January 19, 2018: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 1/19/18 - Last OHD Update: 1/19/18 - 180 Comments

Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

How to share…
Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML codes needed.

Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.)

If the address doesn’t show in the link, also give us the address of the share (helps out if I go to post your share or if the listing site is down.)

180 Comments on January 19, 2018: Link Exchange

  1. Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 8023 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Augusta Victoria Ramsey was born 1859 in Virginia, died 1953 in Ohio. Her husband, John Michener died 1893. The postcard is dated 1909 and has her living in Delaware, Ohio at 164 North Sandusky Street as a dress maker (you can see the sign between her in the window in the photo.) Update: Scroll down to see, JimH has found the actual street address of the house!

    I’m not sure if the house still exists but greatly altered or was torn down. Sanborn maps do not show a building like that at this location but it does show 164 as being as it is now (street link). You may look at the building to the left in street view and think it’s the same one in the old photo but I do not believe it is. The foundation is similar but the rest is so altered, Sanborn maps of 1895 to 1905 show it as the same as now, no bay windows.




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    • Mary C. says: 178 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Upstate, NY

      The house looks as hospitable as the postcard reads. I think I would have liked Aunt Augusta. Thanks for this, Kelly.




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  2. Clay Rammage says: 6 comments

    Love the gingerbread trim on house. One of my favorite features of any victorian house!
    We’ve all heard of Frank Lloyd Wright but what about his sone Frank Jr (know as Lloyd Wright)? He was also an architect and designed this one in Minnetonka, MN. A little out of my price league but still nice.
    https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/mn/minnetonka/2410-oakland-road/pid_21889596/




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      This style isn’t my cup o’ tea as a rule, but what a gorgeous property!




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    • Victoria says: 133 comments

      That MN house is incredible. 11 acres, hope it’s protected & never gets developed. Thanks for the share!




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    • Sarah says: 13 comments

      I kinda love that house! Like a time capsule.




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  3. Bethany says: 1996 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Escondido, CA

    Are you cold out there, old house friends? Come join me in sunny, warm Southern California! A beautiful Victorian in the historic district of my city here in the San Diego suburbs. We’re not all wackos out here, I promise!
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Escondido-CA/fsba,fsbo,fore,cmsn_lt/house_type/2093758210_zpid/11337_rid/1800-1940_built/33.369531,-116.636353,32.751477,-117.574311_rect/9_zm/




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    • Annie K says: 2 comments

      Escondido has some beautiful Victorians! I live in Vegas now, but spent 42 wonderful years in Chula Vista- another city with some beautiful grand Victorian Orchard houses . If I remember right from past posts, you live in Valley Center? I have dear friends who live there.




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      • Bethany says: 1996 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Escondido, CA

        I live in Escondido, just the next town over from Valley Center.




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    • Annabelle says: 121 comments

      Two things. The little stove in the kitchen – which is beautiful by the way! It looks like a child’s stove but obviously it was a working stove. Has anyone seen one like it? And two, what a view! I always thought that part of California was somewhat flat and dry.




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      • Bethany says: 1996 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Escondido, CA

        You don’t have to drive too far (maybe an hour), to find flat and dry, but here in the San Diego suburbs it’s very hilly and also very close to the San Bernadino mountains. My house is on the top of a hill with a view similar to the one in the picture. If there weren’t hills in the way, you could glimpse the ocean from here.




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    • Mary C. says: 178 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Upstate, NY

      Love the house, love the view, love the weather. From upstate NY (think snow), thanks for a glimpse of green.




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    • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      This isn’t usually my favorite architecture but this house is irresistable. It’s the cheeriest residence I’ve ever seen! Even wall photos & paintings full of love & good nature. I have NEVER seen ANYTHING like those ceiling fans! Has anyone else? The little garden is lovely & the view beautiful. The whole listing is a big smile, thanks Bethany and also to the agent who got such super pictures.




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      • Bethany says: 1996 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Escondido, CA

        I love the cheerful vibe of this house too! My own house is full of color–yellow walls, blue walls, light green walls, patterned furniture and curtains, bright accents.




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  4. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

    Smallish Tudor revival: I particularly like the archways, the breakfast area in the kitchen, the lightness of the unpainted wood, & there’s the pink bathroom.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3227-Hildreth-Ave_Cincinnati_OH_45211_M34662-03397

    And a larger Tudor Revival:
    My favorite bits of this one are the entire entry hall, the stairways, the repeated neat & fancy archways, & the windows.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12-Forest-Hill-Dr-Cincinnati-OH-45208/34207901_zpid/




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    • Ashley403 says: 86 comments

      The home on 3227 Hildreth Ave, Cincinnati.It must have belonged to an elderly couple or person. It looks amazingly like it was just built and to have blueprints also WOW. It has been well taken care of. It is sort of stuck in the 1970’s furniture wise, but that is not a bad thing were much simpler times ah yes.




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  5. CireelCireel says: 250 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1963 NondescriptSplitLevel
    WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

    Nice ranch house, built in 1962, which is surprisingly intact…
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6230-N-Robinhood-Ln-Kansas-City-MO-64151/2494204_zpid/




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      Pink wall oven, ’nuff said!




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    • kmmoore says: 170 comments
      Weatherford , TX

      I’m a sucker for a mint bathroom! I also love that it has two dryers. 😆 So handy! I always have clothes waiting to use the dryer!




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  6. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

    Lovely period home featured in the vintage photo. Thanks for sharing. One reason the photo may not correspond to today’s addresses is due to street address changes. Many communities adopted different address numbers around or after the turn of the last century to make streets more uniform for postal delivery purposes. A look at old city directories from the 1800’s sometimes had residential entries for individuals like “the third house south of the Cemetery on (fill in the name) street.” As modern postal delivery protocols were developed, (but still before zip codes) a more accurate address numbering system was sometimes needed. If the postcard house survives, its likely to be substantially altered from over a century ago. Women in the work force were very limited in occupation choices before 1900 so widows without financial support often took in boarders or did alterations/dress making and laundry. No social security existed back then and pensions were far from uniform. Even when a pension was available for the husband, sometimes they did not include payments to the surviving spouse after he died.

    Here’s an 1830’s Federal style home in Centerville, IN, with later added Italianate touches: https://www.trulia.com/property/5034396844-309-N-Morton-Ave-Centerville-IN-47330 Centerville, despite the name, is located just west of the much larger town of Richmond, IN, which itself is right next to the Ohio border east of Indianapolis. Not too many homes remain in the Federal style in Hoosierland so this is a rare find.




