1886 Queen Anne – Emporia, KS

Off Market / Archived
National Register Property
Posted September 2014. This home has been archived on OHD. The sold status is unknown. Added to OHD on 9/5/14 - Last OHD Update: 2/14/18 - 162 Comments
831 Constitution St, Emporia, KS 66801

Map: Street View

Price

$62,000

Beds

4

Baths

2

SqFt

2414

Acres

0.17

Listed on the National Register of Historic Homes this eloquent 1 1/2 story has tin ceilings, leaded windows, hardwood floors, pocket doors, and even a carriage house. It has a beautiful wrap-around porch, a gazebo, and ornate wood inside. There are two beautiful fireplaces. The mirror in the living room runs floor to ceiling and is negotiable in the sale. Four bedrooms, a sitting room, plus a kitchenette offer plenty of space. The home has main floor laundry facilities and a full, unfinished basement. New sewer lines. There is an office above the carriage house that is 22 x 10.
Last Active Agent
Sharol, By Owner      620-794-6402
OHD Notes
On the National Register as the Keebler-Stone House.
Links & Additional Info
State: | Region: | Period: ,
Associated Styles: | Misc:

162 Comments on 1886 Queen Anne – Emporia, KS

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  1. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    At the corner of Ninth and Constitution, in Emporia, is a remarkable house: the Keebler House. One cannot drive by without craning a neck to admire.

    The house has a dollhouse-like appearance. It is charming to an extreme, and looks like something a giant would eat in a children’s fairy tale — a delicious cookie.

    When I discovered that it was designed by Charles W. Squires (the architect of my Cross House), I could not have been happier, and not too surprised. I mean, who else might have come up with such exuberance?

    As I walked around the house recently I was immediately struck by a thought: there were two houses before me. One seems much much simpler, and perhaps from the 1870s. The other house appears to engulf the earlier house, and seems from the 1890s. There might perhaps even been some work done in the 1880s.

    The original house was, surely, just one story, with an attic, and a flat center to the roof surrounded by iron cresting (extant).

    In the 1890s did Squires renovate an 1870s home? MOST of what is visible on the house, and all of the carriage house, is clearly 1890s. But some parts are clearly 1870s.

    Checking through old Sanborn Maps (a favored pastime) helps support this suspicion. An 1893 Sanborn map does not show the carriage house, which is shown in 1899. Certainly the carriage house could have been added, but I suspect that during these years (1893 to 1899) the house went through a significant update and much of what we see today dates from the 1890s.

    I may be wrong.

    No matter the architectural history of the house, the exterior and interior abound with jaw-dropping details.

    You enter a small vestibule but never has such a tiny space been so rich with architectural details. There are two inner doors which have INCREDIBLE swing hinges. The tile floor is stunning and distinctive. There are two small stained-glass windows to each side. I mean, the house had me at the vestibule.

    Then you enter a combined foyer and stair hall.

    Oddly, this space is wide open to the living room, via a gentle arch. Surely there must have originally been greater separation, like with perhaps a pair of pocket doors?

    One enters the living room to the right, and in an east/west line there is:
    – Living room
    – Second living room
    – Dining room
    – Kitchen

    Just to the north of the second living room is a bedroom, and with an adjacent bath just to the west.

    Three rooms have beautiful tin ceilings.

    The main rooms have stunning beveled leaded glass windows.

    Some floors have beautiful patterns.

    The kitchen is not original and is simple.

    As you go up the stairs is a WOW WOW WOW feature: inset in a wall is an arched fretwork panel (now, sadly, with a piece of thin plywood covered its back). Why is it here? It originally opened up into the adjacent room. If I had the house the thin plywood would be gone 10 minutes after I closed on the house.

    Upstairs are four bedrooms, and a full bath. Most are tucked under the sloping roof and, as such, are charming to the extreme. The east bedroom has three dormer windows, and each — amplifying the charm — are of a different width, height, and with different window sashes.

    One bedroom has a kitchen installed, obviously when the house was two apartments at some point.

    As if the whole house was not dazzling enough, there is a carriage house in back., and almost entirely original. Ok, I am freakin’ out, man.

    Nothing can convey the actual experience of being inside the carriage house. The inside is AMAZING. The first floor is stunningly original, and the walls retain their original bead-board. The wainscoting is vertical boarding; the upper walls are horizontal. The window trim, and everything, is original, and in good shape. This interior is a TREASURE. There is a huge sliding door separating the front portion of the carriage house from the rear, and the door retains its original track and sliding hardware.

    Incredibly, the original stair to the second level is in situ. If I were five pounds heavier I would not have, perhaps, made it up the stairs. No image can convey how petite and narrow the stairs are. I found this delightful to an extreme.

    When you get (squeezed) upstairs, you find a single large room, and all recently sheet-rocked. Does the original wall surface remain hidden under????? The windows are all original. The octagon vaults up to for a fabulous spatial experience.

    Geez.

    To the north is a lovely small apartment building. Kiddy-corner from the house is a lovely small church. Sadly, right across the street (east) is a vast parking lot for a a very large church. Two doors to the south is another Squires-designed home (stunning).

    Downtown is two blocks east. Nice.

    To me, 831 Constitution is a rare and valuable treasure. I think a house like this should have energy and money lavished upon it to make it SHINE SHINE SHINE. I would love to see it owned by somebody who was unconcerned about resale value and just wanted to make the house as spectacular as it should be. The house, not too long ago, DID have money and attention lavished up it, but it has since declined a bit.

    I would love to see first-class bathrooms, and a first-class kitchen. I would love to see the magical, wondrous carriage house RESTORED rather than RENOVATED. I would love to see the few not-quite-right aspects of the house made right.

    I love this house.

    2
  2. Lenise says: 17 comments

    **Drool**

  3. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    I wanted to thank my realtor, Lacie, for letting me inside the house to take all the images. I drive Lacie a bit crazy with my endless requests to look at this COOL place or that AMAZING place, and (so far!) Lacie has always been gracious and accommodating.

    http://ekhomes.com/lacie-birk-hamlin/

    1
    • Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 758 comments

      So many great pictures of this wonderful house. So is that you in the mirror, Ross?

      Here’s hoping you and your realtor provide us with lots more houses!

    • shellbell67 says: 138 comments

      I thought that was you in the mirror! 🙂

  4. Lacie Hamlin says: 1 comments

    Ross – Could NEVER say no to you. You are far too knowledgeable, fun and inspiring. Keep ’em coming!

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Lacie! Shhhhhhhh! Your husband might read that!

  5. hea says: 7 comments

    Ross…what can you tell me about those cast iron mantels? We have two in our house (Barber plan #36 Victorian Cottages #2). They seem misplaced and I have always wondered if they were salvaged from an older home or since there was a foundry here in Lexington Mo., they were just more “available” than the wooden mantels more commonly found in houses built in the early 1890s. When I saw similar mantels in the house above, I got excited! Surely you have an answer for me 🙂

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi Hea,

      The house does not have any cast-iron mantles. One mantle is wood, and the dark one is likely slate. Each has a cast-iron insert, and this was normally for burning coal. My Cross House has such inserts in almost every room, although they were likely never much used (if at all) as the house also had radiators when it was built (and still has, but with new high-efficiency boilers).

      • hea says: 7 comments

        Hi Ross…
        The slate fireplace looks a lot like one of my cast iron fireplaces. Similar designs, etc. So similar that I assumed it was cast iron too! Thanks for replying! Additional thanks for finding such a beauty to share! It really is amazing!

  6. Sage says: 75 comments

    Ross, my first thoughts on seeing this place were “dollhouse” and “fairytale” as well. The exterior is really really charming, although I think a fresher paint color is in order. Interior – the tile in the entry way and the hearth of the dark fireplace are really fine. Love all the unpainted woodwork and that wall of old cabinets. The wallpaper must go but really there isn’t much about this house that isn’t liveable. It seems like an incredible deal – you could do your restorations all at once or over time and have something really special for a figurative song.

  7. Denise mills says: 28 comments

    Ross beautiful home. The cabinets and hardware in frame 22 date to early 1920s. Probably about 1922.

  8. Vicki F says: 72 comments

    Well, I have scrolled back and forth through this house for quite a while now and I am totally and unconditionally in love! I knew when I saw the incised lines on the exterior moldings and the little window awning(?) that I was in for a treat before I ever went inside. To me, this is the most impressive house I have ever seen on this site, just because it’s so unique and quirky. I love, love the ceilings and that arched fretwork piece in the stairwell…OMG! The thing is, I’ve seen houses with more fretwork, bigger staircases and more beautiful windows, but it’s something about the way this one was “put together”. I think the architect was in love, or had something really wonderful happen to him when he designed this house – it just seems happy. What the heck is it with Emporia, KS and these awesome houses?

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Vicki, the house is even more intoxicating in person. The images just cannot convey how delicious/delightful/charming the place feels, inside and out.

