March 15, 2019: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 3/15/19 - Last OHD Update: 3/22/19 - 185 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

How to share…
Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below. This part is important! Make it easier for those browsing shares by including the city, state, build date if available and price (international listings excluded.) A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful. No tiny URL links.

Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) Not all shares will be added to OHD as it’s own post.

Bungalow Bathrooms by Jane Powell
The hands-on sourcebook for creating or restoring a stylish bathroom in the Arts & Crafts spirit. In this sequel to the best-selling Bungalow Kitchens, Jane Powell and Linda Svendsen turn to the second most complex room in the house. As reflected in these pages, the bathroom can-and should-be a beautiful extension of the home style-and what better examples than those from the Arts & Crafts era. Though it may seem a self-evident feature of the Arts & Crafts style, bungalow bathrooms are truly artistic endeavors. They go beyond the traditional pedestal sink and claw-foot tub to some of the most beautiful tile work, woodwork, fixtures, and decorative elements available. Bungalow Bathrooms is a guide to restoring or designing a period-style bathroom for a bungalow or other early-twentieth-century house. It provides a wealth of information about flooring, cabinets, countertops, fixtures, faucets, and all the other elements that make up a bungalow bathroom, as well as advice on how to integrate modern technology while maintaining the bungalow look. Jane Powell, the author of Bungalow Kitchens, is the proprietor of House Dressing, a business dedicated to renovating and preserving old homes, particularly bungalows. She is the former president of the historic preservation organization in her hometown of Oakland, California. Linda Svendsen, a graduate of Music and Art High School and Parsons School of Design in New York, specializes in architectural interior and exterior photography. Her work has been seen most recently in Camps and Cottages, Bungalow Kitchens, Old House Journal, Old House Interiors, Victorian Decorating, and Lifestyles Magazine.
Click the photo or title to visit Amazon to peek inside!


185 Comments on March 15, 2019: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9829 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I do not know where this home is located but due to the architecture (and maybe that tree, anyone know what kind) my guess is the West Coast. This style is Stick Victorian but some also call it West Coast Stick. If you check out the Eureka home posted earlier this week, link, you can see the similarities. Maybe we’ll get lucky and someone will recognize it!

    I’ve not forgotten about book recommendations. I’ll go to do it and can’t pick one so will push it to the next week, then the next, then the next. This time I just closed my eyes and pointed. 😀 Any of Jane Powell’s books are highly recommended by those that enjoy the Arts & Crafts styles.

    Don’t forget to include prices, build date and maybe what you are sharing. It’s okay to talk or share other old house articles, doesn’t have to just be about old houses for sale.

    8
    • NonaKNonaK says: 119 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Austin, TX

      This made me think of the Carson Mansion in Eureka, CA. There are many homes there that look like this one. Just a thought.

      1
    • AvatarWendy H. says: 11 comments

      The ‘tree’ appears to be an agave americana,also known as a century plant. The agave grows for about 30 years, then flowers and dies. The timing of this photo was surely to document this happening. This one is huge and California is a good bet, but they can grow all across the south with good drainage.

      9
    • Avatarddbacker says: 379 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1971 Uninspired split-level
      Prairie Village, KS

      People back then did not have the technology, medicine, and other things we take for granted today, but they sure knew how to dress!

      9
      • AvatarSusan says: 13 comments

        You are not kidding! I recently watched an OLD movie with Alice Faye and Tyrone Power called In Old Chicago. I remember thinking how nice it was to see men dressed in those stunning vests, shirts, and dress coats. Usually, I notice the beautiful ladies fashions, but there was such a difference in a man being dressed like a “Gentleman” (what’s that?) and the jeans, tee shirt, and baseball cap look of modern the modern American male. I guess if you lived in a house of beauty, honor and character, you would also keep your own vessel “well dressed” to reflect your belief in the dignity of man.

        12
        • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

          Tyrone Power was so handsome! And I love that movie! And you’re right about the way men dress now. Although I see a lot of women in scrungy jeans, I think men are worse. I’ve been to so many wedding receptions, an occasion where you’d thinks a person would dress up even if they hate doing so, where some guy is in a sweather and jeans. And his poor wife is dressed so nicely, and goes around saying, “Well, its his best sweater. I just can’t make him dress up!” and apologizing for the fool she married. My rant for the day! I really like this house-don’t you wish we could see inside it, to see how it was furnished, and decorated?

          4
          • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1980 board & batten modern

            My grandfather always dressed in a sport coat and there were always “refresments” at 5 pm. If away from his home, then a leather box with spirits enclosed. I miss the theater of those days. Smile

            2
  2. MJGMJG says: 328 comments
    1887 Queen Anne
    CT

    Such a west coast house! I love Stick style homes. I am trying to find the article from the 19th century to post the link here where local Californian’s were giving Charles Eastlake a tour of one of the cities there and attributed the style home to him. And he was horrified and appalled.

    How I wish color photography had been used widely during this period. What I wouldn’t do to see what the color scheme on the exterior is.

    Look at the window shades on the door. There is a really nice “dado” design on them. They most like are spring roller shades which became quite popular then.

    13
    • Matt DMatt D says: 28 comments

      I love this style as well, and like you, wish color photography had been used. I would love to see the original color scheme of so many houses! One thing I do notice in the picture is the expandable screen in the front window over the entrance! I plan on buying a few for our home for the great spring weather and it is nice to know they were in use then.

      3
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1980 board & batten modern

        I agree with both of you on the original choice of exterior house colors. I would like to know how they “played” with their houses then. Poor fellow on the front porch looks pretty stern. Kelly I enjoy the detail shots you include, which helps us see the beautiful work that has been done to create these homes.

        8
      • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        Those types of screens were used as well a screen that was installed outside of the window. These started popping up then too. It was attached to a track that could slide up and down the window.
        https://archive.org/details/WillerManufacturingCompany_185/page/n239

        Also there were window screens in the 19th century that had painted designs or scenery on them. I have yet to ever seen an original in person but would love to. I’ve only seen them in catalogs.

        http://americanhistory.si.edu/object-project/household-hits/window-screen
        https://www.skinnerinc.com/auctions/2514M/lots/1061

        7
        • PaulPaul says: 55 comments
          Arlington, VA

          MJG
          On page 274 of the Willer Manufacturing Company Catalog, shows an endorsement about the use of inner blinds for the Christian Heinrich Mansion. The mansion still stands in Washington DC and is open as a house museum. I have seen the inner blinds, if I remember correctly (it’s been many years) they slide up into a recess into the wall about each window. I don’t remember any screens though. I will have to go by and visit again. An incredible place – though it is now surrounded by commercial/apartment buildings. Thanks for sharing the links, really enjoyed seeing the catalog.

          4
          • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
            1887 Queen Anne
            CT

            hi Paul. Yes I’ve been to that house in DC. Amazing place isn’t it. Such a time capsule. The lady there went upstairs and we took turns listening to her talk through the speaking tube from upstairs to the kitchen. It has the original whistles built in. Almost comical sounding. Was a wonderful experience. She was a new docent and maybe not supposed to do that. But I wish more house museums would be more interactive like this.
            I didn’t even catch that THAT house was in that book. Amazing catch!!!

            3
            • AvatarGarth says: 19 comments

              The aptly named “Wickwire’s” of Cortland NY were the largest screen manufactures in the world from the 19th century well into the 1960’s. Originally the family ran a hardware store and were paid for a bill by a local farmer with an old loom. They restrung it with wire and produced the first wire cloth.

        • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

          Do you know if anyone paints window screens like this, nowadays? I’d love to have some in my house! So pretty! I wonder if any of the catalogs that specialize in reproductions of old hardware, etc carry them.

          • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
            1887 Queen Anne
            CT

            I’ve been searching for years and have yet to find any. Same with window shades that have a gilt or stenciled dado. (Like you see on the front doors.) So I just made it myself. But I don’t know how the screen was done. I found a few online that are original and they give insight into how they looked but I’m wondering if it’s simple as a stencil over the screen and paint being applied or if they had another method. But I have no idea the facts. I’ve been looking for production notes for years with zero results.

            1
            • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1889 Eastlake Cottage
              Fort Worth, TX

              MJG,

              I’m trying to remember where I saw an “artistic” window shade illustration featuring an elaborate stenciled design. Perhaps it was on the John R. Burrows site? Mr. Burrows has been a Victorian design consultant and Victorian Revival furnishings merchant (in Boston) since the 1980’s. His website: http://www.burrows.com/ Scroll down to the bottom of the page and on the left is his contact info. I doubt that he would mind being asked about artistic window shades and/or decorated screens.