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    • GeoffreyPS says: 93 comments

      Love the ironwork on the porch. Wish there were close up photos.




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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

        Agreed. The delicate filigree ironwork reminds me of the French Quarter in NOLA. As some probably know, much of the ornate ironwork in New Orleans wasn’t made locally; it was cast and shipped from Eastern foundries. I suspect there were many more fine examples in the Midwest but they are relatively rare now thanks to all of the wartime scrap metal drives and subsequent demolitions. I discovered this rare 1850’s long abandoned Inn near State College, PA several years ago with a surviving Gothic Revival iron porch: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157618669117473 I hope it still survives… In Cincinnati’s Old West End, I found a side porch in the New Orleans ornamental iron flavor: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/15433258179/in/album-72157618123919235/ Otherwise, not a lot still around to be seen so the Centerville, Indiana, home was a pleasant surprise. I too wish there were closeups showing all of the ornamental ironwork.




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    • ken says: 42 comments

      There is an old English law that existed here in NH, so I would guess it was elsewhere in the USA at the time too. It was called Widow’s Thirds. When I did the last will and testament as well as the deed research, I found when the husband died in 1800, his wife received 1/3 of the property and the use of it. It was described in detail, enough detail in fact to visualize what floor plan of the original house and barn looked like. She was able to use the fireplace and brick oven on certain days and had one door to use for her entrance and exit. It also described what piece of land she got for firewood and the other for tillage. A father bought this farm for his daughter and the widow came with it, until she married about 15 years later, they bought her share for $200 around 1840. She then lived with a son.




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    • FlaOHDJunkie says: 101 comments

      This is a beautiful house, brick federals are one of my favorite and this one looks particularly cared for.




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    • Donald C. Carleton, Jr. says: 237 comments

      The wood mantels with their forthright proportions are great–fine examples of how local craftsmen in the then-backcountry infused standard neoclassical forms with their own spirit and energy!




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  7. Tim Snyder says: 32 comments

    I sort of have two speeds: an impeccably restored house, or one that needs a bit of help. For reasons I can’t possibly understand, this one has grabbed my attention, and it falls under the latter category: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/277-W-Broadway_Cape-Vincent_NY_13618_M40113-91052#photo0




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      Love! Great bathrooms.




      1
    • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Great old place with a fantastic river view – I can understand its appeal! It was built for businessman and civic leader Lloyd Osgood Woodruff (1841-1912), his wife Marion Rosetha and their daughters, well before the 1907 date in the listing.




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      • Tim Snyder says: 32 comments

        JimH: How did you find this information? Are there any other photos of the house, possibly period photos? I’ve poked around the internet, but was unsuccessful in finding very much information on the house.




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        • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
          OHD Supporter

          I pieced together the info from the 1888 map of Cape Vincent, censuses and bios to identify the owner (a prominent guy), and his purchase deed: Peugnet et al. to L.O. Woodruff 20 May 1881, a lot on Broadway for $450 (L227/P53). Capt. Louis Peugnet was among the Bonapartistes who founded the place c.1815. No old photos found online, but I’d bet they exist.
          http://www.historicmapworks.com




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    • kmmoore says: 170 comments
      Weatherford , TX

      Great find! The wallpaper in the stair hall is divine!




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    • 67drake67drake says: 114 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Racine County, WI

      Small world . We have a friend whose mother lives in Cape Vincent. My wife went out there to visit last year and mentioned how much I would have loved this house. She had taken pics of it and said it had a beautiful view of the St Laurence seaway. My friends mother used to run the hostel at the lighthouse in the area. I miss all my wife’s fun trips! My wife just mentioned this house was not on the market when she saw it.




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  8. CharlesB says: 294 comments

    Pomfret is a classic Old Connecticut town, located in the state’s ‘Quiet Corner.’ Here is one of its 18th-century landmarks (a bit 1930ed-up), priced at $164,000:

    https://www.redfin.com/CT/Pomfret/253-Mashamoquet-Rd-06259/home/106627217




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      I wish there were more pictures! A very appealing house from what little I can see.




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      Dying of love here. The kitchen is renovated but well-done. I feel like there might be a missing porte cochere on the side. The driveway curves next to the building and there’s a door and steps over there, and then the drive goes on towards the carriage house/garage. I can’t even say how much I want this. If Kelly puts it on the regular feed, it’s definitely going on my favorites list!




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    • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
      OHD Supporter

      What a beauty, inside and out! A little history:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/i_dig_doug/15786282689




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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

        Jim,
        Interesting that the listing names the architect as “Henry (H.?) Richardson, a well known Chicago architect”. Doug posted in the narrative under his photo of this house: “Evidence suggests however that architect Dillan Prosser Clark specified brick to give the residence domestic scale and warmth.” I tend to accept Doug’s information as factual. If H.H. Richardson-from Boston, not Chicago-had anything to do with this house it might have been through D.P. Clark who, if not a student of the Romanesque style master, at least admired the style. By 1890, Richardson (1838-1886) had been deceased for several years. In many places, such a grand home would be marketed for a million dollars or more. Incredible home for a very reasonable price.




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    • Randy C says: 241 comments

      O.My.Gawd. I’m such a sucker for woodwork and this just oozes with richness. Beautiful house all around.




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    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

      The woodwork in this house is gorgeous! The paneling, the ceilings, the doors, the French doors w. the hexagonal panes, the built-ins, the pale pink bathroom, the doorknobs, etc, etc, etc… And a kitchen that fits, IMO.




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Magnificent house! Of course I’m all about the carriage house = W O W!!
      Thanks’ Tara!




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      • Tara says: 6 comments

        Concord, Ma is an amazingly beautiful, historical town. The houses there will make your heart hurt. I hope this house stays just as it is. I’m in LOVE with the wood work!




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        • Tara says: 6 comments

          Oops. I posted the link and didn’t look. I thought it was for a house in Concord, Ma. Which I can not find the link for now. I do love the house I posted though!!!! All that wood!




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    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 118 comments

      Too bad about photo #30 – not a great advertisement for keeping the original windows… Lovely home, but I am all about the carriage house!




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    • Peter J says: 21 comments

      A beauty. Ticks almost all my boxes. Bricktorian, stunning woodwork…. Could do without the winters!




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    • Victoria says: 133 comments

      Looks to be in pristine condition, such lovely wood – and a great price! Thanks for sharing.




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    • RossRoss says: 2168 comments

      OMG!

      What an incredible house! And the carriage house? ZOUNDS!




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  9. Krstout says: 38 comments

    Anyone up for a bit of European flair?