  9. Vicki F says: 72 comments

    Ross, I can only imagine! Thanks, by the way, for sharing your pictures with us. I came back for one more look before I go to bed and was wondering how this house is heated. I did not see any radiators or heat registers of any type in the pics. Also, what is under the stairwell? Does it go anywhere or is it just a space?

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi Vicki!

      I was so entranced by the leaded-glass window under the stair landing that I never looked to my left to see what was UNDER the stair!

      There is a full basement, but I used an exterior stair to enter it.

      The house has central heat/air.

  10. Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

    So, what are the negatives? Does the roof leak? Does it need to be re-wired…re-plumbed…re-painted? Surely (I know, don’t call me “Shirley”) there must be some dramatic issue if a house seemingly this lovely is selling for only $80k!

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Five factors, in my opinion, seem to impact the price of this treasure.

      1) It is across the street from a parking lot.

      2) The kitchen.

      3) While the house was immaculate about ten years ago, it has not really been touched since. The whole has a slightly tattered air, and the yard has gone slightly wild.

      4) While I think the carriage house is AMAZING and should be restored, MOST potential buyers will want to demolish it for a two-car garage. I am not kidding.

      5) MOST potential buyers only see all the work needed on an old home; they do not see the beauty/quality.

      My realtor says that young people, in particular, are highly focused on one-story homes, and with good energy efficiency.

      So, a 1970s brick one-story ranch — however dull and soulless — but with a new furnace and good insulation, will sell faster than this treasure, and for more.

      Yep, the world is a-crazy!

      There is only a very tiny percentage of potential buyers who would want such a home. You know, the really cool buyers!

      • Paul WPaul W says: 569 comments

        Great house, and you are right its priced based on its ‘limited appeal’. This house needs someone not concerned about resale, who will move their antiques in and go about the business of some light restorations.

        The later ‘free classic” porch doesn’t distract from the main house and other than a couple of things I’d add (brackets on the left side bay window area, I cant find anything to fault with the house or the obvious attention to detail the previous owners lavished on it.

        Great house

  11. Wendy Anstead says: 13 comments

    Ross, what are the monthly property taxes like in Emporia? Zillow is claiming 12K+ for a year for this house. The high taxes are one reason we will not move to New York. Thanks for all your passion.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi Wendy!

      I can assure you that the taxes are not anywhere near that. My Cross House is but a few blocks aways, and my taxes are WAY lower than a $1,000 a month. Yikes!

  12. Betsy says: 164 comments

    “What the heck is it with Emporia, KS and these awesome houses?”

    NO KIDDING !! This one is stunning.

  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    To save comment space, I can only echo what Ross said. The house seems larger inside than the exterior suggests. Noticed in the streetview from Sept. 2012 that there was a “pending” sale sign in the yard-so did the sale fall through or was it foreclosed or perhaps is being flipped? (the last seems unlikely considering the moderate price) The house helps to validate my personal opinion that Kansas Victorians tend to be more ornate perhaps because the architectural stylistic traditions were new and experimental there during the Victorian age. Kansas still has a decidedly rural feel which becomes even stronger as one goes west in the Sunflower State. It looks like in the post-Great Depression era, new development was sporadic which allowed more Victorian era houses to survive. Kansas pioneers were a hardy bunch with the early sod-busting settlers living in underground “soddies” primitive dugout homes. No wonder once the railroads arrived and with it an unlimited access of architectural materials, locals opted for ornate homes even if their square footage was modest. I visited remote Oberlin, in northwestern Kansas a few years ago and there too ran across an unusual Victorian home: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/sets/72157623679885629/ The gingerbread attached to the underside of the eaves in this manner is unique in my experience. So too the unusual layout of the stained glass and the odd ornamental tiles attached around the foundation of the house. Getting back to the Emporia example, it appears from the Spanish language Church that Emporia must have a sizable Hispanic population. Not unexpected in an largely agricultural region. I also noticed the house two doors down had burglar bars over the entry door-so any buyer might want to verify neighborhood crime statistics. Other than that, I can summarize my opinion of this house as being “drop-dead” wonderful! Of course, I’m heavily biased towards ornate Victorians because I personally subscribe to the philosophy that more actually IS more. (I think this colorful house is the decorative antithesis of the minimalist 1970’s modern Ranch style house)

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi John!

      In answer to two of your comments, the demographics of Emporia (pop. 25,000) are:
      79.2% White
      25.4% Hispanic or Latino
      3.2% African-American
      3.1% Asian
      0.8% American Indian
      10.5% from some other race
      3.1% from two or more races

      No, the city is not a hotbed of crime! The fact that one neighbor has entry door burglar bars is, perhaps, more indicative of a super cautious person rather than a crime problem. Note how none of the neighboring houses have burglar bars.

      I get nervous when ALL houses in a neighborhood have bars across the doors and windows!

      1
      • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

        Unless my math logic is wrong, how can a city have 79.2% of one ethnic group and 25.4% of another. Doesn’t that add up to a bit more than 100%? And we haven’t even thrown in the others yet!

        1
        • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
          Emporia, KS

          Good point! I pulled the stats off Wikipedia. But, the stats are not wholly off. Emporia is mostly white, and with a large Hispanic population. There is also a small but obvious Asian presence.

          It should be noted, too, that Emporia is a college town, and this skews things considerable (a lot of young people).

        • JimJim says: 3808 comments

          Your math isn’t wrong but the standard Census Dept. figures don’t count Hispanic or Latino as a race, which it isn’t. The other numbers add to 99.9%. Hispanic or Latino is a separate figure, since Hispanic folks could belong to any race.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      John,

      You wrote: “The house seems larger inside than the exterior suggests.”

      Yes, I was also surprised at how large the house was.

      On the first floor is:
      Entry/stairhall
      Two living rooms
      Dining room
      Bedroom
      Kitchen
      Full bath

      Second floor:
      Four bedrooms
      Full bath

      Full basement
      This has good-sized windows (now all covered up) so this space could make a good shop or something

      Carriage House
      Two more floors of potential.

    • EricEric says: 150 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1918 Bunkhouse
      WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

      John, thanks for sharing the photos of the house in Oberlin, Kansas. Having field-measured
      this house, I am quite familiar with it. The aspects of the house which you find to be unique
      were the result of “artistic licence” by the woman who owned the house in the 1970’s. The
      gingerbread is actually made of scroll-sawn plywood and is now delaminating in many places.
      The ornament above many windows is also made of plywood.

      The ceramic tiles covering the foundation were also added in the 1960’s or 70’s. They were
      originally installed as a wainscot in a meat shop a few blocks away which was built in 1900
      (Oberlin’s Grossinklaus Building) and can be seen in this period illustration:
      http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ksdecatu/Oberlin/page_5.htm

      The “unusual layout” of the stained glass can be similarly accounted for; some of the windows
      were added at the time of the other alterations; some interior and exterior features were
      salvaged from a nearby house which was demolished in the 1960’s.

      I have recommended to the current owner that the gingerbread and other stylistically
      inappropriate alterations and additions be removed, but so far nothing has happened.

      A few years ago Kelly posted a very similar house in Osawatomie:
      http://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/07/11/1906-queen-anne-osawatomie-ks/
      This is very nearly what the house in Oberlin looked like before it was so aggressively
      “Victorianized”. Usually I would agree with you that “more actually IS more”, but in
      this case, more is definitely less!

      • Curiouser George says: 1 comments

        There are three contributors on this blog who I regularly look forward to reading and John S. is one them. His knowledge, insights, and vocabulary are gifts that I’m happy to learn and benefit from. I have to say, though, that it gives me a bit of a chuckle to have Eric reveal those unique and ornate examples of Oberlin Victorian life to be more a case of a late 20th century small town eccentric. Kind of makes me want to go there to see for myself! 🙂

        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

          Thanks, George. I’m just an old house nut who should better spend his time working on old house projects than commenting on old houses because candidly, only a small number of people appreciate them. Guess it could be worse; I could be passionately posting on the Flat Earth Society’s pages. Bless Kelly’s heart for being so tolerant with us/me. While speaking with an architectural enthusiast friend of mine in Cleveland yesterday (Craig Bobby in the Lakewood suburb) he said I was one of the very few people he knew who would literally drive a thousand miles by car to see a particular (Victorian era) house. I think he was politely trying to tell me he thinks I’m crazy.
          With that in mind, I wish I could create a documentary type show like American Pickers on the History Channel where instead of picking antiques, I would travel to film and document some of the interesting old houses featured on this blog. I actually have a Tennessee friend with some connections to the Scripps network in Knoxville, (HGTV channel) but they don’t seem to have much interest in old houses these days. (except how they can be renovated and modernized) Nonetheless, I’m taking a GoPro camera on an upcoming trip and plan to experiment and have some fun with it. If any of the (beginner level) old house video footage seems worth sharing, I’ll post a link somewhere.
          Collectively, as people who care about old houses, we need to find additional ways of saving endangered homes still standing and for those in better condition help to connect caring new owners who will preserve the details that make them unique and appealing. Since every old house buyer is also buying into the community where they are located, it would be nice to have a short historical and contemporary perspective video of the community and neighborhood where the old house is located. I know of at least two out-of-state buyers who bought old houses almost sight-unseen and shortly thereafter regretted doing so. The typical realtor listings are quite limited in the information they provide but there are other places (City-Data for example) where more community information is available. “Virtual Tours” are also quite limited in what they provide but a 3-5 minute HD video with an in-depth look and narrative about the specific house, neighborhood, and the community from the perspective of an old house lover could be very useful. The American Pickers TV guys sometime go into interesting old houses and buildings (and find really cool stuff) but rarely is much mentioned about the setting or the location’s history.

