February 23, 2018: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 2/23/18 - Last OHD Update: 2/23/18 - 286 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat. How to share… Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML codes needed. Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) If the address doesn't show in the link, also give us the address of the share (helps out if I go to post your share or if the listing site is down.)

279 Comments on February 23, 2018: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Today’s old photo might have been (or is) in Freeport, Illinois.

    The Woodmanse Windmill company was based in Freeport: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincup-photo/7121156123

    Besides “Freeport” on the Windmill and “Dave” in the corner, no other clues. I hope someone recognizes the home.

    No scheduled posts for this weekend. 🙂

    6
    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Very nice! Freeport Windmill & Engine Co. sold windmills around the world (even New Zealand!) after 1909, so the place could be anywhere, but probably is upper Midwest. Great house, and the rustic Adirondack chairs are fun.

      4
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 938 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Yeah, there are a handful of Freeport towns around America. I wanted to expand on the different windmill companies but didn’t have time. There were a few in and around besides the one I mentioned.

        1
        • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Towns sometimes specialized in certain products – Freeport Windmill was in Freeport IL also. Different companies came and went, not so different than today. Probably the reputation of Woodmanse of Freeport led to the Freeport brand.

          2
  2. JkleebJkleeb says: 294 comments
    Seattle, WA

    What a great house-I always like seeing an old photo with awnings since even a restored home rarely has them now.

    I am ready for winter to be over so I spent a lot of time this week looking at houses in Palm Springs…
    Elvis and Priscilla’s honeymoon home—you have to look hard past all the Elvis memorabilia to see the house but it is pretty cool-especially the kitchen island

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1350-Ladera-Cir-Palm-Springs-CA-92262/18023249_zpid/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_ejRjycd90

    I’m more of a Greek Revival guy but I think this MCM on the historic register is one of the most beautiful homes I’ve seen. It is nice to a high end, well designed home with original baths and kitchen (minus the newer counter tops). The realtor has done a great job with the listing which includes period photos, floor plans and site plans

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1275-S-Calle-De-Maria-Palm-Springs-CA-92264/18027908_zpid/

    The exact build date is unclear on this house, but it is definitely “old” for Palm Springs and has a lot of charm and an usual kitchen sink
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/259-W-Camino-Alturas-Palm-Springs-CA-92264/18032269_zpid/

    A very high end time capsule from 1978 that seems entirely original and I think still has appeal down to the original furniture (although the furniture arrangement in the living room feels like a waiting room to me)
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1515-E-Via-Estrella-Palm-Springs-CA-92264/17741421_zpid/

    9
    • Heidi says: 149 comments

      I really love the time capsule 70’s home. I’m starting to appreciate the quirkiness of the mid-century homes….and I blame it all on this web-site. lol

      5
    • Signe Johnson - Grandeur Restorations says: 44 comments

      It was so funny you mentioned awnings, I just took a quick look between phone calls because I saw the awnings on this house picture and wondered if they were the same configuration of the we just ordered our fabric for. We found the old 1888 awning frames behind the furnace in our house, but in the original 1888 and 1890 pictures of our house, the striped scalloped awnings are folded up. Again Kelly and Old House Dreams has helped me solve a mystery! You rock!

      Several years ago we looked at a “farmette” just outside of Freeport, Ill. that looked very much like this home, it was very close to the edge of town. Next time I get down that way I am going to see if it is the same house. Freeport is full of amazing Victorians, unfortunately the area gas been very depressed the past 20 years and a lot of the homes fell into disrepair and many have been demolished. I get down there mostly to buy architectural salvage…sadly.

      6
      • Signe Johnson - Grandeur Restorations says: 44 comments

        Here is a link to the original pics of our house showing the awnings folded http://accarterhouse.homestead.com/ORIGINAL-PICURES.html (this is not our farm house we live in, it is our furnished rental in town)We are finishing restoring the gable ornaments and roof fence this next spring and summer.

        10
        • karrie says: 223 comments

          I want to live in that house! sigh… beautiful. thanks for sharing.

          1
          • Signe Johnson - Grandeur Restorations says: 44 comments

            So do I, but it is too small for our needs, but it is really fun to rent it out furnished, then many people get to enjoy it. The bedrooms are very Victorian, however I took some liberties with the common areas because the Victorians settees and chairs were not as comfortable as people would like. I love the Atomic furniture in the this living room, it didn’t look right anywhere in my home, and I moved the patio furniture inside while I was doing some restoration work on the dining set and suddenly we had an indoor garden dining room, so I left it there and everyone likes it better. This house is so much fun, because it is so eclectic! It was melded with the times. If you go to the link for the architecture, there is a link for the interior furnished photos on that page. If your ever in La Crosse, stay for a night or two.

            2
        • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Signe, you folks did a beautiful job with that house. Thank you!

          BTW, Lurene Henry Carter was not a descendant of Patrick Henry, not even close. It’s good you put the disclaimer on that one.

          • Signe Johnson - Grandeur Equestrian says: 44 comments

            Yes, that kinship has been going back and forth for years, we were shown the article and some other documents regarding this by the family but I have always provided a disclaimer. A.C. was a real character, he hated his own middle name so he changed it to Claude and we do not publish his original middle name.

    • Grant Freeman says: 883 comments

      That first MCM really speaks to me for some reason. Possibly because I grew up in a similar house in the 60’s & 70’s. Love how original it is.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Camino Altruas is Looooovely. So warm and sunnnny.

      Calle De Maria is a fine example of the best of Palm Springs modernism. It immediately brought to mind “Dick Witman’s” mind blowing brush with internationally fabulous Eurotrash in Palm Springs:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKI8p_SLnWU God I miss that show!

      Thanks’ JK 🙂

      3
    • Jeklstudio says: 1050 comments

      How have these incredible places withstood the onslaught of decades? They look so original! Fantastic design although I wouldn’t prefer it as my choice if home, I can rally appreciate the incredible design.

      2
    • DianeEG says: 534 comments

      Wow on the Calle-De-Maria-Palm Springs CA home. Is that an Alexander Calder sculpture in the back yard? Did I saw WOW!!!!

    • Gail M. says: 196 comments

      Wow. The Calle de Maria house is fascinating. The palm trees!

      2
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1706 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      The Camino Alturas house is so inviting. Very SoCal with a beachy sunny vibe. I want to sit on the patio at the end of the day, looks so relaxing. I like not only the sink, but the whole kitchen — well organized for a small space. The décor is so right for the house too — shows discipline in using only what will add to the impression desired.

      1
    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I am in love with the desert house. It’s just adorable and beautiful. That kitchen is really unusual too.

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The Calle De Maria house is quite Miesian, which is a good thing imo.

      1
  3. JkleebJkleeb says: 294 comments
    Seattle, WA

    I had to share for the vintage snapshots. I get the feeling this house was someone’s dream home when built.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2270-N-Vista-Dr-Palm-Springs-CA-92262/18022787_zpid/

    10
    • ddbacker says: 484 comments

      I love the Flintstones/Jetsons vibe of vintage Palm Springs homes.

    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1706 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      Nice, airy house. The old photos really are fun to see. Only in California could less than 1/2 acre be an “estate!” Lovely one, though.

    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1050 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      Get a load of that Ford (fairlaine?)! The old photos are just sooo ginchy! I agree with you Jkleeb, this was probably someone’s dream come true. Very sweet!

  4. BethanyBethany says: 3431 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    I enjoyed this article from Curbed.com about the history of a neighborhood in LA that no longer exists. It includes a lot of neat photos.
    https://la.curbed.com/2018/2/22/16979700/west-adams-history-segregation-housing-covenants

    15
  5. Annabelle says: 111 comments

    ALL cool!

  6. Andrew Schroeder says: 8 comments

    The second Rust mansion has been on the market in Tacoma for over a year:

    https://www.redfin.com/WA/Tacoma/521-N-Yakima-Ave-98403/home/2712157

    And a couple gorgeous mansions for sale north of Seattle:

    https://www.redfin.com/WA/Shoreline/166-Boundary-Ln-98177/home/76695

    https://www.redfin.com/WA/Shoreline/21-Cherry-Loop-NW-98177/home/76720

    5
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I’m sure someone shared the Boundary lane house a while back. I certainly remember that EXQUISITE stair. In a world full of one million tacky double stairways; that one rises WAY above! TY

      1
  7. James @ HarrodsburgJames @ Harrodsburg says: 36 comments
    1810 Georgian/Greek Revival

    I really like this 1805 federal, the Lyle House, in Paris, KY.

    https://www.realestate.com/706-pleasant-st-paris-ky-40361–105712511

    Also in Paris, KY is this 1814 Georgian home of stately appearance and more affordable.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/406-Pleasant-St_Paris_KY_40361_M40920-82698

    Paris, KY has lots of historic architecture and is close to Lexington. It is surrounded by beautiful horse farms.

    5
    • ChrisICU says: 672 comments

      That Oak Park place is pretty awesome.

      6
      • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Slightly too much Victorianization there but impressive nonetheless.