    A beautiful house in Scotland. Check out the atrium.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-49632660.html

    An apartment in Genova, Italy. Amazing details and gold leafing.
    http://www.casa.it/immobile-appartamento-liguria-genova-31615645

    A villa from Genova. Make sure you see the 11th image to see all of the painted ceilings!
    http://www.casa.it/immobile-villa-liguria-genova-29342449

    An apartment in Montpellier, France. My favorite.
    https://www.green-acres.fr/en/properties/30095a-fo1-511.htm




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      First house: the atrium is amazing! But every single modern thing needs to go. I would “Downton-ize” it immediately LOL!

      The French apartment is simply elegant and lovely!




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    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 340 comments

      All are wonderful. Post more! (Especially in places like Genoa with palm trees while we freeze here in the north-east USA)




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The Genoese villa and the French hotel particulier are remarkable; thanks’ for posting them. The Scottish country house is a real winner for sure. It’s kind of awkward and bumbling in some aspects, yet simply SUBLIME in others, as one would expect from an old family home ever changing through the ages. The early Victorian solarium is O M G fantastic! Most of the Neoclassical bits are to die for; and the Italian garden = sigh…




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    • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      Tutti sono bellisimi! Le case di Genova, le mie favorite.




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    • kate says: 4 comments

      You know, if a bunch of us pitched in, we could split that house in Scotland and each take a month or so out of the year there… Who else is up for it!? 😉 I volunteer to stay on, as a housekeeper of sorts!




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    • TGrantTGrant says: 265 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      Part of my family immigrated from this area of Scotland almost 300 years ago. Stracathro House is weirdly magnificent. Especially that orangerie. Unfortunately most of the grounds have long been taken over by a hospital development. For many years the house served as nurses housing. The stable block is also available for purchase.




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    • Donald C. Carleton, Jr. says: 237 comments

      The French apartment is the first post to OHD I’ve seen of a place in my current abode of Montpellier! The square the listing says the property is near is perhaps the nicest spot in town!




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  10. StevenF says: 362 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    Hqppy Friday, everyone! Here are a few from the first half of the 20th Century that caught my eye.

    The first is a 1908 Greek Revival with what may be an original kitchen (only a corner is shown), but some vintage bathrooms and beautiful leaded glass remain. Great proportions and nice millwork make this an attractive buy.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/305-Main-Titusville-PA-16354/2097481436_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Another PA find, this one a 1934 colonial with those distinctly non-colonial sized windows that Hollywood set designers were famous for putting into their colonial sets. Tons of sunlight. I can’t tell if the kitchen is original – it certainly has some old counter-tops, but maybe from the 50s or 60s? The kitchen might match the age of the addition that was plopped onto the back. Still a great little house.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/32-N-Pearl-St-North-East-PA-16428/9508808_zpid/?fullpage=true

    My last PA find, a 1912 Craftsman in Tudor drag. Lots of original features, no home depot updates in evidence. Just imagine how nice it would look with the dark paint addressed.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/561-W-6th-St-Erie-PA-16507/52565132_zpid/?fullpage=true

    My last one, from further North in NY State, that looks like a little familiar to me, so I may have been shared before. If so, take another opportunity to feast on the color pallet and regency furniture a-la 1962. Whoever decorated this 1941 Colonial Revival knew what they liked and stuck with it through the years. I wish I had the patience to stick with something long enough for it to become fashionable again. I love the den and the original bathrooms.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6152-Old-Lake-Shore-Rd-Lake-View-NY-14085/30349420_zpid/?fullpage=true




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    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

      All nice, but my personal favorite is the first one; I’d immediately feel at home in it!




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      32 N Pearl is a STEAL at that price! What a fine, solid, fantastic house just loaded with quality features and character everywhere, and in seemingly top condition. A STEAL! Thanks’ Steven.




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    • Teri R says: 249 comments

      I loved touring your picks! The Greek Revival checks all the wish list items!




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    • RT says: 73 comments

      The Erie home is across the street from Garden Court (I think this is what it’s called.) My MIL owns an apartment not too far from here. All the houses on the Garden Court block have their own private backyards, but they also have a big communal lawn/garden. We toured this one a year or two ago right when it went on sale. https://www.zillow.com/homes/recently_sold/Erie-PA/52565307_zpid/11335_rid/globalrelevanceex_sort/42.124649,-80.097727,42.12209,-80.101568_rect/17_zm/
      2nd to last picture shows the communal lawn/garden.




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      If this were “House Hunters” and I had to pick from these four homes, the last one would be it for sure! I wouldn’t change a thing!




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      • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Fake Greek Revival!
        NC

        Me too — it’s a peach! The light, as Steven said, is terrific. Nice lines throughout & room proportions.




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  11. S. Owen says: 12 comments

    Here’s a few low priced houses around my area

    This is a rumoured Catalogue house for $40,000

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/123-S-Vermont-St_Maquoketa_IA_52060_M86097-38526

    Well maintained Foursquare for $49,900 with a large brick building behind it that appears to either come with it or was at some time associated with the property

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/612-Kenilworth-Ct_Clinton_IA_52732_M85868-97529#photo19

    A good sized partially restored home also for $49,900

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2804-N-2nd-St_Clinton_IA_52732_M86248-71524?ex=IA618935011#photo12

    This one isn’t low priced but is still fairly interesting. It has an elevator and although it is of recent installation it appears to have been tastefully implemented.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/900-3rd-Ave_De-Witt_IA_52742_M82134-92786#photo14




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wow. That DR in Dewitt is SPECTACULAR! TY




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    • Ron G says: 66 comments

      Clinton, Iowa is my home town. Many of the older homes that have been for sale the past few years, have fallen victim to the wrecking balls. Many have also been turned into apartments but have been neglected by the owner’s and fell into disrepair. Flippers have tried to make a dollar on some of these homes and failed due to several reasons. Now days, if a house can’t be auctioned off for back taxes it becomes a victim to be demolished. The housing market took a terrible hit in 2006 right up through today and it continues. Just in my neighborhood in the past ten years, I count six homes that have been demolished. The lots sold for two or three hundred dollars just to get them back on the tax rolls. The county I live in is also the third highest taxed county in the state. But the bright side is that the rental market is stable and continues to be in demand especially for single family one story, two & three bedroom homes.




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  12. Rachael says: 9 comments

    I’m drooling over here in Sioux Falls! Who wants to help me rip up the carpet?

    http://www.hegg.com/Home/21800357/DYH/103-S-Summit-Ave-Sioux-Falls-SD-57104/




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    • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’ll help, also with the “repro” tin ceilings (and fans), most of the kitchen and baths, all the white paint etc.

