March 4, 2016: Link Exchange & Discussion

Added to OHD on 3/4/16 - Last OHD Update: 9/30/19 - 145 Comments
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Happy Friday everyone! It's that time to share your house finds, articles and chat about old houses.

Today's old photo is in pretty bad shape. I do not know the location and hope someone could tell me a date based on the clothes the family is wearing (I'm thinking late 1880's or early 1890's.) Notice the snow in the crevices of the house and water pump on the back/side porch.

144 Comments on March 4, 2016: Link Exchange & Discussion

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    A few finds, some no interior photos.

    Church with interesting murals/paintings on the ceiling.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/442-9th-Street-Sagamore-PA-16250/2099525801_zpid/

    I’d LOVE to see interior photos.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/306-Grand-Ave-Yazoo-City-MS-39194/112051579_zpid/

    Pretty fantastic barn.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6219-Lincoln-Hwy-Wrightsville-PA-17368/60433629_zpid/

    Nearly 50 acres of gorgeous land. I want to see pics of the house.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/262-Baxter-Cemetary-Rd-Forest-City-NC-28043/102119414_zpid/

    The porch is pretty cute.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1677-Main-Fayette-MS-39069/2099487763_zpid/

    Location is a little claustrophobic (just lots of commercial around.) But nice house.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/628-W-Gallatin-St-Vandalia-IL-62471/115616582_zpid/

    And lastly, a pretty horrid remuddle.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/607-Arizona-St-Glidden-IA-51443/2099533782_zpid/

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Old photo and history of the Vandalia house in:
      Vandalia, Illinois By Brenda Baptist Protz 2000
      Built in 1895 for hardware store owner M.F. Houston.

      Just read two pages of the Blake Hill blog. They cut down two big trees which was sad but necessary. They’re planning on ripping out the vintage kitchen for a new one from Lowe’s – sad and unnecessary IMO. Their problems with it could be solved by refinishing the existing cabinetry for a whole lot less money than new. I guess they just don’t like it. Oh well, it’s their house and their money.

    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Be still my heart. That barn is just so very lovely.

    • says: 4 comments

      Hi Kelly
      What do you think about this Estate in California? http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/11611-Skyline-Dr-Santa-Ana-CA-92705/25508813_zpid/
      It is my home. It has a lot of history we’ve restored back to 1935. We have it on the market and it’s hard to find a new owner who appreciates vintage. I’d love to know your thoughts.
      Fondly,
      Lisa Lovell

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Whoa! How could you part with it, it’s fantastic! Really nice job with the restoration!

        • says: 4 comments

          Thank you Kelly! Your kind words really mean a lot! It has been a treat for us to live here and restore the Estate! We bought it 4 years ago and we feel like we saved it from destruction! Buyers who had looked at the home prior to us, wanted to tear out the bathrooms and the kitchens and replace with Granite! One buyer wanted to tear the entire house down and build a modern contemporary house on the lot! We just couldn’t let that happen, so we bought it! It’s been a lot of work but we’ve thoroughly enjoyed it and every day here! We are kind of tired and ready to down-size. We feel it’s time for someone else with the means to take over and take the Estate to the next level. We do feel the it will live on if the right buyers come in. I am looking for our next house and that’s how I found your website!

      • evers310evers310 says: 109 comments

        The house is beautiful, but what I really love is the Airstream! Kind of hard to tell from the pictures but it appears to be a mid 50’s Cruiser/Overlander.

        • says: 4 comments

          Thank you! The Airstream is actually a 1953 Silver Streak and we just completed restoration on that last year. We love it and have taken it camping down to the beach a few times.

          • evers310evers310 says: 109 comments

            Ah, I was wondering if it might be a Silver Streak! It looked just a little off from an Airstream but I couldn’t be sure. I’ve had several Airstreams, Spartans, and Shasta’s but never a Silver Streak. Very nice!

      • Dave Little says: 1 comments

        I live in La Habra Heights and I’ve seen your house listed. It’s gorgeous. Reminds me of my dream house, which is here. http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/760-Via-Miguel-La-Habra-Heights-CA-90631/21468263_zpid/

        Good luck with your sale.

  2. Arkham says: 69 comments

    The lady’s dress with the massive leg of mutton sleeves and lack of bustle indicates that it should be around 1895.

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Interesting. Thanks!

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Thanks for sharing the vintage photos. I like to play around with enhancing old images for better clarity, so if I think they are somewhat better I’ll send them to you. (glass plate negatives can be reversed to a “negative” image which of course means they will appear as developed photos but they usually require additional tweaking afterwards for optimal clarity.

        Nice to see those two Mississippi properties. I agree the Yazoo City example may be a real sleeper especially the possibilities about its interior. Some sellers mistakenly believe if an interior is not all modern and up to date looking, its best not to share interior photos. Others are estate sale situations with all of Grandma’s clutter remaining inside. No problem, old house lovers readily accept clutter and “as is” interiors.

        I don’t know if anyone here caught the new HGTV show “HOME TOWN” which aired a pilot episode based in Laurel, Mississippi, but the show is to have additional episodes added to it in the coming months. The show’s younger local contractors seem to have an appreciation for older homes and based on the first pilot episode, they retained some of the older features as well as used recycled wood and other materials.

        The Vandalia, IL house is nice but the loss of a cohesive residential context is always a negative except in dense urban areas. Even there, often the best re-use is commercial or institutional. Last, I agree it was unfortunate that the Iowa house’s makeover was anything but sympathetic to the original style and period of the house. It may have a few more years of survival ahead but without its past it is a confusing mix of old, new, and dare I say, cheap.

        • meg@sparrowhaunt.com says: 25 comments

          John – Do you have any tips for enhancing the old photos digitally? I think I’ve tried everything for mine, but would be grateful to know about things that have worked for you or others just in case there’s something I haven’t thought of!

          • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

            Hi Meg, Actually, I do. The best thing about old monochrome photos is they range from black to white in that narrow range. (yes, you can have sepia tints or yellows but the same approach to enhancing applies) If an old photo seems too dark, begin by lightening it up (you can use a variety of photo editing programs like Photoshop (the simpler “Elements” version is Ok too) or I use an older Photo-Impact version (13) because its easy to use. After making it lighter, (or darker) then begin working on the contrast. It’s like adding and taking away light until you get the optimum balance for clarity. Then I move on to sharpness. Again, you can try various amounts and you will recognize when you over-sharpen an image. Last, and probably to me the most valuable technique is “cloning”. Cloning allows you to fill in and complete details you know are in the image (or are missing due to damage) based on the evidence remaining in the image itself. Here’s an example of a photo I took where the camera flash glare created a reflective white spot: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/21329555113/in/album-72157657139234734/ By using cloning, I was able to go back and fill in the missing details: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/21959805441/in/album-72157657139234734/ The trick with cloning is not to overdo it much like the old retouching studios used to do with charcoal pencils and sometimes hand coloring. You want the results to look natural not artificially enhanced. To get to that optimum state takes time and patience. I typically enlarge the photo to 200% or more to begin cloning-in obscure or missing details. It’s takes a lot of trial and error but in time you’ll find you can enhance old photos quite a bit to reveal more details. Since old photos have to be digitally scanned for digital tweaking, use a higher resolution in the scanner such as 400 to 600 DPI. No point in going much beyond that as it will create a massive file size which some photo editing software programs have difficulty working with. (also depends on you computer’s OS and RAM memory) The accuracy and clarity of the result is directly proportional to the amount of time spent working on it. I’ve seen amazing photo makeovers that are the results of many hours of digital reworking but that makes sense only if the end result requires it. There’s also software that claims to be able take a pixelated or blurred image and make it much sharper…I’ve not used it so I can’t weigh in on its effectiveness. I did re-tweak two photos at the top of this page and shared the result with the site owner. I felt the images were somewhat clearer, cleaner, (no fly spots) and more balanced in contrast but I spent only about 30 minutes on each image. If I spent a day or two and had a high definition scanned original to work with, the results would have been even better. A few months ago, I scanned an 1895 promo book about Springfield, MA with an abundance of old photos in it: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157654835761883 Within the limitations of a printed image (many dots on a white background) I was able to enhance many of the photos (some even had streaks from scratches on a glass plate negative) for a clearer image. Old postcards and printed materials often cause a patterned background effect called a Moire pattern but most photo or software editing programs have a “remove Moire effect” function. I’m surprised to find some the scanned Google archival books did not make any attempt to reduce the Moire effects in the scans. That’s my approach to enhancing old images in a nutshell and I’m sure others might have things to add or clarify. My disclaimer is I’m merely an amateur in this field.

    • Martha says: 4 comments

      The men’s bowler hats are also an 1890s fashion.

  3. KiethCKiethC says: 5 comments

    Here are a few interesting houses listed around New York State:

    This is a really great mansion with a fascinating history located in Utica, NY. It was built by Orasmus Mattison, as something of a spite house. Mattison, a New York State Congressman, was unseated by Roscoe Conkling. Upset by the loss, he used only the finest materials and the most skilled craftsmen to build the grandest mansion in Utica, or at least that’s how the legend goes.

    Later the mansion would become the home of the Catholic Woman’s Club, and following that the home of The Royal Order Kingdom of Poland and a Polish “Princess”. The Royal Order left under somewhat scandalous circumstances, and a proposed bed and breakfast deal fell through.

    Sadly, since then the mansion has fallen on some hard times. There’s still quite a bit to love. Colossal and ornate front doors, 8ft high rosewood pocket doors, stunning and intricate plaster ceilings, not one, but TWO beautiful staircases (one of which is still crowned by it’s elliptical skylight), and an intriguing and catacomb like, albeit slightly horror movie-esque basement.

    Here is the listing on Zillow, and a blog that has featured the home several times throughout the past couple of years. The hundreds of photos capture the mansion’s rapid decline in the past few years and also showcase just how spectacular it once was, and could be again. Also included are some links witch contain the story of the “princess” and some brief history of the property.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/294-Genesee-St-Utica-NY-13502/84106334_zpid/

    http://suburbhunting.blogspot.com/2008/09/294-genesee-street.html?m=1

    http://suburbhunting.blogspot.com/2011/09/294-genesee-st-utica-ny-13502.html?m=1

    http://suburbhunting.blogspot.com/2011/11/294-genesee-street-utica-ny-13502.html?m=1

    http://suburbhunting.blogspot.com/2015/07/294-genesee-stutica-ny-13502.html?m=1

    http://suburbhunting.blogspot.com/2015/08/294-genesee-street-utica-ny.html?m=1

    http://aroundthecitywithbobbysullivan.blogspot.com/2011/09/self-proclaimed-princess-destroys-294.html?m=1

    http://m.uticaod.com/article/20111008/News/310089974

    And because giant old unloved houses make me go a big rubbery one; The Carleton Island Villa, also referred to as the Wyckoff Castle, located in Cape Vincent, NY. I’m sure many people have heard of it already, but since its officially listed again..

    I always feel like I’ve been sucker punched seeing it. My heart absolutely bleeds for it. Vacant for more than half a century, and in a precarious and ruinous state, it is still quite possibly, the most beautiful thing I’ve have ever had the pleasure of laying my eyes upon. I am completely and hopelessly mesmerized by this one! If you haven’t heard of it this one is definitely NOT to be missed!

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/Carleton-Is-Lot-1_Cape-Vincent_NY_13618_M41707-99100

    http://www.thousandislandslife.com/BackIssues/Archive/tabid/393/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/71/Ghost-of-a-gilded-age-Carleton-Islands-Wyckoff-Villa.aspx

    http://www.thousandislandslife.com/BackIssues/Archive/tabid/393/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/66/Carleton-Villa-Visit-2003.aspx

    http://www.thousandislandslife.com/BackIssues/Archive/tabid/393/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/85/Carleton-Island-Villa-A-Souvenir-The-Thousand-Islands-of-the-St-Lawrence-River-by-John-A-Haddock-1895.aspx

    This is another awesome old house located in Syracuse, NY. Perhaps not as grand as the other 2, but still quite a treasure in its own right. Its definitely seen better days, but I love that much of it is still intact. I’m a sucker for the crumbly old houses.