        1
      • zoomey says: 523 comments

        OMG. I want that Oak Park house!! It’s cold there, but, maybe as my summer place… The kitchen is divine. What a sensitive restoration. I love every bit of it except the period-appropriate wallpaper. (I can’t stand wallpaper, not matter how period appropriate.) That’s a stunning house!!

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      It might surprise that the amazing Oak Park house hasn’t sold; but it will take a real aficionado for that house besides someone, (unthinkably), completely gutting it. TY 🙂
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/01/23/1887-queen-anne-oak-park-il/

      4
    • SharonSharon says: 605 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Deep sighs for Oak Park. Many deep sighs. Such splendor.

      3
    • kmmoorekmmoore says: 420 comments
      Weatherford , TX

      The Oak Park home is heartbreakingly beautiful. Just knowing a home like this exists makes my day! I bet Restoring Ross would love this one!

      1
    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Gwen, you poor thing. I am on my fourth week with this flu. Still a bit tired and still a cough but I have made it through the worst of it. I feel for you. Rest, rest, rest, rest.

      You have touched my heart with the Oak Park house. A fantasy house for me. I also really like the San Lucia home. Tons of room and charm.

      Feel better soon.

      2
      • Gwenn says: 102 comments

        Thanks Sue! Oak Park looks to be filled with beautiful old homes.

        Yes, this flu is nasty. I was positive for influenza A and the dr thought I had pneumonia too. I work in a hospital so I’ve been required to get the flu shot for years, so at first I didn’t occur to me that’s what I had. I’m still tired and coughing. At least only one of my kids got it. 🙁

        3
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1050 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      While I do love the basic house (very much), the battle of the wall papers/patterns is a bit much. It’s hard to actually see how lovely the house is with all the patterns and designs vying for attention. Beautiful wood, lovely rooms with good proportions though. These comments are about the Oak Park house..

    • Randy C says: 426 comments

      Wow, Jennifer, we are on the same page today. Beautiful woodwork, windows and light fixtures. Thanks for sharing all of these amazing homes!

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The last three are really remarkable. Thank you.
      Dover NH is a brilliantly preserved gem. A wonder to behold with one of the best early 20th century baths you’ll see; a phenomenal porch and miraculously preserved sleeping porch; A straight through to Z and a St Charles enameled steel 50’s kitchen in a pear tree! Wow.
      Despite some questionable updates, Wilton NH is another GEM!
      The DR in Abeville is BEYOND stunning.

      3
      • Joe says: 748 comments

        I agree with you. I tried to see more of the exterior on the street view. A gmaps walkabout was in order. This house and the corner one to its left seem to have multiple additions which make me lean towards the idea that they have served as boarding houses at one time. The front facade has remained untouched in a way that makes the additions desirable extra space without harming the curb appeal.

        2
    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Nice work, Jen – all winners! I love the Chester house, especially the exterior and landscape, though maybe they should have stopped before wallpaper on the stair risers.

      2
    • Bethany Otto says: 3431 comments

      The Dover house is possibly my all. time. favorite. It looks exquisite, turn-key, tasteful, completely un-ruined in any way, fabulous kitchen and baths, just . . . . perfect.

      2
    • Barbara V says: 1063 comments

      Beautiful finds, Jennifer, just beautiful. Those New Hampshire places would actually make one consider braving the winters.

      1
    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      Wow! that LA. house! the dining room, the office, the stairway, my oh my, that’s quite a home.

      1
    • peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      That NH home is another one. Just stunning and untouched and so well cared for. It must have been really loved, as it should.
      Great ones Jennifer !

      2
    • kmmoorekmmoore says: 420 comments
      Weatherford , TX

      Nice work Jennifer! There’s something about “that” green color that gets me every time. Just gorgeous!

      1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      For those that are able (the $5+ month supporters are able to access private posts), the Dover home previous had great photographs: https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/10/10/dover-nh/

      I’m slow to update and republish because the current listing pics are not as great as the old.

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Kelly, does the fact that there is a new listing mean you have to ditch the old pix in favor of the new? If so = how tragic! The old pix are SO so sososososo so much better.

  8. natira121natira121 says: 693 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    I wanted to show off my new bathroom privacy glass. And I didn’t even have to install it! *grin*

    http://i1174.photobucket.com/albums/r603/natira121/DSCN0970_zpstvvxp78x.jpg

    Hopefully I did that right.

    11
  9. CharlesB says: 479 comments

    An 1820s Federal in Hanover, New York (that’s the grape-growing part of Chautauqua County, along Lake Erie), priced at $21,500 but up for auction in two weeks for a minimum bid of $7500. I drove by the house today (beautiful rural location!), but it was raining too hard to get out and take a good hard look:

    https://www.homesnap.com/homes/for_sale/NY/Hanover/c_42.47124,-79.158606/z_13/m_7,57540159

    https://www.auction.com/details/11015-hanover-road-forestville-ny-14062-2543469-o_1178l

    http://app.chautauquacounty.com/hist_struct/Hanover/11015HanoverRoadHanover.html

    1
  10. prettypaddle says: 180 comments

    Love that lawn furniture in the old snapshot! Wonder if it was at all comfortable?

    Here’s a very well-kept brick Italianate in Nebraska: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/127-Atlantic-&-125-N-1st-St-Brownville-NE-68321/2094883431_zpid/?fullpage=true

    3
    • Jkleeb says: 294 comments

      I love the stairs up to the cupola—larger and more open than usual. I get the feeling the photos aren’t doing justice to the house. I always wanted a house with both an old woodstove and a gas stove in the kitchen.

  11. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1064 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    I think I have one! Maybe. Well, I like it anyway.
    https://www.redfin.com/NY/Scarsdale/8-Overlook-Rd-10583/home/20061658

    Scarsdale

    4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Rad peewee! Gorge! Definite echos of Frank without being a rip-off. Nice. Those two Rumford fireplaces are SO unusual for this vintage; and a HUGE +. I could do without the goofy, poorly conceived new kitchen, and the 5 panel replacement interior doors are absurd: but it’s a RAD house no less. Better be for that $! 😉

      3
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1050 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      Saddle shoes and clam diggers spring to mind, lol. Really REALLY lovely 😉

  12. CharlesB says: 479 comments

    An 1825 Greek Revival in the historic district of Stratford, Connecticut:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2149-Elm-St_Stratford_CT_06615_M49695-30227

    2
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1706 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      The front hall made me just sigh, it’s so elegant. Lovely house all around, except the addition looks better from the rear than the front, where it distracts the eye from that beautiful door and makes the front unbalanced. All the fireplaces are great. Stratford has some beauties.

  13. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Here’s a delicious little gem…

    Marietta, OH:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/75123963_zpid/

    2
    • says: 159 comments

      Thx, Cora. Love these beautiful, unpretentious homes. They are classic! A modern family would love and use every square inch in a house like this.

  14. RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    I noticed a conversation about good haunted house movies had sprung up on one of the recent threads and thought I’d recommend one I saw a while back which I REALLY enjoyed. It’s called “The Skeleton Key”. It is that rare film which combines an excellent plot and screenplay, based in real facts, myths, and traditions; with a very, very good cast of actors, especially Gena Rowlands; and most importantly, a REAL HOUSE and other real filming locations. You’ll find no cheap, fakey fake Hollywood schlock here. You will find a hauntingly believable and thrilling film guaranteed to give you the creeps!
    *** TRAILER *** ” The Skeleton Key”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RlCq1Ash-4

    ALSO ++
    I came across a page detailing the REMARKABLE stabilization work which took place last year to the “Wilderstein” carriage house. It’s been QUITE a job, but is moving right along. Seems they are going to have significant money to proceed with the restoration this year; as well as continuing restoration to the upper floors of the house interior. Great news for a really great, wild and crazy house!

    The house: http://goo.gl/NnTNVY

    The carriage house work: http://goo.gl/38M6ze

    Before and Daisy Suckley: http://goo.gl/NfMcCe http://goo.gl/RZW79F

    All prettified: http://goo.gl/XcZ4xv

    The late John Foreman on Wilderstein: http://bigoldhouses.blogspot.com/2012/03/

    🙂

    9
    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Recent photo – decor by J.B. Tiffany 1888:
      https://tinyurl.com/Daisy-at-Wilderstein

      7
    • Brendan says: 84 comments

      I sure do miss John Foreman and his weekly postings. His site and Old House Dreams were my weekly pleasures!

      10
    • Jkleeb says: 294 comments

      Thanks for posting. I haven’t checked in on Wilderstein in awhile but have toured several times and it was sad to see the carriage house deteriorating more each time. So glad it is at least being stabilized.

      1
    • SharonSharon says: 605 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Daisy is definitely a formidable woman to be reckoned with, if pictures could speak.

      1
    • SharonSharon says: 605 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Thank you for sharing Wilderstein. I think I’ll spend my lazy Saturday reading and exploring this incredible place.

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        So glad you discovered and enjoyed it Sharon. 🙂 I’ve brought it up before, but like to do so again every so often so those who may have missed out have a chance to enjoy it, and the late “Big Old Houses”, if they haven’t heard of them before.