          • JimJim says: 3808 comments

            John, many of us appreciate the work you do in documenting old houses, and talking about them here is part of your larger contribution to the field. Let’s hope that Kelly can find a way to permanently archive all of the houses and commentary on this site for the benefit of future owners and old house lovers. (On American Pickers, I’m amazed at how many people have huge buildings filled with old stuff – I love it. And yes, many of the old buildings are fascinating also.)

            The discussion of whether architectural details are original, or authentic reproductions, or simply modern interpretations is interesting to me. Maybe I’m one of few in wanting to know exactly what’s what on an old house. I think there’s a meaningful difference between something created in 1886 and something re-created in 2014, even if it’s photographically identical. Then there are things that were created in 2014 “in the style of” 1886 or (worse) “in the spirit of” 1886. It’s not that re-creating historical details is a bad thing, but if we don’t know which is which how can we know if a building is a genuine historical artifact or somebody’s fantasy about old houses? As much as I like this house in Emporia, I have many of these questions about it.

            • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

              Well said, Jim. I too sometimes wonder as to what I’m seeing is original or not when the prior owner-restorers were savvy enough to accurately replicate original period details or even add them to suit their whimsy and personal tastes. While its not the worst thing that can be done to an old house, such subtle changes can skew our understanding of the house and make the determination of what is original to the house or added (especially when salvage architectural items are incorporated) difficult to discern. Maybe I’m too much of a period purist and so long as the homeowners enjoy their surroundings, that’s what matters most. Going back a few decades, such period reinterpretations were seldom seen but at least some old house enthusiasts have since mastered the styles and techniques of the past to the point where they can make the new look old and original. When a house has been stripped and lacks original detail, I think replicating an appropriate period interior can be forgiven so long as the new details are not more ornate or clash with the original style of the house. As previously stated, I worry far more about the clueless folks who think every old house needs to look 21st century inside-they far outnumber those owners who personalize the house in period style to suit their tastes.

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

        Hi Eric, Many thanks for clarifying my curiosity about the Oberlin, KS house. At the time (a couple of years ago) I did not notice the eave “gingerbread” as being made of plywood but did note it was the only Victorian era home I’d seen with that kind of eave ornament. I did suspect the foundation tiles were newer as they were affixed to the newer concrete in places. The odd placement of the art glass windows is now explained as well. It’s difficult for me to criticize such naive efforts to add Victorian type details by homeowners when so many others slap on siding, rip off ornamental architectural elements, and otherwise try to modernize a period home. I had forgotten about the Osawatomie house; it has loads of original Victorian exuberance without the need to add yet more. Not that it matters, but virtually every architectural detail in that house (even the lovely stained glass staircase window) could be found in the E.L. Roberts Millwork catalog from 1903-republished by Dover Publications and available in the book list recommendations at the top of this page. The original owner had very good decorative tastes. I still believe many Kansas Victorian era homes leaned towards the ornamental side and were less conservative in their decoration than homes in states to the east. Thanks again for letting me know that more wasn’t necessarily more in the Oberlin, KS house.

  14. Vicki F says: 72 comments

    Well said, as usual John Shiflet, well said. Paul W. I’m considering loading my Victorian antiques and going West, young man. Does anybody know of a good contractor in Emporia? TeeHee

  15. Wendy says: 13 comments

    I did some more research by looking up the National Register on the Keebler house. It seems that during the 1980’s an upstairs bedroom caught on fire causing a lot of damage. Many of the wall and features were redone due to the fire.

    • Wendy says: 13 comments

      Also, at the time of the application for the National Register in 1992 it listed 3 fireplaces. I wonder where the 3rd one went?

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi Wendy,

      The damage was mostly confined to a small portion of the roof.

      Also:

      “In 1983, during the removal of exterior paint, a fire started on the north side of the house. The fire did not do major damage to the house, but it provided an opportunity for the house to be completely restored.”

      Also:

      http://www.emporiagazette.com/news/article_7d3ecbd3-712f-5fbd-b11f-3a0d2db0f13c.html

      • Wendy says: 13 comments

        Thanks for the link to the great article. The house looked so nice dressed for the holidays. My Victorian tree would be perfect in the bay window. Interesting that the owners at the time said it was 3500sf. Do you feel the 2400sf is more in line?

      • Wendy says: 13 comments

        Any idea where the 3rd fireplace is or was?

  16. Theresa Feeney says: 1 comments

    I love the ceilings and windows in this house, so beautiful!

  17. JimJim says: 3808 comments

    I’ve never been to Kansas but I don’t know anything bad about it except for its unending flatness, and the lack of trees in its western parts. Since I’m a hills and woods guy I probably wouldn’t ever live there unless they’re giving away beautiful fully restoring Victorian homes needing only a little fixing. Like this one, for the price of a double-wide.
    If statistics can be believed, there’s not a lot of crime in Emporia, Kansas. The overall rate is low and most of it is petty thefts and bar fights with a few stolen cars and burglaries. There were zero murders in the last 3 years – my east coast town of about twice the size averages more than one a month. I would think the probability of being a victim of violent crime in most big cities is greater than the combined odds of the same in Emporia PLUS the odds of a tornado hitting you.

    Thanks Ross for the photos and commentary – I hope the Chamber of Commerce is buying you some dinners. A couple questions on this amazing little house: How long did the restoration go on here? Are the exterior colors from an analysis of the original paint? What, if anything you know of, was added or replaced? – much of the exterior trim seems new, as do some of the tin ceilings. Just curious.

    (Factlet – The famous Wild West days of Dodge City, Kansas with the bordellos and shoot-outs was in its prime just a couple hundred miles west as this house was being built.)

    1
  18. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    MYTH BUSTING NOTE:

    Kansas is known as a flat state. Pancake flat.

    This is a myth.

    Yes, western Kansas is flat. Flat, flat, and more flatness. It is weird visiting western Kansas and seeing an ENDLESS expanse of…flat. Weird, unsettling, scary even, but kinda awesome.

    However, I live in the Flint Hills.

    The eastern side of Kansas is hilly. No mountains. But nice hills. Very beautiful.

    And I have visual proof:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=flint+hills+kansas&client=safari&rls=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=4sILVK_9BMnH8AGI04H4DQ&ved=0CCwQsAQ&biw=1523&bih=878

    1
  19. Betsy says: 164 comments

    I would love to live in Kansas, I like big open sky, flat OR hilly. AND the winters , while not “mild” would be milder than the ones here in Wisconsin.
    And yeah, that plywood backing to the fret-work n the stairs would be removed before I plugged in the refrigerator!

    1
    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Betsy,

      There is an old saying about Kansas weather:

      If you do not like the weather, wait an hour.

      This is very true, at least in the area I live in.

      We can have a snowstorm in, say, December, and a week later it will be 70 degrees. I am not kidding. When I lived on the east coast winter would set in…and stay for a while. Not so with Kansas. The weather is always changing and unpredictable. I have grown fond of this because when the weather is AWFUL I know it will not last.

      Oh, you made me laugh about the plywood comment!

    • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

      Judging by the photos, you’ll need to replace several/most of the spindles on the right side of the fret display. They appear to have been removed or perhaps were broken in the past.

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

        The spindles and decorative turnings are missing as you noted. Most of these kinds of items have holes drilled deep into the frame so you can first put the dowel/spindle into the bottom hole then pull it up to meet the top hole and glue it in place. The right side will be a mirror image of the left side so the spacing of turned elements is easy to determine. Original fretwork in Victorian houses is a rarity although from the 1890’s to the early 1900’s they were exceedingly common. Now, what one finds most often is a ghost outline and a few holes where screws were used to attach the fretwork piece. Since the variety of interior fretwork designs were almost limitless, determining the correct design of a missing piece is nearly impossible. (unless an even rarer period photo is found) Millwork catalogs from the above referenced era almost always had a fretwork section often called “Grilles”. Here’s an Internet Archive online (free) edition from 1889 by the firm of Cutting and Delaney in Buffalo, NY: https://archive.org/details/ourdoorswindowsh00cutt By 1900, there were probably a hundred or more companies making and selling interior fretwork items. By 1910, they were dwindling fast and few survived the World War I era. Along with the beautiful stained and leaded glass, interior fretwork pieces were a beautiful artistic component of interior decoration from the Victorian Age.