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/106-Pharis-St_Syracuse_NY_13204_M39096-96085

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Surprised the Carleton home is still standing. I cant’ imagine it’s even savable anymore. The Mattison mansion is sad, I hope it will eventually get it’s pretties back (the article sounds like they are being held hostage!) and can be restored.

    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Oh be still my heart. Thank you for the information on these houses. Such treasures. Truly the Wyckoff Castle is the most tragic beauty. I cannot imagine what it would cost to restore it.

    • Renee says: 2 comments

      I just bought the Pharis street home, we are doing a full renovation. House is gorgeous, great bones, can’t wait to get started!!!!

      • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Congrats Renee! Looks like you got a fine unspoiled home in Syracuse for about the price of an SUV. Good luck, and thanks for preserving it!

        • Renee says: 2 comments

          Thank you!!! Can’t wait to get started, we’re closing at the end of June and then it’s a 4 month restoration/remodel. I think it’s going to be awesome! Lots of work to do!!!

  4. KiethCKiethC says: 5 comments

    The Mattison Mansion was listed yesterday and today for $44,900 and removed. It’s been on and off the market for quite a long time. Strange though that it was only listed 2 days. Could be quite the bargain for that place with the city having quite a bit of an upswing with Nano Utica under construction and the promise of thousand of high paying tech jobs.

  5. John MJohn M says: 35 comments

    Here is a good one it has had some updating but has an interesting history. This home was originally owned by a judge and was later the Walbright hospital in later years . Here is the listing and a bit of History on it hope you enjoy. http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/721-Metropolis-St_Metropolis_IL_62960_M75217-97394 http://genealogytrails.com/ill/massac/illus003.html http://fcihg.genealogyvillage.com/JohnHMulkey.html http://www.illinoiscourts.gov/supremecourt/justicearchive/Bio_Mulkey.asp https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_H._Mulkey

  6. CharlesB says: 479 comments

    Here’s a couple of my favorites:

    The finest of the fine old mansions in beautiful Westfield, NY:

    http://ccbrmls.com/public/search/advanced/summary.asp?Listing_ID=1038488

    …and a Federal-period house that blew me away in Salem, NJ:

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/30-32-Market-St_Salem_NJ_08079_M61393-05434

    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Charles,

      The first home is just incredible. Tiffany windows and all. I wish there were more pictures. I could happily create my healing Farm here.

      I like the Federal home as well. It gives off the feeling that it is a happy home just waiting for a family. I am also a sucker for a fireplace in a kitchen.

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Agree the Westfield NY house is amazing. Thanks Charles!
      On the NRHP, the Reuben Gridley Wright estate with 72 acres! There’s an old photo of the mansion in its 1883 form – quite impressive. Some of the grandeur was lost in a 1920’s remodel, but still very nice inside.

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        It might be better for some realtors not to add things like this to a listing: (regarding the Westfield Wright House) “The basic architectural form is Queen Anne, built in the late Victorian period, influenced by San Francisco/Sacramento architecture.” Where does the last part of that statement come from? The first American Queen Anne style house was the Watts-Sherman house in Newport Rhode Island dating from the mid-1870’s by renowned architect Henry H. Richardson. (better known for his Romanesque style) That house was based on English prototypes designed by Richard Norman Shaw who freely borrowed stylistic details from original Elizabethan and Tudor style English houses. The West Coast Victorians thus evolved from East Coast originals, not the other way around. San Francisco’s iconic Italianate/Stick/Eastlake rowhouses and townhomes are a distinctive local house type almost all built of local coastal redwood. Very little on the East Coast with the exception of some beach side resort houses (Cape May, NJ comes to mind) resembles the ornate Victorians of SF and northern California. (Eureka, Arcata, Sacramento) Author Kenneth Naversen in his EAST and WEST COAST VICTORIANS books mentions the more restrained Eastern Victorian examples compared to their more ornate West coast counterparts. As for the Wright house itself: a lovely example of the Queen Anne style.

  7. Michael says: 14 comments

    Here is a link to this interesting turn-of-the century house in a small southern Oklahoma town. It has been for sale for several years. I restored it from near ruin between 1969 and 1986 and got it on the National Register. It has changed hands several times, and the second owners made some changes, such as adding closets, which are not, of course, original to this house, built in 1899-1900. They also took off all the screens, some of which were original on the large windows on the first floor, as well as the original front screen door. All gone for the sake of modern tastes! I have wondered if this house might be a George F. Barber design. Never heard of Barber until I became addicted to Old House Dreams website. Although you can’t see it in the picture of the front of the house, there is a balcony on the left side of the tower on the second floor level. Can anyone tell me if this is a Barber design. I have three more pictures of the house, scanned from my own shapshots back in the 1970s, but I do not know how to get them onto this Old House Dreams site.

    http://jarmanrealtyok.com/listings/183067/508-e-cherokee-wynnewood#.VtotWEAvZh8

    (admin edit to add photo)

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      You can email them to me and I’ll add them to the comments. kelly@oldhousedreams.com

      Great find though. I don’t see it being a Barber though.

    • CharlestonJohn says: 1091 comments

      According to this is was designed by local architect A.J. Barrett:
      http://chickasawcountry.com/culture-history/the-moore-settle-house

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks Michael! Added his photos of the Wynnewood, OK home.

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Very cool Michael – congrats and thanks for preserving it!

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Although most likely A.J. Barrett is credited as the builder-designer it was common in those days for the plans to be ordered from a plan book publisher and then the local architect-builder took credit as the “supervising architect”. Not saying that is the case here but sometimes very clearly identifiable George F. Barber designed house are inaccurately attributed to local architect-builders who used Barber’s published plans to construct a house. Are there other known Barrett designed houses still around? Smaller towns often lacked an architect or, a local builder assumed the role of an architect. But there are others, like George W. Payne in small town Carthage, IL, that expanded his design work well beyond the borders of his home state and in time published their own plan books. In any case, you have a lovely very stylish home for the period and as you noted, not many of these towered Queen Annes remain in Oklahoma today.