        2
    • 67drake67drake says: 272 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
      Iowa County , WI

      Rosewater- what thread had the discussion on haunted house movies? I must have missed it. Two of my favorites are The Haunting of Hill House and The Others. Check them out if you haven’t seen them!

      2
      • Joe says: 748 comments

        The threads were comments following large houses posted by Kelly in the past week. If you go to the main site and look for houses that you think look like they could have been used as a haunted house in a movie, you will be able to find the HH threads in the comments on a bunch of them.

      • says: 159 comments

        The Others was really good-scary. It came out around the same time as The Sixth Sense and didn’t get the attention it deserved. It was so good I didn’t really take in the house it was filmed in. Anybody remember much about the house?

        1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Yeah – here’s the link. I should have included it:
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/02/21/1887-quincy-il-149000/

        Let me also say that the trailer for “The Skeleton Key” is really awful; and please don’t let it prejudice you from seeing the film. It’s a REALLY good movie, and not in the least bit the Hollywood schlockola the trailer incorrectly portrays. It is a VERY realistic and telling depiction of sorcery, the occult, and the supernatural power of the mind!

        Somehow I missed “The Haunting of Hill House”. Thanks Drake!

        1
        • 67drake67drake says: 272 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
          Iowa County , WI

          I bought a used copy of Skeleton Key off of EBay right after I watched the trailer! Thanks for that tip. The Haunting of Hill House is an oldie but goodie. I saw it back when I was a kid in the 70’s, and it scared the begeebers out of me. I hadn’t seen it for decades so I bought a copy (used off of EBay 🙂 ) to watch with my kids. They liked it too!

          1
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Although old houses is my thing, my other is horror movies especially when they involve old house locations. If I had money and time I would seriously be blogging on location at some of these places. 😀

          The Skeleton Key was filmed at the Felicity Plantation (the swamp in the movie was faked): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felicity_Plantation

          I thought of two more, if looking for creepy old house atmosphere movies:

          The House of the Devil (available on Amazon not Netflix):
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtXtSGRV0xc

          The trailer is awful, I’d suggest skipping and just go to the movie instead. Filmed in 2009 but takes place in the 1980’s. I’ve been stalking the home for years, waiting for it to come up for sale (https://goo.gl/maps/FTUKthQDxM22). Don’t remember if it was filmed in the home, it’s been a long time since I watched it. It’s not the greatest movie but the atmosphere (during parts of the movie) are great, that creepy house feel.

          The Let’s Scare Jessica to Death home is for sale. I haven’t seen this movie in YEARS but it’s freaky as heck. (trailer:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cX4eZD3GiL0): link

          2
          • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1050 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1947 Ranch
            OR

            Another scary movie I’ve seen recently is The Woman In Black. It has ‘Harry Potter’ Daniel Ratcliff and wonderful Ciaran Hind (2012). The house where it was filmed, at least the exterior shots is 17th century Cotterstock Hall in Northhamptonshire, UK. It’s on the market for a mere 1,250,000 British pounds! Spooky movie!

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXXRS3Kghh4 movie trailer

            1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Thanks’ everybody for the tips! I love a good horror flick; but they are SO OFTEN bad I normally don’t even bother. Can’t wait to get started on the new list!

    • Bethany Otto says: 3431 comments

      Thanks for the movie tip! I remember thinking that I wanted to see it when it came out, and then promptly forgetting about it.

      1
  15. Rusty Slider says: 34 comments

    A nice one story greek revival in Indiana. The listing also shows an old photograph of the house.

    http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/IN/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/85689316_zpid

    1
  16. Rusty Slider says: 34 comments

    Forgot to include this one with my last post. A really beautiful home and grounds in North Carolina.

    http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/5913306_zpid

    2
  17. Rusty Slider says: 34 comments

    Sorry for the incorrect link. Here is the correct one for the North Carolina house:

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/5913306_zpid

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Great house! How this French / Arts and Crafts house ended up with such a formal, classical interior is wild. Such stiff formality is beyond me; but I certainly can appreciate it when done right, and that’s really pretty. Cool. TY

  18. says: 3 comments

    I spotted this colorful Italianate on Realtor.com. Very close to Notre Dame University, and on my regular old house fantasy route, somehow I’ve never run across it in person. I will now though!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/710-Park-Ave_South-Bend_IN_46616_M43795-73854

    1
    • DianeEG says: 534 comments

      They’re having an open house – now is the time Warren to kick your old house fantasy into a personal experience.

      • Waren says: 3 comments

        YES! and I will be at that open house, but my personal experience already includes rescuing several old mansions in Chicago and Michigan. My fantasy is that more people start doing the same thing in all older neighborhoods. It’s a lot of work, but so is getting an education and raising kids.

    • Jason B says: 191 comments

      That’s sweet! Not too far from home for me (Delaware County).

  19. RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    This house used to be on OHD. It finally sold a year or so ago after YEARS on the market. A year or so later they’re selling, (can’t imagine why), and trying to profit $600 – $700K on their partial Kardsashianated makeover of 3 and the guest house. Oh brother. I will give them the RAD view of the circle monument from 3 not featured before. Old timers will remember it well:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/645-S-Meridian-St-Indianapolis-IN-46225/1081784_zpid/?fullpage=true

    3
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      That home was for sale forever, the gardens were great! Don’t remember if the old listing had an interior view of the guest home. The main house kitchen, I really like. I’m glad they didn’t touch the house (except for the attic? Which paint a color, it wouldn’t be so bad.)

      1
  20. RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    I’m pretty sure that one used to be on OHD. I’m also pretty sure I have some before pix somewhere.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/710-Park-Ave-South-Bend-IN-46616/77020300_zpid/?fullpage=true

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      It’s been shared before but the agent never got back with me about posting the home. I’ve been contacting agents with listings with pro photos for permission, some agents reply but most don’t. That’s why it’s not on OHD.

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Can’t count the times it’s been shared in the past few weeks: at least three this week alone. That’s a shame the agent is MIA.

  21. RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Another VERY common theme in “restoring” antique houses in Indianapolis:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1501-English-Ave-Indianapolis-IN-46201/1093114_zpid/?fullpage=true

    LOVE the breaker box in the entry hall. It’s “industrial” mannn. Yeah, really “loft like” for reals.

    The yuppies just eat it up.

    • Bethany Otto says: 3431 comments

      The listing says it was built in 1900–unfathomable now!

      2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      The before (tear down?): https://goo.gl/maps/KatVbCLJBB42

      I was looking through my saved photos for the site and came across this, I’ve kept for a couple of years. Don’t recall the location, Ohio maybe? The after-after was on an HGTV show, a young millionaire looking for a home (seriously, that was the show that featured new millionaires shopping for a home.)

      I’m not joking, same house.

      • John says: 72 comments

        Good God.

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        That surrrrrre looks like Indy to me. The town is simply infested with them. I’m pretty sure the one I linked still has the actual house in there somewhere. You can still see the porch for sure. My town Noblesville keeps gentrifying at a pretty rapid pace, but fortunately none of the flippers have yet to latch onto this horrid trend.

  22. Libby Lyles says: 4 comments

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/275-Montgomery-Dr_Spartanburg_SC_29302_M65822-40784#photo0 This was the summer home of one of he most successful textile mill owners in Spartanburg. He only lived about 2 miles from this house, they hardly left their neighborhood to go to the summer house. The Montgomery family has done wonderful things for our town.

    6
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Gorgeous! I don’t hate the painted logs, but the original is better. TY

      3
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1706 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      Super house! Looks like a blast for kids and adults alike. Built with much style. The price is worth gawping at — Spartanburg sure has changed if that’s a likely cost even for 23 acres. It’s a hoot they lived 2 miles away — why waste time on the road?

      1
  23. Anne M. says: 903 comments

    A few houses from snowy, beautiful Vermont!
    1824 brick colonial
    https://www.tpwrealestate.com/listing/4675501/1677-barnumville-road-manchester-vt-05255/
    1899 lots & lots of unpainted woodwork
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/41-Liberty-St_Barre_VT_05641_M44732-08371#photo37
    Western Massachusetts, 1790
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/164-Main-St_Charlemont_MA_01339_M46531-03183#photo7
    1785, large farm house
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/80-Baldwinville-Rd_Templeton_MA_01468_M34835-43524#photo0
    And last, but certainly not least, this 1922 with a spectacular view and price tag to match! We used to rent in this neighborhood, on the third floor of a very run-down Queen Anne but our roof-top deck had the same view of Boston. Couldn’t afford a house there 20 years ago and definitely can’t today but it is fun to look all the same.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/38-Brantwood-Rd_Arlington_MA_02476_M38457-24586#photo1

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      All interesting as always Anne. Thank you. I’d sure be in heaven with the amount of great shop space the next owner in Manchester, VT will have. If some schmuck hadn’t made off with the decorative clean out hatch on the antique boiler they could have restored that unit and heated the whole place for a song on anthracite coal. GRrrrrrrrr! Some crafty schmafty person on HGTV started that trend a while back, and I see them missing from old boilers all the time now. 😉

      http://goo.gl/8Bcyw3

      1
      • Joe says: 748 comments

        Is the use of coal as a fuel for heating legal today? i thought that it produced a tremendous amount of pollution. One could always make or have made another door for the boiler.