  20. Dot gillis says: 51 comments

    What a beautiful home. Not house, but home. It’s charming, quirky, and must have awesome tales to tell. I sure appreciate everyone’s knowledge on this site. I spend way too much time on here, dreaming!

  21. Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

    Although this might be close to the perfect house, and close to the perfect price, I can’t say that Emporia is close to the perfect city to retire to.

    It’s not bad, mind you, and it does have Ross and some other cultural/recreational/educational variety, but at the end of the day it’s still more of an out-in-the-middle-of-nowhere sort of a place than anything else. This could be a problem.

    For what it’s worth, as I age and approach retirement (I’m 65 now but am obligated to work until 67), I’m looking for a period home (such as this) in a place that has good public transportation (enough with cars, insurance, gas prices, etc), easy access arriving/departing (for my wife this means an airport, and for me it means Amtrak), strong cultural/recreational attractions (symphony, theatre, museums, rivers, hiking-biking trails, etc), good higher education (college or university, or both), convenient neighborhood shopping (no superstores), cozy (not nosy) neighbors, seasonal weather (I’ll be retired, so why do I care if there’s three feet of snow outside?), and strong, civic-minded local government for a local population of 100 – 200K citizens. I also would prefer a mixture of ethnicity (Asian, African, European, Hispanic…but no alien creatures).

    I don’t know if my ideal place exists, and I’m willing to make some trade-offs, but in the main these are my considerations whenever such a terrific Old House Dream such as this Emporia residence surfaces.

    • Gemma says: 128 comments

      Fairport Harbor, OH
      Bardstown, KY
      Alcoa, TN
      Knoxville, TN has public transport. The others don’t.

  22. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    Dear Curiouser George,

    I would concur that Emporia is not a dazzling city! It is just your average sorta place with a population of 25,000.

    However, everything is relative. Based on your ideal city description, this house, in such an ideal location, would cost WAY more.

    The trade-off with Emporia, and countless similar cities across America, is that they offer highly affordable housing with SOME social amenities. In my experience, the more amenities, the ever greater housing cost (NYC being the supreme example).

    Lawrence, Kansas, has many amenities, and is very close to big Kansas City, but this house would be $600K in Lawrence.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/637-Tennessee-St-Lawrence-KS-66044/91130621_zpid/

    Having once lived in NYC, I do not miss the endless effort to earn enough to pay for housing.

    NOTE: Amtrak goes through Emporia but does not stop. However, plans are afoot for passenger service to resume in Emporia. I can hardly wait. Whoee!

    NOTE: Too many amenities is not always a good thing. When I lived in NYC there was always so much going on that I never focused on numerous personal projects. It was only after moving to the middle of nowhere that I finally finished two books, and got them published.

    • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

      Ross – The house that I really wanted (and still do, but it’s a pending sale) is located in Fort Wayne, Indiana. It was built in the late 1800’s by one of the premier architects of the city and state, and was his residence for a number of years (Kelly featured it in one of the multiple listings a couple of months ago). It’s about 2000sf, which is 500sf less than the Emporia residence, but good for a retiree and it is in absolutely move-in, restored condition. It has a lovely yard with gardens, and a two car garage with apartment loft which was built in 1990. It is on the city bus line, and is in a historic neighborhood with adjacent Asian and Hispanic populations (also African-American). I’ve corresponded with a couple of the owners in the neighborhood, and it’s obvious the pride and enthusiasm they have. The city has an increasingly active cultural life (symphony, theatre, museums), and recreational venues (kayaking, biking and running trails). All are a short bus ride downtown. Also, there are several large and small colleges/universities, as well as a minor-league baseball team, a minor-league hockey team, and some kind of semi-pro basketball league. There is a regional/international airport 8 miles away, but the nearest Amtrak station is 20-25 miles away; from there, though, you can go to Chicago (a few hours), New York, or Washington. The crime rate is about average, and population is around 200,000 – 250,000.
      So, for all of this, the owner initially asked $155K. Four months later, she reduced it to $150K, and four months after that to $140K. In July, it was taken off the market but I’ve been told in the interim that she’s accepted a lesser offer and the sale should be completed soon. It’s just a guess, but I suspect she accepted for around $135K, which is what she paid in 2005. In my book, whoever is buying her property is getting a heck of a good deal, though I don’t discount there are some negatives as well (e.g., too many rentals in the surrounding area).

      I mention this to show that there are still opportunities out there that match my desires with my bank account. The impressive Lawrence home that you linked to is about 5000sf. That’s more house than I’d ever want in a retirement residence, regardless of location, not to mention I couldn’t afford it.

      The Emporia residence is almost as nice as the Ft. Wayne one, and has the advantage of that terrific garage. What a great retirement project that would be. The large parking lot in the front wouldn’t be an issue either, since it’s partially obscured by trees and normally would only be used on Sundays by the adjacent Methodist church. The city’s nicely renovated theatre is only a couple easy blocks away, and Emporia State University is a big plus as well. If the Amtrak train was already stopping (like it used to), instead of being a grass-roots effort to bring it back, then I honestly think I’d be emailing your realtor! Kansas City is not that far up the tracks, and I know it provides a large number of things to do. Go a bit further, and you’re in St. Louis…a bit further and it’s Chicago! Then, turn around and head back home. So easy and convenient.

      Before I forget, I want to congratulate you on the Cross House blog. I was particularly impressed with the inclusion of the information about the previous owners. I’m sure the deceased member would be so proud of what you’ve been able to accomplish making her dream come true.

  23. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    There have been many worthwhile discussions generated as a result of this property and I’m grateful it appeared when it did. It almost deserves to be a separate topic thread in the Forum section. (Kelly, maybe take this long thread and add it there?) I’m sure if we combined the much-discussed Saginaw, MI house and this one they would qualify as the two most-discussed properties in 2014. Whether we realize it or not, we essentially have an old houses discussion group going on and I find it rewarding as well as fun to read and join in on the comments. I think that is what makes Kelly’s blog unique on the Internet and I thank her for allowing it to exist. No doubt, other Internet blogs on the Old House topic are envious of this one. Thanks, Kelly!

    1
  24. franceslyns says: 75 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Windsor, CA

    It is such a joy to reading everyone comments and seeing what they are thinking/feeling about these wonderful old homes. I love this site, it reminds me why I became an architectural historian and, there is no Federal and state laws to worry about, no arguing with engineers about why something is important, no one from the public telling me I’m an idiot (not yet anyway), just pure unabashed old house love!

    1
  25. CoraLeeCoraLee says: 1803 comments

    Hello! I am so happy to see this house here. I am the one who sent the original link via Facebook to Old House Dreams from the realtor.com website. I was so excited that is was for sale.

    I grew uI live in Tennessee, but I grew up in Emporia. When I was in college, I played the piano for the small church that sits diagonally across the intersection from this home. At the time, the owners of the house attended church there and I was able to experience the interior when someone really cared for the home.

    This house is stunning. I can’t really describe it…not just the way it looks but the way a house like this makes you feel. It’s truly an experience.

    As for Emporia, I admit that after growing up there I was ready to see the world. It is a small town in the middle of the Flint Hills. I believe that is part of it’s appeal. 🙂
    Ross, I saw recently that the Plumb House on 12th Ave and West St. is for sale. This is another Emporia, KS “old house gem.” Are you familiar with it?

  26. CoraLeeCoraLee says: 1803 comments

    Thank you, George! Although $400k is expensive for Emporia, KS, considering that the Plumb House is over 9000 sq. ft, it’s not a bad price. I’ve never been inside of the main part of that house, but I’ve been in the basement. At one time there were apartments down there and I had a friend who lived in one. As a kid, I always wondered what the inside looked like. It doesn’t dissapoint. 🙂

  27. CoraLeeCoraLee says: 1803 comments

    I just realized my original comment had a typo. I live in Tennessee. I moved to Emporia, KS with my family when I was 1 year old (in 1970), and moved away in 2000.
    The town is FILLED with old, interesting homes.

  28. curiouser georgecuriouser george says: 162 comments

    The tiles in the entry way looked odd to me, almost like they are modern tiles and they are larger than what I would expect in a Victorian entry way. I’m used to seeing smaller pieces inlaid. Also, it seems like there should be more wear & tear on them.

    Ross – Did these tiles appear period authentic to you?

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Yes, I thought the same thing about the vestibule tiles at first, but closer examination indicates that they seem vintage.

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

        That said, they are not a very common pattern. If any ever come loose, it might be worthwhile to look on the underside and see who the maker was. The Ohio valley region was prominent in the production of art tiles during the late Victorian era. In high end homes of the era, the mosaic appearance would be from individual tesserae, or small stone pieces as in ancient floor construction but here art tiles give the same appearance at a much lower cost. Here’s a Victorian era commercial mosaic installation in an old part of Cincinnati using the ancient techniques: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/7436128970/in/set-72157630245353562

        • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
          Emporia, KS

          John, I will be in the house again on the 24th, and will check the tiles more closely. My initial quick assumption may prove wrong!

