c. 1860 – Max Meadows, VA

Added to OHD on 2/20/18   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   Comments Closed
SOLD / Archived Post
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5009 Peppers Ferry Rd, Max Meadows, VA 24360

Map: Street

  • $220,000
  • 6 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 10400 Sq Ft
  • 16 Ac.
Stately Victorian situated on 16 acres w/stream running thru. Located good area between I81 & I77. Stained glass windows & beautiful woodwork carved by German artisans. Would be wonderful for family, Bed & Breakfast or weddings. House featured in one of O Winston Link's most popular photographs. Waiting for right owner to return to original elegance. Sold as-is where-is. Agent relate to seller.
Contact Information
Ann Pope, Long & Foster
(540) 989-0863
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Misc: ,

60 Comments on c. 1860 – Max Meadows, VA

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Pretty sure this was another submission, I searched but didn’t find who it was.

    Build date on record is 1749 but it’s had some pretty huge remodels since then.

    3
    • Robb H says: 190 comments

      Year is wrong and Realtor is to correct. It is more around 1860.

      2
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Thank you!

      • HDROPE says: 7 comments

        Hi, All thanks for the great comments. My family owns this house. I am the great-grandaughter of B.F. and Pearl Mae Swecker Pope. My mother was at the photo shoot with O. Win stone Link. This hiuse is absolutely extrodinary. I had the privilege of growing up visitin my grandparents here. The little hiuse to the side is the smoke house. It has been used for storage for decades. The old red barn burned down when my mom was in college in the 70s. There is an old pig house, corn crib and meat weighing shed still on the property. My great grandparents raised beef cattle. The realtor is not incorrect about the date of the house, as she grew up there. It has had several additions and was originally just a log cabin. That has been built around the white brick part that is in the picture with the smoke house is the remainder of the original log cabin. It is now an old kitchen and has a huge butlers Pantry attached and leads into a large formal dining room with a large bay window. It is exquisite. The orange bird motif wall paper and fire place picture is the dining room.

        38
        • Globalnomad says: 2 comments

          Thank you for sharing more about this house’s history. Is it possible to add additional photos to the listing? I have been looking for a historic home in Virginia with land and from what I tell it looks lovely.

          3
          • Globalnomad says: 2 comments

            Thanks. I have contacted the realtor two days ago and am waiting to hear back from them.

            2
        • Sherry Cervantes says: 1 comments

          Hello, I found your families home on the internet and I have fell in love with it. We have scheduled a showing this week to look at the property. If you could give me more information about the houses history I would be grateful.

          4
      • H R says: 7 comments

        The realtor is not incorrect about the date. The log cabin which is now encompassed in brick and is the old kitchen was the first structure on the property and then it has been added on to over the years.

        2
  2. Betsy says: 159 comments

    Ho-lee cow. So nice. If ever a house needed it’s porch back it is this one. There are not enough interior photos, but what we can see is pretty nice.

    12
    • Kimberly says: 18 comments

      I agree….when I saw the older picture with the porch, all I could think is “why on earth would you remove that spectacular porch???”. Wish there were more interior photos too, because the ones I saw made my mouth water.

      2
  3. Laura D says: 4 comments

    The porch was spectacular. It’s sad that so many of these amazing homes have “lost” their porches.

    6
  4. JimHJimH says: 4950 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This place has it all: a grand house with style and period details, a bucolic rural site with nice views and acreage, and layers of history dating back to colonial times. Awesome.
    I’d like to know who built the place. The owners shown in the train photo in 1958 were Benjamin Franklin Pope (1895-1968) and his wife Pearl, who raised 7 children here. There’s a set of photos taken before the train shot:
    http://hswv.pastperfectonline.com/bysearchterm?keyword=B.+F.+Pope%27s+House

    8
    • Graham says: 148 comments

      Wow what a great find! It will really help somebody if they decide (and I hope they do)to rebuild the porches. Also to see previous owners/family/pets in old photos is priceless.

      • H R says: 7 comments

        I think the dog in the picture was named Joe, my mom was so happy to see him again!

