September 21, 2018: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 9/21/18 - Last OHD Update: 9/28/18 - 187 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat. How to share… Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below. Format rule! Make it easier for those browsing shares by including the city, state and price (international listings excluded.) A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful. Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) Not all shares will be added to OHD as it's own post.

187 Comments on September 21, 2018: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Facebook has actually killed pages from showing up in newsfeed, dead, dead, dead. Most homes I count myself lucky 1000 people got to see in their newsfeed (I have about 90k FB followers.) I HIGHLY suggest signing up for the newsletter. If you hate daily emails, go for every 3 day newsletter: https://www.oldhousedreams.com/3-day-week-newsletter/

    Don’t know where or if today’s old house is standing. If you recognize it, let us know or we won’t be able to sleep tonight!

    MidwestBecky let us know…nope, no longer stands. Now we won’t sleep tonight for different reasons…as in being sad.

    20
    • julie A.julie A. says: 158 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1914 foursquare farmhouse
      New Germany, MN

      now we need a sad face emoticon to click..:-( The Pillsbury Mansion in Orono, MN was just torn down to make room for more McMansions…13 acres and a 36,000 sq ft mansion, 99 years old. SAD!

      11
    • RossRoss says: 2466 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Damn, Kelly, I thought your fabulous link house WAS extant:

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2014/02/19/1887-queen-anne-toledo-oh/

      But in reading the comments below I see that I am mistaken.

      The Toledo house is amazingly similar, and it must be by the same architect as the lost house.

      Damn.

      1
    • CoraCora says: 2057 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      Well, poop. That stinks.

      7
    • Karen says: 1080 comments

      Damn. I bet some really rich politician or Rockefeller type built this house. I love the gargoyles and the trim on top of the roof crests. Fantastic detail! I keep thinking maybe this house could’ve been a neighbor of TR’s house in Oyster Bay, Long Island.

      3
    • MichaelMichael says: 2451 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Kelly, it was thrilling to see the picture you shared today…….and yet sad to see that it is gone. About the time I think you can’t top that picture, you pull something like this out! It’s fascinating to see these places, standing or not.

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6335 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Ooooohhh Kelly, this week’s house is really decadent! Thanks so much for going to the trouble to upload all the great details. My goodness. I’m sure that principal chimney had 8 or more flues venting fireplaces and stoves from basement to attic. The original interior was no doubt miraculous.

      5
    • Karen says: 1080 comments

      Ummm… I’m no techie. There is a house on Zillow that is in my home town that I’d love to post in here. How does one paste a link in here? Years ago I knew how to cut and paste, but I must not be doing it right, as I’m not being successful every time I try.

    • SueSue says: 534 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I understand why these homes were destroyed but it still seems like it’s like going to the Louvre and destroying a great work of art.

      10
    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      Whoever thought that destroying a beast like this for progress will now know there is a special place in h*** for them. 🙁

      7
  2. natira121natira121 says: 610 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    WOW! That belongs on a T-shirt!!!

    11
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      It does! I’m planning on doing a better scan on it for printing. It’s an old photo that was wrapped in a sealed plastic holder so it’s got a line glare through it, I was too lazy to rescan it for today’s viewing.

      5
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Agreed with Natira121; this does belong on a T-Shirt. I’m not sure when the line is crossed when moving from a mansion to a palace but this one comes perilously close to being palatial. Sadly, giant mansions of this scale dotted the architectural landscape across the country at the end of the 1800’s but by the mid-20th century a vast number of them were already gone. It’s not complicated to understand why because such massive residential palaces required a staff of support personnel to maintain and keep them functioning. By 1910, cultural changes in tastes turned against such ostentatious displays of wealth. Labor shortages during WWI (roughly 1914-1919) and rising servant wages were a factor as well. By the 1920’s many of the families these Victorian mansions were built for either lacked the funds to keep them up or had passed away and their heirs and children wanted nothing to do with them so the lucky ones became schools, orphanages, and other institutions while others were sub-divided into apartments. The rest were razed with little fanfare except for perhaps a small article in a local newspaper. Saddest of all is that we will never have houses like these again in our lifetimes because the traditional trades skills that enabled them to be built are almost impossible to find today. The rare old growth woods are also gone forever. (or at least for several thousand more years) These great architectural expressions are truly lost forever. Had photography not existed when they were still standing they might be completely unknown today. Somewhere in my collections of ephemera is a post card of a similar scaled house in Stockton, California, long gone, just as this example is. A precious few, like Biltmore in Ashville, NC, remain standing but those are the rare exception. Thanks for sharing.

        26
  3. ddbackerddbacker says: 508 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    A very Brady Friday to you all! This Drummond contempo listing says 1951 but I think maybe 1961. Any thoughts on that? Kitchen and baths re-done but retains some groovy paneling and exterior is unmolested. I just like it anyway. $280K
    http://www.reecenichols.com/homes-for-sale/3408-W-79th-Street-Prairie-Village-KS-66208-255066507

    4
  4. MidwestBecky says: 41 comments

    I’m pretty sure it’s the John E. Bell House, which was located at 2401 Park Avenue in Minneapolis. I will see if I can find more photos and info. I think it was torn down to put up a parking garage.

    4
  5. MidwestBecky says: 41 comments

    Hi Kelly,

    I found a couple of pictures to support my last comment. I’m not very tech-savvy, so hopefully I’m doing this right. The John E. Bell House was featured in “Lost Castles.” You can see a photo of it here on page 230:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=rn0z5ozLX7wC&pg=PA229&lpg=PA229&dq=john+e.+bell+house+minneapolis&source=bl&ots=vdft90whJw&sig=-s_tvksHYsAEg5LlZt1_OpqyM_s&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiwgr6ms8zdAhWan4MKHQj7BDcQ6AEwA3oECAgQAQ#v=onepage&q=john%20e.%20bell%20house%20minneapolis&f=false

    It was also in “Lost Twin Cities” on page 137:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=uegmzT1auoQC&pg=PA136&lpg=PA136&dq=john+e.+bell+house+minneapolis&source=bl&ots=JASkzaT41F&sig=unSUQMRCkd92P_cHBx6U02KBhUE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiwgr6ms8zdAhWan4MKHQj7BDcQ6AEwBXoECAUQAQ#v=onepage&q=john%20e.%20bell%20house%20minneapolis&f=false

    I hope those links work — they are from Google Books.

    I own a copy of “Lost Castles,” so I’ll type out what’s written about the house in that book and put it in my next comment, and you can decide if you want to post these or not:)

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks Becky, you did it right.

