April 26, 2019: Link Exchange & Discussion

Added to OHD on 4/26/19 - Last OHD Update: 5/3/19 - 189 Comments
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189 Comments on April 26, 2019: Link Exchange & Discussion

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Today’s old house photo is new (as in newly purchased) thanks to the OHD Supporters. Unfortunately the only hint of a location is “South Street?” Seems like if this house is still around it would be easy to remember, anyone recognize it?

    And if you didn’t know this from last week I’m including an extra photo each week of people. This young lady is not associated with the old house featured and do not know anything about her either. I’m guessing it’s a graduation photo. I hope she had a happy full life.

    I was too lazy to find a book recommendation so went with a blog recommendation. “Architectural Observer” as he is known here, his blog is one of my favorites. Featuring plan and kit homes, observations on updated, abandoned and local architecture, owned house updates and other old house tidbits, I find his posts informative and entertaining. If you’d like to subscribe to A.O.’s blog, click on any post and scroll down to the comment section where you will find “Notify me of new posts by email.” You may have to leave a comment (Sorry A.O., I didn’t find another subscribe section) to subscribe but it’s well worth it.

    5
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      I like the window trim in this photo which resembles neckties. I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s interesting for what it is, but it would be a real hoot if the original owner had a necktie factory!

      7
    • SharonSharon says: 634 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      The young lady’s hair brought back memories of how our mom fixed our hair in the 1960s. She’d roll our hair in these pink and brown rubber rollers, TIGHT, the night before church or other special events. Couldn’t sleep, they hurt so badly. Then she’d leave the curl as is, not brushing it out. Our friends would pull on them to make them bounce. Come on, Mom. Really?! It’s the 60’s already. Give it up!

      https://www.pinterest.com/pin/260997740882101065/

      https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ac/b7/c9/acb7c959eb353a362b344c74f1d79a17.jpg

      7
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        We’d play with those when I was little, they’d never stay clipped but maybe because I was 5 and didn’t know how they worked. 😀

        3
        • SharonSharon says: 634 comments
          OHD Supporter

          2001 Contemporary
          Sedalia, MO

          The trick is to start at the bottom of each segmented tress and tightly roll it up until the roller is tightly flush with the scalp and each separate hair is tightly straining on its weakening follicle—tightly. Close roller quickly, being sure to capture wayward strands within the closure so that they too pull tightly on the follicles. Finished look is that all rollers are so tightly pressed against the scalp that they cannot move. Emphasis throughout process: tight! Fortunately for Mom, this was well before the era when children would call Child Protective Services on their own parents.

          7
          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            I think my problem was jamming fistful hands of hair (remember I was 5, lol.) Now I have naturally curly hair so don’t have to worry about trying to obtain curl anymore. 😀

            5
        • Scott CunninghamScott Cunningham says: 394 comments
          1856 Tudor (fmr Victorian)
          Leavenworth , KS

          Love the tower!! It’s one frivolous feature I hope to add to my house some day!

          1
      • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
        NC

        I remember those! If you fell asleep on them, they went flat & your hair looked really weird!

        5
      • CarebearCarebear says: 1152 comments
        OHD Supporter

        My mother put pincurls in my hair, with criss cross bobby pins. THAT was painful to sleep on. I used to wait until the house was quiet and everyone was in bed, then pull them all out. I got yelled at every morning, but at least I was able to sleep!

        6
      • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        Sharon, you had rubber rollers as a child in the 60s (so did I then as an adult), but……in the 40s, before special occasions, my mother rolled my hair in rags…yes, rags cut from old sheets I guess, which I had to sleep on, but oh, it was so worth it. I felt absolutely beautiful with those tight Shirley Temple style curls the next day….ringlets they were..!!

        3
        • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1920 Colonial Revival
          Upstate/Central, NY

          My mother rolled my hair in small socks once in a while – a variation of the rags deal – this was in the 50’s. But it was usually the crossed bobby pins deal. I could deal with them, but hated the socks thing. Mostly because I thought it looked so very weird! ? As a teen there were the pink rollers which were plastic & kind of hard, then the much softer pink foam rollers. The ones I hated & didn’t use much were the wire rollers with bristles inside them. Ack! It now truly amazes me that I was actually able to sleep in those things!

          3
        • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
          NC

          How did she do that? I’ve always wondered how it’s done.

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          When I was 10 my mom rolled my hair in rags to create the Nellie Oleson curls from the TV show. It was for a school thing where we had to dress up like in the books. Somewhere in this world is a photo of me with the prettiest ringlets but my mom was never a big picture taker so I have none. I was surprised how well those rags worked compared to other ways to curl though.

          3
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1152 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I wish this photo was in color. I bet those gardens were the envy of the neighborhood! I wonder if that stone with the name on it, and the hitching post are still there. We have many here in my town, ranging from simple concrete (?) pillars like this one, to ornate twirled iron posts. One of the cemeteries still has them all throughout the cemetery.

      2
  2. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    Impossible not to fall in love with this 1835 sawmill, converted in the late 1930s into a rustic but very welcoming house near Greensboro NC. I am not purist enough to object to modern baths, as in this place — the rest is so atmospheric & inviting. $875K, which I wish I had in my bank account. https://circaoldhouses.com/property/north-carolinas-oldest-sawmill-circa-1835/#prettyPhoto

    Seabrook on Edisto Island SC, a beautiful example of Federal architecture (reputedly designed in 1810 by James Hoban of White House fame), priced at $8.5 million. It’s as exquisite inside as outside, its décor done lightly, to allow this ravishing house to take the limelight. Photos include graffitti by occupying Union soldiers, which has happily been preserved. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7311-Jenkins-Hill-Rd-Edisto-Island-SC-29438/2095901518_zpid/?

    This weekend’s house photo, Kelly — well kept & much loved what? Italianate? Gothic Revival a little bit? The landscaping beautifully harmonizes the house with its ground and softens its angles — vines climbing porch posts, ferns, azaleas or hydrangea macrophylia, maybe a specimen tree or two. It’s dignified without being stiff. The pretty girl is fun to see, wearing her pendant locket or watch — wonder what papers she thought important enough to hold?

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    • MysticMystic says: 110 comments
      Huntley, IL

      The Sawmill was stunning!!!!! WOW !!!

      7
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      OMG, the second house, the federal, is gorgeous!!! I even love the present color scheme with its soothing pale blues & greens, with a punch of coral, and some yellow for warmth.

      And I was thinking the same thing about this week’s leader house pic. Was thinking Italianate, but that was then followed by, “With some Gothic thrown in??”