        2
    • H R says: 7 comments

      Thank you so much for the link of the before shots of the O. Winston Link photo shoot. I had never seen those before, they are so cool!!
      This house is grand and special and means the world to my family. I am B.F. Pope and Pearl Mae’s great-granddaughter. B.F.’s mother was full Cherokee Indian. He was a wonderful horseman and my great-grandmother was an incredible cook! My grandmother Ruth Imogene (Jean) was the eldest of the 7. There is a story of the union army coming through during the Civil War and the little girl who lived there (probably a McGavock) pleaded with the Union army to not take their last ham and to not burn everything down. Obviously they didn’t. There used to be a widows watch on the top as well.

      8
  5. Cody H says: 135 comments

    *heavy breathing*
    Woah. Holy cow. Amazing. I am agog.
    Give this lady her porches back, yesterday!
    Woodwork! Wow!
    What a setting! Love the lot, and how far the house sits from the road!
    Absolutely perfect.

    5
  6. Lori says: 117 comments

    Seems incomplete without the gorgeous porch which hopefully will one day be built back on. Beautiful house!

    4
  7. Franka says: 21 comments

    The Realtors got so carried away taking pictures of the period details they forgot to photograph the rooms. The square footage of this house exceeds 10,000 feet and the property encompasses 16 acres. We should be able to see more of the home than close up shots of the stairs, a window, a fireplace and a corner cabinet.

    2
  8. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Not all outbuildings are always slave quarters in pre-Civil War homes. I suspect it’s storage, well house, food storage or many other things but not a slave house, it would have been way too close to the main house for it to be that anyway.

    5
    • Robb H says: 190 comments

      Sometimes they had these buildings for tobacco drying. This is a tobacco area.

    • Warbon says: 119 comments

      Do you think that small building could have been a summer kitchen? I know they used to do that when it was hot to keep the heat out of the house. You can tell it’s log built. I hope they can save it.

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        I don’t see evidence of a chimney and I’m not sure if they used log buildings as kitchens. I know what this reminded me of, a smokehouse!

        • Robb H says: 190 comments

          Kelly, you are right. It is a smoke house. I had that verified today. There was also a summer kitchen that was in a cabin like structure that is now part of the house. I talked with a descendant of the house today to verify information.

          1
        • William Walkington says: 62 comments

          I have seen many, many log summer kitchens, even a few detached permanent kitchens built of logs. I know of two in the KCMO area still in situ with their associated historic homes, so this one MIGHT be. Amazing homestead and great choice for inclusion here.

      • H R says: 7 comments

        It wasn’t a summer kitchen. The old kitchen is the white brick part right next to it.

        1
    • H R says: 7 comments

      The little log house was a smoke house, now just stores old shutters and lawn equipment.

      1
  9. Pattyg says: 1 comments

    Oh my. This one catapulted my from my silent voyeur status. It has enough of the features on my checklist to tempt me to retire three years early and move from GA to VA. sigh.

    1
  10. dragonflyspirit14dragonflyspirit14 says: 250 comments
    1913 farmhouse
    Dillon, SC

    the stained glass window is breathtaking!

    3
    • Bethster says: 936 comments

      Yes—the design is so unusual!

    • Jeklstudio says: 1139 comments

      Totally agree. Those stained glass windows are simply extraordinary. Gorgeous color!!

    • H R says: 7 comments

      The main entrance doors have stained glass too, my parents were married in front of them, they are two huge doors with stained glass and then an alcove and then another set of huge doors with stained glass.

      5
  11. Blanche Manos says: 17 comments

    The small house is probably a smokehouse, for hanging and curing hams and bacon.

  12. lottie says: 384 comments

    Goodness, what a beautiful home! Just love those stained glass windows on the stairs and all the wood work! Really love the over 10,000 feet to the house. The land is just beautiful in that area.

    1
    • Lottie says: 384 comments

      This is such a beautiful home! So unforgettable! We were driving through Virginia in February and stopped in at Max Meadows and drove past the back of the house. The front faces the railroad. Incredible home! Then, we were driving through again last weekend and made an effort to drive by and check on the house. It was still there! Hope someone buys her soon and starts renovations. House has a sweet spirit about her!

