March 9, 2018: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 3/9/18 - Last OHD Update: 3/9/18 - 192 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat. How to share… Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML codes needed. Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) If the address doesn't show in the link, also give us the address of the share (helps out if I go to post your share or if the listing site is down.)

192 Comments on March 9, 2018: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12519 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Today’s old house photo is a George F. Barber design in Schenectady, NY. It still stands at 1404 Union Street. Chris DiMattei recently took a photo of it, shown above.

    Joe from Oldhouses.com will be showing us a featured home from his site the second Friday of every month. The owner of today’s featured home has lived there for over 60 years and would like to pass it on to a new owner.

    Another goody from Oldhouses.com… Agents and owners, submit your listing to OHD (via the OHD submission form) to receive a 20% off code for a listing at Oldhouses.com (this is for agents and owners, readers continue sharing your finds in the link exchange.)

    Scheduled posts this weekend. If you share a home and you see it posted this weekend, it was created before your share (I have no way of scheduling “thanks” comments.) Also, PLEASE, when you share a home in the link exchange either include the address or city with your link, if it is not already showing in the link itself.

    I think that’s all. 🙂

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    • BethanyBethany says: 3474 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      I went back and forth for a couple minutes between the old and new pictures of this week’s house, finding all the differences like that photo in the back of every People magazine! At first glance it appears remarkably intact, but the closer you look the more differences you find.

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    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      All good news this week 🙂 The George Barber house looks like our neighborhood. It’s too bad the carriage port is no longer there. But the step is!

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  2. SD says: 64 comments

    We are going to visit this pre civil war house next week. We are still waiting for the agent to send interior pics. There was a fire in the kitchen(according to the agent) although I did find something online about a bedroom fire in 2012.

    Grenada MS

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/201-Margin-St-Grenada-MS-38901/232510649_zpid/

    This looks very familiar. It may have been posted here before. I would really appreciate it if anyone can dig up more pics or history of this house.

    The house at 501 Margin St is also on the market at 399K and was built by the same person.

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  3. StevenFStevenF says: 776 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    I love how today’s link exchange house survives relatively intact, except for the porte cochere. Interesting how the door that led to the porte cochere was turned into a window after the porte cochere was removed.

    I like Joe’s old house as well – what a transformation.

    In the meantime, here are some of my early 20th century finds. I’ve always wanted to live in a stone house and would take any of these.

    1. A 1951 Pennsylvania stone colonial with almost time capsule-like qualities. The stair is elegant and there’s a killer dressing room and untouched rec room in the basement worthy of a movie set of the 1950s. Check out the vitrolite(?) bathroom!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/815-Weldon-St-Latrobe-PA-15650/10631391_zpid/?fullpage=true

    2. Here’s a handsome 1936 West Virginia Tudor featuring some cool second story ceiling shapes and awesome beamed/post porches. There seem to be an abundance of cozy paneled rooms with fireplaces in need of chintz sofas and Cocker Spaniels.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1205-Upper-Ridgeway-Rd-Charleston-WV-25314/2092080115_zpid/?fullpage=true

    3. Built by “Baron Von Duggendorf from Dusseldorf, Germany”, this 1929 (what…ranch…Tudor?) looks like something that you’d see on a hillside in California, not Ashland, KY. The living room and curved hallway are cool!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1724-Dysard-Hill-Dr-Ashland-KY-41101/105722371_zpid/?fullpage=true

    4. Another Tudor, this one built in 1929 in Ironton, OH. I have a soft spot for these metal casement windows and would love to live in a part of the country where they are feasible. Tons of original detail here and some heavily painted egg and dart molding crying out to be stripped and repainted.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/901-S-6th-St-Ironton-OH-45638/34779396_zpid/?fullpage=true

    5. A 1920 West Virginia all limestone(!) beaux arts chateaux with the most amazing travertine-walled stairway I’ve seen outside of a Carrere and Hastings book. What kind of fabulous floor is hiding under that royal blue carpet in the entry?
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/106-Wilson-Ave-Morgantown-WV-26501/22895774_zpid/?fullpage=true

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    • Donald C. Carleton, Jr. says: 324 comments

      Metal casements are early-to mid-20th century American industrial craftsmanship at its best! What a contrast with the crappy vinyl numbers that dominate today….

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      • Lancaster John says: 920 comments

        Does anybody know if they can still be bought (new?)

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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Donald, in my experience, they’re great in Arizona where it’s warm and dry. In cold climates they are a nightmare. They’re like magnets sucking heat out of the house in winter; as well as magnets for interior moisture, which is why they tend to rust and crumble away from the inside out. They are attractive to look at, but bad news otherwise. Out west – no problemo. The good news is that their negatives can be somewhat mitigated, and they can be restored.

        http://www.oldhouseweb.com/how-to-advice/steel-casement-windows.shtml

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    • Cathy F. says: 2330 comments

      My faves of these are #3, 4, & 5.
      Totally agree about the LR & curved hallway of #3.
      That closet (I’m assuming?) on the stairway of #4… have never seen anything like it!
      #5 is very lush, and the removal of its elecric/marine blue carpeting would be my very first project!