          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

            Ross, I’m certain they are tiles rather than clusters of mosaic pieces. Now as to age, like you, I’d have to see them up close to reach any conclusions. At least at first glance at the photo they seem of the period. The variety of Victorian tile designs (encaustic, transfer-printed, and Majolica glazed,) is almost endless. While English tile companies were producing high quality tiles at the dawn of the Victorian Age, by the 1870’s American domestic tile manufacturers were approaching the quality levels of famous English makers. The competition on both sides of the Atlantic remained steady and strong until the end of the era. In the post Victorian era, American Arts & Crafts tiles surpassed the demand for imported versions. The Golden Age of art tiles drew to a close with the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930’s.

          • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

            Ross – Were you able to make the return trip on the 24th? If so, could you determine the age of the foyer tiles?
            A new OHD post today in Illinois showed the type of encaustic tiles that I would have expected to be here, so I’m curious as to whether these tiles are original.

  29. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    George,
    My spouse and I visited this house on Wednesday and Ross carefully pulled up one of the entry tiles. On the back was stamped: “American Encaustic Tile Company” with the pattern name: “Alhambra” Given that American Encaustic Tile of Zanesville, Ohio, has long been out of business,(1877-1935) I feel the tiles are from no later than the early 1900’s and perhaps as far back as the beginning of the 1890’s. I found a link with some information about American Encaustic: https://sites.google.com/site/tileinstallationdatabasemz/oh_zanesville–american-encaustic-tiling-company-showroom

    • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

      John – That is such good news about the tiles, and has made my day. I have to give hats off to you as well, because you earlier mentioned the Ohio origins of so many tiling companies such as American Encaustic.

      Just one more example of why OHD is such a unique and valuable blog.

      • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

        I’ll add that it seems odd that a Google search for AET “Alhambra” shows a noticeably different tile than the one in the foyer.
        http://www.artsconnected.org/resource/51595/alhambra-tile

        There is some resemblance to the tiles around the border, but no similarity to the ones in the center which show a fleur-de-lis pattern. It makes me wonder if the name was used more than once to describe alternative designs.

        Google Images, however, clearly shows the pattern as identical to the one in Emporia:
        https://www.etsy.com/listing/111601211/antique-tiles-alhambra-by-american

        A book titled, “Architectural Tiles: Conservation and Restoration”, notes that many street signs found on American and Canadian corners were in a style titled, “Alhambra”, so maybe it is a generic and popular term after all.

  30. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    I think “Alhambra” referred to a type of of tile that looked like a mosaic pattern. I might presume some tiles were discovered at Alhambra Palace in Grenada, Spain with similar patterning. If one Googles the Alhambra name and looks at the images, some incredible Moorish tilework is portrayed. I will be uploading my photos in the coming days. I underestimated the amount of tasks that accumulated over a ten day period so progress is on a priority basis until I can catch up.

  31. CoraLeeCoraLee says: 1803 comments

    It appears they have dropped the price of this house. I so hope someone purchases it that will love it.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      CoraLee, I worry that somebody will buy the house because it is a good price, rather than because they are deeply in love with the house, and eagerly willing to lavish money and attention to make this special jewel shine.

      When I toured the house again on the 24th (with John!), a potential buyer did a walk-through just before we left. I was heartened to learn that she, too, thought the house was a treasure and that she, too (and her husband?), thought the carriage house was a treasure and deserved restoration (rather than demolition for a 2-car garage).

      So, my fingers are crossed that the RIGHT person buys the home. Such a person will, no doubt, be my very newest and very favorite best friend!

      1
  32. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    When we looked at the house on Weds. we went into down in the basement. Some structural attention will be necessary. Not real bad but not something that can be ignored either. Might be difficult to get financing on this one so best that a potential buyer make a cash offer. The interior is phenomenal for a house this size.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      John!!!!! I must protest!!!!

      Based on my experience, I do not believe that this house will be a problem to finance.

  33. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    Ross, then Emporia has some sensible lenders. One more good thing about your community.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      John, the fact that I easily obtained a mortgage for the Cross House, and the adjacent carriage house, and another chunk of $$$ to get the two properties in order, might well suggest that Emporia has INsensible lenders.

      And this is good!

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

        Ross, some places have lenders who roll their eyes when you mention seeking a loan for an old house. In St. Joseph, MO for example, where I tried to buy a $10k house from Nodaway Bank (I had $7k in checking at the time) I offered a $2,500 down payment and prepared a slick little presentation folder with photos, figures, and other pertinent details that would facilitate a short term personal loan decision- (they do not make mortgages for less than $15k) an hour later, got a call back from my banker who said there was no way would they consider a loan on an old house. I was told by several other St. Joe natives that the only way local banks would mortgage an old house was if it had a new interior, new systems, and passed every inspection that could be thrown at it. It left me with a bitter taste in my mouth and made me wary of ever approaching a bank again for any kind of loan or credit. I put most bankers in the same integrity class as professional politicians and used car salesmen. That opinion was lowered still more when the 2008 banking-housing crisis occurred where the large, “too big to fail” banks got a free ride at taxpayers expense while distressed “underwater” homeowners were served foreclosure papers. My philosophy is to limit credit use as much as possible and pay cash whenever possible.

        1
        • EricEric says: 150 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1918 Bunkhouse
          WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

          I’m with you, John – credit is just a fast track to debt… and just the way the banks want it, too! They create money out of thin air when you take out a loan via their fractional reserve system, and the borrower ends up paying dearly for the magic act. Fortunately, small towns across the country still offer affordable (under 10K)
          fixer-uppers for those old house addicts who wish to avoid servitude. And the best part is that you don’t have to deal with insurance companies and their mandates if you’re not taking out a loan. When you heat exclusively with a wood-burning stove, as I do, that is an issue; insurance companies don’t like antique cast iron stoves.

          • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            Eric, I agree that having debt leads to a kind of servitude.

            But…never paying a lot for anything (to avoid debt) leads to other kinds of servitude.

            I have lived both kinds of lives. And much prefer servitude to debt! I love having a new reliable car (financed!) and I am having the time of my life restoring the Cross House (financed!).

            That said, I am careful not to overload myself with debt, as I did in the 1980s (with disastrous consequences). So, in short, I think debt, like good wine, is a wonderful thing…in moderation!

            • EricEric says: 150 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1918 Bunkhouse
              WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

              I agree to that moderation is the key to a good many things. The point I want to stress is that readers of this blog need not just dream about old houses… those who are are renting because they can’t afford the Victorian mansion they lust after can still become homeowners if they scale down their vision and can thrive in a small town environment. Many houses can be purchased outright for less than the amount required for a downpayment on the “average” house. Unfortunately, these bargain houses are not heavily advertised or promoted… they require footwork and diligence to track them down. But it is still possible!

              • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
                Emporia, KS

                Eric, in this we are in 100 percent agreement!

                Having once lived in NYC (where an average studio apartment costs $500K!), my old friends in the city still cannot fathom that I have an interesting, rich life living in what they consider NO WHERE.

                I think before the internet, living in a great city was more critical than it is now. For example, I once needed a great city for its fabulous bookstores (I love books), today I can find any book I could possibly desire just a click away. Ditto for many many many things once only available in great cities.

                Also, as I have previously mentioned, my income is wholly internet based. What I earn a living doing was once only possible in a great city. Today, it makes zero difference where I live.

                So, live crammed into a $500,000 studio in NYC? Or live expansively in a big old house in a small community for a great deal less?

                1
  34. CoraLeeCoraLee says: 1803 comments

    Ross, yes that is my concern too. I’m afraid someone will see a 4+ bedroom house at less than 80k, buy it and rent it out or convert it to apartments or something. Did I read that it is now on the Historic Register? Does that protect it at all?

    All this talk is making me homesick! While I was in school, I lived in an apartment at the corner of 12th & Constitution in Emporia. It was a Sears home that had been converted to apartmements, however the original features had all been left (my apartment had a claw foot tub and very high ceilings). I’ve often wondered about that place. Emporia has so many old, interesting homes.

  35. Cliff Schlothauer says: 40 comments

    John, I have an appointment to see this house on Oct. 3rd. and wonder if you could tell me where the structural damage is in the basement, so I will know where to look. Any other comments on the damage would be appreciated. This issue is something I have not dealt with before. Where I am from few homes have basements, so I feel a little lost. Your comments on Kelly’s site have been most informative. Thank you for that. Cliff

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Cliff, I might also add that the settling issues mentioned by John are minor. MOST old houses have minor settling issues!

  36. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    Hi Cliff,
    There’s nothing really hidden about the basement condition in this house-just take a strong flashlight with you and go around-everything is quite visible and evident. I think everything is repairable but there are a few problematic areas. Best before you buy the property to have a contractor specializing in foundation work look at the basement, determine what needs to be repaired, and then get an estimate. One can see some sloping on the first floor but everything needs to be checked with a laser level and put within a quarter inch or so of level. (getting a 120 year old foundation dead level may cost more than its worth. I don’t want the foundation issue to seem major because I don’t believe it is but for a new homeowner getting it fixed right off the bat will eliminate bigger problems on down the road. Otherwise, it’s a great house inside. The neighborhood appears nicer than indicated in streetview-it was very quiet when we visited.