      “…finished with cherry and oak woodwork and lite with stained-glass windows.” Architect was Charles Sedgwick. Cost at least $20k originally to build, that’s $553,779 in today’s money which seems like a bargain.

      More… “Within, the house offered more all-out Victorian bravado. The Main hall, thirty six feet long and eleven feet wide and lit by a stained glass window, led through ” a colonnade and arches in oak,”….to the main staircase. Above the stairs was a dome “forming an ornamental ceiling, the dome being in turn lighted by windows opening above it from the front of the second story.” Arrayed around the hall and staircase were a parlor, reception room, library and dining room. Many of the home’s interior walls were adorned with oil painting; water colors were used for ceilings. All of the major rooms also included fireplaces with “massive and elegant” mantels and mirror frames. There were seven bedrooms on the second floor. The enormous attic featured a twenty two by forty two foot “hall” which was probably used as a ballroom.”

      Eventually became a nursing home and then demolished 1961.

      Dang those folks that decided to demolish such a work of art for a PARKING GARAGE.

      5
      • TGrantTGrant says: 824 comments
        OHD Supporter

        New Orleans, LA

        Well merde! That’s tragic, and an all too predictable end in that era. Such artistic glory reduced to a parking structure. As my gran used to say, “some people ought to be shot, but that would be a waste of a good bullet”.

        11
  6. MidwestBecky says: 41 comments

    From “Once There Were Castles” by Larry Millett (which for some stupid reason I called “Lost Castles” in my last comment to Kelly), pgs, 229-31:

    “The John E. Bell House… was perhaps the most madly energetic Queen Anne home ever built in the Twin Cities. Its owner, however, seems to have been the very image of a staid businessman. Born in New York State, Bell settled in Minnesota in 1857. He worked as a merchant in Minneapolis and later as a buyer for a St. Paul wholesaler. In 1870, he and a partner organized the Hennepin County Savings Bank in Minneapolis. Bell served as the bank’s cashier and later as its president.
    His house was among the first local commissions for architect Charles Sedgwick, who had moved to Minneapolis in 1884. Sedgwick went on to a long career, designing such downtown monuments as Westminster Presbyterian Church (1898) and the original portion of the Dayton’s Department Store. These later works were models of restraint compared to Bell’s house.
    From the very start, the house, which cost at least $20,000, captured the attention of the local press. Built of red St. Louis brick with white stone trim, its walls rose up behind a front porch decorated with no shortage of spindles and scrollwork. On one side the porch extended into a porte cochere that led to a brick carriage house. The house’s glory was its roof: two steeply-pitched stories interrupted by a scenic accumulation of front- and side-facing half-timbered gables, dormers, inset balconies, delicate oriels, and chimneys with patterned brickwork. The prospect of watery mischief amid all of these valleys, seams, and crossings must have been daunting, but the roofline seems to have survived more or less intact until the very end.
    Within, the house offered more all-out Victorian bravado. The main hall, thirty-six feet long and eleven feet wide and lit by a stained-glass window, led through ‘a colonnade and arches in oak,’ as one publication described it, to the main staircase. Above the stairs was a dome, ‘forming an ornamental ceiling, the dome being in turn lighted by windows opening above it from the front of the second story.’ Arrayed around the hall and stairway were a parlor, reception room, library, and dining room. Many of the home’s interior walls were adorned with oil paintings; watercolors were used for the ceilings. All of the major rooms also included fireplaces with ‘massive and elegant’ mantles and mirror frames. There were seven bedrooms on the second floor. The enormous attic featured a twenty-two-by-forty-two-foot ‘hall,’ which was probably used as a ballroom.
    Bell, who was married twice and had four children, moved to Excelsior [MN] around 1900 but apparently owned the house until his death in 1909. Like many old mansions of its time, the house eventually became a nursing home. It survived in that capacity until 1961, when it was torn down and replaced by a parking ramp for the nearby Mt. Sinai Hospital.”

    4
  7. CharlesB says: 481 comments

    The Bell House may be gone, but the Dennis House survives in Auburn, NY and is available for $66,500. This 1880 Victorian Gothic/Shingle Style extravaganza has 8245 sf with 10 bedrooms and 6 baths, and is located in a NR historic district:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/88-90-St-South_Auburn_NY_13021_M49284-42887

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNz6ITWGBrM

    4
  8. Matt Z says: 103 comments

    Hey Guys,

    Kelly was kind enough to add some photos I took of the beautiful 1870’s Italianate Mansion in Schoharie, NY.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2015/12/21/c-1870-italianate-schoharie-ny/

    The house was in shambles following the 2011 Hurricane Irene that devastated the Mohawk Valley. It sold in 2015 and the current owners are doing a wonderful job with the restoration. I was so excited to see them working on it as I drove by, I had to stop and take some photos to show you all.

    9
  9. Kristl says: 31 comments

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/310-Quimby-St_Ida-Grove_IA_51445_M80652-42996?view=qv

    Ida Grove, IA. It says build in 1900 but I disagree. More like 1880 something. Less than $180,000!

    2
  10. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Funny, when I looked at Kristl’s listing one thing I noticed was the newel post. I’ve seen that particular design almost exclusively in George Barber designed houses so I wonder if the newel and familiar staircase design was something Barber promoted? Lovely house in any case. Thanks for the listing post and the repost of the OHD entry with the archival photos.

    1
  11. Anne M.Anne M. says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Wowzer! What a fantastic house Kelly!
    Here is a 1902 in Springfield, MA that has been for sale for a long time, just lowered the price a bit to $164,900. Lots to love here:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-Fairfield-St-Springfield-MA-01108/56211172_zpid/?fullpage=true
    Another 1902 in Fitchburg, MA $232,000 – huge fireplace in the foyer
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/353-Blossom-St-Fitchburg-MA-01420/56691715_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1911 in Worcester, MA $489,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/34-Monadnock-Rd-Worcester-MA-01609/56743090_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1931 Tudor in Longmeadow, MA $649,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/128-Eton-Rd-Longmeadow-MA-01106/56183138_zpid/?fullpage=true

    5
  12. says: 3 comments

    Beautiful old home in Iowa Falls, IA for sale at $175,000- built from 1862 to 1864, this home has so much character and charm! Full of local hand cut butternut,hickory and walnut, coming from the property itself! Still has the iceless refrigerator installed , the unique gingerbread woodwork on porch has been revitalized, much more! Here is a link to the property from the realtor : https://hrti.rapmls.com/scripts/mgrqispi.dll?APPNAME=iowa&PRGNAME=MLSLogin&ARGUMENT=9pIfv9bPvb%2FoAAyBZDiS8h7PDy1O6H9gPtQoqqfcnVo%3D&KeyRid=1

    • Karen says: 1080 comments

      Everytime I see that a house was built in the 1861-1865 era, I wonder if the workers and architects were getting any flak from the community for not enlisting in either the Union or Confederate Armies. One of my ancestors enlisted in Brattleboro, Vt, and came home a few years later on a farm furlough. That was where the men could go home to plant or harvest the crops on their farms. My ancestor decided to go AWOL and not return to his unit. His wife left him over it. Doing a little research, I found out that the date of his desertion was important. The men who enlisted at the beginning of the war had been told their enlistment was to last for only a few years. When congress determined they needed more men than were enlisting/being drafted, they passed a law that extended the original enlistments. I think my ancestor got mad that he couldn’t leave as he’d been originally promised, and simply neglected to go back to the war. That his wife left him tells me how high feelings ran about the war.