        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          What – you’ve never heard of “clean coal”? Heheheh. JK. Of course it’s legal. Anthracite coal burns with hardly any smoke at all. The current trend is pea coal stoker feeder boilers; but more guys are going back to regular twice daily hand fire all the time. It’s cheap as chips; but you DO have to work a bit for it. Best part is, (if you’re using a pressure steam system like the one shown – you have to click the long secondary link above), when the deal goes down, you’ll be nice and toasty totally off grid.

          1
  24. SharonSharon says: 605 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 Contemporary
    Sedalia, MO

    Joplin, Missouri —
    From the welcoming cobble sidewalk and stone retaining wall to the expansive porch and everything inside, this is a beaut.
    Staircase is breathtaking and dining room paneling like this sleighs me every time. Perfect bathrooms. I’d like to strip the paint in the butler’s pantry. Then I’ll plug aerate and seed the lawn. All done!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/536-N-Wall-Ave-Joplin-MO-64801/74912408_zpid/

    5
    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      OOooo, this girl is tired but wow. The purple rug up the staircase walls is right out of a Playboy club 70’s decor. What a find and what fun. Thanks Jim.

      1
    • Janna says: 10 comments

      Yep, 70s alright. Looks like a party house that hasn’t been partied in for a long time. I couldn’t stop shaking my head while looking at the photos.

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      WHOA! That is a T.R.I.P trip. Reminds me of the famous abandoned “Mike Tyson house” – on a smaller scale – but still with many plastic plants – heheheh. TY http://goo.gl/biQmEj

      1
  25. SueSue says: 1111 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Happy weekend everyone. We have a temp. of 46 degrees here in Maine. Break out the shorts!!!

    I couldn’t resist posting this magnificent mansion in RI. In the description it says the 1810 Federal is rumored to be designed by John Holden Greene. “A once in a generation opportunity to own one of the last intact family estates on Providence’s Historic College Hill.” Of course it has history. A must look. sigh.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/66-Williams-St_Providence_RI_02906_M31189-48676#photo1

    9
  26. says: 159 comments

    For anyone who wants to do a church conversion. Hard to see but there may still be a bell in the tower. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1-Maple-Ave_Wynantskill_NY_12198_M31304-37252?ex=NY606828193#photo0

    2
    • Bethany Otto says: 3431 comments

      The fantastic property in Oak Park—who posts pictures like that of a million dollar house? If I owned it, the realtor would be fired. If you look at the google street view, you can see that it’s surrounded by a great wrought-iron Victorian fence, and is on a nice street made up of mostly older, nice looking apartments, as is typical of Oak Park.

      4
    • Grant Freeman says: 883 comments

      I’ve stayed at that hotel in Jefferson, TX on antiquing trips with my folks. Such a lovely little town.

      2
  27. Teri R says: 276 comments

    Beautiful 1890 Beer Baron home, two story chimney with a window inside and curved attached windows and iron trim (chimney is an oval turret style), brick with stone trim, fishscale shingles on second story, wrap around porch, oriel window, third story dormer window with decorative iron balcony, original tile, lighting, woodwork, CARRIAGE home in the same style with second story dormer and trim. SO INTERESTING.
    255 NE Randolph, Peoria $159,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/255-NE-Randolph-Ave-Peoria-IL-61606/2091736081_zpid/

    4
    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      Beautiful mansion. I wonder how much was changed in the 1940’s apartments conversion? BTW, the red and green Queen Anne house across the street was featured on these pages a couple of years ago and it too had outstanding details. I looked for tax info. in the listing but it appears to be omitted. Illinois is said to be the second highest property taxes in the nation right behind New Jersey. Regardless of the taxes, I like the quirkiness of this one. Thanks for sharing.

      2
      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Wow! Teri, can you believe it already has a “Pending” on it? Now to find something similar at anywhere near this price. Is Peoria that hot of a real estate market right now? I thought nearly all of the great and desirable Victorians in the town were on fabled Moss Avenue. Guess I need to forget looking for anything there as I’m seeing a lot of old house turnover in the Land of Lincoln. I may visit and look around Galesburg if we make a Spring road trip, but there too it seems that there are almost no fine Victorian homes available. (except for that one Queen Anne that has been on the market for years)

        Perhaps all of that Illinois high taxes hype is more of a Cook County/Chicago thing? (or alternately, simply a myth?) A couple of Decatur houses I’ve looked at actually seemed to have surprisingly reasonable taxes as well as offering a lot of great old house for the money.

        3
        • BethanyBethany says: 3431 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1983 White elephant
          Escondido, CA

          According to wallethub.com, Illinois’ property taxes are 2.30%, with only Jersey being higher at 2.35%.

          • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

            Thanks Bethany for the confirmation. So is it safe to assume taxes can fluctuate depending on their location in Illinois? As mentioned, I saw two Victorian era homes in Decatur that had taxes in the $2,500 range which seemed reasonable for what the houses offered. I’ve also seen Cook country and Chicago houses that seemed to be well above the 2.30% figure. I guess when its all said and done if the buyer is OK with the taxes then that’s all that really matters.

            • says: 191 comments

              John, I’m replying to your statement about taxes based on a previous comment you had made about looking at houses in my area. The Legislature in Indiana capped residential property tax at 1% Several years ago. Some localities have since struggled to fund the public school systems, etc. This only leads to exploitation of the powers of the County Assessor. My MIL’s ramShackle house is assessed at over 200k, and mine is assessed at about 75k more than I could ever sell it for. Assessed value of my property has doubled in 10 years, in spite of the collapse of ’08, and having made no improvements in that time.

              • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

                Thanks Jason. Indiana would be our first relocation choice but right now there seems to be a lack of suitable houses/properties available. That is why I’m making a broader geographical search to find the perfect old house we seek for our forever home. Patience is always required.

        • Teri R says: 276 comments

          John, The portion of this street is on the same river bluff as Moss Avenue. Peoria is home to so many charming architectural styles. Eye candy, good food. Fun road trip, for sure. I hope the pending sale is to a sensitive person who will care for this beauty!

          • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

            Thanks, Teri. For the past 29 years, we’ve done the urban pioneer thing and dealt with gangs, drugs, and even our son bringing home a 38 caliber handgun when he was in elementary school that someone had tossed in the weeds on his way home from school a few blocks away. Thankfully, it wasn’t loaded and was later identified by the police as being stolen from Tulsa, OK, so how it ended up in Fort Worth would probably be a fascinating story. My spouse and I are at an age where more peaceful surroundings would be preferable and appreciated. Nightly gun shots, which we had to put up with for a couple of years after we moved to the neighborhood, we couldn’t tolerate now. After 29 years of living here, I’m pretty adept at identifying a marginally safe neighborhood from a truly dangerous one. We may at least take a look at a couple of properties in the Peoria area but I can usually gauge how relatively safe an area is in short order. We will see…

      • Coqu says: 251 comments

        $4400 was paid in 2016, nothing afterwards listed. I wouldn’t be surprised if the counties/state started omitting this to lessen the shock-and-awe blow to potential buyers. I could never believe they published it to begin with. Then again, I can (if you catch my drift—LOL).

        • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

          Thanks Coqu. I recall a fine home in the town of Paxton (a George Barber design) but after I found out the taxes were nearly $6000 a year my enthusiasm diminished significantly.

          • Coqu says: 251 comments

            My all-time favorite home here is in IL. I just pulled it up and we had a conversation about paint 🙂 $4800/year tax in a small (cold!) town was also just too much for me to consider. It supposedly sold for $150k in January ( https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2016/04/19/1892-queen-anne-blue-mound-il/ ).

            Edit: You mentioned that Paxton home in a comment there, ha!

            1
            • Scott Cunningham says: 393 comments

              High tax regions really crush the homeowners desire to see a house appreciate in value. Its so bad in some areas that homeowners actively seek to keep the value of their home low, so as to dodge insanely high property taxes. Everyone loses. The town, the neighborhood, the homeowner, etc…

    • BethanyBethany says: 3431 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      Fantastic home but the pictures of all the details should be supplemental to actual room pictures that give more of a sense of size and layout.

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Stunning Teri – Thank You. My senses always prick up when I see beer or whiskey baron. Those guys sure knew how to do it!

      2
  28. Jason B says: 191 comments

    Delicious All around! Can’t believe the details! Not sure about the area it is in for that price, never wanted to live in Indy. High for Indiana IMO.
    https://www.redfin.com/IN/Indianapolis/1508-Broadway-St-46202/home/82286822

    5
  29. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Outstanding house, Jason. Thanks for sharing. I think this extraordinary house has been on the market in the past. As for the pricing, perhaps on the high end for Indianapolis but in many other places (West or East Coast) it could be even higher.