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    • JKleeb says: 356 comments

      The house in Latrobe is really appealing as is. I’d buy it for the bar/rec/rumpus room alone.

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    • BethanyBethany says: 3474 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      I’m absolutely nuts about the first house! Time capsule indeed! The staircase shot is great though it makes me feel a little dizzy. As you said, the bathroom, dressing room, and basement are the stars of this listing.

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    • Rachel says: 108 comments

      omg i love the linoleum in that time-capsule rec room from house 1.

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Steven. House #1 is a GEM! The kitchen is UBER RAD; and the top-shelf Crane and Vitrolite baths are too! Those vitrolite ceilings!! The prize though goes to the OMG super groovy boom boom basement. If the next owner appreciates just HOW VERY lucky they are to have found a house with those sublimely preserved features, they’ve just won the old house lottery. Otherwise, those features are goners – they’ll get the HGTV sledgehammer treatment for sure – without question. Good luck house! Fingers crossed.

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    • Grant Freeman says: 1069 comments

      All wonderful houses, but that Latrobe house is an absolute gem! As soon as I saw the word Vitrolite I was raring to see! Terrific!

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    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      I LOVE the Pa stone colonial!! Boy was that home ever loved! It has been kept SO well. Every room is total awesomeness. If you don’t mind my asking what is Vitrolite, what type of material? Keep in mind I’m still learning 🙂

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  4. Linda Starr says: 2 comments

    https://www.trulia.com/p/tx/galveston/1516-ball-st-galveston-tx-77550–2070083429

    1516 Ball St
    Galveston, TX 77550
    Charming Coastal Elegance nestled in Galveston’s Historic East End on quaint Ball Street. Circa 1897 Queen Anne architecture melds with Craftsman style, designed by Galveston architect C.W. Bulger, which evokes the character of days gone by while its many updates throughout the past decades provide for modern convenience. Each space is meticulously crafted in coastal chic design elements, perfectly complementing the home’s impeccable historic features. A grand foyer opens up to the staircase, formal living & dining areas, each encapsulated by majestic 7 foot windows & coved ceilings. The masterpiece kitchen showcases a farmhouse sink, stainless appliances. Large Master ensuite with a mock gas fireplace. Sun room off the master with a wall of windows. Vintage tiling in each bathroom. Claw-foot tubs. Private 3rd level oversize bedroom/2nd living area/game room with a wet bar and full bath. Separate carriage house with a bedroom/bath. Don’t miss out on this piece of Galveston’s history!

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  5. says: 157 comments

    Hey! A George Barber in Schenectady! Great to see it still standing. Thanks, Chris and Kelly. Here’s a house from West Charlton (Amsterdam), NY with five acres. For the handy, according to the realtor, but habitable as is. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2884-W-Glenville-Rd_Amsterdam_NY_12010_M46853-41922
    For a change of pace, an brief article on fictional houses. What are authors’ old house dreams? https://lithub.com/10-fictional-homes-we-want-to-live-in/

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    • BethanyBethany says: 3474 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      Thanks for the article, I really enjoyed it. As a result I ordered House of Leaves from the library. I would choose Manderley if I could pick a house from their list to live in.

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    • john feuchtenberger says: 117 comments

      How can the author have overlooked Shirley Jackson’s Hill House? “…Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”

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  6. nancy Hanle says: 32 comments

    I cannot find the listing about a commercial building for sale with an apartment upstairs and a soda fountain-pharmacy on the first floor – not currently open for business. If anyone recalls this please let me know. It was listed either last week or the week before. Thanks

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  7. Matt Z says: 111 comments

    The old homestead, 1814, home of Sea Captain Joseph Allen. Beautiful time capsule home
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/210-Jefferson-Hts_Catskill_NY_12414_M37000-24439?ex=NY607094369#photo0

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    • Lancaster John says: 920 comments

      On the last one, Handy Road, someone took an historic home and inserted a modern mansion interior. Some might like this combination but I prefer less obvious (and less, overall) modernization.

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    • James @ HarrodsburgJames @ Harrodsburg says: 38 comments
      1810 Georgian/Greek Revival

      I live in your neck of the woods at Clay Hill on Beaumont Ave. It’s on the historical tour and was the boyhood home of KY’s Civil War governor, Beriah Magoffin, Jr.

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Karen. House two looks like a great deal for a really great house. It needs some work, but looks like they were headed in the right direction. Great color and design choices in the front parlor. A very attractive surprise in a house where I wasn’t expecting much at all from the interior.

