1848 Greek Revival – Geneva, NY

Details below are from June 2018, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 6/21/18   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   33 Comments
Off Market / Archived
National Register

1160 State Route 5 And 20, Geneva, NY 14456

Map: Street

  • $248,900
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3226 Sq Ft
  • 1.3 Ac.
1848 Historic Cobblestone home on NYS Route 5&20 between Geneva and Canandaigua. Solid & charming residential home of yesteryear with modern updates: including heating, plumbing, electrical, windows, kitchen, & all new windows. Potential 1st floor office or additional entry level bedroom.Currently a residential 4 bedroom home, the property has commercial potential with approved zoning and excellent road frontage. Whether looking for your new home, a stand alone business, or an at home business opportunity, this may be worth exploring. Just over 1 acre lot with level parking.
Contact Information
Mark Moon, Howard Hanna Lake Group
(315) 536-2700
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc:

33 Comments on 1848 Greek Revival – Geneva, NY

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. RosewaterRosewater says: 6568 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    So – I’ve never seen a cobblestone wall installation like that before. How interesting. How in the world you would find thousands of them, all the same color (of brick), and nearly all the same size and shape is perplexing. Wiki says this was an early exterior cladding technique imported from Canada in and around the finger lakes region from copious amounts of them left by the last glaciers. Still, to find so many uniformly suited is really unbelievable. You really can’t tell what they are at a distance; but how fascinating up close. The installation seems to be holding up extremely well after 170 years. This very elegantly scaled, symmetrical house is built like a bank vault; and I should think it might give the next glacier pause. Pity about the commercial building they sold out to within a stone’s throw; and those tract house colors in an antique home make me ill. Other than that, very nice indeed..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobblestone#Use_in_architecture

    8
  2. Scott CunninghamScott Cunningham says: 394 comments
    1856 Tudor (fmr Victorian)
    Leavenworth , KS

    Yes, the fact that they now have a small business complex for a next door neighbor is a bit unfortunate. At least you can count on quiet nights (aside from the RTE 20 in front of the house). Wonder how much land comes with the place.

    Cobblestones were pretty common in that part of NY. The glaciers dropped huge heaps of them, so finding rather uniform sized ones (softball to grapefruit sized are most common) is not a challenge.

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6568 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Just seems amazing to my mid-western eyes, having never been up there and seen such a thing. Really cool..

      4
    • AmyBeeAmyBee says: 518 comments

      The business next Dorr is a med practice, so only active during the weekday. The bigger concern is the encroaching commercial interests, such as the 84 Lumber 3 doors east. Yes! Rtes 20/5 are major trucking routes so that is a reasonable concern. I can see the house eventually becoming a professional office.

  3. Laurie W. says: 1749 comments

    Cobblestone houses are not uncommon around there. We spent a good deal of time in Geneva when I was a kid but the NY town BEST for cobblestone & fieldstone houses is Phelps NY, a hamlet just packed with beautiful old stone houses, iirc. I see potential in this place — it has woodwork, etc., intact. The thickness of the walls is amazing! (Cool in summer, warm in winter.) Loved your comment, Rosewater, about its making the next glacier take a breather. I don’t imagine you’d make back a very large investment in renovation very soon, since this part of NY state is in the doldrums. Geneva is a nice town, though, with Seneca Lake there, and many lovely houses.

    5
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6568 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      My mother always poo poo’d living in “a stone house” saying you could never get them sufficiently warm during the winter. I wonder if that’s really true.

      • Glenda Barcklow says: 7 comments

        No, that’s not true. Owned and lived in an 1833 Stone Mill, with 2 1/2 ft thick walls for 21 years. Only disadvantage is the inability to be able to change outer walls for additions. It was a very cozy home.

        4
        • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1170 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Limestone house
          Langeais, Loire Valley,

          well, you can open up a stone wall, but you’d better know what you’re doing and prop the whole structure properly with struts to make sure it doesn’t collapse! Check this series of pic when my bf created a door in our limestone barn’s wall (helped by a stone mason): https://www.instagram.com/p/BhtZ9O3l_lh/

          But honestly i’m always amazed at how wooden houses like in the USA are versatile and can be changed in “no” effort. Want a window there? unclad, cut, stud, there you are!

          Another “minus” to stone houses might be humidity depending of the kind of stone that is used. Our limestone house has no foundation and a source runs 12ft below, so it’s often humid inside unfortunately (but the stone walls are sound)

          1
  4. JimH says: 5127 comments

    A beautiful and historically important house in the region. There are wonderful old homes all along 300 miles of this ancient road across New York – fewer every year as they get knocked down for gas stations, Walmarts (a supercenter is right down the road) and such. This was New York’s version of Route 66 more than a century before that was built. Unfortunately New York State doesn’t do much to protect old places and local officials do even less. The road serves mainly locals and cheap truckers looking to avoid the Thruway tolls, and probably isn’t the best spot to live unless you have a business to take advantage of it. It might be good if you have a heart problem though because they’ve just built a Cardiac Center in your back yard – literally 100′ from the back door – Sheesh!