    3
    • Jason B says: 191 comments

      Thank you, John. I sure hope those two chicks referred to in previous comments never get ahold of it. Hahaha

      1
      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Not likely (thankfully) that the “two chicks with a hammer” would ever go near a grand house like that. Karen, the Mother, is also an attorney I believe, while her daughter Mina, is a “designer” with a superbly attuned sense of what visually appeals to Millennials. Historic preservation is not part of their vocabulary. I’ve winced more than once by seeing them rip out historic details doing the architectural equivalent of throwing out the baby with the bathwater. But their rehab approach is decidedly formulaic: first find a dilapidated old house; most frequently, one that has been beat to death by renters and neglectful landlords. (essentially an unfit for habitation dwelling) Then summarily gut it to the studs (and sometimes beyond that) with the end goal being to create a Millennial friendly “crib” that mainly appeals to first time home buyers. To their credit, they do help stabilize marginal neighborhoods as well as somewhat boosting adjacent home values. Their finished “product” fits into the space between in-fill housing built from scratch (like Habitat for Humanity cottages) and renovated houses that still retain some of their architectural character.

        If I lived in one of their target neighborhoods, I’d probably have my pickup at the ready to go salvage many of the reusable things they cast off. Trouble is, their colorful demolition people have zero discretion or sensitivity for saving any old house parts that could be reused. In each episode, the demolition segment is a demolition derby spectacle with everything being smashed to smithereens in the most brutal manner possible.
        I realize that in today’s construction reality, time is money but they seem to delight in delivering brutal blows in the most dramatic fashion to everything in sight. If their old houses could bleed, the demolition aftermath would look pretty gory.

        If I may digress, few seem to be aware that in the future (that is, if we collectively have one) a scarcity of resources/materials will probably dominate life. Therefore, recycling and adaptive re-use will be a necessary part of life. The smart people are already saving and conserving whatever can be utilized. If you’ve ever been to a well stocked architectural salvage yard, you’ll see high values already being placed on old house parts that used to be discarded or destroyed without a second thought. I probably won’t be around to witness the coming era of scarcity but I do follow trends and can envision where they will lead. OK, its Sunday and I’m a deep thinker type so its time to get off my preservation soapbox and leave it at that.

        3
        • Jason B says: 191 comments

          John, Thanks again for the thoughtful reply. I have yet to visit an architectural salvage yard, other than the Habitat For Humanity Re-Store here in Muncie (if you want to call it that). There’s a salvage in Indy that has a website I frequent that has a $20,000, very sweet FP Mantel / Surround that would go nicely in my house if I had that kind of spare change. My Elders thought we Gen-Xers were wasteful, & I’m glad my Grandparents never saw the Melennials past toddlerhood. I know not all Melennials are bad, but most live in a disposable world where very few material items are coveted, and they place higher values on how things make them “feel”. 4 of my 5 kids & all three of my stepsons are this way.
          You made me laugh at the collective future comment, good one!

          2
    • MW says: 902 comments

      West Coast, CA? Yes, way higher. This place is seriously impressive.

      1
    • Kevin says: 91 comments

      What a sad chapter for that house on Meridian St. Must have been very grand as the exterior displays. I sure hope in the near future that most people will realize how incredible these historic homes are, and become much more sensitive to most of the original details.

  30. Ashley403 says: 76 comments

    Evening All, I agree what is being done to some of these houses to flip should be a crime. I think that house at 1501 English Ave is one of the worst. It makes you wonder do not these people that buy these flip properties not have a computer or phone to research and see the former price. They may just not care.
    This was the home of Henry and Sarah Cannon(Minnie Pearl). The young people may not recognize the name, Minnie Pearl was a fictional character and one of the first women country comedians on the Grand Ole Opry. The real Mrs. Cannon was a very nice women and went around to High Schools and gave motivational talks when there was not really a name for it. This is the link to the mansion and shows what was done to a very refine elegant mansion built in 1935 8000 sq ft https://www.movoto.com/nashville-tn/874-s-curtiswood-ln-nashville-tn-37204-571_1568006/
    I have pictures somewhere of the before,I can’t find them right now when it was for sale after the Cannon’s deaths at a million something.They had an open house with the furniture still in place. It was so beautiful and classy. Of course with no money we went to this once in a lifetime event and so did a lot of people. The real estate company had to limit the number of people in the mansion at a time and it was sort of a hands on tour.
    OK back to the listings. This one is in Norwich Ct. it is for the very brave person to take on or slightly demented built in 1945 the ad says 1200 sq ft looks bigger. There are no inside pictures because the ad states” Property is condemned and unsafe to enter at this time”. I guess I fall in the slightly demented group I do not think it is hopeless just a few holes here and there. It must be being sold for the lot at $59,900 then they wonder why it has been on Zillow for 267 days?https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/62-Plain-Hill-Rd-Norwich-CT-06360/61996904_zpid/
    This next one is also a Handy Man special and in Norwich Ct,it sort of overlooks the Thames River.
    It is cheaper $24,900 and was built in 1900. I have not found any inside pictures of either yet.https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/37-W-Thames-St-Norwich-CT-06360/61994880_zpid/

    3
    • Carolyn says: 297 comments

      You made me laugh Ashley! I must be demented too because those are the type of houses I am drawn to.

      2
    • BethanyBethany says: 3431 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      Another demented one here who is drawn to the sorriest houses available. Which is how I end up in houses that perpetually need work and are never “done” . . . .

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Well you sure did throw me off from that first listing – heheheh. I’m sure “Miss Minnie Pearl” had her home looking just lovely. 🙂 Please don’t hate me for being absolutely in love with that stunning, metalic blue, uber tufted, crushed velvet sectional though – sighhhhh. TY 😉

      2
  31. Jason B says: 191 comments

    None of my comments I made this evening are showing up, I wanted thank John. I also enjoyed several posts and comments today. Thanks OHD community!

    1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Wasn’t at the computer tonight, weekend nights always take longer to moderate comments.

      2
      • Jason B says: 191 comments

        Just curious, do you have others that help, like the Mason Jar sites I belong to, or do you personally have to approve all posts? That’s a huge undertaking if so, & I commend your dedication to your wonderful creation here.

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 938 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          As in all comments? Yes, has to manually approve. I had been doing it but a week or so ago asked someone to volunteer, it is just too much for one person. I have not asked her if she wants to be recognized as a moderator yet, figured I’d wait to be sure she was comfortable doing it.

          4
  32. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1927:
    Frankfort, KY:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2091002407_zpid/

  33. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1892. My. God.

    This one should be in the $millions. I hope one of the expert guys on here who can find history on these homes will look this one up. It’s says one owner…But 1892?

    What a treasure for the next owner:

    Georgetown, KY:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2090943044_zpid/

    3
    • Jason B says: 191 comments

      I’m so in love, and I agree on the pricing.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Great house. LOVE the “bear chair”. 😉

    • Barbara V says: 1063 comments

      Lovely house. The only thing that detracts from its appeal, IMO, is the absolute lack of mature trees and landscaping. Surely there must have been some venerable old specimens standing guard at some point – their absence leaves the property looking too much like a McMansion landscape to me…

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Dear Cora,
      The house was built for Col. Preston Kinzea Stone (1851-1925), a wealthy merchant and investor whose horse won the Kentucky Derby in 1891. He no longer owns it but it’s in the family, and his mustachioed portrait remains.
      The home was built of vitrified brick with limestone and terra cotta, and top end fittings throughout. A lot of goodies remain, but much has been lost including some wonderful fixtures and decor just in the last few decades.
      You would think that a bathroom that looked good after most of a century would be worth saving, damnit. If you can find the place where they didn’t discard the Wedgewood basins set in marble, please let us know.

      Write-up and first 6 photos:
      https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/85003491

      2
      • CoraCora says: 2054 comments
        OHD Supporter & Moderator

        Clinton, TN

        Thanks Jim H! You’re the best.

        We are ALL looking for that place where the fabulous original bits that have been removed might still survive, lol.

        1
      • CoraCora says: 2054 comments
        OHD Supporter & Moderator

        Clinton, TN

        I thought that maybe the beautiful butler’s pantry was gone as well, but you can catch a glimpse of it in the listing photo #49, painted white but intact. Also the main floor bath – I think I can see what appears to be an original corner sink peeking out?

        1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        What a great name! Thanks’ Jim. People think they’re soooo clever with these obnoxious kid names these days. Preston Kinzea Stone, now that’s a name…

  34. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Thanks, Cora. This is a visually stunning house in many ways and reflects the prosperity of the era. (just before the economic “Panic” of 1893) It was a time when a lavish display of wealth in a palatial home was still considered in good taste. Such grand mansions were temples of quality construction and have stood the test of time (126 years in this case) very well. Perhaps by “one owner” they mean it has stayed in one family for all of these years? The only detail I find less appealing is the three bay garage which visually juts out from the main house. Perhaps it would be visually more appealing by placing it behind the house so it would be less distracting. We’re fortunate to have a few grand specimens like this still around to remind us of what was possible back in those far-away days.

    1
  35. Ashley403 says: 76 comments

    Hi Jennifer the house at 32 Park Street was featured in OHD I forgot when but I remember the Lion in the living room. If you Google the address or https://www.google.com/maps/place/29+Park+St,+Wilton,+NH+03086/@42.8447978,-71.7359119,3a,75y,288.08h,114.79t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1srzdqY8y5Q2Me_klvgR5w9Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x89e3ce7579abdf7d:0x77aa72804e147f5a!8m2!3d42.8443009!4d-71.7 357652
    that is what the owner had to work with. The add says he worked on it for 8 years. I hope it sells soon and doesn’t wind up like the house above and not overdone.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/01/23/1887-queen-anne-oak-park-il/
    AS Rosewater says above it will take a real aficionado for this type of house.