      4
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1123 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      The William Seabrook house on Edisto was definitely designed by Hoban. He lived and worked in Charleston, which is where Washington noticed his work during his Southern Tour. Hoban was credited with designing several buildings in Charleston including this one:
      https://www.google.com/maps/@32.7763045,-79.9310605,3a,37.5y,323.19h,99.7t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s5zzLJAkrTwQa4yV1wBuSBw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

      The house that you posted was the first and best example of the “Edisto Plan” designed in the Federal or Republic style that dominated the period. Several similar houses were built in the area by wealthy early 19th century planters when Charleston was among the richest cities in the world.

      https://south-carolina-plantations.com/charleston/seabrook.html
      http://www.nationalregister.sc.gov/charleston/S10817710031/index.htm

      1
      • LeeLee says: 46 comments

        What was grown at the Seabrook Plantation? Cotton? Indigo? Rice? It’s a stunning place. And the Union graffiti is the best! Thanks for sharing the link.

        • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1123 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Charleston, SC

          Plantations along the barrier islands from SC to north FL made their fortunes planting Sea Island Cotton, which was considered the best in the world and commanded a premium over inland varieties.

          From a 1862 NY Times report:
          “The sea island cotton planters are rich and proud, very aristocratic and fiercely traitorous; and in their expulsion and by the confiscation of their slaves, the original and the worst secession element in the South is humiliated,if not ruined”

          This was taken about the same time. That’s not snow on the ground, it’s cotton. And those are Union soldiers on the dock.

      • CarebearCarebear says: 1152 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I wonder what became of the slave quarters? Where were they situated? I think I’m just as interested in this facet of the great southern houses, as the houses themselves.

      • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        Thanks Charleston John for the links to Seabrook Plantation history. Charleston is one of my favorite places (along with Nantucket). I wonder if any remnants of the, “quarters” are extent at Seabrook….or if any archeology has been done…? It’s this, “beneath the pretty surface” history that intrigues me most.

    • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      I had posted the NC sawmill couple of weeks ago because it and its story is so wonderful, even though it was pending almost immediately after listing…..do you know if it is now again available???

      • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
        NC

        I don’t know, except that it’s still listed online. I’m sorry I missed it when you put it up!

    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 387 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      This house definitely qualifies as “eclectic” and explains why 19th C architecture was known as the “century of revivals.” I’d personally describe the house as as a very late, remotely Franco-Italianate villa with gothic, stick and eastlake influences, among others. But I’m sure others will see lots of important things that I’m missing.

  3. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I’m trying something new for OHD Supporters, new/active private posts. If one of the logged in OHD Supporters wants to test the comment, make sure they work for you?
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/04/26/1900-queen-anne-macon-ga/

    From now on, OHD Supporters look at your top menu (desktop and tablet users, under the header at the top; phone and small tablet users, it’s the 3 lined menu under “Old House Dreams”), you are looking for “Private Posts” in the menu. The unfortunate thing is that these posts will not appear in the newsletter or RSS feeds nor on Facebook or Twitter. If you want to see the private new posts you’ll have to click that link. I’ll try to have at least one each day. If you are an OHD Supporter and don’t have an account (getting the newsletter is not the same as being registered), register here (link) and then email me saying you are a supporter (you can reply to any of the register emails you get from OHD), I have to switch accounts myself as it’s not automatic.

    With these private posts I’m going to be a little less restrictive about what you say. As long as you aren’t being a dick about the owners decor, no politics and no cussing, I’m talking about these private posts. I’ll update the info at the bottom as a reminder, a separate rule/guidelines just for private posts. So if you want to talk about prices, neighborhoods, whatever, it will be fine on these private posts. (Private posts, private posts, private posts…it’s starting to sound like I’m talking about naughty parts.)

    Edit: Comment notification for these private posts are not sending. It’ll be something I work on this weekend but for now you won’t receive new comments for the private posts, if you sign up for comment notification. Clarify: this is about the private posts only.

    5
  4. RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    So I logged in this morning to make one quickie post here in the share, but OF COURSE have been sucked in for considerably longer by irresistible content . Only a bad thing if productivity is on the agenda today which unfortunately it is – all weekend.

    Cool blog Eric! Can’t wait to have time to read about your “projects”. The RAD, reclaimed materials, “Taliesin West” greenhouse is bitchin: and I love what you’re doing with that clear plastic, rigid, ribbed stuff generally. I’ve only ever seen that stuff used as pseudo skylights on pole barns. Cool!

    Aneehoo. I posted another PRICELESS house to my Flickr page if anyone might like to have a peek. It’s that AMAZEBALLS place in Galveston NonaK posted a while back in the share. Thank you SO much for that Nona. It’s such a special house, in a really special spot. Maybe it will get an OHD page now that Kelly is treating us with the “private new postings” feature; since I’m assuming the agent must never have responded to her. It certainly deserves to be admired and appreciated by old house folks as much as possible. The front hall details are the most interesting thing I’ve seen yet this year – and that’s saying something considering all the amazing OHD treats to pop up thus far! Heheheh. 🙂

    Just click on the little TVplay icon at top right-ish and let the computer do the scrolling for you. Thanks’ again Nona!

    https://flic.kr/s/aHsmAHi4qr

    7
    • NonaKNonaK says: 250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Austin, TX

      Rosewater, you are quite welcome. I am borderline obsessed with Galveston. I love the history and feel of the island and all that has survived multiple hurricanes. I think it says a lot for the quality of the buildings and the tenacity of the residents. Moving there is not an option, unfortunately, but I visit as often as I can.

      2
  5. CharlesBCharlesB says: 481 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    Any Stanley Tool aficionados out there? This is where it all began: 1797 Federal in New Britain CT priced at $199,900. Okay, it has vinyl siding…

    https://www.redfin.com/CT/New-Britain/2162-Stanley-St-06053/home/53888676

    5
    • JoeJoe says: 750 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1820 Federal
      Baltimore, MD

      Am I crazy, or is there something wrong with the room dimentions in this listing. Maybe I am demented, but I just wanted to mention that I noticed a possible typo, in every room description.

  6. KimTKimT says: 74 comments

    I had no idea there was such craftsmanship in this c1910 Queen Anne on the way into Punxsutawney (159.9K, Jefferson Co., PA):

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/804-W-Mahoning-St_Punxsutawney_PA_15767_M40724-62287?view=qv

    Maybe some Eastlake in there?