      3
      • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1740 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
        NC

        In the 1st years people could pay substitutes to enlist for them, and stay out of the service themselves. Eventually this was discontinued because it wasn’t fair to those who couldn’t afford it. However, each state received a quota when new recruits were needed; often it was satisfied by enlistees but if they couldn’t raise enough soldiers, a draft resulted. Draft riots happened frequently — it was no more popular then than now. Anyway, once the state’s quota was met, men not in the army weren’t at risk. Deferments could often be received if a man was sole support for a family too. One of my gr-grandfathers enlisted, another didn’t & I’ve always wondered why he didn’t go. He did have several little kids. But duty and honor were extremely important at that time, as your ancestor’s story shows. If he had been caught as a deserter, he would’ve been executed — unless Lincoln pardoned him, which he was famous for doing.

        1
        • Karen says: 1080 comments

          I knew about the draft riots. Also there were some riots with very tragic results for African Americans-in the North. Oddly enough, my ancestor ended up getting a pension. I don’t know how he wangled it, because he is listed as a deserter!

  13. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. This is a bit funky with the painted trim and 70s paneling, but you can see what once was a lovely home. The staircase is delightful.

    Topeka, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/77494198_zpid/

    3
  14. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1740 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    Cold Spring Harbor NY 1933 French Provincial, reduced from $6.2M to $4.7M. A veritable steal, worth every clam! Especially the bathroom in the last interior photo. http://www.priceypads.com/historic-c-1933-belvedere-residence-in-cold-spring-harbor-ny-reduced-to-4-7m-prev-6-2m-photos-video/

    4
  15. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1740 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    There is so much variety of texture & shape in this 1929 Elizabethan house in Fairfield CT. $29.5 million on Long Island Sound. The living room is the size of the whole block I live on. http://www.priceypads.com/historic-20-acre-sasco-point-estate-in-fairfield-ct-reduced-to-29-5m-prev-62m-photos/

    2
  16. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Anyone that’s lived in the south with exposed shiplap walls… did you have problems with the boards cupping during the summer? We were told that if we painted them it may stop but it continues. They go back to normal during late fall until mid-Spring but humid weather hits and it’s bad all summer long. We have a dehumidifier but it doesn’t really help. It’s not all the boards but the same ones every summer so far. Suggestions? I’m worried about long term issues.

    2
    • Kevin ONeill says: 153 comments

      Are they just mounted to the studs? Or do they have backing/insulation? Exterior wall? You may need some type of vapor barrier.

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        They are nailed to the studs. I don’t know if there’s insulation in this particular wall, the other side is a bathroom but humidity in the bathroom isn’t a problem. It’s not all the boards on this particular wall, only 1 board is so bad that it caused the door trim to come apart from the force of the warp/cupping. I’ll see about taking a picture, it didn’t show well before when trying to show someone what’s going on.

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Yeah, the picture sucks (pay no attention to the upper trim, we didn’t paint the trim yet.)

          The big board in the foreground is against the bathroom. There’s another board doing it, the far upper board you see the top shadow it’s making but not as bad as the other.

          • Kevin ONeill says: 153 comments

            I think the issue is behind the board. If its not tongue and groove I would remove the board, dry it out and paint the backside. Somehow moisture is getting into the wood. What’s puzzling is its the same board. I also wonder if people have drilled small holes to let moisture escape. Anyway if I could look at it I could probably fix it. Good luck.

            1
    • Ron G says: 170 comments

      Kelly, I saw the picture you posted and that made me curious. You said it was shiplap. Shiplap is sometimes used in the generic vernacular for any lumber that is attached directly to studs in the horizontal position. True shiplap is identified by a rabbit dado. Tongue and groove is often referred to shiplap when applied horizontality. Plain plank lumber applied in this manner is also referred to shiplap. If you are experiencing warping, cupping or bowing, it is as you suggested a humidity problem. This leads me to believe that the lumber is a soft pine. The wider the board, the more noticeable the problem. Why this is affecting one piece of the wall cladding and not the entire room is a little mysterious. Lumber needs room to expand. This is really noticeable if the lumber is bowing. If the lumber is cupping, and its true shiplap, it most likely would pull loose from the top and bottom of the two a joining boards revealing the lap joints. If you can remove the effective piece of lumber without damaging it, its worth the effort to see if there is a problem. It may also be worth your investment to purchase a moisture meter. This device will tell you the moisture content of the effected piece of lumber and what the moister content is in other pieces of cladding in the room. Hope this helps with your problem.

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        It is pine (I believe we figured yellow) and there are lap joints. We took the moisture reading last year, don’t remember the readings but will test it again and compare to other. Our ceiling boards also cup but not all of them and not near to the point this one board does. There is insulation and vapor barrier in our attic.

        1
        • CZenos says: 61 comments

          RonG: “rabbet” not “rabbit”

          Hi Kelly,

          As with most architectural/building terms, once the remodeling trade (flippers, RE agents) get involved, accuracy goes out the window.

          True 1x shiplap was intended to be used as sheathing, under another “layer” e.g. siding or roofing.

          Not to beat a dead horse here, “but a picture …”

          Shiplap:
          https://theharperhouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/shiplap4-1.jpg

          Tongue & groove:
          https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/4d9efab4-54c8-47fb-ab81-7b3a9631731c/svn/dimensional-lumber-740462026476-64_1000.jpg

          The probable cause of a single board cupping is the way that the lumber was cut from the log, e.g. where in the log the particular board was cut.

          https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fmedia-3.web.britannica.com%2Feb-media%2F18%2F67718-004-276741F2.jpg

          Here’s is a technical explanation:
          http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Warp_in_Drying.html

          The bottom line is that typical shiplap lumber was never meant as a finished surface, only as a backing & structural member. As long as we are speaking of a lone board cupping, you will never stop it as long as it is “backwards” on the wall. So all you can do is live with it, or remove it and flip it over.