              Another potential source of information could be the J-Stor site which has copies from 1882 to 1897 of of the influential Victorian era interior decorating periodical, The Decorator and Furnisher: https://www.jstor.org/journal/decoandfurn?refreqid=excelsior%3A54e6a5a244f2c1c7b0498b3a6df6c618
              J-Stor imparts an impression of academic elitism and seems to frown upon granting open access to mere mortals preferring instead to allow access through approved academic institutions. (as well as subscribed Libraries having accounts with them) However, they do grant access for non-academics on a limited basis hence my being able to view articles from their large collection of Decorator and Furnisher issues. As a primary source, the periodical provides valuable insight into the ideas and innovations behind Victorian domestic decor. Moreover, the publication evolved with the times so comparing Victorian decor from the early 1880’s shows that it was markedly different from the same in the late 1890’s.

              Here again, I’m sharing what to most folks would be completely useless information but perhaps it would be of some value to a few individuals interested in such a limited topic.

              Unlike the far better and easier to (freely) access Internet Archive, the trend these days is to put up paywalls for obtaining information. I don’t believe the day is very far off when Google and similar databases will impose a per item charge (via a paid “subscription”) for anything they furnish in responding to an inquiry. But I digress…

              Stenciling is a Victorian art form and was widely used in the second half of the 19th century well into the 1900’s. As for stenciling applied to metal screens, there’s a delicate technical balance between applying enough pigment to make a design visible yet not so much that it clogs up the spaces in the screen grid. About the only method I can think of that would consistently yield satisfactory results would be a silk screening print process with achieving the precise desired results being a process of trial and error. Alternately, for those with a good command of digital printing, modern technology might be used which could be better suited for mass production and rapid changing of pattern designs. (sorry, I don’t have start up capital for such a venture)

              • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
                1887 Queen Anne
                CT

                Thanks Shiflet. I didn’t even think to reach out to Butrows. I’ve purchased from burrows before. Great site.

                You are correct about Jstore. It’s a wealth of information but it’s not a user friendly site. And it’s also difficult to move from page to page. Not like archive.org. I actually paid to download a few items on that’s site related to Louis C Tiffany & Co., Associated Artists. I can’t remebr the name but was a fantastic research paper that talks about the real players and details of the group of people involved. It wasn’t as black and white as many historians or doecents say. I think it was called Disassociating the associated artists.

                Omg I’m with you on boring people. When people come to my cluttered home loaded with everything 19th century with no room to see walls, people ask questions and I have to force myself not to go on and on and bore them.

                Yes. Stenciling is a huge part of this period. People today often think of dainty country stenciling when you say stencil but often don’t realize how complex the stenciling of this period often was. I ruined my neck from stenciling my ceilings and walls at all hours of the night.

            • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

              A stencil would be easiest for those of us who can’t draw a straight line to save ourselves. I’ll have to make a trip to a craft store, and see what they have, and what kind of paint they recommend. I’m surprised this kind of screen still isn’t used today, as its such a pretty idea!

              2
              • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
                1887 Queen Anne
                CT

                I know right! SO many things i wish were still used today that were great ideas. I mean, the ornamental window screen is a great idea. Or pre-made wood inlay floors!! How phenomenal is that! I could go on for hours.

          • AvatarLisaN says: 10 comments
            1870 Unknown
            Ithaca, NY

            Karen. Window screen painting is a Baltimore thing. http://www.paintedscreens.org/

            • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
              1887 Queen Anne
              CT

              That’s wonderful someone still does this! Now that is a great resource if you need to restore something.
              They mentioned its a Baltimore tradition since 1913 but the practice goes back much further. I posted a few links overtime here of trade catalogs in the mid to late 19th century selling painted screens.

              1
              • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1889 Eastlake Cottage
                Fort Worth, TX

                Hi MJG,
                Here’s an Internet Archive catalog (c. 1900) for a New Haven, CT, based wholesaler selling Cortland Door and Window Screens: https://archive.org/details/CortlandDoorAndWindowScreens/page/n3 As you will notice, these hand-painted “landscape” door screens must have been popular as they are being sold by the half dozen. Other screened doors are sold by the dozen. Therefore, although Baltimore has been documented as a center for hand painted screes, as you also noted, the decorative practice of ornamental painted screens goes back well into the 19th century. Here on page 5 is an example of hand painted window screens sold by the dozen per crate: https://archive.org/details/CortlandDoorAndWindowScreens/page/n5 Too bad this utilitarian art form has largely vanished in recent times; perhaps there is enough market for a niche sized revival?

                • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
                  1887 Queen Anne
                  CT

                  What’s funny is, every link you send me here I have favorited already 🙂 I bet if you and I did a side by side comparison to what we have favorited in that archive.org we’d have almost have the same groupings.

                  There are some other great books out there too. When you search Screens. Painted Screen. Textual searches are great as well, although the search engine isn’t good. You’re limited in the dates.

            • AvatarPaula Libby says: 29 comments

              Lisa N, before I read your post with the link I was thinking that maybe some of the painting, if not in too many colors, might have been done by using a series of stencils and then applying some different kinds of liquids. To explain myself better…probably most of the screen were made of copper back then and by using certain liquids, ie. ammonia, or combinations of chemicals, you can pattenate areas of the stencils to turn the copper strands brown, green, black, etc. That would leave the holes in the screening free from clogging, but probably not be as visible??? I might have to get this book on inter library loan just to find out the secret. Fun thread about something I never heard of or saw before. Thanks everyone,

              • AvatarPaula Libby says: 29 comments

                I just did a search on Google and found there were quite a few YouTube videos on Screen Painting in Baltimore.

                • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
                  1887 Queen Anne
                  CT

                  Thanks Paula Libby. If you have a book I’d be interested in know more too.
                  Yes Baltimore has a website saying they have a tradition since 1913. Though painted screens go back further than that, it may be possible it “blew up” at this time there.

                  • AvatarPaula Libby says: 29 comments

                    MJG, I ordered the book through inter-library loan today. Will let you know how much info they include on how to do the technique or if it’s just pretty pictures. I hope they describe the process. I can see trying this on the bathroom screens. lol On the link you included showing the screens, I got the impression they were done before 1913 too. In one of the Youtube videos I watched, they spoke about “blocking”, I think the term was, to white out the entire screen first, but they didn’t give any hints about how to do that without blocking the holes.I gather that was the most important step. I also noticed that the artist painted his screens propped in front of a large black board which probably gave him a good idea of not only the design as he painted, but if there were any blocked holes. He didn’t give up any of the secrets his grandfather taught him about blocking though.

            • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
              1887 Queen Anne
              CT

              Thanks I can’t wait to see. I posted another link here or somewhere else of original ones from the 19th century. Though the pictures are not hi resolution so I can’t get a sense of how the scene was applied. I always wanted to see these window screens for many years. Hence why I bring that up. Who would have thought such a buzz would have happened over it. Maybe we should open a business. 🙂

            • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

              Thank you for the link! I wonder how much they charge. I have a ranch house, but this is an idea I think would look great 👍 n any style house.

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Hi MJG,
      Some of most outrageous Americanized “Eastlake” examples of homes were found on the West Coast. I prefer to use the then contemporary stylistic term of “Modern Gothic” to describe them. The most elaborate examples were built on the West Coast during the late 1870’s into the 1880’s with earlier versions popping up on the Eastern Seaboard in the 1870’s.

      However, I’ve never heard of English tastemaker Charles Locke Eastlake making a personal visit to the western U.S. or even to the United States, period, but perhaps he did and I’m just not aware of it. His contemporary English critic and tastemaker, Oscar Wilde, did arrive in the U.S. in early 1882 on a lecture circuit tour and I believe he did make it out to California but his theme was the glory of the Aesthetic Movement or, making an argument of Art for Art’s sake: https://worldhistoryproject.org/1882/1/3/oscar-wilde-begins-lecture-tour-of-the-united-states-and-canada Wilde did not involve himself much with architecture except for interior decoration in the Aesthetic manner.

      The California Architect and Building News magazine in April 1882 shared correspondence obtained directly from Mr. Eastlake in London fuming about the American mis-appropriation of his name and design ideas under the guise of an “Eastlake” style. (on page 49 from Haithi Trust: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.c033264423;view=1up;seq=53 ) His righteous indignation came from being shown published media examples of the so-called Eastlake style obtained from the U.S.. Apparently, some the most egregious examples of misnamed Eastlake designs originated on the West Coast, including San Francisco. Perhaps that is why the California Architect periodical editors decided it was worthwhile to share the Eastlake correspondence with their readers. After the first U.S. edition of Eastlake’s best seller book HINTS ON HOUSEHOLD TASTE came out in 1872, American designers and architects looking for something fresh and different suddenly found their conceptual ideal in the sparse illustrations and ideas contained in Eastlake’s book. (republished by Dover Publications) Early issues of California Architect seemed to regularly share illustrated examples of Samuel and Joseph Cather Newsom’s (the Newsom Bros.) house designs. In the 1870’s they had described themselves as “Eastlake” architects mainly to indicate they were capable of complex, highly ornamental houses then being associated with the “Eastlake” (Modern Gothic) style. It’s probable that after reading the harsh rebuke from Mr. Eastlake that they wisely decided to drop the Eastlake moniker from their occupational description. By that time, they had already published a planbook or two and their ornate design reputations were firmly established.