  37. Cliff Schlothauer says: 40 comments

    Hello John and Ross,

    Thank you so much for your valued opinion of the foundation. With my restoration of 4 homes, the oldest being built in 1845, I have not had the experience of this type of situation of foundation issues. I come from a land of adobes, and that is the type of work I have done. My foundation experience has been adobes, so I know how to handle that. Thank you for your time in answering.

  38. Martin says: 8 comments

    Appearently this house has magical powers, even on the internet. I automatically clicked the picture 1 second after I saw it and, wow, I want it.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Martin, I can confirm that the house is magical!

  39. lara jane says: 574 comments

    Off market as of the 17th. Do you know what’s happening with this, Ross? I swear, I was *thisclose* to making a trip up there (it’s about 3 hours, I’m guessing)! I’m so enamored of this place! I hope the right person found her!

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      An interested party has spent some effort to ascertain costs with regards to heating/cooling, structural issues, electrical, etc. It appears that a contract will be signed very soon.

      That said, until they close the house is still theoretically available.

      • lara jane says: 574 comments

        I hope it works out… and that the new owner is gracious enough to allow us a peek into restoring and living in this gem!

  40. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    UPDATE!

    The house did NOT sell, and is currently listed For Sale by owner.

    I will get a contact number.

    • lara jane says: 574 comments

      I need this house. There’s no rule that says one must cohabitate with one’s spouse, right? He can stay down here in Joplin. We can Skype.

      • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        Not only is there no such rule, it could be argued that NOT cohabiting with one’s spouse might make for a better marriage.

  41. Martin H says: 8 comments

    It’s a shame to hear it’s not sold. I’d love to sea this beauty all cleaned up.

  42. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    For sale by owner.

    620 794-6402

    • Sharol says: 12 comments

      Hi Ross. I am the current owner of the Feebler-Stone house. I just happened to come across this website and I have enjoyed reading all of the discussions posted. I fell in love with this house from photos I saw online. It was always my plan and desire to provide the care and attention this home needs and deserves. Two months after purchasing the home I had to replace the sewer. Over the 2-1/2 years I have owned this home I have had the pleasure of hearing many,many fascinating stories. I had no idea how much the community loves this house. It occurred to me that it would be really great and also fun to come up with a way to share this house with the public. I discovered that it could be made available as a bed and breakfast without the necessity of rezoning. My personal circumstances changed and after a lot of emotional consideration I have to sell the house. It is my plan to sell the house thru auction within the next 4-6 weeks. If you or anyone would like any additional info about the sale please call me 620-794-6402 and please leave me a message or a text. Thanks again for all your interest.

      • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        Hi Sharol!

        So nice to “meet” you!

        Please keep us all informed about the auction.

        And if would you enjoy a tour of my big old house please just contact me via my blog:

        http://www.restoringRoss.com

      • lara jane says: 574 comments

        Best of luck with the sale, Sharol! If we didn’t have one kid in high school and one in preschool (oops!) I would move up there and make your charming home my own! Alas! School, work, responsibilities… boo. 😉

        • Sharol says: 12 comments

          Thanks Lara Jane. I wish you could make this home your own also. You would have loved getting to know the family that lives next door.

  43. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    UPDATE!

    From the owner:

    The date for the auction of 831 Constitution has been set for Sunday, June 7th, 2015, at 3:00 pm. Hancock Auction & Real Estate, 620-340-5692, will be handling the sale. There will be a minimum starting bid of $62,000.

  44. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    An important and significant reason to buy a great old house in Kansas is that the state has a Heritage Grant program.

    Any property in the state which is either on the National Register or in a historic district qualifies for the grant program. One can apply for up to $90K, and can re-apply every two years for additional funds. The program only helps with exterior issues, like roofing, chimneys, windows, siding, foundations, and such stuff.

    The house in this thread is on the National Register.

    My big old house (on the National Register) was awarded a full grant this year, and this will be used, in part, to restore the many stained-glass windows, the clear-glass windows, reline the built-in gutters, reroof the towers and porches, and repair siding. So, whoee!

    Kansas also has interesting weather. Whatever the temperature is, it will not last long. We can have a blizzard one week, and 70 degree temperatures a week later. In short, Kansas does not go into a long deep freeze like many northern states.

    In the summer, we can have a few scorching weeks, then mild weeks, then 2 scorching days, them 3 weeks of mild, and so on. Again, the temperature always varies. We often have extreme temperature variations in even a single day. Last week we had a day when it was like 33 in the morning, and about 80 later in the afternoon!

    I enjoy these temperature swings because if I do not like the temperature (too hot; too cold) it does not really matter because it will not last!

    • lara jane says: 574 comments

      This describes exactly our weather in Joplin! Particularly in the “shoulder seasons,” we go back and forth on whether to turn on the AC or heat! One year I recall wearing sandals on January 1 and then we had snow that May 2. So weird.

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

      Congratulations Ross, on getting the heritage grant. During our visit last September, you mentioned that a group of state preservation officials were coming in a day or two to look at the Cross house windows for which a grant had been requested. I’m very happy to see the approved grant was adequate for both the windows and some additional work. On a house that size, any extra help financial or otherwise is always appreciated. I hope to come back eventually and see the entire collection of restored stained glass windows. (trying to remember just how many are there?)

      • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        Hi John!

        My house has 40 stained-glass windows. A few months back I discovered that it originally had 41! So, one went missing over the last 120-years! Luckily, I have its twin, so can (and will) have the lost window recreated.

        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

          Thanks Ross. I knew it was a very large number but didn’t realize it was 41. Since you know what the missing window looked like, I have to assume you also know where the missing window location is. Many Victorian era homes got by with one or two art glass windows. Grand towered Queen Annes sometimes have a dozen windows but 41 would be in the upper extreme-no problem with that because I share the Cross family’s appreciation for art in stained glass windows. (as I’m sure you do as well)

  45. Melissa says: 245 comments

    Ross – This house is beautiful! Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

    Sharol – Best of luck with the auction and your future endeavors – you have clearly prepared this home for future stewards!

  46. RosewaterRosewater says: 4068 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Thanks for posting this house in the scroll Kelly. This was posted last year when I was ridiculously busy and out of the loop and so missed out on seeing it. It is just the kind of wacky, over the top, super creative type of Victorian I like the most. This sort of original creativity of design is just the thing which makes these old houses so interesting to me. For me as a lover of great antique dependencies, that carriage house is even better than the house itself . Uber cool!

    One thing: are those tin ceilings right? By right I mean original to the house. Whenever I have seen them in the past I’ve always assumed that they are later, (unfortunate), additions, especially in public rooms. Am I wrong? Were tin ceilings installed in better houses in the Victorian age? I’ve always assumed they were almost always used only in commercial construction. These ceilings look wrong to me as they always do in old houses. Am I wrong? Thanks’ in advance..

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Rosewater,

      I believe the tin ceilings are relatively recent, and are from:

      http://wfnorman.com

      They look great in the house. Indeed, I would add another tin ceiling to the dining room.

      Original tin ceilings are not uncommon west of the Mississippi. I suspect this was because there were no plasterers capable of doing the elaborate plaster ceilings found on the east coast. I suspect.

    • Paul WPaul W says: 569 comments

      Rosewater. “Almost Always” they were added later. I have seen two houses documented “built with” tin ceilings. One is in Burlington Iowa and another is in Indiana. In both cases the homeowner had some connection to tin ceiling, both had built stores at the same time they were building homes.

      Tin ceilings were more common in Missouri and Kansas because there were companies in that part of the country manufacturing. Also you may see them more often in small towns where skilled plasters may have been in short supply and a builder could order his ceilings.

      But “almost always” they were a fix for a bad plaster ceiling and people either like them or they don’t. I am ‘not a fan’ of them but it wouldn’t deter me from buying house just because it had one.

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 4068 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Thanks’ Paul. Deter a purchase: certainly not! This is a super fab little property for sure. Rip them out: it would be the first thing I’d do beyond any necessary, immediate fixes. To my eye, this sort of contemporary treatment is just the sort of frou frou re-imagining of the Victorian era popularized by certain magazines, which is all to often found in old houses, (usually in concert with much _______ wallpaper often found and sold in those same frillsy willsy mags. This house is a great example of it’s period and would look great if the interior treatments were more sensitive to that aesthetic. Ultimately it’s a matter of a homeowner’s personal taste. To me, they always make a room look – – much less than expensive. Such a fine house deserves better. 🙂

        • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
          Emporia, KS

          Rosewater,

          I deeply appreciate your loathing of “ye olde” tin ceilings. I see such ceilings all the time in person and in glossy magazines purporting to be all about restoration.