          Steve

          1
          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 902 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            I know the difference but when I’d tell people about our wood walls its easier just calling shiplap since they usually immediately know what that is. It’s not just the one board but it’s the worse out of the bunch.

            There are many southern homes that have wood walls that were built without plans to cover over originally, usually its beadboard but in our case its 10-15″ pine.

        • Ron G says: 170 comments

          The last sentence in the above post saying, “vapor barrier in the attic” got my attention. For several years starting way back in the late sixties, builders came up with the solution to moister, vapor barrier on the interior side of exterior walls. I’m not trying to be sarcastic here, but this begs a question to be asked, “Was the installer trying to keep moister inside or outside?” When a vapor barrier is installed moister is going to get trapped somewhere. Moist air attacks everything in a home; anything wood is the most notable. Doors swell in the summer,, sometimes enough to rub against the jamb, then shrinks as winter approaches. In our homes, appliances are a contributor to higher levels of humidity. Clothes dryers, stoves and refrigerators. Uninsulated furnace ducts that aren’t sealed located in unconditioned areas such as attics and basements are a major contributor. Also ductwork that is undersized and doesn’t allow for adequate circulation. I could add more to your concerns and remedies, but this information should add some insight for you.

          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 902 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            I’m not sure. There is nothing in the attic but attic, no air conditioner units or anything like that up there. It was added before we bought.

  17. Kevin ONeill says: 153 comments

    This hobby farm had an open house a few weeks back that I went to. All the bricks were made on site as this farm in its day made bricks for the area and had giant kilns on the property. Big house with a decent price. About an hour and a half from the Twin Cities.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/63150-277th-St-Litchfield-MN-55355/106772356_zpid/?fullpage=true

    6
  18. Julie C. says: 319 comments

    Kia Ora from New Zealand.
    Here are some listings from the Hawkes Bay/Napier region on the East Coast of the North Island. Napier was flattened by 7.8 earthquake in 1931 and much of the city was destroyed. Consequently many of the homes there are post 1931 but not all. The city fathers decided to re-build the downtown in the then popular Art Deco style and it is known as The Art Deco Capital of the World. These houses are pre and post quake.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3352559

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3396012

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3393060

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3392223

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3173302

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3383752

    7
  19. Julie C. says: 319 comments

    Kia Ora from New Zealand (again)
    A few days ago, we celebrated the 125th anniversary of New Zealand being the first country in the world to give women the right to vote. Kate Sheppard was a Suffragette who played a pivotal role in gaining that right. It just so happens that her home has come up for sale and it is a beauty. The current owner is a really delightful woman but she is ready to move on. The home is in Christchurch aka The Garden City and is located in an excellent suburb.

    https://harcourts.co.nz/Property/859193/IM51684/83-Clyde-Road

    5
  20. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1870. Two words: kitchen sink!

    And the view is way better than therapy!

    Stephenstown, NY:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/32270010_zpid/

    7
  21. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1790-1842:
    Oh my gosh I love this. What a time capsule! If all those antiques come with…Oh. My. I’m so glad I looked… almost didn’t!!

    Canaan, NY:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2089031374_zpid/

    9
    • Nancy CNancy C says: 135 comments
      OHD Supporter

      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      Thank you, Cora, for both these postings. The second is just unbelievable — it would take a person with years of patience and a reasonable amount of funds to take on this treasure, just to sort through it would be an adventure. I hope that special person finds the house and gives it a continued exciting life.

      3
    • Karen says: 1080 comments

      I’d sure like to pick around in those antiques, too! I bet all this house needs is cosmetic work. I hope the next owners do their research on colors and paints, furniture, Knick knacks etc. I’d love to see this house decorated as if by the original owner.

      3
  22. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1890. Swooning over everything but especially that bathroom sink. I’m loving that everything looks ready for restoration. I can’t read the stone monument/marker, it’s too little on my phone.

    Pittsfield, MA;
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/55946535_zpid/

    5
  23. clawhammeristclawhammerist says: 28 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1879 Italianate
    Danville, VA

    Here is a marvelous mansion that I read as Romanesque (though I am happy to be corrected on that score!) in Duluth, Minnesota, a lovely small city in a stunning natural setting, if one that is rather inhospitable in the wintertime:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2029-E-Superior-St-Duluth-MN-55812/61519064_zpid/

    Even at the well-out-of-my-forever-reach price of $775K, I would say that the lucky buyer will be getting a bargain. The house and lot are both enormous and the whole package is totally move-in ready in a tastefully-done way. While the exterior “had me at hello,” some of my favorite features are the knockout light fixtures in the piano alcove, the interior door hardware, the butler’s pantry, and the built-in corner cabinet in the dining room (actually, everything about the dining room is astonishingly wonderful!). Kudos to the realtor for providing copious and high-quality photographs of so many interesting architectural and decorative features.

    10
  24. cheryl plato says: 179 comments

    Howdy all! Have a few to share:
    1870 Victorian 79K Boscobel WI. kinda like the exterior the way it is! lovely woodwork inside also:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/501-Park-St_Boscobel_WI_53805_M83226-77533#photo0
    1899 94K Bay City MI Victorian. Original details abound under granny’s decor
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1601-5th-St_Bay-City_MI_48708_M30199-68557#photo0

    check out the street view. Every single home is a Victorian beauty.

    1900 Willis VA farm 135K. Something so sweet and simple about this one, even with country granny decor
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/438-Emmanuel-Rd-SW_Willis_VA_24380_M64872-10001?ex=VA636122294#photo0

    1898 189K Pearisburg VA Victorian farm
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/4924-Pulaski-Giles-Tpke_Pearisburg_VA_24134_M50043-23128#photo0
    1925 Fayetteville PA 190K Hobbit style! so many cute unique details.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/170-Rocky-Mountain-Rd_Fayetteville_PA_17222_M33890-24068#photo0

    1900 but looks like 1800 to me Colonial Woonsocket RI 190K. I think the interior is just perfect. Check out that kitchen!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/72-Alice-Ave_Woonsocket_RI_02895_M38305-12590#photo0
    1904 Collinsville AL Victorian up on a hill 190K, mostly untouched still has many original features and lights
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/337-County-Road-851_Collinsville_AL_35961_M81867-63263#photo0
    1900 Equinkunk PA farm 200K,
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/260-Dillontown-Rd_Equinunk_PA_18417_M36094-61658#photo0

    my bargains: 1900 old beauty, farmhouse 24K Anniston AL
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2101-Christine-Ave_Anniston_AL_36207_M82559-00817#photo0
    1900 Victorian cottage in Jellico TN for 19K
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/188-Mahan-St_Jellico_TN_37762_M75375-94120#photo0
    Have a great weekend everyone!