    7
  7. JulieJulie says: 342 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora/Hello from New Zealand,
    1930’s brick building in the South Island town of Winton. It was originally built by the Bank of New Zealand and as was customary at the time apartment accomodation was also included for the bank manager. The Bank of New Zealand still occupies the first floor but the current owners of the building have turned the apartment into holiday accomodation with some nice Art Deco features. It has a council valuation of $US232,000.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3534496

    1870’s villa in the South Island Central Otago town of Naseby. Lots of woodwork, rooms and a large yard/garden. Naseby is “world famous in New Zealand” for the winter sport of curling. They used to do it on a lake but now they have an indoor arena as well. I know the place has been up for sale for a while and the price has been reduced. It is for sale at $US305,000.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3279709

    Very classy and beautiful late 1800’s (?) homestead in Omakau smack dab in the middle of what used to be gold mining country in the South Island Central Otago region. 5 acres with great B&B and wedding venue potential. The kitchen is a real winner and looks just like ours (except mine is nowhere near as big or grand)and I suspect it was probably built by the same people who made ours. If I bought it I would keep it all to myself! $US991,600,00.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3477907

    1850’s colonial in rural Whanganui in the Southwest of the North Island. I love all of the original kauri woodwork throughout and check out the old toilet cistern. The bespoke kitchen with large woodfired stove and picture window over the sink is very inviting. $US891,000.00

    https://luxurypropertyselection.com/Property/36903/WGU3946/174-Kauangaroa-Road/Manawatu-Wanganui-Fordell/New-Zealand

    8
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      Hi Julie, maybe you have done this already and I missed it but I would like to know a little about how real estate is typically marketed in New Zealand. Meaning what is “tender”? And why do you mention council values? Is that meant to be a guide to an offer price? etc.

      • JulieJulie says: 342 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1997 1 storey contemporary

        Hi John – Lancaster is my maiden name and I have even been to Lancaster PA-albeit many years ago (I’m American). A”tender” is a sealed bid. Interested buyers can put their offer in an envelope and there is usually a set date by which they must be received. Then it is up to the Vendor to decide which offer they want to accept and of course there may be some negotiation. Then there is the way that it’s usually done in the U.S. The price is listed, a buyer will make an offer (usually lower than the asking price) and negotiations ensue. Sometimes you will see “buyer enquiries over (insert amount here) which means they vendor is looking for offers over that amount. The most popular way to sell is via Auction. In the States, an Auction usually means a bank foreclosure (if I remember correctly – I moved here 24 years ago) but here it is often a way to get a higher offer especially if two potential buyers get into a bidding war – I have seen houses go for several hundred thousand plus over the reserve price but you do incur extra real estate fees if you go that route. The reason you see me give council valuations is because more often than not houses are listed for Auction and that valuation gives buyers a price guide. Naturally, location is everything and if you know the area well you will know how much higher than the CV the owner is likely to be wanting. I’ve said it before that I am sorry that that the houses I show are so expensive but that is the way it is here. Where I live you can easily pay $NZ850K for a modest home on 400sqm of land. My home is on 10 acres so you can imagine what it is valued at but we bought it 20 years ago. When my husband retires we are moving way down to the southern tip of the South Island where we can buy a nice home for anywhere between $300-600k or build for around 600K. That will leave us plenty of money left to live on comfortably in addition to the New Zealand Superannuation plus I will also get Social Security from the U.S. I hope this helps and I am happy to answer any more questions.

        5
        • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 837 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Victorian Farmhouse
          Lancaster, PA, PA

          It does help, thanks! I am always interested in how other countries sell property. There are quite a few variations. I think your NZ system is similar to what I’ve heard about the English and Scottish systems (which makes sense). The only thing I would add is that in some parts of the US (including here in Lancaster County) some sellers still believe in using live auction to sell properties that are not in foreclosure. Many of our farm properties sell this way. So give me a minute to climb up on my soapbox. I believe our system here in the USA is ripe for change. The internet changed how 95% of buyers find homes, and these days instead of the buyer’s agent finding homes to show, the buyers find the homes online and tell their agent that they want to see them. I also think our agent commission rates are way too high (even though I’m a broker myself). And I’m not entirely sure why the tradition of the seller paying the buyer agent’s commission endures. But most buyers still need help in purchasing — the purchase process keeps getting more regulated and complicated every year. Sellers typically need less help, as a sale transaction has a lot fewer variables than a purchase. I think the next wave in US real estate brokerage is flat fee commissions (same amount regardless of the sale price of the property, instead of a percentage of the price) and buyer and seller each pay their own agents. Right now we have sort of a Robin Hood system where huge commissions on expensive properties balance out the small commissions on cheap properties. But I don’t think that’s fair. A dirty little secret is that it is basically the same amount of work to sell an inexpensive home as it is to sell an expensive one (with the exception being the really high end ones which can sit on the market for years and often require special marketing techniques and high-cost promotions). So we shall see how things evolve in the next 5-10 years (if it takes that long).

          3
          • JulieJulie says: 342 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1997 1 storey contemporary

            The Scottish system is a different kettle of fish:https://www.savills.com/blog/article/192349/residential-property/how-to-buy-property-in-scotland.aspx

            Real estate commissions here in NZ are between 2.5-3.5%.

            1
            • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1180 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1875 Limestone house
              Langeais, Loire Valley,

              In France the rates are 4-8%, the lower the price of the house, the higher the commission rate, and the contrary: the higher the house price, the lower the commission rate. And it’s quite a lot to deal with, that’s why lots of sales are done buyer2seller without the help of a real estate agent. Because there’s then notary/sollicitor fees 5-8% to add up and you can’t skip these as you have to go through their services to have a deed. In our case, we bought our house 139,000€ if i remember well, directly to the seller and had to also pay 10k€ to the notary (most of the amount goes into the country’s piggy bank). If sold through an agency, it would have cost us an extra 10k€. When it’s your first purchase and can’t afford to spend a lot, 10k€ are a big deal.

              • JulieJulie says: 342 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1997 1 storey contemporary

                I watch a show in which Brits looking to move to sunnier climes go look at houses in various places (usually France and Spain)and I knew that solicitors were involved but in the shows the host always deals directly with a real estate agent which makes me wonder if the buyers even know they have the option of purchasing directly through the seller. That is an awful lot of money you had to pay to the solicitor. We have to go through a solicitor here as well in that they check that the deeds are kosher and also obtain a LIM (Land Imformation Report)which may include information about potential erosion, subsidence or slippage, flooding of any type, hazardous substances and any overdue rates/property taxes. I think it cost us $NZ2,000.00 or $US1,300.00. On a brighter note, I have seen so many swoon worthy homes in France – lucky you!!!

                1
                • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1180 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1875 Limestone house
                  Langeais, Loire Valley,

                  What’s the name of this show? I’d like to watch it!
                  Well when you are a foreigner it sure is better to get the help of an agent to avoid any pitfall or issues regarding administration matters. You know about French administration, right? Several reports are needed: statement about electrical and insulation performance, abestos/lead paint presence, sewer system conformity check…

                  Our solicitors just adapt the deed to the new owner but i have a very low esteem for them, i see them as lazy (their clerks do all the job). In our case, at the intermediary appointment 1 month before effective sale they had written mistakes about where which room is (which floor), we asked them to correct the deed. On D-day, the mistakes were still there. For a friend’s house (he doesn’t speak French), i helped him through the process. The usual delay between your offer being accepted by the seller and actually becoming the new owner is 3 months. His purchase took 3 extra months because the deed was so old it was difficult to understand what belonged to whom (shared courtyard and attached buildings). The old lady that was selling the house had given us the keys before D-day to start the works anyway as the house had been sitting empty for over 30 yrs. Believe it or not, on D-day, while we were working there, the solicitor came in the morning to measure the house length. Again. On D-day. My friend was supposed to seal the deal a few hours later. *insert curse word towards French solicitors here*.