  8. SueSue says: 1111 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Here you go.

    Extraordinary 12.1 acre oceanfront land parcel with sand & gravel beach and 508′ frontage on the world famous sailing waters Penobscot Bay.
    The property has excellent visibility, road frontage and curb cut on Rt 15 with two alternative entrances on the Silver Mine Road.
    Formerly a farm, the property includes two 19th century homes with detached garages and a 45′ x 64′ barn. These buildings have been vacant for years, so there is deferred maintenance, but each has a well, septic, and private driveway, making this a rare opportunity for an oceanfront family compound or residential subdivision.

    Heaven.

    http://www.landandfarm.com/property/Maine_Oceanfront_Acreage_with_Beach-2509407/

  9. Chris says: 672 comments

    What style is this? Perhaps a mix, but it’s an interesting space. Maybe a few too many updates done in the 80’s, but overall it’s nice. http://www.homes.com/property/504-w-cleveland-st-bozeman-mt-59715/id-700018798672/

    Who wants to live in a lovely stone home just a few hundred feet from an entrance to Yellowstone National Park? It’s weird but the realtor.com app says it’s for sale for 450k, but http://www.realtor.com says the price is unavailable. Regardless, it’s a charming home and currently a B&B. http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/506-4th-St_Gardiner_MT_59030_M71132-45548
    Here’s an interesting MCM house – pretty original looking. I’d say they need a better photographer, but it’s got some appeal.
    http://tours.tourfactory.com/tours/tour.asp?t=1436932

    To call this a time capsule home when all kitchens and bathrooms have been replaced just irks me. But regardless it’s an interesting MCM home. Not sure why I’m stuck on this era tonight… http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1621-N-Promontory-Rd-Boise-ID-83702/72681532_zpid/

    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      Chris, I believe that Bozeman, MT house from 1993 is Eclectic; i.e. a blend of styles from the French mansard roof, to the Georgian Revival circular entry with “pilasters” and other design elements from different periods. Not so uncommon these days for current architects to select from a historical architectural vocabulary to incorporate into their custom designs.

      • Chris says: 672 comments

        Thanks John, that’s what I thought, but wasn’t sure. I think I’ll call this style Alleycat (because it’s sure pretty, but you never know who the daddy is).

      • Chris says: 672 comments

        BTW, the house is from 1936. The guest house is from 1993 and likely that’s when some of the ‘renovations’ we’re done to the main house.

  10. Melissa says: 2 comments

    Here’s one that – I believe – is free if you want to move it, but the owner just filed for a demo permit http://www.8ferrishill.com

    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      Melissa, I cannot believe an authentic Colonial era house like this would be demolished! There are several New England firms that specialize in the dismantling and reassembly of Colonial period timber frame houses that would salivate to get a house like this one. (assuming the interior is indeed original) Maybe that is the plan because disassembly and moving is effectively the same as demolition because the house itself is removed from the land. There are not that many largely intact and original Colonial period houses left so the loss of even one should be avoided if at all possible. Of course, there are a few folks like developers who never met an old house they didn’t want to tear down but I hope that is not the case here. Thanks for sharing.

      • SueSue says: 1111 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1802 Cape
        ME

        John,
        It’s New Canaan CT. Lots of new money, keeping up with the Joneses there. Not surprised they would demolish this. Sad, it is quite wonderful.

  11. evers310evers310 says: 109 comments

    Kelly,

    I would like to submit my blog for the old house blog highlights on next week’s link exchange. I am way behind on updates but I have been working on that. I am adding each post by date retroactively so even though it looks like there has been no activity since last July I can assure you that I am working on it.

    My house is an old plantation house built in 1859 by Captain Andrew Jackson White, he was a captain in the confederate army. I have some very interesting stories about him that I will be adding to the House History tab soon.

    http://the-big-whitehouse.blogspot.com/

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Wow! That’s an awesome home!

    • Lindsay G says: 531 comments

      Now THAT is a house! This completely took my breath away! There’s so much to it, all those rooms and the view, everything is just so overwhelming. What i wouldn’t give to wake up in that monstrosity everyday!

    • Joe says: 11 comments

      Lord in heaven, this home is incredible! Even the updates (like the kitchen, attic and, and laundry/bathroom) are tastefully executed.

    • Ian says: 27 comments

      My wife and I are shopping for a historic home here in Loudoun County ,Va. This house would be just in our budget if it were here. I like to torture myself by looking at the wonders I could purchase for the same money in different parts of the country. This one is right near the top of homes I’d move for. I’ll post some of the homes we’ve found around this area also, there are some pretty interesting ones.

      • eileenm says: 288 comments

        I can relate. My son lives in Loudon County. I have thought about moving closer to him, but I couldn’t afford even the worst house in the area. It is an area rich in history, but suburban growth has made real estate unattainable for most of us.

    • Jennifer HT says: 747 comments

      WHOA! LOVE this house. So much character and style.

    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      How is this house only 529,000? It is incredible. What is the history of this home? Clearly Mr. Gift was a devoted mason. They must have had meetings there as well. That room with the stage seems to suggest that. Think of what this would cost to build today. Amazing.

    • Martha says: 4 comments

      Fantastic! Interesting to see the Masonic symbols. What a hilltop view!

    • KarenZKarenZ says: 1150 comments
      OHD Supporter

      That home is just amazing! I love the “pantry” with the old medicine containers and the vintage “crash cart”! So many awesome things in this house–thanks for sharing!

  12. Noelle says: 46 comments

    Another house from Waldoboro ME. From 1830 this time. Needs some updating..