      2
  13. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Call the agent. Ann Pope, Long & Foster Phone: (540) 989-0863

  14. Robb H says: 190 comments

    I would suggest checking the weather also as the area just got snow and ice. It is not far from the mountains of WV so they tend to get it a bit more than other areas. The roads to the house are a bit back road like so they can be iffy at times. As someone who has seen the house, The house is a bit off the road and I doubt if the driveway has been plowed as they do not want people just going on the property. The house is a project house and the Realtor will not sugar coat how much work it needs. She was raised in the house and is a very nice knowledgeable person. You will like Ann. Ask her for other pictures than what were in the posting as she sent them to me months ago.

    3
  15. ClayR says: 2 comments

    I’ve toured this property and have been inside this magnificent mansion. I can tell you from first-hand experience that the house is huge, and when inside you realize just how massive it truly is. The detailed woodwork is breathtaking, along with the jeweled stained glass windows. Not seen in the pictures is the entryway vestibule with incredible etched glass transoms and ornate jeweled french doors. Entry into the main parlor is through a huge carved archway, opening up to reveal an oversized fireplace flanked on one side by a huge box bay accessed through yet another carved archway. Original dark stained plantation shutters still cover the large windows and sport original, extremely detailed aesthetic period brass hinges. The stair hall WILL take your breath, if not then you’ve stumbled upon this website purely by accident. Up one landing and you’re immediately greeted by three huge stained glass windows with jewels throughout – folks, take my word, it’s breathtaking. Turn around and look upward to the top of the stairs and you can see three carved archways holding up the second story ceiling. At the top of the stairs are three large windows to view the meadow below. There is a room up there directly above the main parlor that mimics it almost exactly, except there is a door leading out to a small balcony. Also not seen in the pics is the second staircase in the West wing of the house – it is truly impressive as well, winding up three floors to the cavernous attic. The attic is also impressive with two large copper tanks which once provided pressurized water to the fixtures below. The old money that built this place is evident when you’re up there in the attic and see the ornate fire fenders, summer covers and andirons literally piled up in the corners. There is another staircase in the attic that leads up to a hatch in the roof which allows access to the widows walk. Down in the first floor, on the west side of the house, is the original brick portion of the old house that was here originally. This houses the original kitchen. It’s like a museum inside. Original green paint covers everything – walls, built in cupboards, ceilings…it’s like stepping back in time…like time has literally stood still in this section of the house. Out back is an original 18th century log smokehouse. I can’t say enough good things about this old mansion – it truly needs to be seen in person to get the full effect. Sure it needs work, but my goodness for the price it’s a steal. I don’t think I’ve seen this mentioned but I know for a fact the owners spent a literal fortune having a new roof put on the house- a quality, professional job with restoration and preservation in mind. Keep in mind you’re also getting all the acreage around the house as well, and old, untouched estates like this are few and far between. From my research, the house was built by the well-known McGavock family, of revolutionary war fame. The mansion was originally referred to as “Max Meadows”, and later on the entire area around the estate started being referred to as Max Meadows. This old estate is a real treasure and when the right person acquires it and gives it the love and attention it deserves, they’ll be proud to own a true piece of Southwest Virginia history.

    15
  16. JimHJimH says: 4950 comments
    OHD Supporter

    ClayR, thanks for the tour! Apparently the realtor is taking the old school approach of providing a limited view of the property to entice prospective buyers to go out and take a look. Unfortunately the listing doesn’t do justice to the glorious house and the property’s interesting past.
    Your description of the late Victorian features, and the older kitchen area, suggests that the big house was essentially new construction added onto a small old house. The oldest parts – 1749? 1860? – confuse the dating of mostly 1880’s construction.
    On the history, Max Meadows was named after McGavock’s (Mac’s, Max) long before the big house was built. The site was the home of Hugh McG. (1761-1844), the eldest child of Scots-Irish immigrant James McGavock. The extensive property was passed down to his son Randal McG.(1803-1890) and grandson Jacob C. McG.(1856-1932). Presumably, the present mansion was built by Jacob, though I don’t see mention of it in the detailed family history.
    https://archive.org/details/mcgavockfamilyge00gray
    https://books.google.com/books?id=kygho6zl-N8C&pg=PA54

    3
  17. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I thought this had sold but guess not. Posted 2016, showing back on the market, moved to front page.