  8. KimTKimT says: 74 comments

    O, to let loose on this place with an Arts & Crafts budget!

    How could they have modernized it like that?! (but I do love the walk-in pool)

    c1895, Boston, MA, 3.95M:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/96-Rockwood-St_Boston_MA_02130_M41910-69634?view=qv

    7
  9. PineyPiney says: 21 comments
    NY

    Here’s a kinda cute house I saw today!
    Build date 1930, but clearly with a mid-century renovation. I’m kind of in love with the kitchen tiles.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/54-Church-St-Presque-Isle-ME-04769/112633970_zpid/?
    (Presque Isle, ME, 74k)

    3
  10. JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1906 Craftsman (Greene & Greene) – Pasadena CA – $4MM
    The Dr. William T. Bolton House was neglected for decades when the architects were virtually forgotten, and saved from the wrecking ball in 1979.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/370-W-Del-Mar-Blvd-Pasadena-CA-91105/20858030_zpid/

    History:
    http://www.thecraftsmanbungalow.com/greene-and-greene-bolton-house/

    14
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Nice, very nice! My favorite bits being the staircase’s landing & its window, the alcove with the built-in benches (which are large enough for naps!), and the wall of built-in cabinet/closet space.

      1
    • LeeLee says: 46 comments

      What a house! How could anyone French Provincialize such a stunning piece of Arts and Crafts perfection?!

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        The decor seems a touch tract house aesthetic and not very creatively or appropriately imagined really when you consider what a very specialty environment this is; not to mention the place being worthy of being a world heritage site – IMO. 😉 Surely the next owner will figure all that out, and maybe we’ll see it again in a few years. It certainly would make admiring this EPIC house more enjoyable. 🙂

        2
        • JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
          OHD Supporter

          I agree the decor isn’t especially inspired, and the repro woodwork and fixtures aren’t ideal. The irony is that the 1st 2 owners, Bolton and the Culbertson sisters, commissioned 4 G&G houses and a boatload of their furniture that would look fabulous there, if it hadn’t already been snapped up by museums and big $ collectors.

          2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      A bit too perfect for me; but worth the money no less. The Wright style scuppers are a magical touch. Thx Jim.

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I had to post it especially after reading that article. It’s a great house to reference when someone brings up a home too far gone or whatever reason someone else shouldn’t bother. Thank you Jim!

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/04/28/1906-craftsman-pasadena-ca-greene-greene/

  11. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central, NY

    A couple of Colonial Revivals; modest houses with reasonably affordable prices. In the Albany/capital district area of NY.

    1) 1930, $269,900; 1,456 sq. ft. Cute Dutch Colonial.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/769-Feura-Bush-Rd-Delmar-NY-12054/70900830_

    2) 1930, $229,900; side hall (although no pic of the entrance hall or staircase for some odd reason!) Colonial Revival. Nothing special in a particular way, but a nice, traditional older house. The kitchen is new, but nothing OTT. Although the exterior could use some foundation landscaping, IMO.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/64-Amsterdam-Ave-Menands-NY-12204/29680936_zpid/

  12. KevinONeillKevinONeill says: 155 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1884 Victorian Cottage
    St Paul, MN

    Beautiful 1893 Condo in downtown Minneapolis.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1227-Hennepin-Ave-APT-2D-Minneapolis-MN-55403/1942454_zpid/
    As a side bar I rented a unit in this building back in my college days. Unit 5A had a incredible view of downtown Minneapolis. The rent was $495.00 per month and I struggled every month to pay it. The owner was out of state and kept trying to get me to buy the unit for 45k.
    This building was also the scene of a notorious murder for hire in the 1890s. additional link below. Shows a picture of the building back then.
    http://www.murderbygaslight.com/2010/05/minneapolis-svengali.html

    7
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Holy crap! That is not just annnny kind of predictable, over the store, CBD, condo conversion – nossir. Woof! Thank you Kevin… A fantastic Midwestern example of a sort of almost top shelf, high late Victorian, New York city almost, classic 8+ (now truncated and adapted for the conversion) flat; and so beautifully preserved / restored / UPDATED! That comfy kitchen quietly thrilling in its verticality and simplicity. Nice. Those mantles are also clearly EPIC. Holy sperg Batman! If this doesn’t get regular posted It should be added to the contributors private post list; along with that other SUPER MONDO UBER rad example Kelly found recently. Please. 🙂 Do I hear a second?

      That price is astoundingly spot on worth it. SOLD!

      3
      • KevinONeillKevinONeill says: 155 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1884 Victorian Cottage
        St Paul, MN

        Rosewater, no one could ever accuse you of holding back. This building was done in the early eighties which was a time of gut the interior, save the shell. This was done very sympathetic for the time. The developer installed an elevator but kept the five story staircase intact. These were originally “Pullman” style front to back luxury apartments. They were basically split in half. I have fond memories of living there. There was a flight attendant who lived below me who would agonize over the fact he thought he paid too much for his unit 70k, can you imagine?
        About ten to fifteen years ago I sent a letter to the occupant of 5A asking if they ever wanted to sell they should call me. Never heard back.
        All of the street scene photos in the listing are walking distance from this building.

        3
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Yeah – heh; sober and sedate I aint.

          How lucky to have enjoyed living there. I’ve seen a ton of upper condo conversions in Indy; and never seen one I liked. This one is special and rare. I’m sure you have your eye on the building, so will look forward to seeing more units as they pop up. I really have enjoyed your condo contributions. Thanks’ for bringing a fresh perspective.

          1
  13. CharlesBCharlesB says: 481 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1846 Gothic/Greek Revival
    NY

    1833 Greek Revival church in Ashville, NY (about two miles from Chautauqua Lake)–$32,900:

    https://www.trulia.com/p/ny/ashville/3183-open-meadows-rd-ashville-ny-14710–2013494445

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Oh my gosh Anne, the Victorian and the Neoclassical mix are so great! The earlier added porch and upper, Queen Anne, oversized bay detail in Leominster are the best! Great colors there too. Love the way they highlit the differences in the periods that way. The Springfield house is one reason why I love your state: it’s just full of great, SOLID, houses like that. Another GREAT porch there as well. The probably Bradbury paper in the hall is decadently gorgeous enhancing the beautiful wood. TY 🙂

      2
      • Anne M.Anne M. says: 881 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1972 raised ranch.
        Hopkinton, MA

        Thank you! Went to an event today in a Mass. town I had never visited before & all I could think was “wow! look at all these great old houses!” 🙂

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          I would, (and very possibly may some day), often do the same if I were there too. MA is VERY high up on my might want to live there someday list. I for sure want to live on the East coast before I’m worm food. I’ve stayed on the cape a handful of times when I was a kid and LOVED it immensely: and stayed at P.town twice when I was younger, back in the 90’s. Thaaaaat was fun, fun, fun. Never saw so many tie die concessions in my life, heheheh, not even at Dead shows back then. 😉 Years ago I clipped the most amazing Italianate house in Barnstable. It’s buried deep somewhere in a file on an external hard drive. I’ve searched for it a couple of times over the years and have never found it. Sure wish I could. Cheers Anne! 🙂

          1
  14. SharonSharon says: 634 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 Contemporary
    Sedalia, MO

    NEVER EVER SAY “IT CAN’T BE SAVED”! EVER!