    1
  36. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Preservation 911!
    From Elkhart, Indiana, comes word that this house on the town’s east side has a city ordered demolition notice affixed to the entry: https://www.flickr.com/photos/equinox27/26586982518/in/album-72157665071371825/
    It seems such a shame to let it be destroyed forever when to me it looks quite restorable. I’m unfamiliar with Elkhart so I can’t say if this is an OK neighborhood or not. Even if its not, since the house has zero value to the City anyway, perhaps it could be moved and rehabbed somewhere else where a vacant lot is available. (and the total costs might still come in at less than a starter home price) Even the original finial still crowns the tower peak. If anyone is wishing to be a preservation hero, this might be a great opportunity to save an already doomed towered Queen Anne. I’d consider it myself if I were able to presently.

    4
    • Jason B says: 191 comments

      Oh Noooooo! I have a branch of my Mother’s Family up there. I wonder what’s up with it, or if I may be able to salvage a few things with the owner’s permission.

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Jason,
        I heard back from a friend of mine (Paul Hayden in Wabash) with Indiana Landmarks. He said the house is in the 1000 block of South Main in Elkhart. Here it is in Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/cZQWbcbPi4n The faded area seems transitioning from residential to commercial but the house remains at the end of a solid residential street angling off S. Main. Mr. Hayden said he would fill me in later with the details but I see no obvious reason why the house should be razed. If more information is forthcoming, I’ll post it here.

        2
        • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

          Spoke to Mr. Hayden at Indiana Landmarks this morning. He said the Elkhart Queen Anne house has been in faded condition for a number of years and its interior reflects a long period of rental use. (abuse) However, he opined it could be moved (he said his office has been involved in 25 or so house moves) and threw out a number to move of around $40K and another $15K for a foundation and utilities hookups. He said there was a residential historic district a few blocks away but also cautioned that the local economy made any investment of the kind needed to save this house unlikely to be profitable at least in the short term. A Wikipedia entry for the city of about 50,000 said: “The (Elkhart) unemployment rate reached 18.8% in April 2009. Due to Elkhart’s recent economic troubles, the city and some of its unemployed residents were featured on the February 8, 2009 edition of ABC News” Conditions may have improved slightly since then but still remain sluggish. South Bend, about 15 miles to the east, seems to be doing better. Once again, we have here an example of a deserving old house to be saved but the surroundings and local economic realities make a rescue effort challenging at best.

          1
          • Jason B says: 191 comments

            A lot of the economy up there hinges on the Camper / RV industry. If nobody is buying new campers, they don’t get to work. Thanks, John.

          • Jason B says: 191 comments

            I also forgot to mention that the whole Elkhart / Goshen area has been impacted by devastating flooding in the last week. This house may be under water now.

            • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

              Mr. Hayden at Indiana Landmarks said he didn’t think this particular block was flooded. He is from nearby South Bend. Folks in Elkhart have a difficult enough time without the added burden of widespread flooding. (which is impacting much of the Midwest right now-on Facebook, a Cincinnati friend is sharing photos of a flood-swollen Ohio River.

  37. Ashley403 says: 76 comments

    I found a few homes in Greensboro, NC. When I was growing up in Middle Tennessee and you or friends lived in a house like this, people would say you were in Tall Cotton (a southern thing). It was built in 1958 and for the most part stuck in the 60’s. Do not miss the bathrooms and kitchen.
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/5923343_zpid/36.124564,-79.78323,36.06707,-79.863997_rect/13_zm/
    The next one was built in 1926 and even at over 3300 Sq Ft the inside looks warm and homey like there would always be a pot of coffee and home made cake waiting.
    Also check out the pink bathroom vanity it sprouted legs.The house must have had a 1950’s redo.
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/5912902_zpid/36.124564,-79.78323,36.06707,-79.863997_rect/13_zm/
    Notice the prices are climbing. This beauty was built in 1925 “beautifully restored and updated home” This home was restored beautifully but even though it is nice, I think they missed the mark on the kitchen.
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/5908899_zpid/36.124564,-79.78323,36.06707,-79.863997_rect/13_zm/
    In case you need more room or just want to impress your friends and family. It was built in 1935 and at 5700 Sq Ft this should do it.The former home of Greensboro philanthropist Joseph M. Bryan. Look at that chandelier!
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fore,new,cmsn_lt/pmf,pf_pt/house_type/5911345_zpid/36.124564,-79.78323,36.06707,-79.863997_rect/13_zm/2_p/

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The solarium at 711 Sunset is HEAVEN; though it sure is an odd duck from the front elevation. Lovely house, and great chandelier for sure. 🙂 TY

      1
  38. Neness says: 50 comments

    Kelly,
    Enjoy and look forward to these Friday listings. Just got back from party where I met a lady who is selling this house in the beautiful Oley Valley of south eastern Pennsylvania with the most fertile soil in the state. The area is close to Philadelphia, Harrisburg, New York, Wilmington and Baltimore.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Oley_PA/type-single-family-home/age-50+/sby-2#M3347957155

    1
  39. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1911:
    Pence Springs, WV:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2090977668_zpid/

    1
  40. Julie says: 4 comments

    Hi everyone! I found this site by Google – just looking at lovely examples of Italianate houses (my favorites) and I’m so happy I did! Loads of thanks Kelly for all you do! Thought I might share a couple gems if you haven’t already seen them. They are lottery ticket worthy for me 🙂

    I think this one is lovely with all the iron work – reminds me of the French Quarter

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3020-Poppy-Way_Louisville_KY_40206_M47835-82221#photo26

    And this one makes my heart sing with all the woodwork and lighting….sigh!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/12005-Osage-Rd_Louisville_KY_40223_M46883-10876#photo49

    4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I’m almost sure the Anchorage house used to be on OHD. It probably didn’t survive the purge.

      The Louisville house I LOVE. It’s been on the market a good long while. Besides being an exquisite, brilliantly preserved, top shelf Italianate; it’s a great example of how an uber posh, classic interior can still be modern, light, colorful, creative, and not in the least bit predictable or overly grandiose. It is a STUNNINGLY beautiful house in every which way. Thanks’ for giving me another look at it Julie. 🙂

      2
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        No, it did not. 🙁

      • Julie says: 4 comments

        Anchorage is such a charming hodgepodge of houses. Apparently it was one of first places the “elite” built their summer homes to get out of the city. Lots of old history there.

        I’m glad you enjoyed the other house as much as I do. It’s one of my all time faves. Gorgeous 🙂

        2
  41. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    My first thought was to pass on this one and not mention it here but anyhow, I ran across it looking at the Peoria, IL, old house real estate the other day, This one is a bona fide Queen Anne mansion with one of the most dramatic entries imaginable, colorful stained glass, multiple pocket doors, multiple mantels, and more: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/802-NE-Perry-Ave-Peoria-IL-61603/5154394_zpid/?fullpage=true That said, the bargain priced $89,900 house appears to be in an absolutely terrible location:(streetview) https://goo.gl/maps/MsQ1X55u3WR2 City-Data Stats shows that much of Peoria is considered a high crime area but this neighborhood appears worse than average even for Peoria. Taxes seem reasonable at $1,844 for 2016. It might be worth moving to a safer location at the current low price. It’s always a shame when I see the best house in the worst neighborhood but it happens from time to time. There are some surviving grand homes across the street as well all boarded up. The 1910 build date is probably off by a decade as most of the details conform to the 1895-1900 era.

    1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      THAT is frickin heart breaking John. 🙁 I know what you mean about it being a shame. It’s the sort of house you wish you’d never even seen. When you factor in it’s dire circumstances, and the likelihood it will ever see another salad day, it really does break your heart. I feel drawn to extol it’s myriad virtues, but – sigh – well, n’uf said.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      S u c h a great house. 🙁

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Indeed it is. While conventional real estate wisdom advises buyers to seek out the worst house in the best neighborhood, I don’t know what one does when you have a fabulous house situated within a bad neighborhood. Perhaps it could be moved (because the selling price is low) but financially that is still a major disadvantage from the start. Given that even the grand homes on Randolph Avenue are selling at a steep discount, the only justification for saving a former mansion like the Perry Street house is as a sentimental labor of love. Same for that hauntingly beautiful house in Quincy, IL, that was recently posted. In a State that seems so inept as to have some of the worst budgetary problems in the lower 48, this pattern of neglect and decline in many communities appears unstoppable. Looking ahead, there’s going to be some fantastic architectural salvage coming out of Illinois. (sadly, that is already the case, but what is now a steady flow will in years ahead become a torrent)
        The high taxes situation are a legacy that wasn’t too burdensome when factories were humming at full output and even blue collar jobs paid fairly well. Now the industrial based economy has been hollowed out and good paying jobs are scarce to none. The higher taxes continue however. One look at the City-Data Illinois commentary pages suggest an increasing pattern of net population loss and migration going out of the state. Even Caterpillar,Inc. which has long had its world headquarters in Peoria, has recently moved to the northern Chicago suburb of Deerfield, about 175 miles to the northeast. For a city the size of Peoria, that has to be like a torpedo hitting a ship below the water line. Wish I could come up with any practical solutions…

        1
    • Kevin says: 91 comments

      Beautiful home, I sure hope there is a way to preserve it.