      I’m happy the house is still there with some original features, but authentically restored it is not. Thanks for posting!




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        – Annnnnd the entire drywall attic = ew. Me; I’d have to start with the plastic shell = arrrrrgh. Sooooo worth all the effort though. Great house! Thanks’ Rachel




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    • Nedebh says: 30 comments

      Can anyone tell me what is up with those screen doors on the bedrooms? I can possibly understand the mosquito concept..but don’t think I’ve ever seen this before?




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    • Mary C. says: 178 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Upstate, NY

      Hi, Rachael-Love the leaded glass and the wood. And that attic apartment is a space you could dream in.




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  13. Anne M. says: 437 comments

    Hi, everyone! Happy Weekend – I have all fairly large houses this week.
    An 1872 Vermont beauty with not enough pictures
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/33-Hubbard-St_Montpelier_VT_05602_M39094-43721#photo0
    An 1860 Italianate with an attached barn/garage
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/5-Maple-St_Shelburne-Falls_MA_01370_M40336-52302?ex=MA605940509#photo0
    Finally 1923, a lot of updates but you can still see some of the original glory
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/418-Longhill-St_Springfield_MA_01108_M43006-14202




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Very nice in Montpelier. Some fine hardware in that house. Pity we don’t get a good look at the converted newel post gasolier.
      What fun and whimsy in the Shelburne Falls house decor. Love that! Have fun with it: don’t take it too seriously. The wood in that attached barn = WOW!
      Thank’s Anne 🙂




      2
  14. Victoria says: 133 comments

    Modernist in Chapel Hill, NC. 1955, designed by George Matsumoto: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/101-Ledge-Ln_Chapel-Hill_NC_27514_M65970-96262#photo24
    More by Matsumoto, with history on the Ledge Lane house: http://www.ncmodernist.org/matsumoto.htm




    4
    • StevenF says: 362 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      That’s a cool house and the owners have done a nice job furnishing it with appropriate furniture without making it look like a Mad Men episode. Thanks for Posting!




      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Love that this house keeps getting shared. It really is a little masterpiece.

      In case you missed it last week: Mike shared; THE Norman Lykes house is on the market!!!!!!!
      https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/6836-N-36th-St_Phoenix_AZ_85018_M19456-23297#photo29




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    • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      I like that house a lot & admire that it has been allowed to remain almost unchanged, even to the shoji screen. Quite a life Matsumoto had; sounds like a nice, talented, & dedicated fellow.




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  15. RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Outstanding, gorgeous, Arts and Crafts church complex in Indianapolis, (wrongly attributed to Bernard Vonnegut is actually the work of Kurt Vonnegut SR.), is back on the market as barely touched, live work space par excellence. The neighborhood is meh – not bad really, and certainly worth the risk for this drop dead amazing building, (should one have the, again, exceedingly optimistic), $1.2M.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1455-N-Alabama-St-Indianapolis-IN-46202/2101084705_zpid/?fullpage=true

    This little Hautian, Victorian cottage was re-done in the early 20’s, and features a remarkable LR and DR with really great leaded glass windows and very fine period light fixtures.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1444-S-6th-St-Terre-Haute-IN-47802/77132135_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Super solid, quality, LARGE, Vic. farm house close enough to Indy, is missing a few bits, but MUCH remains including summer kitchen and out buildings. Price is right on this one for sure!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/11967-N-County-Road-250-E-Roachdale-IN-46172/2091579252_zpid/?fullpage=true

    In case you missed these two in the share last week – DON’T!

    – RT shared this one I’m just NUTZ about!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/459-Hudson-Ave-Newark-OH-43055/74367292_zpid/?fullpage=true

    – Cheryl Plato shared this one which is remarkable in many ways.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/359-Taylor-Bridge-Rd_Jonesborough_TN_37659_M81144-27498#photo0

    +++++++ Check out this light drenched, gorgeous “cottage” in Tuxedo Park.
    http://tuxedohudsonrealty.com/14-clubhouse-road-extension-tuxedo-park-ny/

    ++++++++++++++++ Can anyone identify the decorative device on this door handle? Maybe Arabic / Moorish?? http://goo.gl/ab6TbU




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    • JRichard says: 174 comments
      1763 center-chimney cape
      Biddeford, ME

      Your Hudson Ave., Newark house is amazing — I can’t think of a more spectacular stair hall.




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Sure is JR; in a house FULL of superlatives. Sure wish we had more of a peek in the LL and carriage house! Thanks’ again to RT for sharing last week.




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    • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Some fine houses there, but that tree in Jonesborough and the green swan in the Terre Haute cottage are tops.




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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

      Jeff,
      As for the door knob, it was called the Arabic Pattern and was made by the Mallory-Wheeler Company of New Haven, CT, which was organized in 1834. From an antiques hardware seller: “Mallory, Wheeler, & Company, of New Haven, Connecticut won numerous awards for their hardware, particularly for their reversible lock. Mallory Wheeler apparently began in 1835 as Pierpont – Hotchkiss in New Haven, CT. Mr. Hotchkiss was the patentee of the mineral door-knob. Benton Mallory was hired as a bookkeeper for the company in 1840. Mallory purchased John Hotchkiss’s share after John died in 1843 and the company became Pierpont, Mallory & Co. The company grew rapidly until Mr. Pierpont retired in 1852 and sold his shares to Mallory and John Davenport, and the company was renamed Davenport & Mallory Co., then developed into the Davenport, Mallory & Lockwood from 1858-60, then the Davenport, Mallory & Co. After John Davenport’s death in 1868, his grandson, John D. Wheeler partnered with Frederick Mallory, eldest son of Benton Mallory, and the company became the Mallory, Wheeler & Company. The company was the most prominent exhibitors of builder’s hardware at the 1878 Paris Exhibition, displaying nearly 500 products, where they were awarded a gold medal by the Paris judges.”
      I’ve found at least one example of the Arabic pattern in an 1895 mansion in Bradford. PA: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/3566084547/in/album-72157618714282071/ And, a set online for sale (one of 3 sets) http://www.coolstuffiscoolstuff.com/product_detail.aspx?ID=2311 Oddly, there was nothing else “Moorish” or “Arabian” about the Bradford, PA. house so the reasons for this choice of hardware in that house are obscure.