    These are not for sale BUT you can stay the night–or more! Unbelievable restorations by Landmark Trust in England.

    https://www.messynessychic.com/2018/02/06/englands-secret-historic-hotel-network/?utm_source=drip&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekend+Conversation+Starters&utm_content=Weekend+Conversation+Starters

    11
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      It can’t be saved ever. 😉 Just had to be a punk.

      3
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      The Landmark Trust does a great job of keeping places alive in the face of development or dilapidation. Considering the conditions of modern sprawl, they are a godsend to buildings that would otherwise be gone.

      3
      • JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
        OHD Supporter

        They do a much better job in Britain of maintaining historic places with open space for parks and recreation. In the US, it seems the open space conservationists want to tear down all the old buildings and return to nature, as though wildlife is somehow threatened or offended by architecture.

        4
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          I really wish America would adapt Britain’s grade system for properties and each grade is a different level of approval required (I know, historical districts are similar but take it further with individual properties.)

          Landmark properties not to be touched except for maintenance or system upgrades (museum homes or incredibly rare time capsules.) The next grade are for properties that need approval for interior and exterior changes. The next for exterior changes only. The next no approval needed (for homes that have already suffered too many remodels or non-significant architecture/history.) Each grade also comes with demolition non/approval with the top NO demolition and those that do on the sly must pay the total cost for rebuilding it exactly as it was (or maybe just seriously heavy fines or possible jail time.) This goes for homes, commercial buildings, cemeteries, parks. Right now there’s nothing to stop any National Register home from being completely obliterated by remodels or demolition. These grades may help buildings that could be reused in other ways or integrated into developments rather than being demolished.

          7
          • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
            NC

            Something like that would be great but no organizations have the authority given to British ones. Control is very tight there; you can’t do any remodeling even of a non-graded place in most cities without consent from your neighbors. How nice it would be to see a beautiful old building for sale without having to hope it’ll remain as is. Of course one person’s beautiful is another’s revolting, lol.

            Jim, the other side of the coin you mentioned are those involved in any part of the construction/real estate industries who declare any natural, open land “wasted.” Here near Charlotte, it’s “Bring In The Dozers!” — construction is about to start on a house across from us where thick woods currently stand, just as fawns will be born and hidden in its brush. But there’s $$$$$ to be made!

            1
            • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
              Admin

              1901 Folk Victorian
              Chestatee, GA

              I know, the National Register should have a bigger say than it does. I was about to say something about politicians and where our taxes go but Cora would have to delete my comment! 😀 I was thinking of a home in one of the towns I use to live in where they built a sad little park and tore down an 1870’s vernacular Gothic Revival. That home could have been turned into a beautiful event home or museum if the town had cared. Even better, the local college bringing in volunteers to help restore and maintain the home. But nope, it was in the way of where the sandboxes are now.

              2
          • Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
            OHD Supporter

            2001 craftsman farmhouse
            Bainbridge Island, WA

            Kelly, I agree totally. Last week I received the following email from the Washington Trust for HP. (I sent a letter to NPS). Not only do we not come close to England’s preservation ethic, ours is presently being diluted further.

            “Newly proposed rule changes would adversely impact the National Register of Historic Places and we urge you to submit comments to the National Park Service by April 30. The proposed changes would:

            Make it more difficult to establish local historic districts by allowing owners that hold a larger amount of land within a proposed historic district to prevent National Register listing, even if a majority of private property owners within the proposed district do not object. This is contrary to the fundamental, democratic principle of one person, one vote.
            Allow federal agencies to withhold nominations to the National Register even if they are deemed significant, essentially giving the Federal Government veto power over local places. Local communities, tribes, and state historic preservation offices are often in the best position to understand the historic significance of these sites and our Federal Government should not be able to simply “opt out.”
            Our friends at Preservation Action have developed a helpful resource page with detailed information on the negative effects of the new rule. The page also includes a sample comment letter along with a one-pager highlighting the threats to the National Register.

            The National Park Service is seeking public comment and we need your voice! Summit your comments directly through federalregister.gov in opposition to the proposed rule changes by April 30. In addition, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has developed an advocacy page on this issue, along with a one-click digital option over at savingplaces.org.”

            http://preservationaction.org/national-register/
            http://preservationaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/NRComments_OnePager.pdf

            1
            • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
              Admin

              1901 Folk Victorian
              Chestatee, GA

              That would be incredibly detrimental in getting homes recognized as being historical/significant. “…make it more difficult to establish local historic districts by allowing owners that hold a larger amount of land with a proposed historic district…” that sounds like some BS from developers wishing to exclude their property so there would be less tape in order to tear it down. What a step backwards. April 30th appears to be the date to submit comments to the NPS about this.

              1
  15. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central, NY

    Of a different ilk than the two I posted a bit earlier:
    1935, $465,000. Large & grand and sort of pricey. The foyer alone is huge (25’x25’) – almost half the square footage (1,344) of my own house! And lovely. Across the Hudson R. from Albany.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/818-Washington-Ave-Rensselaer-NY-12144/32229719_zpid/

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      That stove belongs elsewhere; like in the Ford collection, or my living room. A very, very nicely considered installation there lends a decent dose of really old credence to the place. That brick is gorge.. TY

      1
      • natira121natira121 says: 661 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1877 Vernacular
        Columbia River Gorge, WA

        That stove brings to mind a fascinating visit I paid to Buck’s Stoves in Portland, OR in 2001 after I bought my house. I was looking for an antique wood stove for my living room, and after spotting a few in his public showroom, and freaking out over how cool they were, he took me to his two storage warehouses and educated me while I drooled.

        I ended up with a mid-sized cylinder parlor stove that blew my budget by about $500, and I went home happy, but Man! he had some amazing stoves dating back to the 1830’s!

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Sounds like heaven Natria. 🙂 I’m cuckoo for old stoves. Guys who collected those stoves going back, and up through the 90’s, are SO lucky to have gotten them when they were relatively affordable. Glad you’re happy with your splurge. I will someday splurge on a fine base burner when a good deal finally presents itself. Sigh – someday.