    3
    • Beanbag says: 56 comments

      On Boscobel WI, i LOVE the outside. It looks like where Count Olaf should live from the Lemony Snicket novels

      3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      I think the Anniston, Alabama, house has a lot of potential considering the low price. In streetview, https://goo.gl/maps/KMJDpaM2FEr it looks nicely sited on a rise. All of the surrounding homes appear to date from a later time (post 1900) but this house (said to date to 1889) must have been one of the first built in the neighborhood. Enough period details remain that the next owner could renovate it to reflect the original Victorian era flavor of the folk style house. Lots of work ahead for the next owner(s) but for those with vision and creativity, (and deep enough pockets, of course) this house could be outstanding. The terraced terrain would facilitate beautiful landscaping. Thanks for sharing.

      3
    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      I’ll take the Pearisberg VA farm. Like right now. ?

      1
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 810 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      The one in Collinsville AL is not my favorite (seems kind of “heavy”) but the lovely setting with views of hills makes up for it.

      1
  25. Nancy CNancy C says: 135 comments
    OHD Supporter

    abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

    Good grief — there’s a lion above the front door and a some long-haired women on a column on a porch! A trip through these photos is an absolute pleasure. It shows vision and imagination, class and good taste, with lots of money to have produced a home like this one. I am overwhelmed. Thanks, clawhammerist, for posting it.

    1
  26. Carole says: 7 comments

    Throwing this out there for your consideration. A “tiny Victorian” dated 1909 in Fruita, Colorado. Right in downtown Fruita, which is artsy and fun. I’d appreciate any comments, good or bad and thank you.
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/126-S-Apple-Street-Fruita,-CO-81521_rb/

    1
  27. Beanbag says: 56 comments

    Ive got alot this time! A few Bargins, but mainly on the higher price end. 🙂 My next goal is to find some in Chicago under the 900’s.

    $99,950 Topeka, KS 1888 Eastlake Victorian : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1132-NW-Harrison-St_Topeka_KS_66608_M71546-12915#photo15

    $1,650,000 Stillwater, MN 1901 Exotic :
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/625-5th-St-N_Stillwater_MN_55082_M80234-13277#photo2

    $79,888 Muncie, IN Italianate : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/516-W-Jackson-St_Muncie_IN_47305_M44752-12082#photo0

    $367,500 Louisville, KY 1913 Condo : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1028-Cherokee-Rd-Apt-5_Louisville_KY_40204_M49025-35110#photo0

    $72,000 Farmland, IN 1880 Victorian : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/119-S-Main-St_Farmland_IN_47340_M31568-22855?ex=IN613233013#photo0

    $259,000 Peoria, IL 1877, the Wheeler/Woolner House : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/331-NE-Perry-Ave_Peoria_IL_61603_M80195-12181#photo2

    $119,900 Peoria, IL 1900 : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1220-Hamilton-Blvd_Peoria_IL_61606_M89242-07595#photo0

    $389,900 Louisville, KY 1894 Traditional, Condo : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1411-Saint-James-Ct-Apt-3_Louisville_KY_40208_M41613-00993#photo0

    $180,000 Peoria, IL 1905 : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/131-W-Columbia-Ter_Peoria_IL_61606_M86328-14521#photo0

    $170,000 Highland, IL 1867 : https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/700-9th-St_Highland_IL_62249_M74296-47005#photo4

    !!!!!! also the most unique is this! it makes me feel like putting on a dirndl and drinking beer! it is Oktoberfest season 🙂 dont know german however!

    $549,000 Cincinnati, OH 1893, the Swiss Chalet:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2214-Upland-Pl_Cincinnati_OH_45206_M45105-66914#photo1

    4
    • StevenFStevenF says: 834 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      The chalet is amazing and worth every penny. I see it’s already pending which is no surprise. Thanks for sharing!

      5
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Patricia Williams, a real estate broker who lives with her husband and family near the Swiss Chalet house, said an accepted offer has been made on it. Not surprising. considering Upland Place’s coveted location and the provenance of this unusual style home.

        3
        • DaveZ says: 21 comments

          John, this is a great house, but I’m partial to the one he built for his mother at the end of the street. Its truly an Architectural Jungle Jim.

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Hi Dave,
            Agreed, there’s some real architectural eclecticism on Upland Place. I recall about a decade ago, several Upland Place properties were being marketed at what now seem like bargain prices. Good to see this pocket neighborhood remaining fairly intact. It’s one of Cincinnati’s architectural showplaces.

    • Eric says: 395 comments

      The “exotic” and the chalet are both incredible. Thanks for sharing!

      3
    • CandyCandy says: 149 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Carpentersville, IL

      Oh holy hell! The “Exotic” in MN is just amazing!! I wanna know the people that live there! If only it were ANYwhere but MN!!! (oh…and if I had the $$$) There are just not enough words to describe how I feel about this place! And the furniture…That horn chair(?)…just alllllllllll of it! It’s amazing!! This house is testament that “more is more”

      1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2208 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      I like the condo in Louisville, KY!

      1
  28. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    No interior photos, being advertised as a tear down. I imagine this home was once very elegant. Watervliet, NY $160,000 – Build date says 1790, that’s always possible but it had a later Greek Revival (or Classical Revival) update.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/311-Boght-Rd_Watervliet_NY_12189_M45444-82407

    4
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Yeah, as it appears from the limited photos that it is a classic Greek Revival “Temple House” probably dating from the 1820’s to about 1850 with it likely to be closer to the earlier date. I agree that originally the house was probably close to mansion grade. Sad indeed to see it being sold now for a teardown. Sad as well that one of the support pillars is missing; chances are it could have been repaired and put back into service. Items have already been taken out of the house according to the listing so who knows what remains? The Greek Revival seems to have been as popular in the first half of the 19th century in New York State as it was across the South where grand examples were built. Looks like there will soon be one less Greek Revival standing.

      1
  29. Teri R says: 285 comments

    1924 French estate style in Portland OR with spectacular gardens! From the listing “formal Gardens included in Smithsonian Institution Archives of American Gardens”

  30. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1890. This was a magnificent mansion. It needs a bit of work but has been well-kept. Beautiful brick Victorian with a lovely tower, and reasonably priced.