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Thanks’ John! I suspected I might count on you for the 411. WoW, that face plate is the real show stopper of the set for sure! Beautiful. Oddly, the house it’s in in Muncie also doesn’t have much remaining, besides maybe a set of newel posts, to indicate any elaborate Aesthetic period interior once existed. I had assumed that was due to the course of changing tastes; but now I wonder if maybe the sets were just “marked down” due to changing preferences in motifs. Here’s the house if you’d like to have a peek.
        https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1225-N-Elm-St-Muncie-IN-47303/85186783_zpid/?fullpage=true




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        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

          It’s interesting that the Muncie, IN, house has the same Arabic Mallory-Wheeler hardware pattern. I would suspect the patent date for that pattern is between 1875-1885 so that by 1895 it probably was a “closeout” item. The mid to late 1890’s also corresponded with the Turkish Corner decorative fad so the pattern might have had a short revival of popularity. I read from another source the Mallory-Wheeler hardware was later distributed by the Sargent & Co. firm. The Victorians always seemed to have a penchant for anything exotic (or “artistic”) especially during the short period when the Aesthetic Movement was at its peak around 1880. Thanks for sharing the Muncie house.




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    • StevenF says: 362 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      The cottage exterior of the Terre Haute house did not prepare me for the grandeur that is that living room!




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        That little house has a TON of potential Steven; and it’s in the best spot on the best street in the best “historic” neighborhood in town. It would be VERY satisfying to see someone get in there and do something with the exterior. The bland, dated, nature of the materials, as you say, gives no hint at the interior: in fact, that shingle is straight up ugly. I used to live across the street next to the museum, and also never guessed it had such a rad 20’s redo hiding inside.




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  16. ChrisICU says: 438 comments

    The owner of this magnificent home didn’t ignore the historic lines and details of this home. While bathrooms and kitchens (and likely basements) have had a heavy hand in ‘moderninzing’, the principal rooms still look terrific. So lovely. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2727-E-Newberry-Blvd_Milwaukee_WI_53211_M76007-42712




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  17. ChrisICU says: 438 comments

    File this one under: do your research before you post some incredible hyperbole in a listing. Sorry Kelly, I’m trying my hardest to be supportive and positive about this one.

    While expansive, this listing compared this home as ‘a replica of Anne Boylyn’s home’. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/35308-Pabst-Rd-Oconomowoc-WI-53066/52220922_zpid/

    But do a quick search of ‘Hever castle’ on google and you instantly see there is indeed no real resemblance. At. All. It’s like comparing an Easter Peep to an actual chicken. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/159314905544691409/ Both may have their merits but simply aren’t the same thing.




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    • Kelly, Old House Dreams adminKelly, Old House Dreams admin says: 461 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Yea, it’s a bit different. But nice looking home, I love the bedroom, I want to wake up to a view of trees!




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      It’s a bit of a stretch to compare this to Hever Castle. And as usual, I prefer the “before” pictures to the “afters” but I’m weird that way.




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Yeah – heheheh – that’s Hever if the Kardashians had their way with it, instead of Mr. “All the Money in the World”.




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  18. Jayl65 says: 13 comments

    I just closed on this beauty this past Thursday. Now for the fun part.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/07/18/1910-dillon-sc/




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    • Kelly, Old House Dreams adminKelly, Old House Dreams admin says: 461 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Congratulations!




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Congrats. Kelly! Another reader finds their dream on OHD! How satisfying it must be to know your efforts helped make someone’s dream come true. You rock! 🙂




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    • ThePark says: 16 comments

      Congrats!




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      I’m so envious! What a lovely home. What are your plans for it?




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      • Jayl65 says: 13 comments

        Thanks! Overall it’s in great shape. I could just move in and live there. But there is some knob and tube in the attic. It needs the attic and floor insulated. Some window restoration. And just a good polish and decorating. The Kitchen will be restored to 1920’s era with 1950’s appliances. It’s missing the wrap around porch which needs to happen but will take a while because if the expense.




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        • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Sounds like you know what you’re doing; and plan to do right by your antique house. Have fun! If you’ve a spare minute, please post a note on that house thread from time to time to let us know how it’s going. Cheers! 🙂




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    • Mary C. says: 178 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Upstate, NY

      Congratulations, Jay! You must be so happy. Love so much about this house but especially that abundance of dark wood. Please keep us all posted.




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    • RachelMed says: 78 comments

      Congrats!! Looks like a great house with some fun projects.




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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

      All seem to be excellent values for what is offered. I personally like the c. 1904 house in Clayton. Although its definitely in the “good bones” category it retains some of its period details and is priced low enough so that for less than a typical starter home, you can have a nice period residence. Thanks for sharing.




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    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 340 comments

      OK, the first one in Five Points: A 3800 square foot 6 bedroom house that seems in fair shape, another house plus an old store building on 3 acres, with $325 taxes and 1.5 hours from Atlanta. Could be the deal of the year at $49,500.




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  19. Susan in Georgia says: 1 comments

    We toured the campus of Florida Southern College yesterday, with 12 buildings created by Frank Lloyd Wright. It was an incredible experience, he worked on this project for 20 years – beginning when he was 70! Link to the fascinating backstory: http://www.flsouthern.edu/visitors/fllw-visitors.aspx
    There are many historic Florida bungalow style homes surrounding the campus. This one is much bigger than most, and lovely. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/417-Frank-Lloyd-Wright-Way-Lakeland-FL-33803/47365779_zpid/




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    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

      The pics showing the porches, under their roofs, are most esp. cool!




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      WOW! I literally gasped when I saw it. THAT is probably THE best “Prairie Box” one will ever see anywhere EVER! Thank you SO much for sharing it Susan. THAT PORCH – my god, talk about monumental; and stunningly in brilliant harmony with the scale of the house – wow. THOSE EVES – go big or GO HOME. Fantastic interior, and oh boy that art glass after Green and Green = amazing. Woof!

      JEALOUS you got to spend time on Florida Southern campus! I’ts one of the few must see Wright sites I have yet to tick off my list. I love the story about how Wright was able to prematurely age all the copper there shortly before the campus was opened. Heheheh. What a hoot!
      FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE –
      http://goo.gl/BjKY3R http://goo.gl/e5kNbi http://goo.gl/mbvDL7
      http://goo.gl/VjVPz1




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  20. CocoaG says: 68 comments

    This is a 1760 restored farm on 40+ acres. It has 4 bed and 3 baths. Waterfront access and lake views.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/140-Old-Terrell-Rd-Semora-NC-27343/111329051_zpid/

    This is listed as a 1901 home but historians have told sellers that the home was actually built in 1890. Original heart pine floors, 12’4” ceilings, plaster walls with picture molding, french doors with original hardware and original tile baths.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1426-E-Fort-King-St-Ocala-FL-34471/45868282_zpid/




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I have got to say, Kelly’s readers, week after week, are NAILIN IT with these shares! You – CocoaG – have nailed it for sure with these two! YOU are my winner for best shares of the week. Both of these houses are exemplary of the best aspects old house “restoration” for similar and differing reasons, but each VERY STRONG in it’s own right, and both just GORGEOUS! I could blather on about these two houses for hours. Above and beyond all of the great rooms I’ve seen shared this week, that screened porch in Ocala = my god – heaven – just heaven. I would do away with the carport and expand it, but even as is = FAB! Thanks’ again Cocoa!