          1
  16. Dr.SnyderDr.Snyder says: 71 comments
    1895 PORTAGE, OH

    So, this is a 1908 Irondequiot/Rochester, New York home. The sale price varies; right now she’s at the low 200s, though she’s not for sale…I keep an eye on her just in case. Obviously it’s a 1 1/2 story Cape Shingle with a Gambrel roof. For anyone familiar with Rochester, it’s in Tent City (or White City) at the end of one of the many terraces that dead-end at the shore line of Lake Ontario. I rented a tent conversion home the next terrace over for a year and wandered past this home a number of times, though I’ve never been inside, and fell in love. In the words of Fee Waybill, “She’s a beauty,” and I’ve fantasized living out my days living in her and listening to the waves of my beloved Ontario lull me to sleep at night…Dover has nothing over my beloved Big Water.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/389-Lake-Front_Rochester_NY_14617_M34566-02174#photo24

    2
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      I like this one! Cute, comfy home, and pretty landscaping. Although I’d wonder about the beach erosion possibly creeping up…

      1
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1735 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      Hope you find yourself sitting in that sunporch someday. Adorable house and the garden looks fabulous. I grew up in Pittsford — it’s a lovely part of the world. If I could afford the taxes, I’d love to go back there.

      1
  17. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    Next door to my favorite on the river in Smithfield, VA….interesting house.

    223 South Church St., Smithfield, VA….1882, $550,000 also on the river.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/223-S-Church-St-Smithfield-VA-23430/79136419_zpid/utm_source=Yahoo&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=addresssearch

    1
  18. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1919. Overall a fantastic old house, in good condition. I adore the original kitchen and the porch! I’ve always wanted to live in Austin; it always seems to make the “best cities” lists. Maps seems to show this one close to downtown and in the listing it mentions possible commercial zoning. I hope someone buys it and loves it as their home. $800K

    Austin, TX:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4312-Red-River-St-Austin-TX-78751/63835829_zpid/

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Nice Cora. Really great house. The price must be the “weird” premium; and I get that, (of course – heheheh).

      I am being SO naughty spending all this time with houses besides my own this weekend, but how rewarding, as everyone is posting some REALLY great stuff. Wish I had time every week.

      Thanks’ for all you do. 🙂

      2
  19. RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Tippecanoe Place, South Bend, Indiana. I’ll bet a nickle Pete has played at least one piano in this house. Heheheh. 🙂

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ac/fb/4c/acfb4ccef5af92fb058168c2f2dcf1d5.jpg

    Bonus fun click for house folks only. 😉
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Cr_apcZkpY

  20. QuiltingWitchQuiltingWitch says: 79 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 split level prisoner
    Great Falls, MT

    Big & lovely, Augusta, GA $350,000 – https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2575-Henry-St-Augusta-GA-30904/14945983_zpid/

    Beautiful wood inside a stone castle, Jackson, NH $1,250,000 – https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/61-Carter-Notch-Rd-Jackson-NH-03846/86722750_zpid/

    2
  21. ScottScott says: 339 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    I’m sharing this one because it reminds me of our ancestral farmhouse that was once located in Lawrence County, Indiana. The house my grandmother spent summers in was a huge brick Greek Revival house built beginning in the 1850s. The massing and detailing was similar, but our house didn’t have a front pediment along the front. At any rate, the home fell into disrepair and, after the last occupant died, vandals got into the house and stripped it of the staircase, mantles, light fixtures, and other items. The house finally met the wrecking ball in the mid-1970s, a few years before I was born, leaving only photos and memories.

    I troll this site hoping to come across a home similar to the one our family lost. Not necessarily to buy, but to admire. As I said, the brick in this link is similar. Architectural historians, I have a question: Why would the front of the house, left of the pediment, be so symmetrical while the right side is so asymmetrical? Was it built at different times? 502 S. Sycamore, Martinsville, Indiana. 6,800 square feet, 1 acre, 10 bedrooms, $239,000.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/502-S-Sycamore-St_Martinsville_IN_46151_M38327-12595

    1
  22. NonaKNonaK says: 250 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Austin, TX

    What do you think? You know how the occasional house just grabs you? This is one in Galveston (where else?) that is nagging at me. It gives a build date of 1960 but I think it is much older. It is in an historic area and surrounded by some homes built in the 1800s. Note the front door and it’s transom, the baseboards and windows and window trim, the door knob in the blue room etc.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3329-Avenue-O_Galveston_TX_77550_M73012-08237

    1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11877 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Older than 1960 for sure. It does pull you in and could be stunning with a total restoration. As to the build date, my mind is blank on if they built raised cottages before the big hurricane or raised them after. I’ll definitely add this to my post list, if it doesn’t sell before I can get to it.

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5147 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1890’s at the latest, since it shows on the 1899 Sanborn Map with the same porch gable and rear ell. The trim with bullseye corner blocks and the decorative truss in the front gable, of which only part remains, are from that period also.

      The resident from the late 1890’s was William A. Schuchard (1852-1912), a German-born druggist who came over in 1870. Rooming with him and wife Carrie was apothecary Sigmund Weinstein, also from Germany.

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Poor thing. I wonder if it was raised like that after the big one?

    • NonaKNonaK says: 250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Austin, TX

      Thank you all! I’m happy I seem to have learned a few things from this wonderful community of folks. I’ve noticed that a lot of homes in Galveston have 1960 as a build date. And many are like this house, in that you know they are not. I wonder if it is related to hurricane Carla in ’61. Maybe they had some kind of property data clean-up (records destroyed?) and any home they couldn’t confirm the build date just put down 1960? (before Carla?) I’m going down in a couple of weeks, I’ll ask around and see what I can find out.

      1
    • Leah SLeah S says: 164 comments
      OHD Supporter

      TX

      NonaK, that raised cottage does have potential! Great find. Peeling off the old siding and replacing the columns would make a huge difference on the exterior. I grew up visiting Galveston, and was just there a couple of weeks ago. The main things I miss when I go back are so many of the old live oaks that perished during Hurricane Ike. Fortunately, I see that the city has replanted, at least on Broadway Ave.

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Although many details are newer, this house probably originated during the 1880’s building boom. It was surely one story originally but was (wisely) raised after the infamous 1900 hurricane. The Queen Anne style door could be original or found and installed later. Some of the original Victorian era door trim and corner blocks remain. Enough clues remain for a fairly faithful reconstruction to take place.
        As for Hurricane Carla, I’m giving away my age here by stating I remember it vividly. We lived in Corpus Christi at the time and I was wide eyed and somewhat terrified kid as the wind squalls blew though our yard and knocked our wood fence down. I recall elementary school was out for what seemed to be two to three weeks. But as I also recall that Galveston did not suffer greatly except for a high storm surge from that storm. However, Port Aransas and Padre Island were severely impacted. Galveston does suffer from it’s elevation of being just feet from the sea level.

  23. New listing in Redlands, Ca. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1106-W-Highland-Ave-Redlands-CA-92373/17269247_zpid/ Needs TLC. Lovely home. I have been in it a few times through the years. Beautiful street with other stately homes.