    Paris, KY:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/105712485_zpid/

    1
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 810 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      What style would this one be? Seems to have Romanesque influence and the brickwork is intricate and unusual (on the front). Maybe it would be an “eclectic”. Interior woodwork is nice but straight out of a catalog so far as I can tell, and much of it had a run-in with a can of white paint. Never seen anything quite like it.

      1
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 810 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        I’m answering my own question. The NRHP application for this historic district mentions this property and calls it Romanesque Revival: “During the late 1890’s, several high-style residences in the district were designed in an eclectic interpretation of the Romanesque Revival, displaying the massive proportions and rough-cut stonework that are typical of the mode, along with hints of the emerging Neo-Classic. Romanesque Revival dwellings in the district include the Renick House (111 Duncan Ave.) and Remington House (110 Duncan Ave.). (Photo 3.) The district’s most stylish residence of the period is the Ashbrook-Hall House at 124 Duncan Ave,, an exceptional and sophisticated example of the Romanesque Revival. (Photo 4.) And: “5. 124 Duncan Ave.: Ashbrook-Hall House (C)
        An outstanding example of the Romanesque Revival style, displaying rare sophistication.
        Complex and asymmetric in plan with semi-circular tower, an array of dormers and gables,
        and pressed “Roman” brick in a variety of decorative patterns. Built c. 1890 for W. T.
        Ashbrook; sold in 1912 to banker Joseph M. Hall. Its interior exhibits a mixture of
        Colonial Revival and Craftsman details, as well as some late Victorian elements.
        According to legend, much of its original interior fabric was destroyed in a 1916 fire.”

        1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6335 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I’ll bet a nickel this one used to be on OHD. I would agree with your thought Cora and add: + in a delightful little town, in a delightful state.

      1
    • SueSue says: 534 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      What a beautiful place Cora and so very cozy even with it’s size.

  31. SueSue says: 534 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Happy first day of fall!!! It is a cloudy fall like day here in Maine so while recovering from a cold why not look at beautiful houses.

    A Victorian in Houston. Says it was built in 1892. Not so great kitchen design with a die for stove and an odd “greenhouse” attachment to the back but wow, the rest is wonderful. I love all four stories.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1802-Harvard-St-Houston-TX-77008/27759865_zpid/?fullpage=true

    This is the Keoh mansion that needs to be rescued but with taxes of over 15,000 plus additional taxes for the carriage house that goes with it, I cannot see it flying off the market. Which is sad because I would love to see it brought back and filled with laughter. It has been without inhabitants for a long time.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2553-Sullivans-Trl-Falls-PA-18615/2088487369_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Some additional pics

    http://www.uer.ca/forum_showthread_archive.asp?fid=3&threadid=81509

    The carriage house. Can anyone tell me what the machinery is in the pictures? They say nothing about it in the listing.

    https://www.berkshirehathawayhs.com/homes-for-sale/2553-Sullivans-Trail-Harding-PA-18615-210679940

    2
    • CZenos says: 61 comments

      re: machinery

      Bottle filling & capping machine.

    • Randy C says: 449 comments

      The Houston victorian is in an area known as the “Heights”. Very close to downtown and VERY popular with those who can afford it because of the short commute. When I moved there in 89 I looked in the area. Even then, a 2 bed shotgun on a very small lot was $250K. Mostly just for the lot so someone could tear down and build a McMansion. There are still some gorgeous homes there, but many gone for more modern….it’s really a shame.

  32. RosewaterRosewater says: 6335 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Inspired by Kelly’s recent post, I was just taking a minute to check out other old houses on the market in Auburn, NY. I ran across this one from 1890 which has had two very successful alterations; in the 19teens, and a surprisingly successful recent addition for contemporary living. There is also a superb, strongly Prairie influenced, single bay garage which is THE most elegant little temple to automobility. Quite a nice way to live there on 2.6 acres I’d say. Choice.

    From 1890 with alterations TUDOR / Auburn, NY / $600K

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/144-South-St-Auburn-NY-13021/30037620_zpid/?fullpage=true

    2
  33. ChrisICU says: 650 comments

    Here’s my next off-beat find – an Old BIRD House Dream! Before you put your money down make sure you have the room. It’s over eight feet long! https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/a-monumental-bronze-and-metal-bird-cage-of-pallad-0c8431c84c

    11
  34. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 810 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    Simply lovely historic home in quaint Mercersburg, PA, listed at 500K, was the childhood home of the niece of President James Buchanan, who served as his “First Lady” in the absence of a wife. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-N-Main-St-Mercersburg-PA-17236/2111111924_zpid/?fullpage=true

    8
  35. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 810 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    I’m not sure if Charming Forge (Wolmesdorf, PA) has been featured on this website before, but it is an important colonial-era home with very impressive woodwork. Prior listings had better photos with it fully furnished. It’s been on the market a long while, currently at $825,000, but with 48 acres included in the price. Reasonable distance to Philadelphia or New York for a weekend retreat. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/274-Charming-Forge-Rd-Womelsdorf-PA-19567/82197633_zpid/?fullpage=true

    6
  36. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 810 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    Here is a gothic-style ironmaster mansion in Cornwall, PA, now foreclosed with no price on the Zillow listing. This used to be owned by friends of mine. The people who bought it from them lost it to foreclosure. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/137-Furnace-St-Lebanon-PA-17042/86525653_zpid/?fullpage=true

    9
  37. JimHJimH says: 5043 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Landmark house in southern Delaware: 1873 Captain Ebe Chandler House – NRHP
    A somewhat conventional Carpenter Gothic house when built, then eccentrically modified after 1918 by a retired sea captain who held seances there. Updated and B&Bed unfortunately.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/13-Main-St_Frankford_DE_19945_M56334-48423

    https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/79000643

    1
  38. CharlestonJohn says: 1129 comments

    Hyde Park is one of several old rice plantations that line both sides of the Cooper River inland from Charleston. The house was built by John Ball Sr. around 1798 using a typical one-and-a-half story Lowcountry plan with Federal style details. The house was evidently used for “marooning” and as a hunting lodge, and was never intended to be lived in full time. The haunting Lowcountry scenery is the real prize here, though. Unlike nearby plantations with names like Comingtee and Bossis, there’s no need to guess as to where the “Hyde Park” name originates.

    http://www.jonkohler.com/hyde-park.php
    https://south-carolina-plantations.com/berkeley/hyde-park.html

    2
    • nic says: 77 comments

      John Ball’s descendant, Edward Ball, wrote a highly regarded book a few years ago called ‘Slaves in the Family’. He gives a well researched history of the Ball family and their ownership of 25 plantations and 4,000 slaves. He tracked down living descendants of the family’s old slaves and interviewed them. A fascinating read for those interested in the topic.