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Well, if someone is of the hardcore “urban pioneer” type, you could buy the cheaply priced house, bring or acquire an aggressive dog or two such as Dobermans. You also might want to make sure you’re always well armed, put some surveillance cameras strategically placed at every corner of the property, and have a good alarm system. While an alligator stocked moat with a drawbridge might provide even more of a sense of security, city building codes probably wouldn’t permit it. A millionaire might be able to buy up a few blocks surrounding the house then fence the perimeter with a razor wire fence or better, electrify it. Keypad coded security gates for entry and having an armed guard on constant patrol might provide enough of a sense of safety for peace of mind. That’s mainly why I believe moving this large house to a safer area might cost less in the end than what it would take to feel safe in the original location. It’s truly sad that many of our American urban neighborhoods make law-abiding folks feel a need for such extreme security measures for safety but that urban reality has been around since the 1970’s if not earlier. The movie, Fort Apache, from 1981 focused on this urban malaise theme as well as the more recent Gran Torino with Clint Eastwood: (Wikipedia synopsis) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gran_Torino While the movies are fictitious, they are based on urban ills that are real. Any workable solution will require addressing the conditions that led to this situation and for now, not many communities are doing so.

        • Kevin says: 91 comments

          Well said John, it’s a real shame and certainly is a reality in many locations.

        • czenos says: 60 comments

          Hi John, unfortunately, as to moving it, you would have to move it east and across the river. There is nowhere within a 2 mile radius of its current location that would be any improvement, i.e. any safer.

          And in reality, the area 1 mile due north, on the bluff, developed after 1900, is MUCH worse.

          I grew up here and am only back because of my father’s death. We are actively looking for a destination, but are finding that large portions of the country are just as bad as PIA, albeit with lower RE taxes.

          -Steve-

    • CoraCora says: 2054 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      Gosh. What a fantastic house! The houses across the way and on the whole block really, are grand and beautiful. This must have been Peoria’s well-to-do neighborhood at the turn of the century.

  42. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Since I’m not posting auction listings anymore, sharing here.

    http://www.talktotucker.com/idx/575-pike-street-wabash-in-46992/11005657_spid/

    This property is going to auction, March 29, 2018 at the property at 6pm. Auction estimate: $35,000 – $60,000.00. Move-in ready two story home with lots of character including beautiful natural woodwork, pocket doors, built-ins and stained glass! Home features 4 bedrooms and 2 baths along with a newer detached 2-car garage. High Efficiency furnace, newer water heater and some newer vinyl replacement windows. Could be a great starter home or an investment property! Come see for yourself, Open House: March 20, 5:30-6pm.

    1
  43. Tom Morette says: 2 comments

    10 Hope Ave, Fairhaven, MA Previously 84 Main St
    This home sold on the same day we listed it.

    Many of the previous renovations had to be removed to bring this home to our standards and to restore as much integrity as possible. The history we were able to uncover is charming.

    https://www.facebook.com/ctpropertiessouthcoast/photos/a.1955416174693452.1073741849.1676096129292126/2004677779767291/?type=3&theater

    3
  44. Jason B says: 191 comments

    Lots of slump glass windows! I accidently found this house leaving my Mother’s house the other day. I think that with the asbestos siding and wrought iron porch rails replaced with period correct items and details, this could be a real Gem. Pricing a little high for the area, but nice double lot / corner location makes it worthy. There are some very large period mansions right around the corner fronting the river.
    https://m.realliving.com/Property-House/Mobile/Listing/ListingDetail.aspx?listing=232273588&search=57ab4fa9-e158-4c90-99e6-09f52a0fec94&first=41

    1
  45. RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Hey Kelly, look what I just stumbled across:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/185-A-W-Roberts-Dr_Ball-Ground_GA_30107_M60827-80460#photo0
    Isn’t this the one – your favorite? Was it flipped like this when it was on the site? I don’t think so. I can’t remember if we even saw the interior at all before. Looks like a really poor quality lipstick flip; and that price! – ugh. 🙁

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Yeah, it’s still here but private. There are confusing listing photos that kept changing, I gave up on it. Not a flip. Besides painting the exterior the interior has been the same for decades. Shows much better in person, interior wise. I don’t understand what is going on with the exterior paint. I’ve silently been praying no one gets a hold of it and switches the windows or does anything drastic to turn it into a rental or b&b. The price, I’ve vowed to never comment on prices again. 🙂

  46. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Another share, not sure it’s going to last before (or if) the agent ever responds so I want y’all to see it now! I REALLY love the potential here.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1627-Pine-St_Eureka_CA_95501_M17522-49159

    2
    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Looks like Heather’s new house in The Dalles, and could be just as nice.
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/11/21/1878-italianate-the-dalles-or/

      A couple blocks away is this updated one for about the same price – not bad for CA.
      https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2207-Fairfield-St_Eureka_CA_95501_M14071-88115

      1
      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Thanks for the share. The price is very reasonable, even for Eureka. (please remember folks, this is still coastal California-go down the coast 250 miles south, or to Mendocino, about half that distance, and this house would be likely be priced at over a million in the hyper-inflated housing markets there) Eureka is a quaint town that still retains its late Victorian era ambiance. However, the weather there is often damp, chilly, and gloomy/foggy, but the town itself has its own charm.

        Although some would classify this 1880’s Italianate as being in the “good bones” category, I appreciate the fact that it hasn’t been messed with too much. Spiffy up the cosmetic issues, make sure the roof is sound, and this ugly duckling would soon transform into a beautiful swan.

        I spied something special in one of the rooms…take a look at the ceiling in photo #24 and notice the California version of shiplap. You’ll see at least one board with a prominent wavy grain pattern like the highly figured wood used on the back of a violin. This plank is from the unique species known as Coastal Redwood. Such rich grain patterns are today highly prized and can be used in fine furniture or for other special uses.

        Eureka in the 1870’s and 1880’s was a regional center for huge logging operations of Redwood. The majestic sometimes thousand year old trees were felled, hauled to Eureka, then sawn into lumber and loaded onto ships headed down the coast to booming San Francisco. The rapidly growing Gold Rush city had an insatiable appetite for Redwood lumber to fuel its building boom. Several individuals involved in this lucrative enterprise amassed millions with perhaps the best known being William McKendry Carson. The fortune he made from clear cutting virgin Coastal Redwood forests enabled him to build Eureka’s fabled Carson Mansion with money left over to build a smaller but still impressive mansion directly across the street. Both remain standing. (Photos in case anyone is interested: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157621673226309 ) Redwood is renowned for its durability and resistance to decay-you’ll find that most Victorian era homes in Eureka are made entirely from this now scarce species. There’s a millwork business in Eureka, Blue Ox Millworks, that still reproduces fine Victorian era millwork pieces in Redwood and ships these custom products nationwide. The owner (whom I have met and discussed local Preservation issues) will give you a tour of his unique factory if requested. What makes this Millwork factory stand out even more is due to the owner spending decades scouring the country for the oldest milling and woodworking equipment he could find. Among his prized items is a Victorian era machine that mills four bull’s-eye/rosette corner blocks at a time. I’ll stop here, but if you’ve never been to Eureka and you love Victorian era architecture, then you’ll be as happy as a kid in a candy store when you pay the town a visit. Just a short distance away going south is the almost entirely intact Victorian village of Ferndale (more photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157621785437700 ) and Arcata, which is due north of Eureka a short distance away.

        Were it not for Eureka’s frequent “London Fog” type weather, I could see myself living happily in Eureka in a house like this. Eureka and most of far northern California up to the Oregon border is far more laid back and culturally world’s apart from the hectic big cities to the south. Talk to the locals and they’ll probably tell you they just love the slower pace of life in this region.

  47. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1910. The exterior of this one reminds me of a popular TV show from the 1960s.

    I’d pay extra if the little dog sitting in the front hall came with the house. A-dor-a-ble.

    Parsons, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/77207902_zpid/

    1
  48. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1914:

    Cherryvale, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/77241479_zpid/

  49. Heidi says: 149 comments

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Canton-IL/pmf,pf_pt/105609444_zpid/3960_rid/globalrelevanceex_sort/40.611346,-89.964209,40.51941,-90.118018_rect/12_zm/2_p/?

    There is a lot going on with this house and from the first few pictures I wrote it off as a complete heap. Then the pictures of the downstairs—-
    original fretwork, unpainted woodwork, the fireplace.
    I wish there were more pictures of the main floor.