      A more balanced look at San Francisco’s best architecture from the time of the Link Exchange’s subject photo is the book Artistic Homes of California (1888) lovingly republished under the title: Victorian Classics of San Francisco. (Windgate Press, Sausalito, 1987) I was fortunate to locate a reasonably priced copy on e-Bay about a dozen years ago. Homes designed by the Newsom Bros. are featured as might be expected, but they were working in an extremely competitive environment in a wealthy city having numerous other fine architects. Perhaps that helps to explain why they sought and found clients in places like Eureka and in the mid-1880’s they opened a business office in Los Angeles which was undergoing an unprecedented growth boom. Please share anything you find that might confirm Mr. Eastlake’s U.S visit(s); but to my best knowledge he was pretty much a homebody who like to circulate in English high society circles.

      10
      • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        That’s the article I read! Thanks so much for finding it. I was looking for that in two other posts. I read so much every night and I don’t always remember to bookmark. Also, I think you’re right mentioning Oscar Wilde, I confused Eastlake with Oscar Wilde’s visit I bet in my mind because when I read about Eastlake, I was reading about the aesthetic movement.

        Modern Gothic is a fun term. Kimbel and Cabus had some beautiful pieces of “modern gothic” furniture https://library.si.edu/image-gallery/collection/kimbel-and-cabus that this site has great photos of some of the pieces. What I would do to own a piece.

        I actually own Artistic homes of California and have digital versions of it as well with high resolution images of the houses. I think some are online. Some of the images change between versions, I believe. Some of the photos of the houses are different perceptive views. What’s great about that book is that it explains all of the detail of the houses inside and sometimes tells you the colors the house was painted. One house in Oakdale was one of my favorites and explains each band of color on each floor.

        10
        • SharonSharon says: 332 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Sedalia, MO

          I’m enjoying this banter. You two should keep it going. I’m learning so much and will spend the weekend exploring the resources you’re citing…what I can find online anyway. Thank you, gentlemen.

          9
          • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
            1887 Queen Anne
            CT

            Lol Thanks Sharon. My iPad is so overloaded with links and photos I needed to save to the cloud. I have thousands images and references and papers and articles that I’ve written or others.
            Johnshiflet and I can probably talk for hours and hours on here. If we had ever met in person I can only image what that would be like. We both clearly seem to be crazy over the same thing. I’m surprised Kelly hasn’t banned me yet for getting off topic. Like John said in another post, we probably get a little too off topic. Lol.

            9
            • AvatarSarah Erwin says: 61 comments

              If you and John ever meet, I’d suggest you start early in the day, or at a 24 hour restaurant. I would think y’all could chat for hours!! Thanks to you both for sharing your extensive knowledge!

              5
              • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
                1887 Queen Anne
                CT

                That’s very nice for you to say that. For me it’s simply a passion that I’m bore all my friends and family with. But here we can all learn from each other and share and debate.

                5
              • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1889 Eastlake Cottage
                Fort Worth, TX

                Sarah, I’m chuckling…because, as I sometimes tell folks, in my mind I keep an encyclopedia full of useless knowledge. Glad that someone gets anything useful out of it but many others just roll their eyes when I launch into one of my architectural history or preservation diatribes. In a different life I might have ended up as a tenured professor of history instead of a general flunky. I highly covet this site as it provides a channel where I can share such esoteric prattle. I also feel privileged to have met a few people over the years who share my passion for the past but they are definitely few and far between. I appreciate the kind comments.

                7
                • AvatarSarah Erwin says: 61 comments

                  John, better your head “contents” than mine. If I could get rid of all the song lyrics and cartoon trivia stuck in my brain pan, I’d have lots of space for intellectual conversations. Sadly, I’d have to sit with you two, and just drink iced tea and listen in.

                  3
                • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
                  1887 Queen Anne
                  CT

                  I love to window shop in these types of sites!! I can’t afford what the prices usually end up being sadly but I do make bids if I see that the price stay’s in my price range.

          • AvatarSandyF says: 124 comments

            I am loving this conversation-you are all such a great resource .
            As for Jane Powell’s book-I sure miss her. I spoke to her at Grove Park Inn one year-she signed a book that I bought fo a friend, she signed it” Don’t bungle your bungalow”, but she told she really wanted to sign it with a more provocative quote-“don’t F UP your bungalow ” Loved her. What a gift to the bungalow community.
            Her wonderful Oakland CA Craftsman was for sale shortly after her passing. I really worked on my husband moving there from So Cal but no way. It was insane. Article references the house : https://www.berkeleyside.com/2012/02/10/friends-set-out-to-help-renovator-save-her-historic-home

            4
          • AvatarMargaret Kuberka says: 56 comments

            Please none of this is boring, don’t ever think so. We would not be here if we did not want to learn and you gentlemen know so much. Thank you for sharing. So many wonderful California mansions lost to earthquakes, fire and time. Two off my favorites, Thurlow Lodge and the Darios Ogden Mills Mansion are now just a memory.

            • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
              1887 Queen Anne
              CT

              thanks a lot Margarite. Sometimes folks on here are offended by my posts as being rude or insensitive to the owners. But again it’s an open forum and you will never make Everyone happy and there’s nothing I can do about that. I respect people’s likes and dislikes. If we were all the same how boring would that be.
              But these kind thought and words make me feel good and glad that you appreciate the obsessions people like us have. You included.

      • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

        I love reading your entries in here! Thank you for all the research you’ve done for us!

        4
        • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
          1887 Queen Anne
          CT

          I love the entries too in these chats. So well thought out and full of great resources for learning.
          The more we learn, the more we can respect the past. The more we can also squash the silly things people made up about the past that made fun of it.

          1
  3. AvatarLaurie W. says: 1542 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Fake Greek Revival!
    NC

    Plantation touring in Virginia this week or How the Other Half Lived. Sigh.

    Syria, VA, Culpeper County, $6.95 million for all 881 acres, $1.95m for house & less land. Stunning Greek Revival begun in 1820 as 4-room log cabin; in 1850s the present house was constructed to surround it for the purpose of outshining Montpelier, a few miles away. It has been through bad as well as good times, sold now by the governor of West Virginia (and owner of the Greenbrier), who bought it as an investment and has never lived there. It has been vacant since the 1980s, reflected in the kitchen and earlier bathrooms. Beautiful original moldings – I love their continuation up the wall side of the stairway, a hanging stair of exceptional grace, double bedroom doors – solid ones and louvered to allow for breezes in hot weather, an early mural on dining room walls, and too much more beauty to list. Formal period gardens abound, though only marginally kept. If not sold, to be auctioned, date not established. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/8368B-Horseshoe-Rd_Rapidan_VA_22733_M55064-25727?ex=VA652154034&view=qv
    Fun backrground reading https://www.fredericksburg.com/the-horseshoe-huge-and-hidden-in-the-piedmont/article_31dfcff9-763e-566e-9380-bc2780264cf2.html and https://www.starexponent.com/news/family-of-west-va-governor-auctioning-off-culpeper-county-properties/article_555cf773-2dd5-5008-9f0b-83b84a8690d4.html

    And in New York:
    Mill Neck, NY, $1.725 million, built as farmhouse 1789 (though listing says 1793). It was rescued from ruin 1914 when lawyer James M. Townsend renovated using period materials where possible, and vastly remodeled it, adding 2 wings. He managed to maintain its charm, though it became a more formal 18th-century-style house. More recently it seems to have received an extremely unfortunate entrance. https://www.sothebysrealty.com/eng/sales/detail/180-l-944-c6wxdp/16-frost-mill-rd-mill-neck-ny-11765# Interesting background and photos here: https://books.google.com/books?id=tm0XAQAAIAAJ&dq=%22Mill%20Neck%22%20intitle%3Aarchitectural%20intitle%3Arecord&pg=PA385#v=onepage&q=%22Mill%20Neck%22%20intitle%3Aarchitectural%20intitle%3Arecord&f=false

    7
    • AvatarMatt Z says: 86 comments

      Great shares Laurie! As for the Mill Neck house, curiously the realtor only shows the rear of the house, the front facade and entry still matches what is seen in the architectural record book
      See streetview here https://goo.gl/maps/18vRmHpkbWG2

      4
      • AvatarLaurie W. says: 1542 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Fake Greek Revival!
        NC

        Thank you, Matt! I take my snarky comment back, lol. I did look at the street view but didn’t travel beyond where the trees screen a view of the front door. Glad to have that solved.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4341 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Both interesting. Thanks’ Laurie. 🙂 Too bad about the tiled bath at the back of the stair hall which now encloses the originally cantilevered stair. Must have been very elegant before the change. The Mill Neck rambler is super duper fine, unpretentious and comfortable, while at the same time baronial and impressive. Not an easy feat. Looks like heaven to me: someone must agree since it is sold; and no wonder considering the press it got.