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12-Shady-Ave-Waldoboro-ME-04572/91864353_zpid/

  13. FergusFergus says: 230 comments
    1705 Queen Anne

    I’ve been saving up a lot of listings that I’ve been meaning to share for a while, so here they are:
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-49743277.html – This Elizabethan mansion is absolutely wonderful. That majority of the interior is gorgeous and in the original taste, if not condition, which isn’t bad for a house built in 1577.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-51873115.html?premiumA=true – This Regency style home has a lot of charm and potential. It does need a lot of love, but I think it would certainly be worth it for that handsome facade at that price.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-53614577.html – Although there’s very little left of this one to save inside, the exterior/setting looks like something out of a fairytale.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-50813986.html – This Arts and Crafts style home is very quirky and has the potential to be a real stunner, if you can see past the dated decor.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-37886859.html – This charming mid-Victorian home is very nicely presented.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-34151541.html?premiumA=true – This Arts and Crafts mansion is rather impressive too, if you can see past the modern kitchen.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-36863781.html?premiumA=true – This has to be one of the most beautifully restored and presented homes that I have seen in a long time.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-36435279.html?premiumA=true – This is also a very nicely presented home.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-51481741.html – A huge restoration project with a lot of character still remaining, 6000 square feet of floor space is practically a royal palace in England!
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-57934766.html
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-52412935.html – The golf course this house sits across the street from is also quite historic.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-52038445.html
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-51963067.html
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-35924112.html?premiumA=true – This is a rather charming barn conversion as it still has a lot of character.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-55823171.html
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-57490013.html
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-34409709.html?premiumA=true – The exterior and setting is gorgeous, but the kitchen and some of the bedrooms lack that certain something.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-30261588.html – The latest Sacha Baron Cohen film is set in this very town.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-29988723.html?premiumA=true – The enchanting exterior of this gothic revival home certainly makes up for the interior which still has the potential to be just a nice one day.
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-52716106.html

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      The Church Street, Sutton Courtenay was my favorite, gorgeous! Thanks Fergus! Hope you are doing well!

      • eileenm says: 288 comments

        I found this sight only a few short months ago. It is so wonderful to realize that there are other people out there who share my love of old homes. I can hardly wait for each day’s post. I have always dreamed of restoring/living in an old victorian. That is never going to happen for me, but OHD lets me do so vicariously. Keep ’em coming!

      • FergusFergus says: 230 comments
        1705 Queen Anne

        You’re welcome, I rather thought you might take a liking to that one.
        Currently, I’m just trying to avoid being buried alive under mounds of University work/projects at the moment. But that being said, one still manages to find time for old houses. πŸ™‚

    • says: 355 comments

      These are incredible! Thank you for posting!

    • SueSue says: 1111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      First house…..built in 1530. That alone blows me away. So many stunning homes here but the 5 bedroom town house on Church Street has my heart.

      Fergus what does Grade II listed mean?

      • FergusFergus says: 230 comments
        1705 Queen Anne

        “Grade II” or “Grade 2 listed” dictates where the historic building falls on the protective listing system here in the UK. Each grade/level has a specific set of rules about what the owner can or can’t change about the property, all are enforceable by law to a certain extent. The other levels/grades are Grade 1 and Grade 1*, at these levels you would need to seek permission from the relevant authorities for pretty much anything from re-painting the interior to extending/demolishing. You can also be forced by law to maintain your property to a specific standard and face prosecution and criminal conviction if you don’t. At Grade 2, it’s more a case of seeking permission to make any structural changes, such as extending/demolishing and also replacing/changing any external windows and doors, e.t.c.

        You can read more about it here:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listed_building
        https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/what-is-designation/listed-buildings/
        One thing I’ll add is that despite the legally binding nature, there’s always a way around the system if you know how to play it. So even if a building is listed it can still be demolished or disfigured horribly, much like the American system you may be familiar with, it’s no guarantee of safeguarding a property.

    • JayStar says: 20 comments

      That first listing – the Elizabethan mansion – makes me happy. Actually, these are all great. Thank you for sharing!

  14. Stacy G. says: 5 comments

    Wow! What a wonderful surprise to have our blog linked here. Thank you so much. Owning Blake Hill House has opened up a whole new world for us, and Old House Dreams continues to fuel our daydreams too. So many houses, so little time. πŸ™‚ I had no idea the passion I would feel for old homes prior to owning our own little piece of history. Thank you again for featuring our blog, and thank you for creating and maintaining this wonderful blog.
    -Stacy
    http://www.BlakeHillHouse.com

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Love the porch on the Marietta, OH home!

      The Baltimore house is scary. If I were the neighbors on either side I would be worried about what it would do to my house as well.

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Assuming anyone would even want to tackle a house like the Baltimore example (where one local quipped on Facebook there were tens of thousands of houses waiting there to be demolished) the approach would be to totally gut and rebuild. There’s nothing left to be saved and restored here so come in and do your best “Property Bros.” reno…you’d have some great before and after photos. Even the LA based Flip or Flop couple, Terek and Christina sometimes go in and makeover wrecks almost as bad as this one. But unless its in a prime location in Baltimore, it has money pit written all over it. (not to mention ugly outside as well)

        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Heh, heh, heh. Yeah John. I didn’t mean to include that one for anything besides a good chuckle. Sometimes we lament an agent not including any interior pix; and, sometimes, there might just be a valid reason why they didn’t. This agent went well beyond what was necessary to get the point across. ‘Rubble included’! πŸ˜‰

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        My plants would be VERY happy on that porch; and so would I πŸ™‚

  15. says: 355 comments

    Beautiful home! We bought a house a block away but were very tempted by this cozy house. It is a 1/2 block walk to the library. $84,900

    http://www.movoto.com/talladega-al/317-coffee-st-talladega-al-35160-621_739875/

  16. Lindsay G says: 531 comments

    Wowzuh! Those are some of the most beautiful properties I’ve ever seen! Figures that they’re all in Virgina. Virginia is a very pretty state. I have some questions about a couple of the houses though:

    With the house on Old Wheatland rd, Waterford, in the pictures 1, 9, 11 and maybe some others, what is that empty shaft beneath the stairs? At first I thought it was like a closet but it doesn’t seem to have a floor. Is it another stairwell? In every picture, it seems like it’s a mini elevator shaft. Sort of weird if you ask me.

    And the second question for the Charles Town Pike house, are all three homes attached? As in, is it just one big home on the inside even though they look separate on the outside? Hell, even from the back they look like one big house. I studied the description and it doesn’t say anything about the “three homes” actually being one big one. Does anyone else seem to know?