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    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      I like the Louisville Rd farm house, it just says grandma and grandpa, who probably worked so hard. Love it.

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  8. JKleeb says: 356 comments

    I love seeing the old photo/current photo on today’s featured house (and StevenF’s observations). Catskill NY is a great town I’d love to live in and I love the Sea Captain’s house–even with the changes.

    Her is a survivor–1920s flat in San Franciso that has original baths, original kitchen with minor changes, light fixtures, etc I think the switch plates may be original too. I am stumped on the wood used for the trim and built-ins and my best guess is some type of walnut. If anyone knows more please share.

    There are better photos in the virtual tour. Click the photos link at the top (the tour is just a drone view of the area).

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3011-Van-Ness-Ave-San-Francisco-CA-94109/61288289_zpid/

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  9. Lancaster John says: 920 comments

    A time capsule high-end 40’s ranch, with what looks like original kitchen and baths, unusual wood burl veneer paneling in the study, and ceiling tile and knotty pine in the basement family room. I like how it is furnished, too. Pending, but worth a look for fans of 40’s homes. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/617-N-Webster-Ave_Scranton_PA_18510_M48515-88438#photo0

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  10. CharlesB says: 479 comments

    1848 ITALIAN VILLA–Located in the Stratfield Historic District of Bridgeport, CT, it was built for James D. Johnson, best friend and confidant of P.T. Barnum (Barnum’s home ‘Lindencroft’ was located right next door). The architect is thought to be Chauncey Graham. In 1864 the house passed to Johnson’s son-in-law, Salem H. Wales, editor of the Scientific American Magazine and chairman of the New York City Board of Parks Commissioners. The house originally had a deer park (mentioned in Barnum’s autobiography) and other accouterments of a proper gentleman’s estate. Priced at $179,900:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/528-Clinton-Ave-Bridgeport-CT-06605/66688224_zpid/

    http://historicbuildingsct.com/?p=12352

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Charles. What an interesting, and ODD, Italianate! The features of the tower; it’s scale; that door; the trim; the windows above, are all so wildly out of scale and style with the rest of the house. It’s kind of shocking. I love that kind of “Frankenstein’s monster” stuff though. It’s definitely perplexing, such that one wonders what about that house is original and what may have come later. Huh? Great door for sure! 🙂

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    • JimHJimH says: 5595 comments
      OHD Supporter

      That’s a nice one, and it would look even better with its porch and the top of its tower. The interior is full of goodies. Thanks!
      https://books.google.com/books?id=zgRNoi8YlMkC&pg=PT125

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  11. RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Nothing interesting from Indiana this week: except this funky monkey tower Victorian on el-cheapo in Richmond.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/300-S-13TH-St-Richmond-IN-47374/85778812_zpid/?fullpage=true

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    • BethanyBethany says: 3474 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      Funky indeed, and so fascinating. The shot of the facade is so cropped that I went to the street view to get a better idea of how it sits. Looks like a pretty decent piece of property, but the street view is 11 years old and it was definitely in better shape back then.

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    • Gregory K. Hubbard says: 449 comments

      Terrible photographs! It looks as though this house has an interesting staircase. These photographs, and the personal possessions in these rooms, do not present this house in a particularly attractive way. Too bad.

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  12. John Shiflet says: 5666 comments

    Thanks for sharing the textbook (actually, I mean plan book) George F. Barber design in Schenectady, NY. Finding Barber designed houses in areas which had more than an adequate number of native architects when these houses were built is a testament to Barber’s widespread appeal. The Knoxville, TN, mail order architect truly had a gifted talent in designing striking house facades. Too bad that his period of popularity was so brief. (1888-1908)
    Those who know me are probably aware I often feature and champion the more minor examples because they are the most likely to be lost from neglect. A million dollar home will probably stay standing whether it sells or not. In any case, here’s a surprisingly nice Queen Anne style home in Alexandria, IN near the town of Muncie. The house needs some TLC but the “good stuff” from the past remains. Then there’s this little gem almost for nothing in the town of Anderson which is also not too distant from Muncie in far east central Indiana: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2215-Fletcher-St-Anderson-IN-46016/80683956_zpid/?fullpage=true Still I see two decent mantels but its sad that the porch details in streetview are now missing: https://goo.gl/maps/EFAeGSi3FQ12 Perhaps the sellers has these delicate features stored somewhere. One can only hope… Nice to see the next door neighbor is patriotic. Despite the shabbiness, I see potential in this faded house. Only $18,500 and a decent stater home for someone wanting to get their feet wet in the old house restoration world for way less than a new starter home.