      5
    • AvatarFlaOHDJunkie says: 133 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1902 FL

      Than Rapidan VA house is my new favorite

    • AvatarEric says: 287 comments

      I would feel like the Beverly Hillbillies going from a log cabin to stunningly beautiful 12,500 sf mansion. I bet it even has the cement pond for Ellie May.

    • AvatarStevenF says: 699 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      One of the architects noted in the article you posted is quite famous: William Lawrence Bottomley.
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Lawrence_Bottomley

      Lovely house!

      1
    • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

      I see what you mean about the entrance. I’m not crazy about the outside, but I love the interior! The kitchen, looks a little too modern, but I love the sheer size of it. The upstairs-get rid of the carpet!

    • AvatarSandy B says: 380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Wonderful house at Rapidan……the sinuous staircase is one of the most beautiful I’ve ever seen. Thanks for the history also……poor house doesn’t seem it’s enjoyed much love or appreciation in its life.
      This is a gorgeous part of Virginia, which I’ll be enjoying again in a couple of months. Did a couple of archeological work studies at Montpelier when it still had the Dupont additions. In fact at the very first one the Nat. Trust conducted, we slept in the attic and our food was catered in…..what a very special experience, the sixteen of us lounging on Madison’s terrace after dinner, totally immersed in the historic wonder of it all…!!

      2
    • AvatarSandy B says: 380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      The Zillow listing gives a few more photos of the Rapidan property.
      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8368B-Horseshoe-Rd-Rapidan-VA-22733/2085522893_zpid/

      • Avatarzoomey says: 482 comments

        I love the way the front stairs look like they pool on the floor like the skirt of a ball gown! What a stunning, romantic house!

    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      The Virginia Plantation is so exquisite. How could you not fall in love at first glance?

  4. AvatarTony Bianchini says: 4 comments

    Another Dublin, TX treasure, all of it appears to be intact and from the original 1938 build date. 2,363 Sq ft, asking $230K:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/352-N-Grafton-St_Dublin_TX_76446_M89488-67894?view=qv

    I have pneumonia this week, so forgive me if I missed a posting requirement.

    6
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9829 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Get well soon!

      7
    • AvatarLaurie W. says: 1542 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      I’m glad you felt well enough to discover this house — it’s a charmer, very appealing; even the extremely pink bathroom is super. The arched doorways, bookcases, windows, etc. are so ’30s and nicely consistent. Yowzers about the roof tiling! Hope you’re on the mend!

      2
    • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

      I’ve had pneumonia twice, and its awful, isn’t it? Even after its supposedly over, you feel so drained. And you’re left with that horrible cough. Ugh. Take your antibiotics, and drink all the fluids (water is best) you can! Tea, with honey and lemon…and don’t tell the dr, but a little whiskey too, helps sooth your throat after all that coughing. If you have a recliner, sleep in that if the coughing is worse when you lie down, or prop yourself up with pillows as sleep is really important to help you recover. Take care, and I hope you are able to track down the evil person who gave you this, and kill them soon! Hide the body in the dirt cellar of an old house you hate.

      4
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      You poor thing. Pneumonia takes everything out of you. I hope you have someone looking after you. Get well soon.

      1
  5. NonaKNonaK says: 119 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Austin, TX

    1962 Modern (almost MCM) – $2,500,000 – 5440 sf – Pricy, but a cool house. Updates, I think, blend well with the original details. I love how it looks out to the pool and the water beyond.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1616-Driftwood-Ln_Galveston_TX_77551_M84698-27779?ex=TX643204231&view=qv
    1895 Queen Anne – $575,000 – 3,216 sf – Beautiful woodwork, fretwork, transoms. Alpine is a great little town near Big Bend National Park in Far West Texas. And near Terlingua, TX where my daughter just bought land.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/403-N-8th-St_Alpine_TX_79830_M71111-23376?view=qv

    7
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4341 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Nona. 🙂 Really great, mostly original, mid-mod there in Galveston. The one VERY sore thumb is the horrid, contemporary, tile throughout. It is likely covering a whole house full of original terrazzo. It may be possible to repair; but at great time and expense.

      The Alpine, TX is really nice as well.

      3
  6. AvatarMIke says: 58 comments

    Happy Friday, all!

    Two in the Irving Park neighborhood of Chicago.

    The first, the 1865 Ropp-Grabill House, for $875K. I grew up two blocks away and was always mesmerized by this house; one Halloween a bunch of us kids were even let into the cupola at the top and you could see over the bare trees to all corners of the city.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4132-N-Keeler-Ave-Chicago-IL-60641/3647719_zpid/

    The second, the Race House from 1874, for $850K. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3945-N-Tripp-Ave-Chicago-IL-60641/3665326_zpid/

    I believe they’re both official city landmarks.
    Have a great weekend all!

    5
    • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

      Both are fantastic…but does the Race house come with the wine?

      1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1827 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      I’m not a fan of Italianates in general, but… I really like Ropp-Grabill house! Light & bright interior, beautiful grounds, and nice flow to the floor plans. Can even “age in place” since the main floor can easily have a bedroom & has a full bath. Must’ve been soooo cool to go up into the cupola on Halloween as a kid!

      1
  7. MattDMattD says: 28 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1870 Classical Revival
    New Orleans, LA

    Posting some of the BIG homes here in New Orleans. I am trying to find ones that are original (or close to). So many of the old homes have been completely “renovated” and don’t match their history. These stood out to me.

    1850 Greek Revival in Coliseum Square area of the Garden District in New Orleans. Great restoration! I toured the sister house this past December. Beautiful.
    https://www.trulia.com/p/la/new-orleans/3227-coliseum-st-new-orleans-la-70115–2062314298?mid=0#lil-mediaTab

    1893 Thomas Sully Mansion on St. Charles Ave. currently being used as a B&B.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2727-Saint-Charles-Ave_New-Orleans_LA_70130_M72504-32122

    1889 Mansion on St. Charles Ave. Always and eye catcher from the great paint scheme and nice to see the original interiors.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/5718-Saint-Charles-Ave_New-Orleans_LA_70115_M78497-90945

    10
    • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

      I love all three, ut I think the St Charles Ave one has me-it has a pool! But the one thing that draws me to all, are the bathrooms!

      • SueSue says: 272 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1802 Cape
        ME

        Same Karen. Wow. Clearly they also found every gorgeous Victorian bed in New Orleans.

  8. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1980 board & batten modern

    1969 Hollywood Regency, Palm Springs, 1,737,000

    This house, this environment, is totally foreign to me, but I am intrigued. I would like to be a guest for a vintage cocktail party.

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/2055-S-Joshua-Tree-Pl,-Palm-Springs,-CA-92264_rb/

    6
    • AvatarAnne M. says: 534 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Hopkinton, MA

      Wow – that’s an amazing house. You could dress like Twiggy and have a nice dry martini.

      3
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1980 board & batten modern

        I would love to dress like Twiggy and have a dry (dirty) martini! I used to have a vintage (now), silk jacket and sheath dress with an ink blotch pattern I would to have it again. It was a great martini dress!

        3
      • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

        Twiggy was just made a Dame, in the UK. I saw a photo of her being awarded her title by Prince Charles the other day.

        3
    • natira121natira121 says: 253 comments
      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Houses like this both horrify and fascinate me. I can’t imagine living in one, but they are sure fun to look at, especially the more over the top ones like this!

      10
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4341 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I’m with Natria on the actually living there bit Kimberly: and I’m guessing so are potential buyers since that weirdo is still on the market. I thought it had its own page on OHD; but it must have been a share. Who could forget “the matchy, matchy menagerie”! Heheheh. It’s a really great house; but at that price especially, I’m sure buyers aren’t able to get past the – – ya know. 😉

      2
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9829 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        It was on OHD once, you know before that thing that happened. 😀 But it was shared two or three weeks ago.

        3
        • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

          ummm…what thing?

          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9829 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            Rosewater calls it “The Purge”. 😀 It’s when I kind of went a little nuts and deleted a couple thousand homes from the site.

            2
            • Avatarkaren says: 579 comments

              Well, don’t feel bad. Stephen King once told of writing an entire book, when he first got a computer, and hitting the delete button instead of save. He had to write it all over again! I can’t remember what book he said it was-must’ve been one of his older ones-but I wonder if he liked version 1 or version 2 better?

              2
    • AvatarRandy C says: 420 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2015 Reverse Ranch 1/2
      Olathe, KS

      If someone had described this to me, I would have never believed it. Now I have seen it. Very interesting and nostalgic but I could never fall asleep in that hot pink bedroom!

      3
      • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

        Gawd. If you’ve ever seen Steel MAgnolias…that bedroom looks as if its ‘been hosed down with Pepto Bismol.” Is this what rich people did with their money, in 1969?

        2
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1827 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      OMG… talk about *saturated* colors!!