          However, in this house the newish (I surmise) tin ceilings look really good. Indeed, at first I thought they were original.

          As I stated above, this would be, for me, a very rare situation whereby I would keep the tin ceilings, and actually add one more in the dining room!

          • RosewaterRosewater says: 4068 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Ross,

            If you put up a tin ceiling in that gorgeous house of yours, I’m gonna drive all the way over there and kick your butt! 😉

            • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
              Emporia, KS

              Rosewater!

              I would never put up tin ceilings in my own house!

              However, I am planning to install, throughout, dropped acoustical ceilings. With 2×4 fluorescent light inserts.

              • Hell, in that case Ross, I’ll trade you my dropped ceiling tracks, panels AND florescent inserts for some of the ceiling fixtures that they’ll make obsolete in your house!

                • Sharol says: 12 comments

                  Amusing banter!!! My 2-1/2 cent opinion is I love tin ceilings for many reasons authentic, fake, original or recent. It’s wonderful that we all have such different opinions and taste!!

              • RosewaterRosewater says: 4068 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1875 Italianate cottage
                Noblesville, IN

                Hehehe 😉

  47. Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

    I’m curious – If a house is being auctioned, does it require full payment by the winner? In other words, is it possible/probable a person could win an auction but have a financial institution finance the sale? Or would payment of the winning bid be required immediately?

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

      George, I would think that a lender would be willing to finance such a sale. However, I’d also expect a down payment equal to 20% of the purchase price would be required, as well as the usual appraisal, and other customary details mortgage loan underwriters require. For FHA or VA financing the requirements might differ. The only thing about an auction sale is that it is always “as is” with no warranties or specific conditions except for a clear title and all taxes paid to closing. Seller incentives like money for closing costs will not be part of an auction sale. Best to check with some local lenders (you might ask Ross, a local resident, for recommendations) and see what terms and conditions they require. The seller and auction company usually expect full payment within a day or two of the sale and may require a proof of funds letter or deposit to be eligible to bid. As noted, the opening bid must be $62,000 or higher to be accepted. (called an auction “reserve” price)

      • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        In my experience, one normally has a reasonable amount of time after an auction to close. Like 30 to 45 days.

        In any event, the auction company will confirm the details.

    • Sharol says: 12 comments

      Please feel free to ask Paul Hancock, the broker for the auction, any questions you or anyone else may have. His number is 620-340-5692. If anyone has a question for me please call or message me from here. I have enjoyed reading all the blogs everyone has written.

      • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

        Thanks for the input, Sharol. I have e-mailed Mr. Hancock with a couple of questions.

        For what it’s worth, I am working overseas (time zone 11+)and would not be able to attend an auction, but I am interested in the mechanism for doing so.

        Can you explain why the December, 2014 offer wasn’t accepted?

        • Sharol says: 12 comments

          The December 2014 offer was accepted. The offer was $75,000 and the appraised value of the house in its present condition was $75,000. The buyers ultimately decided not to purchase the home.

  48. RossRoss says: 2311 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    From the owner:

    “Just wanted let anyone that may be interested: Hancock Auction & Real Estate will hold an open house on Thursday, May 14 from 5-7pm, and on Sunday, May 17 from 2-4pm.”

  49. Martin H says: 8 comments

    I come back every now and then to look at the house again. I still drool all over my keyboard.

  50. Ed FerrisEd Ferris says: 292 comments

    The Lyon County Treasurer informs me that the 2014 property taxes for this house were $1444.36. In Indiana, homesteads are taxed at 1% of valuation, other residential property at 2%, so the taxes would be the same for a non-homesteader.

  51. Tommy QTommy Q says: 454 comments

    I’d even brave tornados to live here but alas I’m 18 months from retirement. Otherwise I’d sell my house, buy this cash, stick a $100K in it and call it home…

  52. Sharol says: 1 comments

    It is now 3 days until the auction. If you will not be in attendance please pray, think positive thoughts or whatever you believe will result in a new owner for this home. Thank you! I hopefully will be able to post a successful outcome to the auction this Sunday at 3:00p.

    • Kelly, Old House DreamsKelly, Old House Dreams says: 9369 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Good luck! 🙂

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      I am praying that your FABULOUS house finds the perfect steward. Good luck!!!!!

    • lara jane says: 574 comments

      I still wish it could be me!!! Best of luck to you AND to the next owners! Thinking positively that an old house dreamer (“official” or not 😉 ) will be getting its keys!

  53. Martin H says: 2 comments

    I hope it gets an owner who takes good care of it

  54. Susan says: 5 comments

    Kelly, I can’t remember now how I found your website, but I visit very often, and I love it. I am in awe of all you do. My comment is also to Ross; I am originally from Ks, a small town east of emporia, and I have family in emporia. I can’t say I know it well, but they do ?. I Live in Florida right now, but planning a return to ks, hopefully in the next few months. I enjoy this site, your comments in particular. I’ve been old house crazy for a long long time ?. I love this house, and if my timing were a little better, I think I’d grab it! Smaller than what I swoon over, but great nonetheless.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Thanks Susan for the kind words! When you arrive in Emporia let me know! Let’s go old house a-huntin’!

  55. Susan says: 5 comments

    I will! I rehabbed a Queen Anne in KC in the early 2000s, not far from The Plaza. I hope I get a chance at another project one of these days.

    • RossRoss says: 2311 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi again Susan,

      Well, the house did not sell yesterday, so…you…still…have…a…chance!!!!!!!!!

  56. Sharol says: 12 comments

    I tried to post the outcome of the auction yesterday. Since I do not find it here I will try again. The house did not sell yesterday at auction. There just was not a good turnout. It is possible someone may make an offer that was not at the auction yesterday. If this does not happen by the end of the week I will be back at square one. I do not have any definite plans at this time for what I will do next. If anyone would like to contact me directly regarding any interest in buying the house my cell number is 620-794-6402. Thank you to everyone for all of your kind words. I have really enjoyed reading all of your postings about this house.

    • Kelly, Old House DreamsKelly, Old House Dreams says: 9369 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Sorry to hear that. I’ll keep your home as active, can you let me know what price you want it marked as?

      • Sharol says: 12 comments

        Thanks Kelly. The house appraised for $75000 in December 2014 in its current condition. For the auction I set a minimum bid at $62000. If anyone would offer me $62000 I would accept.

  57. DelDel says: 6 comments

    I am in so much Awe & Love with this house! It is truly exquisite, from the beautiful unpainted wood work, carvings, to the pressed metal ceilings, ceiling roses & wall paper print. The lead light windows are just stunning, an absolutely, delightful sensory over load & I have so very much loved watching this house & reading all the comments, it has been such a joy. The coach house, leaves me speechless, such a beautiful testament to the time, a real time capsule of wonder & architect, all of it! I wouldn’t change a thing, just lovingly polish it & nurture it, the whole house. I would so love to buy it, & would share it with the community of Emporia. This beautiful house needs to have it beauty shared & experienced by all. I could see art classes, reading/poetry groups, craft groups, photography groups, gardening groups, oh so many people could so dearly enjoy this house, along with my family. Now how much is 62k in Australian Money?? And how would an Aussie Expat go living in Emporia??? Dreaming to make it a reality!

    • Sharol says: 12 comments

      Thank you Del for your post and interest in the house. I really don’t know how to answer your questions. All I can tell you is this home really needs someone who can financially afford to take care of her. I love this house…too much. I just don’t have the financial means to do what is necessary. Again, thank you for your interest.

  58. Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

    Today’s (06/10/2015) exchange rate is about $1US to $1.3AUD, which means a home costing $62k US will set you back around $80k AUD.

    With the cost of Australian homes reportedly being among the highest anywhere (http://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/australias-house-prices-secondhighest-in-world-bis-20140915-10gybt.html), $80K must seem too good to believe!

    And having traveled a bit myself, I find Australians (like Canadians) to be welcome everywhere in the English-speaking world. Americans appreciate your natural geniality and good-heartedness, and I can’t imagine the local paper passing up an opportunity to do a story about how you ended up there! (Sort of a reverse Wizard of Oz, so to speak, with you being from the land of “Oz” going back to Kansas.) I think you’d be a right good fit for Emporia (though it does get cold there in the winter).

  59. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

    Ross, would you or anyone you know be interested in sponsoring a family from Australia? By sponsoring, they could get a green card leading in time to full American citizenship. (dual-citizenship status is permitted) If you have skills in certain critical fields, you may be able to obtain a green card without sponsorship. You’d need to contact an American consulate or the embassy for more details. Not many Australians are immigrating to the states so this process may be less difficult than from other countries. Here’s wishing you good luck; I’ve seen this lovely house myself last September and if you’re a fan of Victoriana, you’ll love it too.