    6
  24. CarolynCarolyn says: 303 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    One of my favorite houses ever here in Grand Rapids. I don’t even mind the kitchen opened to the dining room. 1900, $480,000

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/553-Paris-Ave-SE-Grand-Rapids-MI-49503/23815872_zpid/

    6
    • EileenMEileenM says: 290 comments
      Camillus, NY

      Beautiful home, nicely decorated. I even like the updates. I know, I know, purists don’t like painted woodwork and 2019 kitchens, but this I could live in.

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        I guess I’m a “purist” with regard to most aspects of old houses Eileen; but many times painted wood work doesn’t bother me at all; and often is an improvement in what would otherwise be dark cavernous spaces. Very many times trim details were originally painted, and intended to be so. Kitchens are a fascinating subject. Sometimes antique kitchens are great; other times when contemporary kitchens are done well and in harmony with the house, they are a stunning plus in antique spaces. The kitchen in this super elegant, genuinely historic home is the most thrilling thing ever; and though it stands alone as an uber modern workspace, it doesn’t clash with the house at all – IMO. Check it out: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmanHNLP

        1
    • ScottScott says: 339 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      I take one look at that beautiful and delicate newel post lamp and realize that with my kids it would only last about 15 seconds before they bent or broke it!

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6648 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wow. I can see why you say that Carolyn. That house is gorgeous! Of course I’m more thrilled by the great untouched attic than anything. Thanks for posting. 🙂

  25. JoeJoe says: 750 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1820 Federal
    Baltimore, MD

    This is a silly post, but I thought it was kind of fun. When looking at last week’s Redding CT post’s aerial view I saw a Google Maps label that said, “Tonka Truck Tree”. I couldn’t guess what it was. I thought it might be a road or development name. Want to see?
    https://www.google.com/maps/@41.307735,-73.3315937,3a,75y,184.74h,63.92t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sDZJKgjDTD-DK3_pKt3t9ww!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
    Hope you get a kick out of it too!

    2
  26. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1870. This old church makes me a little sad. The stained glass windows are beautiful. The price is right; wouldn’t be too difficult to convert this to a unique home. $27K

    Longton, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/406-Montgomery-Longton-KS-67352/2084884753_zpid/

    1
  27. Sandy BSandy B says: 765 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    The multitude of congregations fading makes me very sad. This is a very nice, straight building, however the street view isn’t very encouraging. I’m just afraid someone might strip those gorgeous windows and leave the rest. ?

  28. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1908. I almost passed this one up without looking at the photos. I’m glad I didn’t! Check out the millwork. Beautiful. $175K

    Gainesville, TX:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/301-E-Scott-St-Gainesville-TX-76240/90323956_zpid/

    1
  29. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1887. A big fancy Queen. Not sure if some the bathroom fixtures are original or just made to look old, but either way, they’re great! The wallpaper in the stairwell is gorgeous. Lots of information in the listing about renovations throughout the home’s life, but I would like to know whose house this was when new. $360K

    Wausau, WI:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/504-Franklin-St-Wausau-WI-54403/71307172_zpid/

    3
  30. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 664 comments

    Bordering the St Croix river in Minnesota, this gothic fantasy is truly unique. The closest city is Minneapolis, but the address says Denmark Township. With over 170 photos you can certainly get your fill of OHD fantasies. Not sure what justifies the $3.6M price tag, but certainly will be a joy for the next owner. Pretty authentic and original condition, not sold in 60 years, and I’m betting some infrastructure (HVAC, eletrical, plumbing) will need to be attended to. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/7689-Quadrant-Ave-S_Hastings_MN_55033_M89615-75611#photo120

    2
    • natira121natira121 says: 661 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      That’s a cool place! I was of course hoping for a 1920’s kitchen, but no such luck. The existing kitchen isn’t bad though. The outdoor areas are spectacular!

      • ChrisICUChrisICU says: 664 comments

        Natira121 my bet was the original kitchen was very utilitarian and likely not what the owner of a house like this would use. The renovation to what we see today probably occurred during the transition from in-house domestic staff to the homeowners spending more time in the kitchen. Then again, there could have been a kitchen in another part of the house and this kitchen was installed in a more convenient place. Either way, I like it but it’s probably mid-century.

    • ScottScott says: 339 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      Wow! Is that an agate pedestal sink in the powder room? I’d love to know the history on this one.

    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Holy mackerel – not one’s run-of-the-mill house!

  31. ChrisICUChrisICU says: 664 comments

    You gotta like a lot wall-to-wall shag carpet to like this one… but what a special MCM. Designed by Bringham Young’s great-grandson, this Salt Lake City 1970’s modern is a treat. Pretty original condition, including the kithen. 899 thousand
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/790-E-Northcliffe-Dr_Salt-Lake-City_UT_84103_M12118-64409#photo9

    2
  32. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    From the town of Napoleon in Ohio (on the Maumee River, about 44 miles southwest of Toledo, pop. about 8,800) is this nice Queen Anne style residence priced at $190,000 https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/714-W-Washington-St-Napoleon-OH-43545/75069036_zpid/ It features two baths, five bedrooms, and nice woodwork inside. Said to date from 1898 which seems accurate.

    2
  33. natira121natira121 says: 661 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    My daughter told me about a house for sale this morning. Great neighborhood, close to Portland,OR in Camas, WA.

    1952 350K I don’t know what to call the style, but it’s not been touched since it was built. Nifty vintage kitchen and bath!

    The exterior is very blase, but would dress up nicely with wider trim, and perhaps shutters.

  34. harrisfrank4harrisfrank4 says: 1 comments
    1763 Nottingham, NH

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/152-Gile-Rd-Nottingham-NH-03290/86827836_zpid/ This patriot’s house was built in 1763 originally as a tavern. Restoration started in 1985 and has recently been completed. Maj. John Gile who built the home fought in the Indian Wars and was a 1st Lieutenant in the continental army. He fought with Washington at the siege of Boston. It is now on the market for 591763.

    4
    • natira121natira121 says: 661 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      That is one gorgeous house. Very well done! I wish they had a picture of the set kettle mentioned in the listing.

  35. KevinONeillKevinONeill says: 155 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1884 Victorian Cottage
    St Paul, MN

    Mansion on the cheap, Sabina Ohio, $109,900.00 on a two acre lot.

    https://www.zillow.com/savedhomes/for_sale/227512003_zpid/1_pnd/54.572061,-65.566407,16.720385,-125.595704_rect/3_zm/1_rs/1_fr/?

    3
  36. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1920. What a delicious creampuff. The vintage bathrooms and cute kitchen are sweet, and I love all of the vintage wallpaper. Other than remove carpet, I wouldn’t change much. $430K

    Stockton, CA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/145-W-Pine-St-Stockton-CA-95204/15320605_zpid/

    4
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Yes, lovely! I like the clean lines of its exterior, and the inside seems larger than the sq. ftg. listed – even supposing they used a filter to make the rooms seem longer/wider. Yep, bye-bye to all of that carpeting! The wallpapers… some I really like, but others I would jettison.