      1
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      It would be like living on an old Hollywood set. I have to say a part of me is really loving the pink bedroom bath combo. Great find.

      1
    • AvatarJulieanne says: 27 comments

      This is in perfect condition! It’s the perfect place in beautiful Palm Springs! I had the privilege of being there a couple weeks ago. I’m in love with the area!

      2
  9. AvatarAnne M. says: 534 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Hopkinton, MA

    Love the guy in his bowler hat in this week’s picture!
    A 1920 farmhouse is Brattleboro, VT for $215,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/19-Prospect-Ct-Brattleboro-VT-05301/92042462_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1780 in Hopkinton, RI for $199,000
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1-Clarks-Falls-Rd_Hopkinton_RI_02833_M34802-92366?view=qv
    1845 in Northfield, VT for $125,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/134-Central-St-Northfield-VT-05663/75469468_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1900 in Northfield, VT for $199,000 – looks like it may have been used as a dormitory or camp
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/91-Prospect-St-Northfield-VT-05663/250871928_zpid/?fullpage=true
    I try to not to post super expensive home frequently but really wanted to share these two because they are pretty noteworthy:
    1904 Colonial in Southboro, MA for $1,899,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1-Sears-Rd-Southborough-MA-01772/57639905_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1890 in Whitinsville, MA for $1,495,000. has 23 bedrooms & not enough pictures!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/120-Hill-St-Whitinsville-MA-01588/119239069_zpid/?fullpage=true
    enjoy your weekend, everyone!

    7
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980 board & batten modern

      Super collection of homes. I love the RI home, trying to figure out the chair? in the living room with the long two handled saw above? The chair reminds me of the barber shop chairs my uncle had in his living room back in the day.
      The last house is super spectacular! Wow, I love the railing in the Sears Rd home.

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 4341 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Love “what is it” comments. Thanks’ Anne and Kimberly. The thing above the chair, which might be a saw, to me looks like some sort of very old, very primitive, farm animal yoke: though I’ve never seen another one like it. It seem almost too slight for it’s assumed purpose. Very fat Shetland pony yoke? Heheheh. 😉

        The chair, I am sure, is a 1920’s model Koken barber chair made in St. Louis MO. They are considered THE finest of said chairs ever made; and are VERY collectible, depending on options, functionality, and state of preserve / restoration. That one looks to be in REALLY good shape considering; and is worth a pretty penny even with the exploded seat cushion. Here’s a restored example:
        https://i.pinimg.com/originals/66/4c/86/664c86a29397c5f7eceffdd413120fb0.jpg
        The double round, enameled iron, 19teens versions are the most rare, collected, and accordingly valuable examples; aside from perhaps the even earlier wooden models. https://gentlemint-media.s3.amazonaws.com/images/2012/02/12/dd9153ad.jpg.505x650_q85.jpg —- https://i.pinimg.com/736x/8a/01/11/8a0111b9fd229edd9caab39cec60184f.jpg No u.m.c. man cave would be without at least one of them. 😉

        • natira121natira121 says: 253 comments
          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          That weird yoke thingy? I think it might be part of the beater of an OLD loom, because you’re right, it’s too light for an animal yoke.

          • RosewaterRosewater says: 4341 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Loom! That’s a very good guess; better than mine.

    • AvatarJoseph says: 311 comments

      The Whitinsville MA house was apparently one of the Whitin family homes (big mill owners, hence the name of the town). There are some others still extant. One on Linwood street was a mansard style, and at one point was an extremely elegant and expensive restaurant/inn. Now I think being operated as some sort of function venue. Another Whitin family home (possibly for summer) was atop a hill in nearby Northbridge. Now the nucleus of a nursing home/assisted living, they did keep the Dutch colonial mostly intact, and it serves as lobby and offices, etc., but of course overshadowed by large modern wings. Still, they do keep some family memorabilia on display.
      One difficulty with these mill-town homes is that most people want to live among their peers, and there is a big gulf between these mansions and the typical home in the area. In the old days, the mill owners were comfortable expressing their station.

      1
      • AvatarKaren says: 579 comments

        The First Presbyterian Assisted Living Home in Lockport, NY, has as its nucleus, the Keep House, which was once owned by a Chase (can’t remember his first name) who was a brother of Salmon Chase, one of Lincoln’s cabinet members. There is a modern wing to another old house, which I think was built by John Pound, a prominant local attorney, for his mother in law. The Keep House is now the offices, mainly, and upstairs, the director’s office is in the ballroom-which has skylights, and which for some stupid reason, is carpeted. There was a huge old oak tree that was planted by Salmon Chase and his brother in front of it, that recently had to be cut down. A windstorm took a large branch down, and the wound revealed that the tree was mostly hollow, and therefore in danger of the whole thing coming down one day. I used to live in an apartment next to the Home, in another old house also built by John Pound.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4341 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Anne.

      I know I’ve seen the Southboro, MA house before. Who could forget that insanely scaled, (beautiful ?), Frankenstein’s monster of a double tri-fold, art glass door and it’s impossible fan light!? That has to be utterly unique: decidedly not a catalogue unit. Also hard to forget, (not to mention imagine how exactly they were successfully able to butcher), the “modified”, original coal range = CRINGE. Being a designer to wealthy clients must be fun considering the percentage you get on top of all the absurd bullschmidt you’re able to talk them into. Heheheh.

      1
      • AvatarAnne M. says: 534 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Hopkinton, MA

        I thought it was likely Southboro had been posted previously but it is listed as “new” on realtor.com – probably taken off market & put back on again.

  10. AvatarCharlesB says: 398 comments

    Waterbury, CT is characterized by its often outlandish triple-decker houses with oversized three-story porches marching up the sides of its steep hills, making it perhaps the most architecturally memorable of Connecticut’s cities. Here’s a more diminutive house from the early-20th century built in the ‘Storybook’ or ‘Charles Lindbergh’ style, priced at $47,500:

    https://www.watchforeclosure.com/foreclosed-homes/connecticut/new-haven/waterbury/11770350/67-oakland-ave.html

    4
  11. AmerikiwiAmerikiwi says: 158 comments

    Kia Ora from New Zealand,

    Today I am focusing on Gisborne in the remote East Cape region of New Zealand. I had no idea it had such beautiful big homes so it’s been a pleasant surprise.

    2 storey Edwardian country residence/homestead on 21 acres near the town of Gisborne. 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, lead light windows, french doors, billiards room and even a pool and guest house. It is available for $US821,250.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3482231

    Marigold Manor currently run as a bed and breakfast but definitely not frou frou. Exotic and eclectic decor blends well with the traditional, original features. 6 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. $US465,000.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3502190

    “Te Nikau” (Nikau is an indigenous palm tree) a 4 bedroom 3 bathroom two storey 1920’s country home full of original, untouched woodwork, floors, leadlight windows looking out onto the surrounding countryside and a pool. It is up for Negotiation and but has a council valuation of $US750K.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3414884

    “Kohatanui” (Big Rock)a beautifully renovated 1921 6 bedroom 2 bathroom homestead owned by the descendants of the original settlers. Unpainted original woodwork and built-ins, many original kitchen features and a large verandah that takes in sweeping views of the countryside. It is for Private Treaty which means the property is offered at no fixed price and prospective buyers are required to submit their offers by a specified date and time. The vendor isn’t obliged to accept any offers and can choose to accept an offer at any point during the listing period. The council valuation is $US1,265,000.00.

    https://www.bayleys.co.nz/2851565

    2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980 board & batten modern

      Kia, I am thinking of you and your country today. I hope this is okay to post.

      13
      • AmerikiwiAmerikiwi says: 158 comments

        Thank you so much. We are all stunned and devastated because we are a very peaceful and safe country.

        14
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980 board & batten modern

      Some very nice homes today Kia. I especialy like the kitchen in Marigold Manor. I believe that was the one with that large window in the kitchen. Looks like a wonderful place to cook.

    • AvatarJeanne Smith says: 59 comments

      Kia, I’m am so sorry that your peaceful and beautiful country has been shattered by such senseless and hateful violence. All I can do is pray that this never happens again. You all will remain in my prayers and I will do what ever I can to help.

      6
      • AmerikiwiAmerikiwi says: 158 comments

        Thank you very much. The shooter was in court briefly yesterday but his face was deliberately hidden because we don’t want him to get any attention and everybody has been asked not to watch his video or read his manifesto. Our already strict gun laws are going to be tightened but right now we are still in shock and people are pretty subdued.By the way my name is Julie and Kia Ora is Maori for hello. I am also originally from the States.

        5
        • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1980 board & batten modern

          Glad to meet you Julie!!! My name is really not Kimberly62, just Kim. Named after an afghan hound in 62. Smile.

          • AmerikiwiAmerikiwi says: 158 comments

            Hi Kim. I love dogs. We are getting a new one today. It is a puppy that has been withdrawn from the Guide Dog program because he is uncomfortable with small children. We will now have three dogs.