    Otherwise, they’re all lovely homes. I’d take them all if I could! πŸ™‚

    • Lindsay G says: 531 comments

      This was supposed to be in reply to Ian’s comment which I definitely clicked on but for some reason didn’t post as a reply……

      • Ian says: 27 comments

        Yes, that one in Hillsboro is 3 attached homes! That one was SO cool, we actually put an offer in on it but missed out. Started out as a tavern in the stone house and went from there.

        The shaft you speak of is actually a staircase. It’s very steep and narrow, goes sharply to the left. It goes down to the lower level (former kitchen) of the stone section of the home. The room with the huge cooking fireplace and timbered ceiling. A very special house.

        We are ready to pounce on the next good one that comes along, looking at these ones that we missed out on is a bummer!

  17. Jennifer HT says: 747 comments

    I just realized I posted in the wrong share thread earlier! Sorry about that!

    Here are a couple

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/629-Washington-St-Shelbyville-KY-40065/2105465105_zpid/

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/312-W-Jefferson-St-La-Grange-KY-40031/2100118641_zpid/

    This house has many great details!

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/102-W-3rd-St-Madison-IN-47250/85419432_zpid/

    LOVE this house too! The baths have been updated (boo). The kitchen needs to come with a ladder to get to those uppers. ha!
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/514-E-Main-St-Madison-IN-47250/85419151_zpid/

    • RonnieH says: 84 comments

      Jennifer, you are nailing my tastes…especially the Madison ones! Keep them coming! I just don’t have enough time to look myself, but enjoy reaping the benefit of others work…thanks.

  18. Cora says: 2054 comments

    My favorite detail I’ve seen yet – the huge old fireplace with benches built AROUND it to warm your feet:

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/30-Pelham-Rd_Philadelphia_PA_19119_M40511-38191

  19. Jennifer HT says: 747 comments

    An old firehouse.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1006-State-St-New-Albany-IN-47150/85248761_zpid/

    Wish the brick wasn’t painted. The wallpaper and carpet was to go. I am digging the fireplace. Do you think it is original? I don’t remember seeing one like that before.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1118-E-Market-St-New-Albany-IN-47150/120227970_zpid/

    uniquely interesting. Too modern in some ways.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1612-Edenside-Ave-Louisville-KY-40204/73455662_zpid/

    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      The old Firehouse is unusual and being marketed for either residential or office use. The interior is about as “open concept” as a buyer is likely to find these days and fits the loft townhouse profile. The second house is a textbook high end Italianate style home. The ornate fireplace is an original slate or cast iron example that was faux finished to look like marble with a profusion of what was called “Eastlake” geometrical ornamentation mainly of pin-striped lines intersecting at different angles. There’s a stylized “Swan” in keeping with English designer/tastemaker Charles L. Eastlake’s philosophy that artistic renderings of natural subjects should “typify” them in an abstract manner rather than literally. Eastlake unwittingly launched a decorative arts movement stateside with his 1872 book Hints on Household Taste.(which went through several editions in the U.S.) Although Eastlake’s book celebrates the hand made and praises the decorative artisan work from the Gothic Medieval period, (Eastlake was also called by his peers a Gothicist) his book offered only a small number of visual “hints” as to what was considered tasteful. It was not long before American designers and manufacturers created a non-sanctioned form of “Eastlake” style which Eastlake himself later disavowed as “extravagant and bizarre” but it was very popular in the States from about 1875 until about 1890. Long explanation, I know, but necessary to explain the weird type of ornamentation on the mantel. New Albany is very historic preservation conscious and has the southern regional office of the Indiana Landmarks Foundation.
      The last house in Louisville fairly screams decorator’s house. It’s an exploration of fashionable trends and creative ideas but it is so personalized that it may take a while for someone who shares the artistic vision of the creator to find and buy it. The original 1908 house was merely an easel for the artist to create his artistic vision. Way too modern and “trendy” inside to suit my tastes, but nonetheless probably ideal for someone. Thanks for sharing.

  20. JuneKleever says: 2 comments

    https://youtu.be/n6vfnlabrHM
    This house is the reverse floorplan of my own. Built in 1942 at the same time as 10+ houses all the same floor plans flipped in different directions. It’s the first block built in the neighborhood. Any help on identifying the type of house this is and what would be original cabinets for these kitchens (some are wood, some metal and I’m not sure which came first). My kitchen is horrendously 1960’s with bad cabinets I want to refinish.

  21. JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
    OHD Supporter

    One of the largest surviving mansions of the Gilded Age was demolished Saturday. The mansion at Duke Farms in Hillsborough NJ was begun in 1893 by tobacco baron James Buchanan Duke, and later much expanded with extensive gardens and fabulous greenhouses, now mostly ruined.
    At its peak, the 60,000 SF house was the centerpiece of a 2700 acre estate with 18 miles of roads, 7 lakes, 45 buildings and 159 employees, all inherited by 12 year old Doris Duke in 1925, along with $150MM cash and stock. Doris altered the mansion, added a large private theater, and lavished her attention on one of the greatest private garden complexes in the world, adorned with numerous fountains, follies and statuary at every turn. The gardens are no longer public.
    The estate is still owned by the Foundation established by Doris Duke, but it has chosen to do away with many of the old buildings as it pursues Sustainability and its Green Initiatives.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bH94cEXq4M
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/takegoro/albums/72157644976233709
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_Farms

    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      Sad but strangely familiar as a couple of years ago the Victorian era Cincinnati Westwood neighborhood mansion of James Gamble (of Proctor & Gamble fame) was demolished by a similar “environmental” foundation set up by an heir of the Gamble family fortune. It too justified the mansion’s demolition on the grounds of it not being green or sustainable but the true purpose and mission of the foundation was not very clear. The foundation executives went to court against the City of Cincinnati which had belatedly declared the Gamble mansion a landmark but this delay was enough to allow the foundation to prevail in court. The foundation had already removed many of the mansion’s interior details to justify it being “too far gone to save”. The “sustainability and green” initiatives appear to be a smoke screen to justify not spending the money on a huge, high overhead property. These days, our architectural heritage seems to take a back seat to greed which makes sad stories like these all too frequent nowadays.