    4
  18. RossRoss says: 2456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    I will add yet another WOW to these comments.

    The lost porch is one of the most famous in America. It would be incredible if bits of it were stored in the attic. I would, without hesitation, rebuild the porch. The Link images (see JimH comment) would be invaluable in recreating the porch and other lost details.

    And that stained-glass window? I am having heart palpitations, my dears!

    7
  19. ddbacker says: 509 comments

    Two very sad phrases: burned barn and lost porch.

    7
  20. StevenFStevenF says: 863 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    Quite a lot of interesting history. Can someone please educate me on the “faux” fireplace (in the room with the wallpaper) that has no stone hearth and has the room’s panelling where the firebox would be? What would have been the purpose of this feature? It doesn’t appear that it was really trying to create a faux fireplace, because the lack of hearth and the presence of the panelling. Any ideas?

    4
    • Michael Mackin says: 2394 comments

      I am curious about the fireplace as well. It appears to be original and unaltered but was never a functioning fireplace!

      2
    • JimHJimH says: 4950 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I thought it was just a decorative sideboard of sorts. It’s in the dining room and matches the wainscot and corner cabinet, and a set of goblets would fit nicely on the lower shelf.

      It’s amazing to me that this house hasn’t sold when developer homes 1/3 the size on small lots are selling in the area for over $300k. Wake up, America!

      8
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      It is a very unusual example in this late 1880 interior update. There was probably a heater stove in that location. Even though there was a stove and no fireplace, many still wanted a mantle to display pictures and tchotchkes and such. You’d have to check for a flue and a stove pipe port. There probably is one.

      1
  21. Signe Gronbeck-Johnson - Grandeur Restorations says: 48 comments

    I was watching this lovely home for a couple years, we were considering relocating while we fought off a 100+ acre illegal quarry 300 ft. from our historic property. I always wished I could see pictures of the interior. Well, after an almost 5 year legal battle against two multi-million dollar corporations and over 100 grand in legal etc., we finally won our fight to save our historic property from the illegal quarry, but we are left broke. We won’t be relocating anywhere soon, but it is so nice to see this house again and I cannot wait to see more interior pictures! I have to thank Kelly and Old House Dreams for her wonderful site. During the worst of our lonely battle I spent many all nighters on legal work and I would escape by visiting this sight looking for somewhere we could go if we lost our gorgeous old house to this horrible quarry. It really helped us to see that there are still fabulous old mansions out there to be saved, and it also helped us to keep up the fight for our old beauty. I am so glad to read the wonderful comments here about this home from the granddaughter, I always got that cherished homestead vibe from this special house when we had it on our short list, and I am glad to see comments from those that are going to take a look at it. I hope that whomever buys it, they intend to replicate the lost porches,if you invested in a good band saw and a quality duplicating lathe you could do this for a fraction of the price of cost to contract it out. I know, that is how I first taught myself the restoration trade over 30 years ago, all starting with a gingerbread porch. The photo documentation of this woodwork is fantastic and makes it so easy to scale. Good luck to the lucky new owners of this gorgeous home!

    6
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Sorry you had to spend that much but glad you won!

      5
      • Signe Johnson - Grandeur Restorations says: 48 comments

        Thank you, it is just what we Old House fanatics do, right? It is nice to know there are a large group of people out there that understand, and that they have a place like this to chat. Love your site!

        2
    • vicki b says: 65 comments

      Sure would like to see your house Signe, I know it was worth it.