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 779 comments

      I always love your shares Julie! The settings are beautiful and I enjoy the exteriors and interior woodwork, very often light-toned wood, beautiful mantels. The corridor with the staircase in the 2nd listing is cool!

      1
      • AmerikiwiAmerikiwi says: 158 comments

        Thank you. I enjoy trying to find homes for the weekly exchange. This is a young country so it’s hard finding really old houses. I sure miss the old houses from the U.S. and look forward to my daily OHD fix.

  12. AvatarDon Richards says: 96 comments

    Some interesting new listings popped up this week, signs of spring are on the way!

    First up is this 1850 Colonial in Woodbury, Ct listed at 415k. I’m pretty certain that the build date is earlier than stated. 12 over 12 windows would be odd in 1850, no? In any case I love the little Gothic Revival barn.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/258-Washington-Rd_Woodbury_CT_06798_M43745-06911?view=qv

    Another in Woodbury listed at $265k is this 1810 schoolhouse with assorted additions over the years. The floorplan is quite quirky, but I think with some judicious tinkering it would make a great home. Love the barrel vaulted ceiling in the schoolhouse section.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/43-Tomlinson-Rd_Woodbury_CT_06798_M37511-47842?view=qv

    Next is a 1918 Tudor in Waterbury, Ct for $135k. It’s a foreclosure that needs some love, but retains much vintage charm. Hard to believe someone paid over $531k for it 13 years ago.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/137-Woodlawn-Ter_Waterbury_CT_06710_M43372-45064?view=qv

    Another foreclosure in Waterbury is this little bungalow with strong Asian influences listed for $47.500. in the right hands, there are great possibilities.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/67-Oakland-Ave_Waterbury_CT_06710_M44977-75371?view=qv

    Lastly is This 1770 amalgam of 2 18th century houses in Amenia, NY listed for a staggering 17 million. This estate is 432 acres of bucolic wonderfulness with a guest house, assorted barns, etc. Daryl Hall of Hall and Oates reconstructed these buildings a number of years back and created quite an impressive compound. He had a show on called Daryl’s Restoration Over-hall that I found on Itunes sometime ago. It documented his restoration of his old house in Sherman, Ct that he left the big estate for. Worth viewing in my opinion as far as home renovation shows go.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/964-Huckelberry-Rd_Amenia_NY_12501_M32626-38782?view=qv

    6
    • AvatarLaurie W. says: 1542 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      Love the former schoolhouse. Give Daryl Hall big applause — something of a potpourri of styles, materials, and periods, but it works well and has a historic character. In one of the most glorious parts of the world, too.

      1
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1980 board & batten modern

        We used to watch his show. I remember that rustic kitchen and jam sessions in the barn. Agree with Laurie and MissApple, good job!

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 779 comments

      Love the Amenia house! Love this kind of old houses. Simple yet elegant and cosy

      1
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Don, I had the Tomlison Rd house on my list for a bit but I just don’t think it has enough land for the horses. I do like it though. I watched the interview with Daryl Hall of the restoration of his property. Very interesting. I really like the Washington Rd home. Wish it has land with it.

  13. AvatarMatt Z says: 86 comments

    Happy Friday

    I wanted to share this pretty incredible Victorian pile that recently came back on the market again in the upper Hudson Valley. The home sits on a bluff that allows one side to face the Catskill Mountains, and the other side to have an amazing view of the Hudson River. I wish I could read what the fireplace mantel says, I bet it’s the name of the estate!

    1890’s Victorian $2,750,000
    2924 Route 385, Coxsackie, NY 12051
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2924-State-Route-385_Coxsackie_NY_12051_M39209-09344#photo14

    6
  14. AvatarRonnieH says: 75 comments

    Merced, California. $500,000. Built in 1900 on .4 acres. Says it’s a Victorian in the description….is it????

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/CA/19170155_zpid/9_rid/1700-1905_built/44.590467,-107.490235,29.477861,-131.11084_rect/5_zm/15_p/?

    1
    • AvatarBethany otto says: 2519 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      I’m no expert on style; just wanted to say that my daughter attends UC Merced and loves it up there so much. It’s about halfway between Fresno and Yosemite National Park and is a beautiful open agricultural area.

    • AvatarHoyt Clagwell says: 254 comments

      It’s a melange of everything that was going on in that period. I would place it in the Shingle Style above all (the free-flowing openness of the downstairs rooms and the “living hall” in lieu of a more formal entry and stair arrangement are clinchers), but it’s Shingle Style with a heavy peppering of English Arts & Crafts, Craftsman, and arguably even Prairie Style.

      1
      • MJGMJG says: 328 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        Victorian is really just the era. Victorian in some respects isn’t even a style. Though popular norm does usually refer to it as such. Its such a complex era and with each decade within the era there are massive changes in clothing, interior and exterior decoration, designs in advertising, inventions etc. Its really just the umbrella and under it, all of these styles are born, created, reborn, recreated, mixed around, shared, and revitalized.
        Victorian Era technically died with the queen in January 22 1901 but trappings and styles from the period exist until what the populace of the board seems to agree around 1915.

    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      What a wonderful house. It seems to have a million rooms. It made me sad to see that broken window left like that. How lovely it would be to own and restore this place.

  15. Avatarddbacker says: 379 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    That is a very good question. I see elements of tudor, gothic, and even craftsman. A real hodge-podge. I like it.

    1
  16. AvatarPaula Libby says: 29 comments

    Congress St. Portland, Me. $369.900. If you like intown living, but don’t want to live in a Condo, this might be for you. It is an old colonial in the heart of Portland and cheaper than most condos. Lots of potential. https://www.trulia.com/p/me/portland/1399-congress-st-portland-me-04102–2003758632

    2
    • AvatarJoseph says: 311 comments

      Nice house at a good price (Portland has gotten expensive), but that is one busy street. On the plus side, walking distance to Tony’s Donuts (get the molasses ones).

      2
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Portland and surrounding areas have gotten very expensive. This is a find. I love Portland though and now it is considered the best food destination in the country.

  17. AvatarFlaOHDJunkie says: 133 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1902 FL

    Interesting house on 9 acres very private location claims to be 1830 $227.5K Brownsville Tn
    http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/pmf,pf_pt/house,condo,townhouse_type/119353857_zpid/globalrelevanceex_sort/35.636302,-89.202376,35.553387,-89.348288_rect/12_zm/

    6
  18. CoraCora says: 1856 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1920. This is a sad old farmhouse on roughly 3 acres. According to the listing, the home “has no value.”

    Something about photo #3 makes me hope that someone will save this old home place. That big porch would be a wonderful place to watch the fireflies on a summer night.

    This place was someone’s dream once. I think it could be again. 💚 $70K

    Greenville, TN:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6955-Horton-Hwy-Greeneville-TN-37745/66599046_zpid/

    3
  19. Avatarnailwhacker Pete says: 29 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1935 cape with A&C elements
    Malverne, NY

    Victorian, unique exterior, great flooring, built-ins and original interior trim built by Tilghman Fogel in 1906. 6 bed/2 bath $509K 2.7 acres with addition 2/3 bedroom apt over garage.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3301-Linden-St_Bethlehem_PA_18017_M45455-19002?view=qv

    3
    • AvatarChrisICU says: 527 comments

      Love the style. Thanks for sharing

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 779 comments

      How interesting!! I would love to know more background history about why it was built like that with some interesting (salvaged?) materials such as the bottles or pitcher?!

    • natira121natira121 says: 253 comments
      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Really nice! It says “needs complete renovation” Whatever! To me it looks “move-in ready”!!!

      1
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 779 comments

      My type of house too! It’s perfect as is, wouldn’t change a thing!

  20. AvatarJKleeb says: 147 comments

    Madison, Indiana 1949 Lustron, $65,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1447-Michigan-Rd-Madison-IN-47250/85424983_zpid/

    Madison, IN Federal, $329,000 build date listed as 1900 but it is obviously earlier than that.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/428-Mulberry-St-Madison-IN-47250/85419456_zpid/
    Madison, IN, Greek Revival 1840, $459,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/708-E-Main-St-Madison-IN-47250/85419010_zpid/

    3
  21. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9829 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    People always wonder what happens to homes after they sell, sometimes this happens:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/03/28/1936-tudor-revival-denver-co/

    1
    • AvatarStevenF says: 699 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      Slightly sick to my stomach now.