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      A judge has halted the demolition of the Duke mansion halfway through, on behalf of a preservation group. Silly.
      http://www.nj.com/somerset/index.ssf/2016/03/appellate_judge_issues_stay_on_duke_mansion_demoli.html#incart_river_home

      • Ian says: 27 comments

        It just makes me smile that they are costing the foundation time/money, it’s definitely coming down. What a waste, shame that such a home didn’t have some sort of protection or a foundation more interested in preservation than trends.

  22. Cora says: 2054 comments

    And this one. Gutted…but many of the details are there. 2nd Empire. Someone save it…$18k:

    825 Vine St
    $18,000 | 3 Bed β€’ 1 Bath
    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/M89485-27885

  23. Cora says: 2054 comments

    And another…how can a house be this beautiful and obviously historic…yet the realtor gives no history? I’m hoping one of you all who somehow magically find the history on these gems will fill me in. 1881:

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/724-N-5th-St_Saint-Joseph_MO_64501_M74292-95835

    • Chris says: 672 comments

      Love the house one of my favorites in that style. Not sure about the neighborhood though

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Cora, that’s the James W. Hartigan house, built in 1889 for a meat market owner, and part of the Robidoux Hill Historic District. It’s a very nice Queen Anne and looks to be in pretty good shape, though at the edge of the District with some unattractive neighbors. If you stroll up 5th St. for a few blocks, the neighborhood gets a lot better! https://goo.gl/maps/45TRALUPoWw
      http://www.stjoemo.info/index.aspx?NID=273

      • Cora says: 2054 comments

        Very cool! I love learning the history of these homes. Thank you!
        I’m also addicted to Google Street View – it’s wonderful to be able to view an entire area as if you were there, from your recliner. πŸ™‚

        I will look up James W. Hartigan!

      • MW says: 902 comments

        A nice old Mustang parked out front on the street too. Looks in very nice shape. So, neighborhood isn’t that dicey, at least during the day.

  24. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Cora, thanks for sharing. I lived and worked in St. Joseph from 2004 until 2006 and remember the Second Empire style house well. You can back date the Streetview to 2008 and in the older version a wrap-around porch remained. Why folks in Joetown like to go in and totally demolish the interiors of these old houses and then think its easy and affordable to reconstruct them has always baffled me but it happens all too frequently there. The second brick Queen Anne is a lovely home and actually priced for slightly less than it was offered when I lived in St. Joe (it sold then, so its again back on the market) That house is not from 1881 but from around 1890. The realtor (Lisa Rock) for that first house, the Second Empire, is very knowledgeable about St. Joseph history and architecture. (I believe she’s also on the local landmarks commission) I would recommend her for either of these houses.

  25. Cora says: 2054 comments

    Thank you John! St Joseph seems to have a number of these large Victorian homes. I thought 1881 seemed a bit early and you confirmed.

    The Second Empire looks oddly small without the porch – nothing to balance the signature roof. I guess the porch went with the guts of the house.
    Even so, you can see that this was once a lovely old place with the few details that are left. I love the shape of the staircase.

    This one is so far gone, that without old photos of the interior it would be almost impossible to recreate the original look…and who knows where it’s “parts” went. Was it occupied when you lived there?

    I always champion the homes that are deemed unsaveable or nearly so. If I had unlimited resources, they are the ones I would buy up and bring back!

  26. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Cora, it had been a rental for many years in an area where cheap rentals and neglected homes were common. As I recall, the remodeling interior changes actually took place about the time I relocated away from St. Joseph (2006) but such gut remodelings were fairly common in St. Joseph at the time. The original porch on the Second Empire house was likely one of two types: first would have been a full width porch straight across the front probably with square chamfered 6 x 6 posts, an ornamental pedestal base and scroll sawn corbels/brackets at the tops of each post. Alternately, rather than a full width porch there may have only been a smaller portico over the entry. (with the same ornamental details-there are examples seen in houses of this age around St. Joe) I do recall on the side bay some unusual scroll saw work indicating some kind of fraternal order affiliation symbols. Don’t know if that remains or not. If it were mine, I’d opt for a full width porch reconstruction for the hillside views. The missing wrap around porch was an early 1900’s addition. As for the interior, there might be a few clues left to suggest a direction. The showy focal point was always around the entry and parlor in houses of this age. Staircases were inevitably of the Italianate style with octagonal or hexagonal newel posts and hefty turned balusters. Mantels were either slate/cast iron, wood, or marble with an arched hearth opening. If it were my project, I’d collect and assemble salvaged parts from the period and put the house back as it would have looked circa 1880. The color scheme is actually correct for the period but here’s an 1884 paint company catalog with color combination choices of that time: (Internet Archive; free read and download) https://archive.org/details/HarrisonBrosAndCoCCA18956 Maybe this house will appeal to someone who does have the money and ambition to take it on. It’s much easier for me to “restore” this house in my mind than go out and do a bricks and mortar restoration.

  27. Ian says: 27 comments

    Scaleby, a beautiful old estate is for sale near me:

    http://assist2sell.com/listing/0-MILLWOOD-RD-W-BOYCE-VA-22620/3yd-LONGANDFOSTER-2-CL8724315

    Seems pretty large until you realize the Mellon estate, Oak Springs Farm, is right down the street. Wish they had more pictures of Scaleby.

    • Ian says: 27 comments

      Ah ok, here we go:

      http://rs.locationshub.com/location_detail.aspx?id=009-948&photopage=1

      Some very impressive decor as well.

      • MW says: 902 comments

        Love those 1980-90’s photos. Especially the ones with the over the top pickup truck parked right out in front of a mega millions $ house. And with that little yard mower in the background. Must have been a 24/7 job to mow all that grass in the summer with that little mower. But maybe the job paid very well. That is why the mower guy could afford the top shelf pickup!

        Speaking of, I don’t think I could even afford to pay for the mowing on this house. That expense alone must be crazy high.

    • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

      The estimated mortgage payments of over $97,000 a month puts things into perspective. However, properties at this price point often sell for cash either to very wealthy individuals or investor groups. I’ve never seen so many million dollar plus properties on the market as there are now. Aside from the ultra high price tag, Scaleby is quite the estate.