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  13. 67drake67drake says: 300 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    What a week! My wife told me I look 10 years younger, my doctor said my blood pressure is down, and I just finished writing my first novel. How? I donated to OHD! Kelly is too polite ask, so I will. You can donate as little as $1. That’s painless! (Though not as painless as that kidney I donated yesterday). So come on, don’t be a freeloader,DONATE! Thanks. (Individual results may vary)

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  14. James @ HarrodsburgJames @ Harrodsburg says: 38 comments
    1810 Georgian/Greek Revival

    This New Bern, NC colonial era home, the Eli Smallwood house, has just come on the market. I love the detail of the interior mouldings.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/524-E-Front-St-New-Bern-NC-28560/78314945_zpid/

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    • Karen says: 1219 comments

      I read Rebecca when I was in 5th grade, and automatically imagined myself coming down the grand stairs in some fantastic ball gown, going sailing out of the boat house, and sitting in the garden listening to the sea. I was so upset when Manderly burned down! Manderly was as much a character as The Girl and her husband, Mrs Danvers, and of course, Rebecca.

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    • CharlestonJohn says: 1093 comments

      Beautiful Federal style interior details with an abundance of broken pediments. Nice find.

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  15. Anne M.Anne M. says: 1033 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    A lovely 1880 in the central Mass. town of Uxbridge
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Worcester-County-MA/57662524_zpid/2879_rid/1720-1935_built/42.886027,-71.016999,41.84092,-72.774811_rect/8_zm/2_p/
    1830, described as a “Gothic Victorian” in Amherst, MA once known as the Goessmann School, (there is an old picture in the listing) The Goessmann School was a prep school for girls, which opened in 1908. The principal was Helena Goessmann later the first woman faculty member at what would become the University of Massachusetts
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Amherst-MA/56256085_zpid/50721_rid/1720-1935_built/42.488555,-72.285576,42.247072,-72.725029_rect/10_zm/0_mmm/
    Have a great weekend!

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    • Jkleeb says: 5 comments

      Both homes are great but the house in Long Beach is perfect as it is. I love the green tile.

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    • SandyF says: 130 comments

      Love the LB home. It looked like a flip but the history doesn’t suggest so. I can see with painted appropriate Craftsman colors and a few more appropriate colors etc-a real beauty. LB is a fun city-not for those looking for a quiet existence, but one looking for fun, culture, and always things going on…thanks for sharing.

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    • Cathy F. says: 2330 comments

      I don’t think I have come across the term “airplane bungalow” before; one learns something new every day. ?? Both are really nice, with great built-ins – esp. the LB house.

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    • SandyF says: 130 comments

      The Pasadena house makes me sad! All of the rafter tails-goen ( an airplane does does not look correct without them) Fireplace new rock, track lighting…ouch. Please we beg you-leave bungalows original! The location in Bungalow Heaven is great-a wonderful place to live. But Ouch!

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      • Rachel says: 108 comments

        is the fireplace new rock? it looks like original river rock me. it matches the posts on the porch.

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        • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Yeah – I’m afraid it’s veneer stone Rachel. The tell is in the distance between the stones, and the quality of the installation; as well as the depth of the stone at the firebox. Real stones originally installed would have been place much more tightly together. It’s not the worst, but it is what it is to a discerning eye. 🙂

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  16. Rachel says: 108 comments

    also sharing two perfect usonain mid-century specimens from frank lloyd wright disciples:

    1950, la jolla, ca (don’t miss the trippy funkadelic baths)
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/CA/house_type/16851547_zpid/9_rid/wright_att/44.127028,-109.456788,30.040566,-129.144288_rect/5_zm/

    1965, santa cruz, ca (don’t miss the hexagonal, sandstone tub)
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/999-N-Rodeo-Gulch-Rd-Soquel-CA-95073/16163091_zpid/

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      House 1 is interesting, if a bit gimmicky. I mean, can you imagine having all THREE of those fires going at the same time?! Good lord. You could do a sweat lodge cleanse in your own LR! Heheheh.

      Now house 2 is another matter. Yes it is explicitly derivative of Wright; but it is probably the best Wright house not designed by Wright I’ve ever seen. The overall scale is the one very clear tell. I REALLY like the scale in fact. I’m a tall guy, and could live there FAR easier than in most Wright designed houses. The main, central, masonry axis comprising the LR fireplace; STUNNING, MONU M E N T A L, kitchen wall; and various utility spaces is THRILLING. I could blather on about that gorgeous house for days. You’ll not see a better acolyte designed Wright IMO.

      Thank you Rachel. 🙂 You’re my winner for this week!

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  17. Rachel says: 108 comments

    and, finally, this prairie arts and crafts is a total mystery to me. are these glass blocks original?!?

    1923, hyannis, ne
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/83857-N-Highway-61-Hyannis-NE-69350/2124115231_zpid/

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    • JimHJimH says: 5595 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Probably not, Rachel. Looks like there was a remodel about 15 years after construction there.
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/01/29/1923-hyannis-ne/

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      • Rachel says: 108 comments

        thanks, i missed the post before. very interesting.