      2
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Same here. Thanks to the repetitious grey, (black) and white kitchens as well as bathrooms displayed on popular TV programs, a stereotypical decor template has been created allowing almost anyone to clone their own version of this monotonous decor theme. The more popular this trend becomes-I sincerely hoped it has peaked-the more dated it will look in a few years with who knows what will follow it? (but it will surely keep future remodelers busy)

        One often repeated trendy decor term, (besides the ad-nauseam “Open Concept”) that I personally find irritating is the phenomenon of “Shaker Cabinets” in Kitchens and Bathrooms. From what I know about the original Shaker religious sect, their beliefs included simple but sturdy utility items that avoided the then current notion of anything from door hinges to light fixtures showing superfluous ornamentation of some kind. Their dislike of ornamentation was based in the religious belief that anything “fancy” was disrespectful to the divine as it demonstrated false pride and immodesty. Being devoted to their beliefs required strict humility as well as following certain core tenants such as celibacy .
        Fast forward to your local big box retail home improvement center and “Shaker” appears now to denote plain white cabinets with doors having a sunken panel with a raised surround. Cabinet hardware is often inspired by 1950’s design. The Shakers if they could see this misappropriation of their design ethic would probably be horrified, especially if they saw the term “Shaker” being used for cabinets installed in million dollar homes and more. But any kitchen or bathroom designer today knows exactly what “Shaker cabinets” are supposed to look like. My apologies; but that is just one of my pet peeves at the moment.

        On a different note, while I dislike what was done to the aforementioned period house I do think it should be documented as an object lesson and vivid example of unsympathetic remodeling showing major stylistic changes made through modern eyes. Perhaps worse, such a short-changed old house is quite likely to sell (especially to younger, heavily media influenced buyers) who are so completely ignorant about the historic homes of the past that they actually will believe the “after” results are greatly improved and highly desirable. Small wonder that many younger people couldn’t explain what historic preservation means if you asked them.

        4
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      So sad but not surprising. At least there wasn’t the obligatory brown tile in the bathrooms and kitchen. It seems that almost every house I look at in CT has the same brown tile from Home Depot in the bathrooms and kitchens – and why do Realtors still tout ugly granite counters as if they are something to be treasured? I cry thinking of the loss of that adorable kitchen and bathrooms in this house.

  22. Avatarprettypaddle says: 53 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This 1896 two-home compound in Evanston, IL, is being sold as two lots with the intention that the new owner will demolish the original houses and build new. Price $355,000 per lot. This is a really nice, quiet part of town. These are the two listings — identical except for the address: https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/pmf,pf_pt/3520036_zpid/globalrelevanceex_sort/42.056259,-87.713648,42.051304,-87.721609_rect/16_zm/
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/pmf,pf_pt/2141870986_zpid/globalrelevanceex_sort/42.056259,-87.713648,42.051304,-87.721609_rect/16_zm/

    The pictures on the listings give no hint at what the homes might be like on the inside — and hardly show what’s on the lot. It was last sold in 2004. No idea if it’s been sitting empty all this time. I’ve always been intrigued by this one and would love to see inside. It’s nothing fancy, but even driving by it feels like a different time.

    I found an interesting obituary for the previous owner, Ray Milz, who was born on the property and lived there almost all of his 89 years. https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/chicagotribune/obituary.aspx?n=ray-milz&pid=114946019

    When everything else around it is surburbia, it hurts that anyone would want to tear this down just to build another cookie-cutter house.

  23. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 507 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA,

    Eufaula, AL 1835. 299K: The pictures aren’t great, it’s fairly small, and the price in my opinion is mostly because of the water views. But since it’s an historic jail, I thought it worth sharing. Complete with iron or steel door and bars on the windows!

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Eufaula-AL/house,condo,townhouse_type/2086245535_zpid/35557_rid/globalrelevanceex_sort/32.271458,-84.616013,31.56508,-85.797043_rect/9_zm/

    4
  24. CoraCora says: 1856 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1904. This has the best tower I’ve ever seen. The kitchen floor is faint-worthy – I *think* it is tile, but I know there’s OHD-ers who can positively confirm. Whatever it is, it’s incredible. Breathtaking, fantastic house. This home is on the NRHP. $459K

    Hyrum, UT:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/166-W-Main-St-Hyrum-UT-84319/126188498_zpid/

    4
    • JimHJimH says: 4024 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Awesome place, the Soren Hanson House, built for a man who sold millions of eggs. Certainly the kitchen floor is period tile, proven by the stress cracks and stained grout that you wouldn’t see otherwise. Looks like some of the original furniture also.

      https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/82004109

      3
      • CoraCora says: 1856 comments
        OHD Supporter & Moderator

        Clinton, TN

        It appears some of the furniture will remain with the home.

        I just can’t get over the floors in the kitchen and bath.

    • AvatarJKleeb says: 147 comments

      I’ve never seen mirrors like those in the stair panels. Can’t get a sense of their age from the photos. Unusual —and I can’t say I like it. Maybe they were more common than I know. I can only think of how much time one would spend dealing with smudges.
      The tile floor is wonderful.

      1
    • AvatarJulieanne says: 27 comments

      This house is breathtaking! It is exquisitely decorated and the view of the mountains is stunning. I love all the red!

    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 393 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980 board & batten modern

      Cora-Wonderful!

    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Be still my heart.

  25. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9829 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I happen to really love mid-century homes when they are nearly completely original including kitchens and baths. This Fresno, CA home has some incredible features but the kitchen is unfortunate so just going to share it here instead of it’s own post. 1964 at $520,000.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5050-N-Van-Ness-Blvd-Fresno-CA-93711/18707536_zpid/?fullpage=true

    2
    • AvatarMW says: 700 comments

      If I had a reason to live in Fresno, I’d be into this house for sure. Looks like that kitchen was mostly a cabinet front and counter top make over. Likely new to help sell it. Would be an easy project to swap that out to something more in keeping with the rest of the house.

      The next door neighbors certainly have some interesting modern design concepts going on.
      https://goo.gl/maps/JCzbbFueDNo

      2
      • AvatarHoyt Clagwell says: 254 comments

        I was going to make pretty much the exact same comment about the kitchen, MW–all surface, and a pretty easy fix. It really looks like they just put new fronts on the cabinets, while leaving the basic layout and possibly the actual guts intact.
        If I were going to live in CA, this house is exactly how I’d want to live.

        1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        The next door neighbors certainly have some interesting modern design concepts going on.

        Boy do they ever…early American Solar Panel style with tasty camouflage accents? Anything goes seems to be the architectural rule in California. At least they are energy efficient and probably pay less for electricity.

  26. AvatarSandy B says: 380 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    Hard to tell what’s going on on the other side…….mobile home park? RV storage? The street view wouldn’t let me go that far.

  27. AvatarSarah Erwin says: 61 comments

    Can anyone here comment on living in Ohio? We are planning to move (from central Illinois), and have been thinking of central Tennessee, hoping to avoid the heat and humidity here, as well as Illinois’ fiscal troubles. Today hubby found a Craftsman (our style of choice) in Ohio — a location that we hadn’t even considered — but, other than snow, which can be dealt with, it looks like a pretty decent place to be. The town is small, the price and condition of the house look really good. Any pros and cons that anyone can offer regarding the state will be greatly appreciated. Don’t want to share the house — afraid one of you will snatch it out from under us!! LOL! Thanks in advance. If nobody is planning a move to Ohio, I’ll share the link.

    1
    • CandyCandy says: 125 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Carpentersville, IL

      Sarah-
      Ohio, like many states, is rather large and very diverse. I lived in NW Ohio for maaaany years, moved to Sacramento CA in 2000 and moved from there to the Chicago area in August of 2017 (where I remain until sometime this spring/summer/fall) I still had/have many friends and family members all over Ohio and could likely answer your questions (and would be happy to help) but you’re gonna have to be a bit more specific about the area that you’re considering.

      • AvatarSarah Erwin says: 61 comments

        Thanks to Candy and John for your thoughtful insights. Ideally, we are looking for a house close to half way between our kids — one in central Illinois (who may or may not ever move — who knows) and the other in Huntsville, AL (who will probably never move). My hubby likes the idea of the Tennessee plateau — east of Nashville, and higher in elevation so generally lower in temps and humidity. The other option that we have thought about is the area between Knoxville and Chattanooga, further from our daughter in IL and closer to son in AL. Neither have been fully “explored”, and yes, we plan to do that thoroughly before we decide on any location or house. The house we saw today was the first that I have seen that matched our style and would have allowed us to sell here, buy there, pay for professional movers and still have cash left over. But we decided over supper that OH makes us further for both kids to come visit, and being reasonably close to them is really a high priority. Another priority is looking to live where retirement income isn’t taxed out the wazoo. That’s one thing in Illinois’ favor….. for now, but with the fiscal mess the state is in, I expect they will change that and start taxing retirement $$ and Social Security before long. Indiana has always been in our minds, except for the unequal distance for the kids. It is much like the area that we live in now — small communities with farmland all around, but big city accessibility for culture — museums, plays and musicals, etc.

        Here’s the house — Brian, OH — $94.900 — 1915 Craftsman with beautiful built ins (that are pretty much perfect matches for 2 pieces that we have that were rescued from houses that were torn down). Now….. if we could just uproot this house and move it to TN…..

        https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/340-E-High-St_Bryan_OH_43506_M36688-42629?cid=dsp_forsale_gdn_retarget_dynamic_43506_032019&cid=dsp_forsale_gdn_retarget_dynamic_c_032019&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI0_-V7O2J4QIVYeS1Ch3lEwuuEAEYASADEgJr5PD_BwE#photo0

        Thanks again, folks!!