      3
      • Signe Johnson - Grandeur Restorations says: 48 comments

        I think so, though others have labeled us as the town crazies for not selling out. It is an amazing eclectic rambling brick that was added to several times between 1840 and 1890, each section retaining all the original architectural elements of it’s day of construction, it eventually totaled 22 rooms. It is so interesting. It was the main home of our township founders and was once one of the first and largest tobacco plantations in Wisconsin. We purchased it in ruins in the 1980’s (so bad we had to pay cash)and we were in the middle of our second major renovation when this quarry mess started. All work had to be stopped to fund the legal battle. We could have sued for damages, and settle to leave the property to be destroyed by the blasting, but we chose to sue to stop the quarry instead so the home would be saved. We don’t know if we will be able to recover any of the legal, but this house has our heart, we saved it once in 1986, now we had to save it again. By the time I am dead, I promise all you fellow old house lovers that I will get that gorgeous old tower rebuilt. My husbands great great great grandfather was the first European child to be born in this township, just a mile and a half from our home, his father had died a month before his birth leaving his mother alone in this then mostly wilderness area to raise 6 children on her own. She sold 3/4 of the land she and her husband had bought and stayed here until her death, never remarrying, and often working for the family who’s home we now occupy. We found out this history AFTER we bought this home. The feeling we get knowing that we, the descendants of this brave widow, now live in what was the grandest home of her time is so dear to our heart. From what we know of this great lady, it would have made her so proud and we feel it is a tribute to her struggle to keep fighting for it, and for the natural unspoiled beauty of the area. So we will keep keeping on until we can’t, then we will hope to find another devotee on Old House Dreams to carry on. You don’t own grand old houses, they own you, it is a labor of love.

        4
  22. ErnieErnie says: 325 comments
    AK

    Wow! The comments by the great granddaughter were interesting. I noticed one post saying they had scheduled a showing, wonder how that went. Must not have bought the place though. I wish there were way more pics of the interior.
    Wonder what happened to that awesome porch & I hope the person who buys it puts it back on. If ever a house cried out for it’s porch, it’s this place.

    2
    • ErnieErnie says: 325 comments
      AK

      JimH commented on 1/15/17 “Apparently the realtor is taking the old school approach of providing a limited view of the property to entice prospective buyers to go out and take a look.”
      I have to say that I believe it is doing the home a great disservice by not providing as many pics as possible. Not everyone is close enough to make a walk through appt. & would like to see more before contacting the listing agent. I did see where Robb H said, “The house is a project house and the Realtor will not sugar coat how much work it needs. She was raised in the house and is a very nice knowledgeable person. You will like Ann. Ask her for other pictures than what were in the posting as she sent them to me months ago.” So maybe she won’t mind if more photos are requested.

      4
  23. says: 10 comments

    This is the most amazing house, property and history! WOW! How I would love it-I’d spend the rest of my days just fixing her up, room by beautiful room. And yes, first thing? An authentic craftsman would have to come and redo her porch. Ah….peach tea anyone while we watch the wind blow through the grass?

  24. abevy says: 345 comments

    My,MY, how wonderful! Are taxes high in this area? Please a few more pictures.

  25. Gobriari says: 14 comments

    This is the most gorgeous house! Since I’ve stumbled onto this listing, I compare everything else to it. This one wins. So much to do here, but so much scope for the imagination! I’d have a small working farmette on property, and continue my business from home as I lovingly restore each room. This is my sugar-plum house. Was originally looking at TN or NC. But it may be VA. We shall see….K

  26. CRC says: 1 comments

    All I can say is I’m speechless!!! This home is a dream come true!! It would be so hard for me to sell this beautiful home, but then I don’t know the families reasons. I do hope that the lucky new owner will love and cherish this home forever!! I would love to see more pictures of before and after!!! WOW everything about this house is amazing!!!

  27. SD says: 56 comments

    Does anyone have more pics of this house. The real estate agent refuses to send more than the few that are listed online. The homeowner is apparently worried that someone will break in and steal a staircase and some windows….is that something you have to worry about in this town? You go to church and come back to discover your stairs to the 2nd floor missing? The online crime statistics for this town say no.

    It is no wonder this home has been for sale for so many years. This is a home that obviously is not going to sell locally or it would have by now. The real estate agent should be looking for out of state buyers.

    Even though I am interested in this house, I don’t want to take 2 flights across the country and rent a car to see it when a a few pics would let me know if this is a project I want to tackle.

    If you could email them to me. I can assure you that they won’t find their way online.

  28. Cheri says: 5 comments

    I live in Florida and my mother lives in Statesville N.C so I asked her to go look at it for me. Just so happened when they got there the person who was in charge of showing the property was there he would not allow my mother or the other potential buyer to look inside the house. If i recall she said she would have been afraid to enter due to the condition of the wood rot. Her vibe from the man there was that they had no intention of selling the place. If I can find her email from the visit I will post the pics she sent it is in much worse condition than the posted pics portray.

    3

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