the room, a doggie or kitty pass-through would make sense. But I can certainly imagine that any number of other possibilities exist for what its function is….

      1
  30. SCHodgesSCHodges says: 1 comments
    1928 English Tudor Style
    Palatka, FL

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/334-S-19th-St_Palatka_FL_32177_M62082-11876

    Built in 1928
    Located in the serene town of Palatka, Florida
    Listed at $450,000

  31. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

    When I saw this Tudor Gothic stone home in Wilmington Delaware for under 900k and over 10k sq feet I thought there must be something wrong with the location. But, street view shows an in-city house on a tree lined street surrounded by comparables. Granted there’s been a lot of woodwork painting and it doesn’t show much ofkitchen or bathrooms, but I’m hoping it’s because they are old and dated – just our cup of tea! The photographer likes showing details without a sense of the rooms themselves.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1007-N-Broom-St_Wilmington_DE_19806_M57531-25811#photo23
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postles_House

    1
  32. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

    Picture-perfect inland waterfront Victorian on the Virginia coast. 899k
    Lovely home and setting. No kitchen or baths pix and that always makes me suspicious.

    Either those must be giraffe yard art or they sure have some funny looking squirrels over yonder.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/826-Main-St_Reedville_VA_22539_M67261-08019#photo23

    1
  33. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 665 comments

    Cape May New Jersey is on the southernmost tip of the Garden State and has been a resort town for generations. There are so many historic homes for sale there right now and I’m not sure why. This is my favorite although it leaves much to the imagination.

    Located in the marina area, it looks like a tug that’s been pulled to shore and made into a house. Includes 2 lots, 2 houses, and discussion of ‘renovating while living in the wheelhouse’ whatever that means. Deserves many more pictures. 674k

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1408-Texas-Ave_Cape-May_NJ_08204_M59022-14985

    1
  34. ErinSErinS says: 32 comments
    PA

    This one was just put up for sale…already pending. Thought I’d post it before it got removed. Very unique old place:

    https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/pa/lavelle/58-dutch-rd/pid_30848205/

    (Sorry…no zillow link)

    1
  35. leslieheemsbergenleslieheemsbergen says: 3 comments
    1984 Log cabin

    This house is in Fairfield, Iowa. It is offered for $335,000. It is a George Barber built in 1896. It is 25 miles from my home & I have admired it since I was a child. Last night I attended the open house & saw many interesting features like the original central vacuum in the basement! The entire proceeds go to Iowa animal rescue. https://www.fairfieldiowarealestate.com/-/listing/IA-SEIRMLS/20171854/401-E-Burlington-Fairfield-IA-52556?display_page=1&index=6&lpp=20&total_listings=16&from=results

    2
  36. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11922 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    There’s been a few people that occasionally link to an OHD copycat site, please link to an actual listing page or the agents page. I’m not going to say the name of the site but if your share doesn’t show up here it’s because you linked from that blog.

    1
  37. ScottScott says: 339 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    Here is a beautiful red brick house in Millersburg, Kentucky. Nearly 5,000 square feet on a large corner lot. The listing gives a build date of 1841, which is probably pretty close. The house is seems to be a transitional style from Federal (small “portico” over the front door, the symmetrical chimneys at the gable ends, the prominent pilasters on the front facade, the sweeping central staircase) to Greek Revival (boxed eaves with returns on the gable ends, recessed front door with (doric?) columns, the simple but elegant woodwork). I don’t know much about the area, but at $219,900, this seems like a great deal.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1001-Main-St-Millersburg-KY-40348/2088307365_zpid/

    3
  38. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    From the old Ohio River town of Madison, Indiana, is this early to mid-19th century brick home (Federal or Greek Revival?) offered at $50,000: https://www.realestate.com/415-e-3rd-st-madison-in-47250–85419032 The brick home needs some work, obviously, but it hasn’t been excessively modernized or altered. The windows with the triple pane upper sashes likely date from around 1915. Madison is gradually gentrifying as the listing states so I agree there’s potential for value appreciation in future years. Here’s a typical streetview of the downtown district: (pan around) https://goo.gl/maps/ph78dscWsyFCnUjY9 I think there is enough tourist traffic that this house could be rehabbed (sensitively, I would hope) so it could be an Air BnB or vacation rental. The tourist season in Madison is seasonal but it is in far southern Indiana across the river from Kentucky. Some of the town’s residents are retirees and there’s an abundance of antique shops and small boutique type stores and restaurants. Thankfully, Madison has managed to avoid the national brands fast food strips covering the downtown area but it does have museums and an FM radio station. The population is slightly less than 12,000 although over 55,000 people live within 15 miles of downtown. Not many communities in Indiana have such a large collection of early to mid-19th century homes and commercial buildings. Some of our Old House dreamers could do a lot with this home.

    1
  39. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5452 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    From the north central Indiana town of Plymouth, (due south of Southbend, IN) is this spacious looking American Foursquare from c. 1905-1910: https://www.realestate.com/800-w-washington-st-plymouth-in-46563–85561771 for sale for a modest $55,000. Four bedrooms two baths. The interior looks almost entirely intact including nice leaded glass built-ins, a rare mirrored Hall Tree from the period, and period light fixtures. The abundance of household goods suggests an estate settlement situation. The house needs some TLC but it appears to mainly be cosmetic in nature. In streetview, the neighborhood looks quiet and stable: https://goo.gl/maps/XTTAWxjKBLm1s3gS6 Plymouth has a population of just over 10,000.

    1
  40. MikeMike says: 370 comments
    1886 Queen Anne Victorian
    IL

    One of my saved real estate searches produced a newly listed house featured here previously that received a lot of interest: https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2014/09/05/1886-queen-anne-emporia-ks/ In case you aren’t familiar, this is not only in the same town as our own Ross’ Cross House, but was designed by the same architect, Charles Squires! The new listing pictures do not show any real improvements since it sold three years ago, but the price seems to have gone up by about $25k…here is the link to the page on realtor.com: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/831-Constitution-St_Emporia_KS_66801_M75257-30435#photo46

    1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1835 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Mike,
      This is a great entry! I love this house. Anyone who wants to see what a wealth of conversation and historical information can be said about one house just needs to dive into the OHD link Mike has listed here. Thank you for showing us again. I hope the house finds somebody loyal to the integrity of this home.

  41. SueSue says: 536 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    My husband is soooooooooooo lucky this doesn’t have enough land for the horses.

    This Italianate (?) in West Cornwall, CT was built in the 1800’s. No specifics of when in the 1800’s it was built.

    It says that “This home was partially destroyed by fire in 2008 and its title was cleared of a life tenancy in 2018. There is a two bedroom separate barn apartment on the property.” Sadly in forecloser with the asking price of 239,900

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/57797857_zpid/

    2
  42. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11922 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Condo in a building designed by architect Hubert T. McGhee, $178,000. The condo is cute for what it is but y’all have to check out the main staircase for the building, one of the most amazing newel posts I’ve ever seen.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1116-Poplar-Ave-APT-5-Memphis-TN-38105/82697935_zpid/

    1

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