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  21. Imbroglio69 says: 29 comments

    Providence, Rhode Island’s Carrington House in all its glory:

    http://66williams.com




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    • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      My first impulse was to say Wow, but it’s too trite. Gorgeous place all the way through and outside. I sincerely hope it doesn’t end up an institution, but remains a private home. Beautiful from the lovely Regency chandelier in the front hall to the stairs & on. If it were mine, I’d take out the pin lights in the ceilings right quick; otherwise it’s good to go! Don’t see a price listed — it is obviously in the lines of “if you have to ask….”




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      • krstout says: 38 comments

        I had to know the price for myself. Looked it up on Zillow. It’s $5,500,000. And the yearly taxes are $114,000. Definitely a Lottery win. But what a house!




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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        I’m highly inclined to agree with you’re assessment Laurie. Though lovely, the formal interiors are entirely predictable. I suppose though, for the nature of it’s current mistress, this interior is entirely appropriate and perfectly acceptable. Not everyone has the nards to employ a designer with avant garde flair like say, Robert Couturier, (whom I intend to employ in heaven 😉 ); http://goo.gl/P1Km5p Likewise, I was going to whine about the desecration of the extensive service spaces; but why bother? It’s their house. If they want to spend untold gobs of money turning priceless antique spaces into a spa – well have at it I guess. I feel like such a pundit when it comes to these 1%ers. Who cares what I think? Certainly not Muffy! Heheheh. 🙂




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        • Donald C. Carleton, Jr. says: 237 comments

          I’m afraid you don’t know the worst of it when it comes to the service areas.

          Here’s the stoty: The house and its contents, including the invaluable Carrington papers, had been given to RISD in 1936, but was sold off c.1961, I think because the school was experiencing financial difficulties. The late China trade historian Jacques Downs, who was there at the time inventorying the Carrington papers, told me (if my memory’s not faulty) that the service areas in back included Carrington’s office, pretty much untouched. So from what we can see from the photographs here, it would appear that the fittings of a federal-era merchant’s “counting room”–potentially a gold mine of evidence for understanding the material culture of business in the early national period–have indeed been irretriveably lost! (Fortunately, the papers and some key Carrington objects made it safely to the RI Historical Society.)




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          • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Jeez, I suspected as much Donald; though the loss you mentioned goes far beyond what I could have imagined. At least the actual archive was saved; but having it remain in it’s historic context would surely have been preferable.




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        • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments

          Muffy. You are too much, Jeff! I’m gonna laugh all day. You make excellent points, especially in view of the comment below re the counting room & office. Tragic.




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    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

      “Lavish” doesn’t even begin to describe this house!




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    • Victoria says: 133 comments

      Stunning, Carrington House is the best yet. I agree, words do no justice. With a personal art gallery space attached.




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  22. Diane Gladstone says: 10 comments

    There are several homes in the Heritage Square neighborhood in Saginaw, MI. My favorite is 203 S. Porter St. Saginaw, MI, 48602. This a true beauty! My husband and I live in this neighborhood. It is one of the best in the Saginaw city.




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  23. BarbF says: 34 comments

    Here’s a 1926 Sears catalogue home in Tn. The street view was somewhat surprising. Surely, it’s been posted before, but I couldn’t find it.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4525-Highway-70-N-Eidson-TN-37731/41529136_zpid/




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  24. Mary C. says: 178 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Upstate, NY

    Here’s a 1901 factory zoned residential. Love the spaciousness and the vintage vibe. Hope it stays a single family. You could invite your neighbors over for a dance (as long as you could dance and avoid the posts at the same time)! https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/203-Jansen-Ave_Johnstown_NY_12095_M34588-43142#photo0




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      TONS of potential there! I even like the asphalt siding – heheheh. Thanks’ Mary




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  25. Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Fake Greek Revival!
    NC

    1929 church with full kitchen already & numerous rooms offering much potential. http://homeslandcountrypropertyforsale.com/historic-homes/properties/historic-church-building-for-sale-in-small-town-tennessee/




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The sanctuary is more like 1880 or earlier: and what a gorgeous space it is! These old churches have a much better chance of remaining relatively original when the stained glass is nice and bright, and more geometric like these. Lovely! Good spot Laurie!




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    • StevenF says: 362 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      LOVE the den in that last Detroit house. Great house!




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      OK, that first house–Second Empire Brickorian is my very very favorite kind of house. But–being marketed as a tear-down for development, and 1,000,000? Must be in an up-and-coming area of revitalization in Detroit. I expected the price to be about $40k. I would walk through the MI snow barefoot to see inside this place.

      Great group of houses; I’d take any of them!




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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

        The formerly grand Brush Park neighborhood in Detroit has come full circle…in the late 1800’s some of the finest homes in the city were built there; it was literally an architectural showplace in the days before Detorit became motor city. After World War I, the servants and housekeeper staffs owners of Victorian mansions employed were largely gone. The costly upkeep of large Victorian homes resulted in them being sold to rental landlords after the original owners passed away. The mostly absentee landlords subdivided the Victorian homes packing as many renter as possible into these houses. They milked every rent dollar they could out of them without properly maintaining the aging homes. Once the city condemned the houses as unsafe or substandard, the houses were abandoned and soon vandalized. By the early 1960’s the transient population of renters and the apathy of landlords had reduced Brush Park to a virulent slum. After 2000, some early investment occurred in the neighborhood starting an improving trend that continues to this day. A few years ago, celebrity rehabber Nicole Curtis came in and restored a long derelict 1870’s mansion that was little more than a vandalized empty shell of a house. By that time, new condominiums and market rate apartments were going up on the long vacant lots around the neighborhood so that now, Brush Park is again a respectable neighborhood as it once was over a century ago. Therefore, property values have skyrocketed upward in recent years. 25 years ago, you could have probably bought this place for less than $40K, but everything has changed since then.