  39. prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 144 comments
    OHD Supporter

    A 1963 time capsule house in Skokie, IL, for $489,000

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4646-Grove-St-Skokie-IL-60076/3523206_zpid/?fullpage=true

    The kitchen! The wallpapers! The metallic blinds! Looks very well tended and is in a great neighborhood.

    My main concern is that, once it’s bought, a dumpster will be moved into the driveway and everything from windows to walls will end up in the trash. Then builder-grade Home Depot will move in. Hopefully it’s priced high enough to scare off the flippers.

    Flipping seems to be an epidemic around here. There was a building boom in the 50s and 60s in Skokie and a good fraction of the original owners are still in their homes. Makes me cringe to know that when they move to a retirement home or pass away the homes that they loved all their lives will be almost unrecognizable in just a few short months.

  40. liz says: 2 comments

    I thought this house was a great price and the inside is lovely. Wonderful old historic stone home. http://www.priceypads.com/albany-nys-historic-charles-ladow-house-reduced-to-750k-prev-1-2m-photos/

  41. DMoran23DMoran23 says: 3 comments
    Marshall, MI

    Here is a perfectly restored Victorian Home located in Historic Marshall, Michigan. The seller’s have gone far beyond what is normally seen in a full restoration. This is a gem in a community where Historic Homes are valued.
    https://DavidMoran.bhhsmichiganrealestate.com/XWT18047018

  42. Andrew Schroeder says: 8 comments

    A lovely Classical Revival in Tacoma:

    https://www.redfin.com/WA/Tacoma/1022-N-K-St-98403/home/2714471

    1
  43. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1925. Lots of potential, needs someone to love it. In my hometown back in Kansas.

    Emporia, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/91200211_zpid/

  44. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1160 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    Hi everyone, here are a few French listings in Côtes-d’Armor, Brittany:

    1930 granite stone mansion, fireplaces, oak floors (321,893€ / $377,456): http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/64565LRE22/house-for-sale-in-callac-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france

    3 stone farm rowhouses with outbuildings (stalls), 2 already renovated, third one to be done (265,000€ / $311,711) : http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/69753SBI22/house-for-sale-in-plouguenast-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france

    Stone manor originally built in 1370! Incredible supermassive stone fireplace with writings on it flanked by stone niches (299,450€ / $352,234): http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/54250NG22/house-for-sale-in-loudeac-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france

    Manor with highly unusual interior, a mishmash of various eras (despite the house dating c.1900), medieval gothic, bourgeois walls with moldings in bedroom, check out some pieces of furniture (a sedan chair in the corner of a bedroom? a dresser with built-in clock, etc.) (375k€ / 411k$): http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/78776MLG22/house-for-sale-in-merdrignac-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france

    1788 stone house with stairs tower (197k€/231k$): http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/78775DH22/house-for-sale-in-laniscat-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france

    1905 Anglo-Normand mansion, to be fully restored, lots of work ahead (289k€/339k$): http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/83110CRI22/house-for-sale-in-guingamp-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france

    2
  45. DMoran23DMoran23 says: 3 comments
    Marshall, MI

    https://DavidMoran.bhhsmichiganrealestate.com/XWT18047018

    Built in 1884, Excellent Restoration, Located in Historic Marshall, MI 49068.
    Priced at $419,900.

  46. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    I’m pretty sure this masonry 1894 Romanesque/Eclectic in Pomeroy, Ohio, has been featured before but not at this price: ($73,900) https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/320-Condor-St-Pomeroy-OH-45769/110414931_zpid/?fullpage=true Nice unpainted woodwork inside and as far as I can tell it’s located high enough above the Ohio River (Pomeroy is in southeastern Ohio and overall is a picturesque town) to not be in a flood plain. (but prospective buyers should verify to make sure) Seems like a lot of house for the money with some interesting landscaping terrain surrounding the house as well.

    • JRC says: 145 comments

      Is the house on the R a different property? So close.

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Good question, JRC. A look at the listing “neighborhood map” suggests there are two units but in this instance, I’d highly recommend contacting the listing agent (Jay Gardner, Green & White Realty, LLC, (740) 740-7405 ext. 74059130 ) to verify what exactly sells with the property. A look at the market history shows this property being listed at $41 per square foot back in 2013 followed by a steady reduction in price to the current $22 a square foot. Taxes for last year were a modest $651. I looked for a streetview but found none; however, I recall a technique I once used for another hilly location that had limited streetview. I found that streetview was available for the main commercial street below the house along the river and, as luck would have it, you can get a pretty good view of this house above in the background: https://goo.gl/maps/KPjtCMt3HcC2 I also noticed nearly all of the downtown is much lower in elevation than this property so I’m almost certain it is not in a flood plain. The (Ohio) Riverside has nice bike trails and walkways with benches along the bank. Pomeroy is a picturesque town with a remarkable 19th century courthouse. According to Wikipedia: “Set into the side of a cliff, the three-story Meigs County courthouse offers a ground level entrance on each story, gaining it a mention in Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” I’m sure the river views from this property are impressive. I sincerely hope the next owner(s) will preserve and protect the integrity of this period home.

  47. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    An interesting 1893 Queen Anne/Romanesque hybrid in the eastern Ohio (not far from Wheeling, WV) town of Cadiz: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/301-Lincoln-Ave-Cadiz-OH-43907/118461256_zpid/?fullpage=true priced at $215,000. The listing mentions “some outlets don’t work” and the house being sold “as is” but at this price point I would expect to see some interior photos. Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/jtRwtyGsfSB2 shows it built on a rise near other substantial period homes. Square footage is just over 3,000 but it looks larger on the outside. The streetview dates from 2012 so likely there have been some changes in the streetscape since it was made. Ohio has had a very aggressive form of state-sponsored and funded urban renewal since the end of the 2007-2008 Recession (called “Moving Ohio Forward”) resulting in a volume of demolitions not seen since the original urban renewal days of the mid-20th century. Cadiz has hilly terrain allowing for expansive views from the town’s high points.

    2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1644 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Do you feel the porch is a later edition?

      • JimHJimH says: 5043 comments
        OHD Supporter

        My take is that the arch of the original 1890’s window – photos #10 and #14 – was used as the theme of the porch and porte cochère addition about 20 years later. Interesting house!