  28. Paul Price says: 194 comments

    ….http://joplin.craigslist.org/reo/5477738518.html….this place is sad and appears to have some yeasty beasties…

  29. dragonflyspirit14dragonflyspirit14 says: 241 comments
    1913 farmhouse
    Dillon, SC

    Just found this home on Realtor and had to share. at 149k it is a sweet deal for CT as even with taxes it would be affordable to most of us. It really does need an experienced restorer. It’s also on 2.13 acres. Check it out. http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/493-Simsbury-Rd_Bloomfield_CT_06002_M46860-64252

  30. says: 71 comments

    A few from my neck of the woods. I’m in love with this one, but of course can’t afford it. And as per usual, shame what’s been done to the kitchen.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/35-Ellison-Park-Waltham-MA-02452/56362684_zpid/?view=public

    If I couldn’t afford the one in Waltham, this one is about ten daydreams shy of anything resembling reality. There’s a floor plan available on Redfin, which refers to the small room with the fireplace as the “hunting room.” I could live in that room alone, forget the rest of the house!

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/100-Meadowbrook-Rd-Dedham-MA-02026/57438879_zpid/?view=public

  31. Sharing a magnificent home in Olde Towne East historic neighborhood of Columbus.

    https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/oh/columbus/731-e-broad-street/pid_10897194/

    • says: 71 comments

      This is my Waterford daydream. Not very practical for more than just one or two people though.

      http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/40221-Main-St_Waterford_VA_20197_M67978-69477

    • KarenZKarenZ says: 1150 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Wow, Ian–you were really on a ROLL! I just happened to have insomnia last night, so it was the perfect time to take a look at all of the beautiful homes that you and everyone else listed! That last home in Waterford is on the market for 300,000 less than they paid for it in December. Either they really have financial hardship right now or there are some seriously scary ghosts in that house, lol! I have a soft spot for Winchester, Virginia as my mom and dad eloped there when she was only 18 years old! I believe that they traveled there because my dad had been in the Navy and several of his buddies were married there, too. They had to get married in the jail, as the courthouse was under construction! It was so funny to hear her tell the story to my kids when we drove to Williamsburg from Pittsburgh,PA about 10 years ago! Until then, I had no idea that they were married in a jail! Anyway, thank you for sharing all of these beauties (I can even forgive all of the white paint because they all look so pretty)! Best of luck to you and your wife on your home search!

  32. SueSue says: 1111 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    I thought I would share some homes that are for sale in my town.

    This has been on the market for a long time. I have always liked this house. I think it is taking so long to sell because of the busy main road it is on.

    http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Windsor-ME-04363/112654921_zpid/59468_rid/any_days/44.371601,-69.289913,44.249011,-69.624996_rect/11_zm/0_mmm/?3col=true

    This one is around the corner from me. For as long as I can remember it has looked like this but hasn’t fallen down. Testament to how sturdy these old houses are. Wish there were more pictures.

    http://www.trulia.com/property/3127021325-197-Coopers-Mills-Rd-Windsor-ME-04363

    Nearby in Gardiner, ME is his home. I have always loved this house. It has been on the market for over a year but I know see it is pending. The basement is very interesting.

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/242-Brunswick-Ave_Gardiner_ME_04345_M33021-28758

  33. Cora says: 2054 comments

    Any guesses on the Ave of this old girl? The listing doesn’t say…and it’s hard to guess in this case:

    2136 Bayou Rd
    $288,500 | 4 Bed β€’ 3 Bath
    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/M87508-04210

  34. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    Cora,
    Based on the visual evidence, I’d date this Classical Revival (not an Antebellum Greek Revival) house to no later than the 1930’s nor earlier than about 1910. The staircase hallway is far too narrow to be from the early to mid-1800’s Greek Revival. Arches as seen between the rooms were also popular in the 1920’s and 20’s. So too the “Colonial” corner cabinets with broken pediments. Looks like it needs a fair amount of work

  35. Cora says: 2054 comments

    This one is lovely…but I ddnt think at first it had anything terribly unique that wod make it interesting enough to post here.

    Then I saw the library. I’ve never seen shelves border the ceiling like those. Has anyone else? Are they original, and was that their original purpose? I love them! They would be reserved for my very favorite, rainy-day-cup-of-hot-tea-and-an-afghan books. <3

  36. Cora says: 2054 comments

    Nothing about the exterior of this house gives you any inkling of what you will see inside.

    Specifically, the staircase. Or, staircases. This puts Titanic’s grand staircase to shame.

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1205-E-Parkway-S_Memphis_TN_38114_M83927-18002

  37. Cora says: 2054 comments

    Wow, I wonder why it hasn’t sold? The price is certainly right.

  38. LUCINDA HOWARD says: 242 comments

    Ian, the home in Peoria is unbelievable.Can’t think of adjectives to do it justice.

  39. LUCINDA HOWARD says: 242 comments

    The home on 3rd St in Madison will do just fine. Love the staircase.

  40. WayOutWardell says: 68 comments

    Here’s a great bungalow in the northwest suburbs of Chicago:

    http://www.homes.com/property/1238-s-des-plaines-river-rd-des-plaines-il-60018/id-600013167299/

    I grew up next door to this house and it was just incredible to me as a child. The owner back then was an older Italian widower who bought it in 1945, kept it in immaculate, pristine order. Until he died, around 1991, there had only been one other owner. He had a garden with a grapevine (he made his own wine), had loudspeakers on the eaves so he could play music from a record player in the kitchen while he was outside. There’ s a bathroom in the attic he installed in the ’50s (pink fixtures). There were a lot more trees, lilac shrubs and plants, too.

    Subsequent owners haven’t been as kind (painted the woodwork and the copper gutters/downspouts, installed carpet, questionable color scheme, nonexistent yard care). It all looks reversible, though.

    Some things that the photos don’t show too well:
    -there is a lit concrete shuffleboard court (next to where the garden trellis used to be)
    -there is a stone BBQ that the old man built using plans from Popular Mechanics
    -on the outside of the garage, there is a porcelain drinking fountain.

    I hope someone appreciative can polish this gem.

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