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    • Bethany says: 1996 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      Great listings! For some reason the first thing that came to mind when I saw the first plantation-style house was how much fun it would be to play tag on that front lawn!




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  26. CoraCora says: 1492 comments

    I worked at a private school up the street from this lovely old home for 10 years. Fountain City is a wonderful, historic part of Knoxville. In between the school and this home is the magical, indescribably beautiful, Savage Garden, cir. 1917: http://bluestreak.moxleycarmichael.com/2013/09/20/savage-garden-a-magical-fountain-city-treasure/

    The owner of the garden also owns the school I worked for, and most of the historic homes on the block. My husband and I were married in Savage Garden.
    This would be a perfect neighborhood for an old house dreamer.

    Knoxville, TN: https://zillow.com/homedetails/41610973_zpid/




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  27. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 340 comments

    But not antebellum by at least 60 years.




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  28. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    This looks Barber-ish to me:

    Knoxville, TN: https://zillow.com/homedetails/41637855_zpid/




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  29. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Sweet old home in Jefferson City, TN:

    https://zillow.com/homedetails/41560041_zpid/




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  30. Joseph says: 274 comments

    In PA Dutch country: A nice setting, and a lot of potential. Listing should win award for realtor tact and candor: “A few additions were made which offer great additional spaces, but are not historically sensitive. ”

    https://www.trulia.com/property/5030935804-440-Cider-Press-Rd-Manheim-PA-17545

    This one looks nice to use for a business; adjacent commercial uses might make a residence problematic. Wish it had some interior photos:

    https://www.trulia.com/property/5033863429-53-Refton-Rd-Refton-PA-17568

    A foreclosure, so only one photo. A busy road, and it looks like original land long sold off for adjacent development, but looks like it’s never been altered (at least from the facade).

    https://www.trulia.com/foreclosure/1061797538-2014-Old-Philadelphia-Pike-Lancaster-PA-17602

    And if you have a hankering to raise livestock, and want move-in ready this is perfection. (Although, if you could afford it, not sure why you’d want to tend animals when you could just watch “Babe” in the home theater):

    https://www.trulia.com/property/3157575422-286-Conestoga-Creek-Rd-East-Earl-PA-17519




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  31. Victoria says: 133 comments

    Here’s a fun one; Greta Garbo’s Ingaro island escape. The realtor’s links are in Swedish, but you can also read about the property on Dwell. I’m sure the 1929 interior has radically changed, but the bones and some original details remain.

    “Built in 1929 in the traditional architectural style of Ingarö, the 3,046-square-foot, seven-bedroom villa has a yellow, wooden facade, and interiors with glossy wood floors, lofty ceilings, and bay windows that look out to the Baltic Sea.”

    http://www.wrede.se/objekt/955171#.WmSaAktG09W
    https://www.dwell.com/article/greta-garbos-swedish-island-villa-is-up-for-sale-b2e458e9




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    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

      After seeing the exterior, the interior was nothing like I expected! Expected it to be a bit more… rustic, not polished. Maybe a pied-à-terre for someone with oodles & oodles of $?




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  32. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1314 comments

    1930, and don’t really know how to classify this house, other than Colonial Revival in a generic sense. I’ve gone by it a few times while taking walks & liked it, and now get to see inside. I like its interior, too.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2233-Douglas-Cres-Utica-NY-13501/31574252_zpid/




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  33. Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 8023 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    JimH has found the home in the old house pic…it’s still standing! At 277 N Washington St, Delaware, Ohio. https://binged.it/2Dxs6z6




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    • Laurie W. says: 1325 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      Terrific! JimH is an amazing sleuth. The poor house misses much of its personality via the later porch & the loss of the fencing on the bays & balcony over the door. I liked the space around it in the old days too, but that’s progress. Best part is that it’s still there and in super shape. Neat to see!




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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

        Wow! Hat’s off to Jim H. for a fantastic find. As Laurie noted, there have been some changes but it still looks like the house in the postcard. Perhaps Sandusky street was changed to North Washington at a later time? Now, if only the walls of that house could talk and share the colorful stories that come from a century and a half of being a home to so many people.




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  34. Brennden says: 4 comments

    Im new here so I really don’t know what I’m doing to be honest. I don’t know if I’m allowed to post a house that isn’t for sale (heck, this place may never be sold, as it will probably be stripped of everything that is of monetary value and then bulldozed) but this place is my great-grandmother’s old childhood home. I have no knowledge of when the home was built, or what house plan book it came out of (or if it was a custom build), but what I do know, is that my great-great grandparents took great pride in the house and the farmland around it. My grandfather would say there was no such thing as a crooked fence or anything that was out of place in general. Although as my great-great grandparents health declined, their son took over chores, but he couldn’t care less about the place. After they died, the house was left to rot, along with all the memories it held. When my grandmother and I walked through it today (today was my first time inside) there were just boxes upon boxes of different items; books, papers, letters, and even an old nativity set. I was only able to take two pictures inside (living room and stove in the kitchen) for we had limited time. I plan going back as soon as I possibly can, maybe even taking out some doors for us to keep and use at some point. I completely forgot to take a picture of the large built-in china cabinet in the dining room. (I’m kicking myself for that) Anyway, I kind of just felt like sharing this for some reason. If any of you could give me a general time period of when this style was popular, or maybe even an idea of a catalog the plans could’ve come from, that would be amazing.

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/1NLZRlwX8D6PL1zy2




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    • CoraCora says: 1492 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      I am always fascinated by stories and photos like this, thanks for sharing! Would love to see more photos of the house. That stove is awesome.




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    • Coqu says: 248 comments

      The arches above the windows match a similarly designed home I know of that was built in 1908, so I’d imagine somewhere around that timeframe. That home had stucco on the bottom and wood up top—I wonder if this brick is original?




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    • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Very interesting Brennden!
      The design looks like standard planbook bungalow c.1910. The construction is vernacular with no fancy catalog parts. The mantel is locally made – you didn’t say where it is but I’d guess a long way from major cities that had factories producing affordable millwork, or these folks were on a very tight budget.
      The brickwork was done by an old-school mason trained in the Italianate style. The arched lintels look like they could be part of an older home, but the square windows flanking the chimney were part of the Craftsman plan, and the brickwork is all 20th C.
      I’d love to see a photo of the built-in to see if it’s a catalog item or locally hand-made. The desk unit next to the fireplace may be a factory-made piece.
      Thanks for posting – the love for your old family place came through loud and clear, and that’s as beautiful as the architecture.