    5
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6568 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wiki mentions; “Cobblestone Quest – Road Tours of New York’s Historic Buildings”. Bet that would be fun on a nice, mild summer afternoon.

      6
    • Bob says: 14 comments

      Not the best spot to live on Rte 20 at all. That’s a very busy highway; I’ve travelled on it quite a bit. Google Maps shows an 84 Lumber a stone’s throw away, and a Walmart nearby. The cardiac center is ridiculously close. I don’t blame a cardiologist for not wanting to live there; once he built the center he wanted to move I suppose.

      4
      • Polished Hippy says: 59 comments

        The good news about the location is that a busy route is going to be plowed quickly so you won’t get stranded. Trust me – that is a big deal!

        5
  5. Scott CunninghamScott Cunningham says: 394 comments
    1856 Tudor (fmr Victorian)
    Leavenworth , KS

    I have a place near RTE 20 and Cazenovia. Not a lot along RTE 20, but many of the towns have some superb architecture. Caz has great houses, but nothing compares to Skaneateles.

    6
    • Bob says: 14 comments

      Caz is indeed very nice, but Skaneateles is something else. Lovely.

      5
    • BrianWM says: 1 comments

      Went to college in Caz and I absolutely agree; the architecture in the area is beautiful. Even some of the smaller areas like Nelson have some amazing structures.. although sometimes you need to really keep your eyes peeled for They’re there!

      3
  6. MW says: 902 comments

    Wow, I’ve never seen that kind of masonry before. Are we sure those are cobble stones and not fired brick material? The texture and color of the material up close sure looks a lot like fired brick to me. Maybe those are custom fired bricks in the shape of round “stones” like that?

    Regardless, the work on that looks exceptional and still in very good and sound shape too, remarkable actually. That must have been some very high quality work that has been able to stand up very well to 160+ years of NY winters.

    The interior looks like it needs some help, but easily fixable. The interior photos make it seem kind of small, but it says it is over 3,200sf, so I guess maybe not.

    The street view doesn’t show that commercial building next door, so must be pretty new. Too bad and such an odd location for something like that to be placed right near the house like that. There doesn’t seem to be much commercial stuff nearby otherwise to justify that. Maybe it was a spite project to just piss off the owner of the house for some reason or another.

    2
  7. Marc says: 241 comments

    Camp Cobblestone in the Adirondacks has five cobblestone buildings built in a rustic, Adirondack style. Like most great camps, it was built entirely without road access; materials were transported on boats or over the ice in the winter. The camp still has no road access and was listed for $3.9 million in 2006!

    http://www.campcobblestone.com

    3
  8. scott says: 58 comments

    I live about 30 minutes from this house that is located on 5 & 20 just outside Geneva… I can take pictures if anyone wants of the surrounding land… I did find this on the internet about the cobblestones….. I believe someone thought they might be hand made.. I have been told that they rocks were sorted by size….

    what I found on the internet..

    In the Finger Lakes Region of New York State, the retreat of the glaciers during the last ice age left numerous small, rounded cobblestones available for building. Pre-Civil War architecture in the region made heavy use of cobblestones for walls. Today, the fewer than 600 remaining cobblestone buildings are prized as historic locations, most of them private homes. They are clustered south of Lake Ontario, between Buffalo and Syracuse. There is also a cluster of cobblestone buildings in the Town of Paris, Ontario. In addition to homes, cobblestones were used to build barns, stagecoach taverns, smokehouses, stores, churches, schools, factories, and cemetery markers. The history of building with cobblestones and 17 driving tours to see the remaining structures are found in “Cobblestone Quest – Road Tours of New York’s Historic Buildings”.

    The only public cobblestone building is the Alexander Classical School, located in Alexander, New York.

    6
  9. RosewaterRosewater says: 6568 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    A reader just left a link for another great cobblestone house on the link exchange; http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4929-W-Ridge-Rd-Spencerport-NY-14559/30998746_zpid/

  10. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11849 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Posted 2015, not sold yet. Moving to front page, comments above may be older.

  11. Ricardo Cantoral says: 15 comments

    250k ? That’s a steal in New York !

  12. Patrick Walker says: 20 comments

    This house would be easy to love , but my cats would not survive the road . Some good evergreen landscaping can hide the ugliness of the thing next door and soften the highway. At the time of building labour was very cheap so quite easy to have all cobbles the same size.

    2
  13. LIn Smith says: 63 comments

    I chased down my daughters property from this house on Smith Rd in Canandaigua NY and its an old posting because my daughter has the boat in her yard and my grandsons little boat sand box and hes 13 so this was many moons ago .

  14. Ken says: 4 comments

    The digging of the Erie Canal had a lot to do with the availability of vast amounts of uniform stones.

  15. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 518 comments

    This is truly an exceptional example of cobblestone masonry in the Greek Revival style. The interior is lovely, but a little disappointing: no working fireplaces and the kitchen is pretty mediocre for that price. Outside, it appears the driveway is sore need of refurbishment and there is no garage. A properly paved driveway (e.g. asphalt) and a garage are essential in rural CNY where winters can be brutal.

    1

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