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      • Coqu says: 249 comments

        On the Link Exchange where this was first shared (Jan.26) you wrote: “Glass block was very cool in the 1920’s.”
        Here is a link with a lot of cool history on glass block: http://forgottenchicago.com/features/chicagos-glass-block-part-i-1893-early-glass-block-and-prism-glass/
        There was an ebb and flow with its popularity, coming and going out of fashion. “In 1897, Luxfer hired an aspiring young Wright to design prism tiles for their line.”
        I always thought this stuff was so ugly and cheap looking, but because of OHD I’m enamored of it and its history!
        I’d say this could be original, but then I came across a thesis by Elizabeth Fagan “Building Walls of Light: The Development of Glass Block…” (174 pages!!!!!!!!!!) and she highlights its usage from 1937-1940s. (Google it, I don’t know how to share the link since it’s a pdf).
        How my mind wanders!

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        • JimHJimH says: 5595 comments
          OHD Supporter

          I did say that, but I looked it up and found out that structural glass block wasn’t available in 1923. There are other 1930’s alterations in the house as well.
          When Kelly posts a house with nice big photos, I can see it better too. ?

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          • Rachel says: 108 comments

            lol. i like to imagine this eccentric, wealthy nebraskan getting jazzed about glass bricks and then putting them EVERYWHERE. it seems like first he went insane with the batcheleder tiles, and then he went crazy with the glass bricks.

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    • Coqu says: 249 comments

      Yes. This house was shared a few weeks back and discussed quite a bit I think. You should try to find it in past Link Exchanges. I didn’t know anything about the glass blocks being used in new construction really either, but after seeing them in a local historic school, I realized they too were original because of the discussion here. I would have imagined they were “replacement” windows at the school, but it would have been hard picturing what type the originals would have been in the locations they were, so thus original!

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  18. cheryl says: 172 comments

    Howdy! Found a few:
    This one is really cool! Lots of neat details. Eclectic?
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/415-Cliffwood-Dr_Newport_TN_37821_M88346-36288?ex=TN626143387#photo2
    I love this old Victorian farmhouse, a lonesome beauty to it…..
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/725-Wisecarver-Rd_Mosheim_TN_37818_M74820-58908#photo1
    Another lovely Victorian farmhouse virtually untouched a great bargain
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2297-Sunville-Rd_Cooperstown_PA_16317_M44531-86471#photo0
    1868 Empire style, neighborhood has brick streets, just needs a little touch up to bring its beauty out great price
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/321-N-Perry-St_Titusville_PA_16354_M44957-30512
    finally an adorable little farm for a song. Look at that stove. And it’s Looneyville!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1106-Vineyard-Rdg_Looneyville_WV_25259_M38174-95404#photo0
    Have a great weekend!

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    • says: 157 comments

      Hi, Cheryl – 5 examples of my favorite kind of house–a Great Bargain! My faves are the house in TN and the farm in Looneyville. And the last not just because it’s in Looneyville (although I would love to say I lived there).

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      House one had me oooohhhing at that first exterior shot = prettttyyy. If I’m not mistaken, the upper course of foundation stones are halved common, plain, geodes! You certainly couldn’t get away with that these days. You may not want to either considering the nature of their potential amplification, (coming and going)! You’d probably need a lead pillow if you weren’t interested in lucid dreaming. Heheheh.

      House three is a great example of why you often see old iron vent grates in ceilings. The one shown is doing exactly what they all were meant to do = allow heat from a stove below to pass into the spaces above.

      Thanks’ Cheryl!

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  19. John says: 781 comments

    Also in Stamford NY. Seems like a decent price for so much house.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/ny/stamford/13-w-end-ave-stamford-ny-12167–2089131056

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    • natira121natira121 says: 817 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Wow, that’s a pretty cool house. What style would it be? And maybe we’ll luck out and someone will find old pictures of it, because I have a feeling those porches were much different when it was built.

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    • Cathy F. says: 2330 comments

      I know this house! I grew up in Stamford, and although I was never in the house, it was on the next street over from where I lived from age 12 (when we moved across town) until 18; my parents then bought the empty lot next door, sold their house & built a new house on the lot – this featured house was seen from their dining area windows.

      The mountain you can see in pic #1 is Churchill Mtn. Mt. Utsayantha (higher) is to its left, but out of the pic frame.

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Whoa! Those 2″ THICK, beveled glass, 5 panel doors are a TRIP! Dang. That’s a first for sure. Thanks’ John.