    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      Gosh, that house has been on the market for quite a while. It is restorable, but doesn’t have a lot going for it location wise. If someone is looking for a project house but has a smaller budget this might work. Not for the faint of hear nor too shallow of pocket. Best to visit the property and get a good grasp of what it will cost to make it habitable.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Chaaaa. If that was in my town I could fix it up and retire on the profit. That back bit is doing a real Houdini levitation act there. It’s almost as if they built it with that sill and beam assembly knowing the foundation would completely disintegrate. The way those inexplicable beams are probably dovetailed together old school barn style, (I’m guessing), the little corner bit could go and the whole thing would probably still be sittin there straight as a line all cantilevered WAY out over nothin. Heheheh. Wild! TY

  50. Lady Texas says: 194 comments

    I’d like to introduce you to an unusual property in danger of demolition. Collinwood House in Plano, Tx. dates to ca. 1861. It is the last home of Plano’s frontier era still standing in its original location. The city of Plano owns the house now and wants it moved off the land. The city will give you house and an incentive offering of $200,000 to assist in moving the house. If no legitimate offer is made to move the house, the property will be destroyed.
    Collinwood is a spacious 3,200 sf 1-1/2 story cross-gabled farm house with 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. It includes many unique features such as pointed arch windows on its side-gabled ends. You enter through a Greek Revival double-door with sidelights and transom containing a large number of original panes of glass. We believe that the glass was transported by ox-cart from the riverport of Jefferson,Tx across country to the site. The original clapboards remain beneath a sheath of wood shingle siding. The room currently used as a kitchen was remodeled at some unknown date and includes metal cabinets dating to the 1940s.The most unusual feature is the half-cellar. Cellars in North Texas, particularly of this vintage, are rare.
    You would expect a house of this age to be a tilting wreck. Instead, it was continuously occupied and well-cared for until 2014 when the last owner sold the house and remaining 80 acres to the city of Plano. The city now wants to turn the acreage into a public park and the house is in the way.
    I am including links to photos of the house and its history as well as the city’s information notice in the hopes that you would be interested in posting to your site. Perhaps, someone will fall in love with the house as preservationists have and save it.

    I apologize that I cannot make the link work from this site, but if you copy and paste into your browser, you should be able to see the photos. I’ve also included the contact information for anyone who would be interested in this house. This is an amazing historic house inside and out. It would be a travesty for it to be turned into kindling.
    https://planomagazine.com/show-support-saving-historic-collinwood-house/
    http://planomagazine.com/collinwood-planos-oldest-home-running-out-of-time/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bTpKu6a_F0

    INFORMATION NOTICE
    THE HISTORIC COLLINWOOD HOUSE (C. 1861)
    LOCATED AT 5400 WINDHAVEN PARKWAY, PLANO, TEXAS
    WILL BE AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED PARTIES ABLE TO RELOCATE AND REHABILITATE THE HOUSE FOR THE PURPOSE OF PRESERVING IT. THE CITY OF PLANO OWNS THE HOUSE, BUT IS NOT PROVIDING PROPERTY FOR ITS RELOCATION. IF NO QUALIFIED PARTIES ARE ABLE TO RELOCATE THE HOUSE, IT WILL BE DISMANTLED AND THE MATERIALS MADE AVAILABLE FOR SALVAGE. THE COST TO RESPECTFULLY DISMANTLE THE HOUSE IS ESTIMATED TO BE $250,000. THE CITY WILL PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE IN AN AMOUNT UP TO $200,000 IF A VIABLE AND TIMELY PLAN TO RELOCATE THE HOUSE IS RECEIVED. PREFERENCE WILL BE GIVEN TO PLANS FOR RELOCATION WITHIN THE CITY OF PLANO. A FORMAL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS WILL BE ISSUED LATER THIS YEAR.
    CONTACT: ANDREEA HAMILTON, AIA
    QUIMBY MCCOY PRESERVATION ARCHITECTURE
    (214) 977-9118 EXT. 7004

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thank you for taking the time to bring this to the attention of the OHD community. I will re-post the notice for you in the upcoming Friday share, (with credit), so many more people will see it; unless you prefer to do so yourself. Cheers!

  51. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Sad to learn but Plano is ground central for sprawling new development in the DFW metro area. (Toyota just moved its U.S. headquarters to Plano) The $200k city assistance offer is a pretty big carrot but the next owner will have to make a significant investment as well. Best to bring in some experts to ascertain the feasibility of this major project. In summary, it can be done, but requires adequate funding and outstanding organization. All building codes and city ordinances will require compliance as well as involving an architect to submit plans for city approval. I wish the prospective buyers the best in their efforts.

    1
    • Lady Texas says: 194 comments

      Yes, John. Plano is unfortunately turning in to Konkrete Korners with all the green space getting gobbled up. The city will give it away along with the $200K incentive to someone who will move it. The house has a colorful history as it sits very close to the Shawnee Trail. In those days, before hotels and inns, hospitality was given to travelers who could stay overnight and get a good breakfast before resuming the journey. The notorious Belle Starr is rumored to have spent a night in the house, although she used a different name. The cattle herds also used the trail and passed by the house. There are many colorful stories associated with the house. It’s a shame that progress doesn’t treasure them.

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Lady Texas,
        Thanks for your comments. I can only concur with you about the runaway sprawl and rapid new development going on around the DFW Metroplex. (we live in Fort Worth and have new apartments presently going up just feet away from our 1889 Victorian) Given how little respect this rare fragment of Plano history receives, perhaps it would be preferable to relocate the dwelling to a community that cherishes history such as Grapevine. I was going to include McKinney (where some family members of mine lived in the 1880’s) but it too is quickly becoming another Plano. I’m old enough to remember Plano before sprawl and explosive development overtook it. Money always seems to trump history. Here’s wishing you folks good luck with saving this rare early survivor.

        • Lady Texas says: 194 comments

          I’m delighted you are so close by, and agree that relocation is better than reducing the house to kindling. As you can see, Collinwood is similar to the Nash House in Grapevine, only larger. We are hoping that the more people who know about Collinwood and its history will be compelled to keep its memories alive. Many newcomers don’t know about Collinwood, even if they live close by. It is our last remaining gateway to Frontier Plano. More importantly, because of the confluence of the creeks, there is huge evidence of buffalo, american indian traffic along the Shawnee trail, and even dinosaurs from the ??cretaceous?? period. You’d think that the schools and universities would be all over this property. Thank you for your good wishes. We are virtually at the end of a 4-year effort to save the house in place. If no one steps up to move it, the house will be flattened.

          • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

            Thanks Lady Texas, please keep us posted. Preservation miracles are rare but not unheard of so lets hope (and pray) Collinwood will be one of them. Our oldest in Fort Worth neighborhood is straining under the onslaught of new apartments construction, Since 2005, I’ve witnessed over half of our neighborhood period homes being lost and the process isn’t over yet. As mentioned, apartments are under construction adjacent our property and if our 1889 home-owned only by ourselves and the original family (for 97 years) since the time it was built-survives without becoming yet another senseless teardown, no one will be more surprised than my spouse and I. Preservation is often a hard sell in Texas because of its myopic focus on “progress” at any cost.

            • Lady Texas says: 194 comments

              the lead story in D Magazine this month is “Lost Dallas: Secrets from the City’s Past”. Apropos, indeed. It would seem that all cities should record their past stories and secrets before they are lost to a dusty attic in a moldering library.

              • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

                At least to Dallas’ credit, they do maintain an architectural “petting Zoo” known as the Old City Park. There’s already a lovely late 1890’s blue and while painted towered Queen Anne style house resettled there from PLANO. (a documented George F. Barber published design as well) Finding vestiges of 19th century architecture in Dallas is challenging and increasingly so in Fort Worth. Perhaps some philanthropic Dallas benefactor with a preservation consciousness could be persuaded to fund a move for the Collinwood house to Old City Park? I’m increasingly convinced that for a number of fast growing Texas cities, creating a preserve/park for their last remaining early historic homes may be the best solution. Most old house lovers would be appalled to see the rich architecture Dallas once had. I have a copy of GONE FROM TEXAS from the 1980’s and any number of lost Dallas Victorian mansions archived in the book would be landmarks today.

  52. CoraCora says: 2054 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1920. Here’s a nice solid old house in my hometown back in in Kansas. Lots of original left inside, and in great condition:

    Emporia, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/91200036_zpid/

  53. says: 191 comments

    Smokey Mountains at your door step for $24K! Just, WOW!
    https://www.redfin.com/TN/Cosby/4703-Bogard-Rd-37722/home/108478867

  54. says: 3 comments

    Hmmm… this one seems kind of familiar but but I couldn’t find it amidst all the other “dreams” so…Greek Revival in Salina KS anyone?
    .
    https://www.coldwellbanker.com/property/673-S-Santa-Fe-Ave-Salina-KS-67401/31379140/detail
    .
    A lot of nice and unpainted original woodwork including both the “grander” front and servants staircases still in place. Some of the “updates” aren’t exactly easy on the eye, but it looks pretty well taken care of!
    .
    After you move in you can even don your coat and tails and stroll over for an evening at the nearby vintage Steifel Theatre. A beautiful old place in it’s own right!
    .
    http://www.stiefeltheatre.org/
    .
    Granted 3/4 of a mile is a bit of a stroll, but still…

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