        2
        • CandyCandy says: 125 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Carpentersville, IL

          Sarah… I’m chuckling to myself right now. I’m from Defiance OH…about 18 miles from Bryan (where your Craftsman is) and was actually considering moving to Bryan for a short time. I have several friends that live there and as I stated before, I still have many friends in the Midwest and especially in my hometown, where there are not just friends but family as well! Bryan is a great little town (with emphasis on little)! It has lots of small industry (Such as Ohio art, where etch-a-sketch is made… Spangler candy, maker of Dum-Dum suckers) it’s a friendly little town with an Amtrak stop and it’s very close to a Turnpike exit… either one giving you a straight shot into Chicago. The town square, with its beautiful courthouse, is surrounded with lots of little businesses that seem to be thriving. A very good friend of mine recently opened a restaurant and microbrewery in what was a church (Father John’s microbrewery… Kinda hilarious Because he happens to be a surgeon and we nurses used to tease him all the time about how doctors think they’re God but Surgeons KNOW they’re God) It’s a beautiful venue with great food and a live entertainment. However, be aware that you’re not gonna find much else happening in the evening in Bryan. If you’re used to having Big Box stores and/or large grocery stores with any ingredient you might need for that exotic Indian/Asian/Mediterranean dish you love to cook) nearby, Bryan will be difficult to adjust to. There’s nothing within even an hour. But if you’re okay with that, if you’re looking for a beautiful little town with a stable economy and friendly neighbors, you’re gonna love Bryan! One last note… are you aware that the Craftsman is under a contingency contract? I called a friend of mine that is a realtor because I wanted to go look at it right after it was first posted on old house dreams and it was already under contract and not being shown. I dunno if anything has happened since but That was the status about three weeks ago. Best of luck to you with your search! I’m right there with you… Unfortunately my kids are spread much farther than yours… I have one in Monterey California and one in the Chicago area and unfortunately I’m not a fan of anything between those two points for one reason or another! I left Sacramento because the city life was just too much… And my intention was to go to Florida. However, I’ve since realized that Florida may not be my cup of tea anymore so it’s very possible/probable I’ll head back to Cali and try to find something closer to my son in an area smaller than Sacramento. It’s all just a dilemma at this point! All my best to you!

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Taxes are usually lower in Central TN but culturally it may be somewhat more “rural” in feel. I have a friend in LaFollette, TN (about 50 miles west of Knoxville) and when we visited him he drew us a backroads map that would save us an hour of driving but he cautioned us to be careful and not stop to ask questions. We did pass a couple of places that seemed to be straight out of the movie Deliverance. A lot of that area is Coal mining country with all the hardships that implies. But there are bright spots here and there. The 1930’s era Tennessee Valley Authority did much to help the state economy bringing electrification to remote areas. Many areas of the state have problems with Meth and Opioids but that is certainly not limited to TN. Ohio has many of the urban ills in its big cities as found in Illinois but Columbus seems to be a bright economic spot. Cincinnati is slowly improving but has a ways to go. Cleveland is…well, Cleveland, and location there means everything. The Cleveland suburbs of Ohio City and Lakewood have safer areas and lots of great old houses. Our personal preference, though, is for Indiana as much of it is farmland and friendly small towns. Take a look at Madison, or Logansport. (voted by Forbes as the most livable small town in America last year) Wabash, Aurora, (also on the Ohio River) and even smaller towns like Williamsport and Attica. The taxes in Indiana are the lowest in the Midwest but still slightly above Tennessee levels. I recommend doing more than just looking at a house, drive around, talk to locals, and get a feel for the community as well. If jobs are needed, be sure there are some in the area you’re interested in. Those are all generalities…if you have more specific questions I or better, locals, may be able to help. We’re based in Texas, but have traveled around the Midwestern states extensively. Good luck with your old house quest.

      2
  28. SueSue says: 272 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    From Thomaston CT a Colonial from 1830. They are calling it an Colonial/Victorian but it’s a Colonial to my eyes. Needs work at the price of 229,000 but it I think it has great potential. Floors are wonderful. Check out the funky spindles design in the staircase. Cute. They don’t let you see the much of the kitchen which makes me suspicious. Yard is gorgeous.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/366-Hickory-Hill-Rd_Thomaston_CT_06787_M36154-96663?ex=CT616979109#photo22

    A cutie in Woodbury. Don’t know what style to call it. The curved ceiling living room I believe was the one room school house mentioned in the description. Perhaps part of the add on was the teachers living quarters? I am curious to what the chair door thingy is in the upstairs hallway. This is another one that is low priced which in CT speak means it needs work. 269,900

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Woodbury_CT#M3751147842

    I love this house. Not enough land for us but had to share it. Realtor is calling it a Colonial but I don’t think that is right. Correct me if I am wrong. Built in 1839 it was the country house of American Antiques dealer David Dunton. It is a lovely home. Has a remodeled barn that comes with it. Wish there were more photos. 439,000. It has been on the market for over a year.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Woodbury_CT/pg-3#M3927960219

    2
  29. AvatarCharlesB says: 398 comments

    Circa 1890 Queen Anne priced at $120,000. Yes, the woodwork is painted, but the location in the beautiful river town of Tidioute, PA more than makes up for it:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1-Elm-St-Tidioute-PA-16351/93745044_zpid/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUbVYiHIux8&t=131s

    1
  30. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 507 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA,

    Montgomery, AL 1966 $450K. An exceptional and spacious mid-century modern home. The owner’s love of color and some of the decor choices pull the eye away from the architecture, which is spare and pure and so far as I can tell nearly original. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Montgomery_AL/sby-14#M7532965195

    2
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I am telling you, being in this group has really made me a fan of the Mid century home. I really, really love this house.

      1
  31. CoraCora says: 1856 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1924. What a curious, unusual home in Dallas, TX. I have no idea what style this is… Prairie? Craftsman? It’s my favorite house I’ve found in a while, even in it’s current condition. Needs a good amount of work. I sure hope someone saves it. $500K

    Dallas, TX: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1320-Kings-Hwy-Dallas-TX-75208/26712923_zpid/

  32. CoraCora says: 1856 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1956. This is a modest MCM that’s been left untouched, almost completely. It’s adorable. Would liked to have seen more shots of that kitchen. $120K

    Waterloo, IA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/625-E-Mitchell-Ave-Waterloo-IA-50702/76662228_zpid/

    2
    • SueSue says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Kimberly, I shared this a few weeks ago since it was on my list of homes to look at in CT. I took it off my list because there is so much to do still and it is so expensive to have things done like this in CT. It’s a gem though.

      1
  33. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 779 comments
    1875 Limestone house
    Loire Valley, France,

    -‘Hi, do you have in your listings a 104 rooms / 67 bedrooms property?’
    -‘Yes of course, here: https://www.ouestfrance-immo.com/immobilier/vente/demeure-exception/neuille-pont-pierre-37-37167/13644103.htm

    I need to find more info about this property in my region, this is amazing, I want to know what it was for, was it a school, a religious property? A military one? I wanna knoooow!

    1
    • AvatarNeness says: 45 comments

      Grand merci, Miss Apple, but now I’ll no longer be able to tell people that our former house with it’s 54 rooms was the largest ever advertised on this, my favorite real estate site. This house has that certain Teutonic “laideur” that I find hideous, and so unlike the beautiful, graceful buildings that one usually finds throughout France.

      2
  34. Avatardlovellogeorgiatrust-org says: 1 comments
    GA

    https://www.georgiatrust.org/endangered-properties/a-george-f-barber-house/
    Built date: c. 1900
    Price: $60,000
    Location: Brunswick, Georgia

  35. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4611 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    This George Barber designed house appears to be relatively intact although it has a few interior alterations like the arched passages (1920’s-’30’s) between some of the rooms. It is certainly reasonably priced considering the coastal location. However, it is placed between a student center and church administrative offices. Continuing towards the downtown, the residential context quickly gives way to a commercial/ institutional setting. The lush coastal landscape with the iconic Spanish Moss does provide the right ambience for a historic home.

    A couple of more intact examples of this Barber design have been posted on this site in the past so any potential restorer could reference those to better understand the original design. Thanks for sharing. Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/6XYhezLGhdK2

  36. AvatarAngelico says: 4 comments

    This house was posted on OHD a few months ago, but no interior photos were available at the time.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/01/21/c-1850-greenville-al/
    Here’s a listing with quite a few pics inside:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/201-Herbert-St-Greenville-AL-36037/232695923_zpid/
    It needs a lot of work, but this could be a truly magnificent home, if the right people came along and gave it some love and attention. Graceful, and quintessentially Southern, old school. I’d love to see the steps up the middle of the porch recreated!

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