        1
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5477 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          Nice to see some interior photos finally posted. The interior can reveal a lot of information about a house such as it’s style, and history. I agree that the porch with the distinctive arched windows is probably later but the question as to whether the brick arches are later or not is more difficult to definitively answer. Perhaps Sanborn maps, if they exist, could provide a clear answer. The large mantel clad from hearth to crest in a red marble-like veneer and cream colored tiles is for me a unique example. Even the interior fretwork seems to be of an uncommon design but all indications inside point to a fine period residence. I had feared, based on the “as is” notation, that the house was in poor condition but if the photos reflect its current state then I’m pleasantly surprised by what they tell us. I posted the link with some hesitation because of the lack of photos but now I’m glad I did. If we were in a position to seek our next home, Cadiz might be one of our places to check out.

  48. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1880. This was on the site in 2015 and sold. Since then it’s had some restoration work done; a completely modern kitchen installed.

    A stunning mansion by all accounts. Hard to believe you can buy something like this for less than $1million.

    In 3 weeks I am going to Kansas (to see Alice Cooper with my sister! ?). My husband wants to go to Abilene to see the Eisenhower museum. Maybe I’ll get lucky and there will be an open house…

    Abilene, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/91120914_zpid/

  49. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Edited the excerpt on the front page for this post, if you are wondering, I’m not dead, just sick. I’ll be back when the world stops spinning. 😀

    PS, Wish I weren’t concerned with inaccuracies when it came to the posts…this could be a fun challenge, “drunk” posting (not drunk, just got that feeling)…some houses look better when “drunk” than when not “drunk”.

    5
    • Zann says: 549 comments

      Hope you feel better soon, Kelly. Take your time.

      1
    • DeniseLynn says: 218 comments

      Hope you feel better soon. Your site really helped me through this summer. I had my first (and hopefully only) bout with sciatica. I had to spend a couple of weeks resting my back and leg and more weeks taking frequent breaks. Finding your site kept me from going stir crazy! It’s been fun to find a community of kindred spirits that love the character and quality of old homes. And it’s been even more fun to peek inside so many varied old beauties.

      3
    • Joe says: 750 comments

      This is my prayer:
      -may I never take Kelly for granted. She created a forum that has taught me more than I would ever have imagined. If I am disappointed when I go to OHD and see no new posts, may I appreciate that Kelly bends over backwards to do more than most people do in a lifetime on a daily basis. Kelly, you could stop doing all that you do right now and still be the best of the best for the contribution that you have made so far to my knowledge base, and my spiritual well being.
      – Of course I hope that you won’t stop, but I love you for all of the things that you do. I do not think, because of your modesty, that you have any idea of the amazingly positive effect you have on the lives of thousands of people on a daily basis. I would give you the Nobel Peace prize for EVERYTHING. You have certainly been an extremely positive influence on my life by being yourself.

      1
  50. RonnieH says: 82 comments

    Grants Pass, Oregon. $345,000
    Craftsman on 1/3 acre built in 1923.
    I love the built in table and seats in the kitchen!
    I’d consider this if the commute wasn’t a little far for me and my boyfriend.

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Grants-Pass-OR/60771109_zpid/31829_rid/42.83217,-122.674714,42.002876,-124.151001_rect/9_zm/?

    2
  51. Zann says: 549 comments

    1840, castle tower. Helsinki, Finland. This one is in the millions range, price wise, but it’s pretty interesting.

    https://www.etuovi.com/itempage/625088?sc=LRhelsinki_nodistr&so=yd&pos=1

    I’m 99% sure I know who is selling this, and if I am right, the new owner will have to deal with people taking selfies outside every now and then.

    2
    • CandyCandy says: 149 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Carpentersville, IL

      Zann… ummmm… are ya just gonna leave us hanging with that comment? ?

      1
      • Zann says: 549 comments

        Oh! I’m sorry. LOL.

        It’s not someone I thought many people would know. I was thinking it wouldn’t really make that many waves.

        I *think* this is, or at least was, owned by Ville Valo, the lead singer of the Finnish band HIM. They aren’t a household name here in America, but they have a pretty big fan base in Europe.

        1
  52. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1160 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    Love the spiral stairs steps design! Then i went on this Finnish website to have a look out of curiosity, look at the ceramic stove in this apartment! https://www.etuovi.com/itempage/9524653?sc=LRhelsinki_nodistr&so=yd&pos=5

    1
    • Zann says: 549 comments

      I was smitten by the room with the green paper on one wall and exposed brick on the others. Just absolutely gorgeous! The staircase also got me. Overall, it is a very elegant castle tower.

      I looked at that same apartment yesterday. If I had to move to Helsinki for some reasons tomorrow and could buy whatever I wanted, I could easily see myself getting this one. The setting is great, and the fireplace and entry are swoon worthy.

  53. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1160 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    This apartment in Helsinki, Finland is almost 2 millions euros, but just for eye candy, have a look at it: floors, doors, ceramic fireplaces, view right on the frozen sea and ships! https://www.etuovi.com/kohde/9556427?sc=LRhelsinki_nodistr&so=yd&pos=33

  54. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1160 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    I’m dreaming with Finland houses!

    1849 house (270,000€), wide plank floors, stenciled walls, old ceramic stoves, gingerbread outside… https://www.etuovi.com/kohde/9418068?sc=M1306773325&pos=106

    19th C., 109,000€: this one is a blank slate, hand-hewn log walls, super cool old B&W photos: https://www.etuovi.com/kohde/h84773?sc=M1306773325&pos=29

    1850, 59,000€: just to show that it looks similar to American greek revival houses with eyebrow windows. And check out the attic with hand-hewn beams: https://www.etuovi.com/kohde/7861467?sc=M1306773325&pos=172

    1902, 98,000€: double house with gambrel roof, same features as many above: floors, stoves, etc. (and sauna, like in most Finnish houses i’ve browsed today!) https://www.etuovi.com/kohde/7861356?sc=M1306773325&pos=175

    1897, 239,000€: amazing log walls, and i like the aqua color with natural wood in the kitchen: https://www.etuovi.com/kohde/f24927?sc=M1306773325&pos=78

    1
    • Zann says: 549 comments

      I lost track of which one it was, but one of the houses you posted, the one with the dining room to die for and the stenciled flower borders on the white bedroom walls, is just a dream come true. I take back what I said about the apartment. I want that house instead.

      The dining room seriously made me fan myself with a loose sheet of paper. 😀

      1
    • BethsterBethster says: 900 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1927 Spanish Revival
      Richmond, VA

      Ooohhh, I love the ceramic stoves in the 1902 listing!

      1
  55. Thomas McLean says: 32 comments

    Look at the height!

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