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  20. SandyF says: 130 comments

    A Hollywood Spanish with a past. Frank Capra’s Hollywood Hills home listed at a bargain price of $1.5M. A bit of Malibu tiles, redo the bathroom with period fixtures and tile, But a beauty

    6480 Odin Street, Hollywood Hills East, Los Angeles, California, 90068 United States

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  21. EOlsonEOlson says: 18 comments
    IL

    I live in Illinois so I randomly will search IL (even though my goal is to get out of here!) anyway.. This one confused me, but it is pretty cool. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1244-W-Carmen-Ave-Chicago-IL-60640/3701074_zpid/

    & this one seems pretty..wish there were more pictures. It says its only been on zillow 1 day though hmm. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/700-9TH-St-Highland-IL-62249/4919818_zpid/

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  22. Doug Green says: 83 comments

    This is a nice Spanish Revival home in southern California. Due to the way the house faces the street, I think it may have originally been on a much larger lot. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1837-Sherer-Ln-Glendale-CA-91208/20839648_zpid/?fullpage=true

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  23. Stacey Weyrick says: 5 comments

    This house is only $60k and has a lot of the original features left. Check out the floor and the fireplace!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1402-Jefferson-St_Burlington_IA_52601_M78468-62527

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      That aluminum siding is probably covering up some likely really great original Stick exterior details. Nice! Thx Stacey.

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  24. Hi everyone. This is my first time posting a property. Its by my home town in Michigan.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/6440-Bordman-Rd_Bruce-Twp_MI_48065_M43256-45082#photo0

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    • natira121natira121 says: 817 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      OMG!!!! That place is absolutely amazing! I can’t imagine leaving it, EVER! I was just flabbergasted at nearly every picture. The house is very very nicely done, the grounds are gorgeous, the outbuildings just dreamy. My farmer’s heart sings.

      Well done for your first post!

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      That’s a nice way to live Kater. Thanks’ for sharing.

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    • Rachel says: 108 comments

      even the basement is charming!

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  25. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1684 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    The Hampstead house (c. 1827-1837) of John Constable, the painter, is on the market. Very well kept — 21st-century comfortable without losing its historic character. Even the kitchen fits okay — I rarely look at kitchens in antique houses because most modern ones look alike, but this one shows somebody is aware it’s in an old house. Best photos are in the Daily Mail: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5482905/Georgian-townhouse-owned-John-Constable-sale-4million.html . Here’s a listing for more info: http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-71690483.html

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  26. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1923 – I’ve neither seen nor heard of this style before. Very unique, I really like it! Love the fireplace, the entrance, the floors…

    Memphis, TN:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/42151184_zpid/

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  27. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1869. 8 fireplaces and gorgeous round porch:

    Memphis, TN:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/42295094_zpid/

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    • Lancaster John says: 920 comments

      Cora, this is a gem. But please, oh please, can someone ban fish-eye lenses on real estate photography?

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      • CoraCora says: 2086 comments
        OHD Supporter & Moderator

        Clinton, TN

        I know, right? I had to look at it twice to be sure the porch really WAS round or if it was just the camera lens playing tricks on my eyes.

        Walleye-vision, I call it.?

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        • Ron G says: 156 comments

          The fisheye lenses can be use for interior shots such as the one’s that are in the post. However, there are a couple different lenses and you have to understand their usage a long with proper lighting (artificial) and correct filtering. These photos could have been altered via software to smooth them out. However, anything is better then camera phones.

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  28. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1907 G.R. On 38 acres:

    Oakland, MS: https://zillow.com/homedetails/120984838_zpid/

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  29. Jennifer HT says: 735 comments

    I apologize in advance if my shares have already been posted. I’ve been busy and need to get caught up on the posts. 🙂

    So many great details. Keep an eye on this one, they are adding more pics.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/700-9TH-St-Highland-IL-62249/4919818_zpid/?fullpage=true

    This Brooklyn home is quite nice. 🙂
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/261-Henry-St-Brooklyn-NY-11201/30567930_zpid/?fullpage=true

    This home and the surroundings are STUNNING.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/524-E-Front-St-New-Bern-NC-28560/78314945_zpid/?fullpage=true

    There are some great details in the pic. Just lovely!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/117-S-Church-St-Zeeland-MI-49464/91754386_zpid/?fullpage=true

    A great time capsule home. So much goodness here.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4003-Collis-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90032/20689927_zpid/?fullpage=true

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    • Cathy F. says: 2330 comments

      Agree, about the brooklyn house – nice! And, rather amazingly, still a one-family home vs. being split up into apts. or condos.

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    • Cathy F. says: 2330 comments

      I’d happily take the third house, in Brookline, MA. Yep, lots of angles, and other than changing out the kitchen’s green backsplash, like it pretty much as is.