  60. DelDel says: 6 comments

    Thankyou “Curiouser George” for the conversion rate & a warm welcome 🙂 We Aussies tend to be a fairly good nature, relaxed easy going mob, well I am anyway & tend to adapt very easily to new surroundings, I love a new adventure, & meeting new people! It was only announce last night on our local news that a typical standard suburban home in Sydney will set you back at least a million dollars. Real Estate prices are soaring in Oz, meaning the next generation will find it increasingly difficult to ever be in a position to own their own home in built up State Capital Suburban areas. There are still country rural properties within an affordable price bracket. Being such a young country, however, period properties, such as divinely beautiful as the “Constitution St House” are as rare as hens teeth, & priced accordingly. I have never lived in a modern home, have always lived & restored simple, weatherboard Victorian Miners cottages,in the Central Goldfields area, but have an absolute love for all things old. I also restore Vintage Automobiles, & have a 1940’s Leyland Double Decker Bus & I am in the process of restoring a 1915’s Red Rattler Train Carriage (which was one of the first Trains in Victoria, Australia, to be changed over from Steam to Electric 🙂 So yes I think (hope) I may fit into the Emporia Community 🙂 So romantic, the story of a Girl from Oz, travelling to Kansas to the Land Of Emporia – There’s No Place Like Home! Thanks for the info, now to do the maths!

    • Curiouser GeorgeCuriouser George says: 162 comments

      Del –
      It’s not generally well-known, but L. Frank Baum wrote many other adventure stories involving young Dorothy Gale, including one where she was ship-wrecked while traveling with her uncle to Australia to visit relatives (titled, Ozma of Oz)! So, in a way, you may already be related to the Emporians! 🙂
      In addition to the (always) valuable information that John S. provided, I’ll add that I work at the American Embassy in Astana, Kazakhstan, and our consulate officer is literally only a few steps away from my office. So, if you do have any travel questions requiring a quick answer, I’d be more than happy to go ask him.

  61. DelDel says: 6 comments

    Thankyou “John Shiflet” for your reply & suggestions. Looking into it all at the moment. Have only just discovered this website this week, & this house has just jumped out at me, & I can’t seem to get it out of my dreams, yes I love & have lived in All things Victorian 🙂 But nothing this exquisite or as ornate as the “Constitution St House” & I am in Love! I am a retired nurse, & currently run my own internet business, which can be managed & run from anywhere in the world & is, as I travel fairly extensively each year throughout Asia. Thankyou John for the comment, there is a lot to think about & learn.

  62. DelDel says: 6 comments

    I would love to say a big Thankyou to “Kelly” & the OHD Website, it is such a magical journey looking through the photos of all the old houses, & has given a group of my friends, in Oz, an opportunity to dream of greener pastures in the USA 🙂 And I would also like to Thank “Ross” for his additional photos of the “Constitution St House” on his wonderful Blog Page, which is just absolutely AMAZING, & that I have become an avid reader of, thankyou so very much 🙂

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

      You are welcome, Del. I found on the Canberra U.S. Embassy site a helpful page for prospective immigrants: http://canberra.usembassy.gov/immigrant-visas.html You may also wish to seek legal counsel from a specialist in immigration matters. That said, sometimes its easier to work on obtaining a Green card from this side of the pond and immigration lawyers here are numerous and active in most of the States. (Kansas City would be a logical place to look) I’m not sure about the visitation time limits on a standard visa but you’d have time to see if Emporia was a good prospect before moving on to obtaining a Green card. U.S. immigration policy is more restrictive for some countries than others. I’m sure Ross (wink) would be willing to give you the “grand tour” as well as valuable information should you come for an initial visit. My advice, if its feasible for you, would be to visit before the coming winter. I’m not sure how long the Constitution St. property will remain unsold as well. Kansas winters are not severe generally but a visit is certainly more pleasant during the more temperate times of the year.

  63. Mari2 says: 28 comments

    Del,
    I don’t think purchasing a home in the USA should be difficult if you have the funds to do so. People purchase homes in other countries quite frequently. The thing you need to look into is a Visa type that will allow you to come here to live in and work on the house. From my experience a person here can sponsor another on a visitor visa if non related, but a visa that allows one to move here usually requires sponsorship of a family member, university or employer. Also, sponsors must make a certain yearly income to qualify. That does not mean that the purchase of the home is not possible for you.

  64. DelDel says: 6 comments

    Thankyou all for your insights & encouragement. There is a lot to take into consideration on many levels, but primarily this keeps entering into my head “Would I do “The Keebler House” justice, would I be the best steward/caretaker for her? Would I be able to commit the time & love that this house deserves? The Keebler House needs to be shared with the good folks of Emporia, & not just purchased for private use, locked away behind closed doors, so how would I achieve this, manage this. Should this amazing house be in the hands of an Aussie Expat, better perhaps to be in the loving care of someone local to the area? I know Sharon, is looking for someone, who will love it & nurture is as much as she has. So with this in mind I am taking this all into consideration, methodically & very seriously, because this house deserves this kind of love & respect. Without a doubt, if I just went with my heart, my plane ticket & bags would be already bought & packed, sending for the husband & children later Lol! 🙂 So I will keep looking into everything, & if it is meant to be, it is meant to be & if it is, I will be looking up Ross, & asking (pretty please) for the Grand Cross House Tour.

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4439 comments

      Del,
      Your enthusiasm for this house (Keebler) is admirable. It is, indeed, a remarkably well preserved slice of Emporia’s architectural heritage. That said, there are a fair number of surviving late 19th and early 20th century homes in Emporia and while this one is better than average, it is not in the same category as the Cross House that Ross is restoring bit-by-bit. I’m sure some locals might enjoy seeing the inside of the Keebler house (especially the architecturally daring carriage house) as we did during our visit last Fall but its unlikely this would be a museum house or bed & breakfast. I really think if it is within your budget and plans to hop on a plane, land in Kansas City (or Topeka) and then take a rental car to Emporia. The town has several decent hotels at reasonable prices and reservations can be made online once you know your travel itinerary. Outside of the aforementioned moderate amount of foundation work (the Keebler house is quite livable, as is) the rest appears to be cosmetic changes to suit your tastes. I’d also recommend if a trip becomes feasible, that you take a look at this house in the native American named Osawatomie, Kansas, which is close to Emporia: http://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/07/11/1906-queen-anne-osawatomie-ks/ It is a literal time capsule! We had a look at it last year: (the first dozen photos) https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/sets/72157646670849453 In the basement was an old paper bag with rolls of the original 1906 wallpapers. Note the original brass/copper gas light fixtures and vintage cookstove in the garage. It’s been on the market for a while so there might be some flexibility on the pricing. Gas light fixtures remain in place upstairs. In any case, there is much to see if you have the opportunity for a visit. You’ll like Ross; his enthusiasm for old houses is catching and he knows the local old house markets very well. Good luck with your plans.

  65. gemma says: 128 comments

    we need to think outside the box, in this case, emporia. ‘museums 101’ just came on the market. historical societies, from local to national, can be alerted. does the house have a facebook page?

    in the event of work needing to be done, perhaps locals can chip in and do little bits. i, for my part, since i am 500 miles east, will put in a word to st joseph.

  66. Sharol says: 12 comments

    Kelly I want to thank you for all your hard work to have this blog. The services you provide are outstanding. Since it doesn’t seem likely that I am going to find a buyer for this house in the foreseeable future I need to make its status inactive by June 31st. Even though it would have been a burden lifted to sell the house I will continue to love it in all of its beauty and its flaws. I don’t have the financial means to fix all her flaws but I am hopeful that over the coming year with “small moves” I will be able to begin the process. If anyone wishes to discuss anything further my cell phone number is listed at the beginning of this post. Thanks again.

    • lara jane says: 574 comments

      Oh, Sharol! I’m so sorry you didn’t find a buyer and that you feel burdened by the home. You can see by the outpouring of love that it has its admirers, but none of us are living there and dealing with the maintenance, which can be overwhelming on any house much less one that’s over 125 years old!

      It’s just such a sweet place, and I hope that if the time comes to list it again, all of the chips will fall into place and the right person will be able to buy. I wasn’t joking when I said earlier that I wish it could be me! I’ve been watching the local listings daily (more than daily, if I’m honest) for more than a decade and there hasn’t been anything this special in this price range around Joplin/Carthage in all of these ten years. Yours is truly a gem!

  67. Sharol says: 12 comments

    I just realized I wrote June 31st as the last day to have active status. Since there are only 30 days in June and today’s June 30th, this is the last day for my house to be actively for sale. When and if things change I will be sure and post updates. Thanks everyone again for your interest in this house.

  68. Angela says: 199 comments

    I just looked at this house today – with every picture I kept saying WOW. It is one of those fairy tale houses.

  69. Brenda M. Crowder says: 1 comments

    Did the house sell?
    I was totally shocked at the low price. I paid $62,900 for a home in TN in 2003. Why is this home’s listing price so low? It clearly has more charm than my simple brick craftsman. Plus mine is only 1386 square feet and although I have four bedrooms, I only have one bathroom.
    Thanks for any updated information on the status of this wonderful home.

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