  37. Michaeljoe62Michaeljoe62 says: 48 comments
    1941 Cape Cod
    IN

    I’m late to the party here, but WOW, what a gem! I’m betting someone else has already mentioned, but the stone carved with the name is a “carriage step,” used for getting from the carriage to the ground gracefully. I’ve even seen some of these personalized ones in our local historic cemetery (which must be confusing to amateur geneologists!).
    On the other subject, I, too, was subjected to pincurls once in jr high (in the 70s) when I thought I wanted a man-perm. Thank God Mom did that as a test. I HATED how I looked. LOL

    • Hi– I too thought the low flat stone is a carriage stone, but…it’s too far from a curb. Without anything for scale it’s kinda tricky to judge, but I’m guessing the sidewalk must be at least 3 feet wide, so the foreground grass must be wider than that. And we can’t see the curb, so, maybe 6 to 8 feet from the curb? too far for a carriage stone, unless the street got narrowed, which would be a pretty rare occurrence. I saw a few in my home town and they were all within a foot or two of the curb.

      Also it seems too low, tho it’s sunk in the ground too. Maybe it’s the owner’s name?

      • Michaeljoe62Michaeljoe62 says: 48 comments
        1941 Cape Cod
        IN

        Possible. Also possible the block has been moved back (for snowplows?). But it’s in line with the hitching post. It does look like it has sunk. I would think it’s the owner’s name but not sure. U

  38. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2199 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central, NY

    Both near Albany, NY:
    1)1930, $399,900; really cute mid-sized Cape. Screened-in back porch plus a patio, and much appears to be original – chair rails, DR cupboard, baths, kitchen, etc., except for what appears to be a newer addition, View out front is pretty & calming.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6-S-Loudon-Ln-Loudonville-NY-12211/29697380_zpid/

    2) 1926, $199,000. Small 2 bed, 1 bath bungalow, under 1000 sq. ft. Nice looking street. Listed for only one day and already has a pending status.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12-Euclid-Ave-Delmar-NY-12054/29669900_zpid/

    1
  39. 67drake67drake says: 269 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    $235,000 in Greenwood Wi. Unique turreted farmhouse. Need a few more outside pics! I’ve never really seen a home like this in my area.
    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Greenwood/Willard-Rd-54437/home/146729057

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      The 1917 dated house is likely to be about a decade older. It retains details from the late Victorian era Queen Anne style. The walls and columns of the first floor appear to be made from man made concrete blocks that were very popular during the first decade of the 20th century. The ads back then stressed how economical it was to build a home from this new “wonder material”. The key ingredient in the improved concrete mix was Portland cement (history: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_cement ) first developed in the 1820’s and taking until the 1890’s to become widespread in the U.S. Even the multi talented inventor Thomas Edison built a few experimental concrete houses in the first two decades of the 20th century: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/thomas-edisons-concrete-houses Although the common material never became mainstream for home construction, hundreds if not thousands of cement houses remain across the country including this farmhouse. I know of one other cement towered Queen Anne style house I photographed in Bucyrus, Ohio, several years ago: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/34606634740/in/album-72157680886647193/ The fact that they are still standing over a century later is a testament to their durability.

      2
  40. katherinekatherine says: 1 comments
    1935 historical
    TX

    https://matrix.ntreis.net/matrix/shared/WdMv8yz0Nbc/400SWaddillStreet

    Built 1935
    Price $475,000
    McKinney, TX

    1
  41. CoraCora says: 2058 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1910. A bargain-priced Victorian on over 2 acres. Pretty staircase, millwork, built-ins.
    Something about the first photo with the snow cover and overcast sky, just seems to make this place more appealing to me. A good book and an afghan in front of a warm old house fireplace…ahhhh… $130K

    Havensville, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/21250-Us-Grant-Rd-Havensville-KS-66432/91243877_zpid/

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Agreed…this is a very appealing house. I strongly feel it was built from a published design. Those oval Colonial windows on either side of the entry are very distinctive. I think George Barber had a house with Colonial windows configured like that but doubtful that this is a Barber design. Already has a pending offer on it.

      1
  42. msjeanne28msjeanne28 says: 35 comments
    Palmer, AK

    https://circaoldhouses.com/property/neoclassical-perfection-with-original-features/#prettyPhoto
    1903 neoclassical in PA. Fabulous home and price, I drooled over all the interior shots. Lots of original woodwork and well preserved.

  43. Hi–re Michaeljoe62 and the carriage stone—here’s a youtube vid showing a bunch, and several are set back from the street, so I guess the carriage would drive over the grass to get to them, assuming no big curbstone.

    Also, many have owner names.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS2na1yj8vg

  44. 67drake67drake says: 269 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    $195,000 in Neillsville Wisconsin.Italianate built in 1893.

    The child in me wants to hold my breath and pout till I get this house. It would be perfect in so many ways for my wife and I. Man if it were only 75 or so miles south!

    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Neillsville/US-10-Unknown/home/89688305

    1
  45. ScottScott says: 339 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    The older I get the more I am drawn to some of the classical revival style homes instead of the high Victorian architecture. Oh, and mid-century modern. How’s that for a dichotomy?

    At any rate here’s a beautiful Italianate style place in Thompson, Connecticut. Listing says 1813; some of the interior photos make the house look like it might be an early post and beam construction (original build?) with mid- to late-nineteenth century updates. Listed as 5 bed, 2.5 bath, 3,800 square-foot home on just under an acre for $169,500. To me that’s a steal. Homes like this are hard to come by in the Pacific northwest.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/361-Thompson-Rd_Thompson_CT_06277_M44454-96145?cid=soc_shares_ldp_fb&fbclid=IwAR34Jh23kFj87TffRwy78xhrBgDA2JqHrsL8-9HgAAWNcHGNw8JPbbH5kPg#photo1

    1
  46. AlanAlan says: 48 comments
    1948 Cape Cod/Bungalow?
    Davisville, WV

    Below is a link to Zillow featuring a 6 bedroom, 3.5 bathroom, 5,291 sqft, home built in 1884. The pictures are interesting but I am having trouble categorizing the “style” of the house. There appears to have been a much wider front porch with a set of “french doors” on either side of the main entrance that are now glass block. The main entrance has been straightened somewhat but there is evidence of an arch at the top. Some of the windows also have been filled in with glass block. The main staircase is much plainer than expected, the cabinets with the sink in the kitchen are metal. The dormer windows and the smaller windows on the lower levels are 9/9 and the larger windows are 12/12. Can anyone find any more information on this home? By the way, they lowered the price by $5,000 to just $170,000.

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Parkersburg-WV/pmf,pf_pt/23180582_zpid/40256_rid/globalrelevanceex_sort/39.420281,-81.270676,39.121004,-81.739655_rect/10_zm/

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