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      • Brennden says: 4 comments

        The house is quite a ways out of town (Farmington, MO which is an hour south of St. Louis), the entire area is just farmland as far as the eye can see. I plan on taking a visit today, as I’ll have more time to take more pictures. My mother wanted to buy the place with all her heart, but her great-aunt talked her out of it. She then decided that if she couldn’t have the house, she would just take out her favorite pieces, which was the leaded glass in the dining room. I’ll be sure to share more pictures!




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  35. RobynMeRobynMe says: 115 comments
    1907 George F. Barber
    Hamlet, NC

    Is there anyone here that knows a way to tell if a pocket door is hidden in a wall without any damage?
    Somehow I doubt current owners would appreciate me taking a crowbar to the wood covering the slot where I suspect/hope they might be…




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    • Hoyt Clagwell says: 196 comments

      Well, stops or some such trim where one would expect flat jambs inside the opening, and an unexpectedly thick wall would be clues indicating the possibility at least.




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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Interesting question Robyn. Love it! My McGuyver, (the original), mind goes into overdrive with problems like that. I live for that stuff. SO – though they may not be amenable to using a crowbar, you may have some luck if you ask to drill a hole in the plaster approximately the circumference of a thin wire hanger. Following me here? 😉 So you drill the small hole juuuust deep enough to go through plaster and lath; insert your length of wire hanger, and, of course, if you meet resistance appr. half way through the wall cavity = VOILA! The owner may just consent to said operation to know for themselves, and another inquiring potential buyer, whether or not there is still a door in there. 🙂




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      • RobynMeRobynMe says: 115 comments
        1907 George F. Barber
        Hamlet, NC

        The original planbook design shows pocket doors. The thickness of the walls and 4″ wide strip of trim covering the suspected slot in the jam are there. Maybe a tiny hole just above the baseboard would be acceptable…

        I’ll let you know what I turn up if they agree to exploratory surgery. 🙂




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  36. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    A lovely 1898 stone castle in Pennsylvania:

    Ridgway, PA:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2097066416_zpid/




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    • Scott Cunningham says: 365 comments

      Amazing to see a $1.3M listing with this amateurish (frankly, sloppy) photography. Most of the photos aren’t even level!!! I’d have a new realtor by sundown if that’s the best effort I saw.




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  37. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1889. The snow makes this big old house look cozy. I think this has one of the prettiest newel posts:

    Ellicottville, NY:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2098945291_zpid/




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    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 118 comments

      What a lovely Italianate – and I love the “grandma’s house” feeling inside! It has the sense of one family being there for a very long time – wish they’d shown the kitchen…




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  38. RachelMed says: 78 comments

    A nice Italianate in Massachusetts. They also have one of those dollhouse style 3-D virtual tours which I LOVE! Wish I could virtually walk around every old house that goes on sale.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/120-S-Main-St-Middleboro-MA-02346/56658882_zpid/




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  39. Mike says: 41 comments

    First, an update on the World’s Fair House recently ‘discovered’ outside of Chicago, where the landowner would like it moved – looks like he’s itching to do so and may dismantle it if nobody can move it soon. Story here:
    https://www.chicagobusiness.com/realestate/20180118/CRED0701/180119898/worlds-fair-house-in-wilmette-may-be-dismantled

    Also, this two-flat in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago needs a lot of love, but it’s on one of the best, intact blocks in the entire neighborhood.
    https://www.urbanrealestate.com/property/6606-S-Minerva-CHICAGO-IL-60637-6WqFBSyEjWIp.html




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  40. Matt Ziehnert says: 66 comments

    Bay Ridge Cottage. I thought this charming rustic summer camp was interesting! No bathroom or running water. Listing even has a historic photo of the place. <3 <3
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/207-Taborton-Rd-Sand-Lake-NY-12153/32261242_zpid/?fullpage=true




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  41. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    The build date listed for this is 1789, though there are obviously some newer additions. I love the country setting. Some of the very old details are still intact (floors, mantles). It appears the owners have massively cut the price:

    Stanfordville,NY:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/67545995_zpid/




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  42. JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This fine house was in the movie “Ironweed”:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1511-New-Scotland-Rd_Slingerlands_NY_12159_M39681-75979




    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 3250 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      In 1987 I was a junior in H.S.. It was a great year for movies; “Moonstruck”, “Spaceballs”, “Hellraiser”, etc.; which may explain why I missed “Ironweed”. Guess it just never crossed my radar until now. So glad you mentioned it! Mary Louise Streep / Nicholson / TOM WAITS! / Nathan Lane / Fred frickin Gwynne! what a treat. Just reserved it from the library, and can’t wait to see it. Dark – sad – fascinating – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_9eCULwZ3o Great house too! Thanks’ Jim




      0
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

        Those DOORS!




        1
      • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I never saw the movie, but the house is known from it. (My ex knew Meryl growing up in NJ, and disliked her for some reason. Her comment when the movie came out was “Oh God, the slut’s doin’ Jack now!” lol

        Anyway, the house is impressive, esp. the facade, stair and DOORS!




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  43. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    This one looks familiar – I didn’t see it when I did a site-search, but it’s been for sale a long time. It may have been on OHD before. Anyway, it’s GORGEOUS, and in typical Oil City fashion, an amazing bargain:

    Oil City, PA:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/78768671_zpid/




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  44. Jeffrey says: 11 comments

    Sub 100k Ohio stunner… stained glass and wood for days.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/400-W-Church-St-Galion-OH-44833/97108802_zpid/




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  45. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    I think the owners did a nice job of restoring this little farmhouse:

    Willis, VA:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/124573965_zpid/




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  46. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    I hope someone buys this 1880 home that has a vision for how amazing it could be. The historic photo in the listing is helpful.

    Lawrence, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/74585184_zpid/




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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4031 comments

      Thanks for sharing, Cora. Lawrence, Kansas, would have to have a very robust housing market for a house like this-arguably in the “good bones” category-to be priced at $275,000. It is also being sold “as is” which could mean a major fixer upper. Sad to see the vintage photos when the house was still in prime condition and compare it to the appearance today. In some rural communities, a house like this might be priced around $10K but this value compares favorably with prime Overland Park real estate. I wish the sellers good luck.




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  47. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1903. Great floors, woodwork, built-ins, lots to love. $25k!

    Leavenworth, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/77224999_zpid/




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  48. CoraCora says: 1492 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Gorgeous home. Some very unique, fine old light fixtures in this one:

    Kirksville, MO:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2094804043_zpid/




    0

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