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  30. EOlsonEOlson says: 18 comments
    IL

    Oooooh man! I’m currently trying to convince my family members to all pitch in & buy this! We all live in Chicago.. And my aunt & uncle have a getaway house in Princeton IL. This is only 20 minutes or so away from Princeton.. A lot of cute, affordable old houses there as well. But this one is amazing to me. I would change very little..mostly just fix. Henry, IL

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/506-Carroll-St-Henry-IL-61537/115697020_zpid/

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wow. Yeaaaaah. $70K – yeaaaaah. The minute after I got the key I’d walk in there with my ladder and my framing hammer and rip out every awful bit of cheap tin: but beyond that – – not tooooo bad! Good luck on that proposition.

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      • Hoyt Clagwell says: 232 comments

        The ceiling? Is that even really pressed tin? Or is that that awful plastic crap they sell at Home Depot? You probably wouldn’t need a framing hammer–it’s probably just stuck up with double-sided tape.

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        • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Oh brother. I was unaware of the plastic variety. We have the Vicky mags to thank for the popularity of this stuff. Oy.

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    • Grant Freeman says: 1069 comments

      Wow, that’s a whole lot of magnificent house for a very reasonable price!

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  31. Kathryn says: 10 comments

    I was able to take a tour of this mansion yesterday in Oklahoma City (where I live). Embarrassing to say I’ve lived here all my life and never once took the tour!
    It’s called the Henry Overholser Mansion, which was built in 1903 with 12,000 sqft! It’s considered the first mansion in the city. Mr. Overholser was a founding father to the city, which he built several major buildings.
    The mansion is a museum and has been for quite some time. Website:

    http://www.overholsermansion.org/

    I took several photos inside, but don’t know how to attach them here. It’s very easy to just Google Overholser Mansion and tons of images come up.
    I would like to relay what the tour guide said about the home that’s not on their website. I immediately thought of this group of old House lovers when she said the house AND interior is 95 percent original and intact since day one. All original light fixtures, curtains, carpets, furniture, clothes hanging in the closet, books on the shelves, etc. The walls were hand stenciled to match the homeowners wedding fine china pattern, which is found all throughout the main floor. Nothing has been touched since the 1950s, when The Overholsers only daughter passed away. After she passed away, the house was left to her husband, which later sold the house along with the entire collection of interior contents, to the Oklahoma Historical Socity in the early 1970s. It’s been a museum since then. The only room not 95 percent original is the kitchen. Mr. Perry (the man who sold the house to the state) attempted to completely update the kitchen, but halfway succeeded. His current wife left to go on a trip without him and he wanted to surprise her by updating the kitchen while she was gone! He got as far as removing the farmhouse sink ☹️ and removing cabinets. He installed a stainless steel sink with Formica counters and plain brown box cabinets. He also added a free standing stove/oven. What survived was: original cook stove, 1931 refrigerator, butlers pantry. This was all done in the 1960s. His wife came home two days early from her trip and put a stop to the kitchen update nonsense! She was pretty upset that he had done that. He said his next step would have been to get rid of the old stove. So thankful she came home early!
    The carriage house is also part of the tour – all original in there, too. They’ve added artifacts and a check in desk, but the horse stall doors are still there, ornate metal ceiling, horse buggy, and lighting. Upstairs is their office space.
    Also, the only daughter that the Overholsers had, Henry Ione, lived on the third floor with her nanny up until she was a teenager. It’s a giant space for one child. She never had any of her own children. The entire third floor was closed off from when she was a teenager until the 1970s – it was just storage. Now it’s back to the way it was in 1905, along with some added display cases for old toys.
    Once both Mr. and Mrs. Overholser passed, (1915 and 1940) the house was left to Henry Ione.
    The whole story is extremely interesting – and the city’s history behind the mansion. I’ve Googled a lot! Oklahoma is a fairly young state (1907) and this is original as you can get. The mansion was ‘out in the country ‘ when built and had other very sizable homes slowly built up around. It was a good 15 blocks from downtown. Now, it’s in the most prestigious neighborhood in the city, Heritage Hills, which has the biggest mansion in the state – 20,000 sqft – across the street.
    I could go on and on, but this house was a huge treat to see and I’ve come to really appreciate history from this site. It’s so fascinating!

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I agree Michele. I shared that one last fall. Looks like a fresh listing. Besides the unfortunate 1950’s front porch enclosure and maybe some exterior restoration; this house barely needs cosmetics if anything at all. Thanks’ for giving me a fresh peek. 🙂

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  32. Cheryl says: 3 comments

    https://www.redfin.com/WA/Tacoma/2715-N-Junett-St-98407/home/2979506

    Beautiful 1907 home in Tacoma, WA which appeared in the movie “Ten Things I Hate About You”.

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  33. John says: 781 comments

    OK everybody keep in mind I know nothing of this area but doesn’t this seem like a good deal ? Very vlose to the ocean and 6.63 acres. Thought it was worth a share. https://www.trulia.com/p/va/lancaster/300-ottoman-ferry-rd-lancaster-va-22503–2020754981

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    • Lancaster John says: 920 comments

      I’d say it’s a deal. This is Virginia’s Northern Neck, which is a dead-end peninsula sticking out toward the Chesapeake Bay. Very quiet, no through traffic. Quite a few Washington DC area and those from central and western Virginia buy “river homes” on the Rappahanock as summer places. Not far is Irvington, VA which is an small but upscale community. The Tides Inn is located there. If you are interested in a retro getaway the Tides Inn is lovely. I have no connection to it, other than having stayed there twice and enjoyed it — and the area — quite a bit.

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  34. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1932. Super cute!

    Wichita, KS: https://zillow.com/homedetails/77343911_zpid/

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  35. RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    This just popped up. The floor length windows are spectacular, just a pity you can’t really admire them much through the unfortunate, mostly closed, 1960’s white painted shutters. There are some PHENOMENAL original details here; a RAD brick summer kitchen; a pretty amazing river view; and a huge, muti-use pole barn in a pear tree. Nice.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/806-W-Market-St-Vevay-IN-47043/85725638_zpid/?fullpage=true

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  36. Joseph Johnson says: 42 comments

    When I look at the photos of the inside of this house, I’m very impressed! But I don’t know much about old houses. What does this online community think of this house in Henry, Illinois? https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/506-Carroll-St_Henry_IL_61537_M84280-14534#photo0

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      See EOlson posted above. I hope this house gets posted. It’s a really interesting property, especially at that price!

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      That IS something to see! Thank you for sharing. It’s a miracle that interior stone and brick work were never painted. Great barns!

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  37. RachelMedRachelMed says: 107 comments

    I know this is late to post but I just came across this house in Swampscott, MA and I’m dying over the wild kitchen stove top! I’d love to have that in my own house!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-Summit-View-Dr-Swampscott-MA-01907/56966559_zpid/?fullpage=true

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      That Lucite vanity chair! Heheheh. This is the third interesting split level I’ve seen recently. Imagine that! thx RachelMed

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  38. Tommy Q says: 446 comments

    HEY! YOU LIKE — NO LOVE MID-CENTURY? Sorry to shout, but this is coooool!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/37-N-Garvin-Dr_Fayetteville_AR_72701_M87481-63832#photo20

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7455 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Oh yeah – thats’ sweet! Amazing stone work. The Roman court yard is heaven. Woe unto those who might change the RAD, period, exterior green trim color.

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  39. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12519 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    This one didn’t survive the purge but I bet some of you remember it. I’m sorry to say, the wood didn’t make it. I’d also like to say, wood work that’s lasted 80, 90, 100+ plus years without a lick of paint and then someone does, that’s when I get pissed. It infuriates me more when flippers do it. Just freaking GRRRR as heck you flippin’ flippers that do this! Not all flips are bad, I’ve even posted flipped homes that were done well. And not all homes with painted wood work make me angry, some were originally painted while others were painted so many decades ago, I feel there’s a level of forgiveness after that long (plus we usually don’t have before photos to see how it was.)

    The before: https://www.estately.com/listings/info/210-s-birch-street

    The after: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/210-S-Birch-St-Santa-Ana-CA-92701/25445050_zpid/?fullpage=true

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  40. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12519 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks for all the shares!

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  41. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    MCM yumminess. 1960:

    Wichita, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/77313063_zpid/

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  42. John Shiflet says: 5666 comments

    An 1896 Colonial Revival for sale in the northwestern Indiana town of Goodland (near the Illinois border) https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/109-W-Jasper-St-Goodland-IN-47948/85625634_zpid/?fullpage=true The property in streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/5oThZCiQzYN2
    Goodland is approximately 100 miles from Chicago and just under 40 miles to Lafayette, IN.
    The listing photos leave a lot to be desired unless you’re a fan of fisheye lens effects. Good period details remain, however, and new Trane furnaces are said to have been installed in 2017. Listing says the house needs some minor cosmetic work. Seems reasonably priced for the features offered.

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  43. Mike says: 382 comments

    I didn’t have time to look through all of the links shared here, but in case we missed it, I wanted to share this jawdropper in Milwaukee that a friend emailed to me this morning. Looking through the pictures turned me into a slobbering, idiot, LOL…what a house! https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2727-E-Newberry-Blvd_Milwaukee_WI_53211_M76007-42712#photo0

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  44. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12519 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Another in Milwaukee. This is already pending but had to share. WOWZER!

    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Milwaukee/2044-N-Lake-Dr-53202/home/90226573

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  45. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1956. Bargain MCM! Cute:

    Wichita, KS: https://zillow.com/homedetails/77408942_zpid/

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