1898 – Grenada, MS

Added to OHD on 3/14/14   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   Comments Closed
SOLD / Archived Post

235 South St, Grenada, MS 38901

Map: Street

  • $63,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 2552 Sq Ft
Lovely VIctorian home with beautiful wood floors, inlaid wood work, sold wood doors, spacious rooms, 3 full Baths, lots of character. Priced in the $60s.

State: | Region: | Misc: ,

67 Comments on 1898 – Grenada, MS

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. says: 89 comments

    The carpenter who built this house was an amazing artist! In addition to all that is apparent, there are a lot of interesting features that are obscured by paint (the front door and surrounding angled beadboard, for example). Thank goodness so much has been preserved. You have really found a beauty here, Kelly — it is right up there with Brazil, IN Mission Revival.

    2
  2. What a gem! That unpainted wood work is amazing! I think I hear MS calling.

    2
  3. RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Can anybody identify the burled wood in the panels?

    1
  4. says: 89 comments

    Rosewater — this is a wild-ass guess. Kelly featured a similar vintage house, sometime in the past year I think, in Alabama that had panelling that was identified in the listing as curly pine burl. (I’ve never heard of curly pine, if I’ve even recalled this correctly.) Is it possible that’s what’s used here? At least some of the other woodwork looks like pine. Whatever it is, I’m obsessing over this house.

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I know; it really is a great house. Don’t really care for houses where the rooms are encased in wood work top to bottom and side to side; but this one is just great with the panels on a more limited scale as accents..
      Googled curly pine, and burls in general, and couldn’t find anything which is as spectacular as these examples.. I remember that house too, and those panels were just as amazing as these.. Hard to say. Has be thinking maybe they are faux bois – ? -…

      2
  5. Dot G says: 38 comments

    Beautiful home. Love the kitchen floors and the outstanding woodwork. I enjoy looking at the houses “undressed” as I can put my imagination to work.

    2
  6. john c says: 435 comments

    I am in the process of buying this house for the purposes of a winter home in Mississippi (along with keeping me so busy I’ll be otherwise out of mischief and forming the requisite money pit and sweat abyss).

    It needs a lot of work. The house was not built all at one time and not all parts have the high standard woodwork. For example, several bedrooms and part of the kitchen, at least, were formed out of porches. At one point there were three apartments and one kitchen (since dismantled) was out on the front porch. The floors in many rooms are covered by vinyl, laminate, carpet etc and may be worn through underneath, while what lurks behind dry wall etc, is largely unknown to me at this point.

    If and as I make any progress and if anyone posts a desire for reports and photos, I will try to do so. I take title on October 31, according to present plans.

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      You are buying one of my favorite houses!!!!! Congratulations! Glad you are the one buying it. πŸ™‚

      Of course we want reports and photos! You know my email, if you care to send the photos for me to post, anytime. πŸ™‚

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Congrats john! This really is a great little house with some unique and beautiful details. I’m interested to know what you find in those panel details: burled wood, or faux bois? Breakaleg!

      2
  7. john c says: 435 comments

    Thanks. I am heading down there for a tentative October 31 closing. I think working on the house will be fun. In the 80s, a man employed a cousin to make it into three apartments and, then, some years later, ready it for sale. The cousin is to meet with me and go over where there is hidden wood ceilings, walls, etc, and, as well, show me which rooms were originally porches. The house is going to need a lot of slow, patient work. Still, I figure I have one house left in me to do, and I know it will be fun doing what i can.

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      – and relatively warm doing it! Hehe. That’s great that you have this guy’s insight into the historic fabric. I envy you the warmth and the fun you’ll have down there this winter. I’ll be thinking of you when I’m crawling around in my barely accessible, mostly un-excavated crawlspaces digging and schlepping, digging and schlepping, and finally installing new footing, piers, and support beams this winter. Ugh.. Enjoy!

      2
    • says: 38 comments

      John ~ Hello! So glad to see you have found yourself a home you can work more magic on! And that we have reconnected after a brief period of confusion on my part. I looked through all the photos here, and it seems there is much to be done, but much already in place to work with and around. Also, to do so in warm weather!
      I am also looking forward to seeing photos of the progress as you make (or have made) it come alive as a wonderful single family home once again.
      Thanks for getting back to me so quickly, and I will now go back in my emails and do a quick search for the email that seems to have slipped through the cracks.
      Have a wonderful day and I will be looking forward to seeing the pictures of the progress ad it comes about. I hope to find that email, and get caught up on what you Γ»u the time and effort to send me.
      Best regards and blessings on your continuing battle with the foe that is trying to take you from us much, much too soon!
      Shari D

      2
  8. john c says: 435 comments

    Oh, boy. Let me know if you want a late Winter break. I am going to follow up Kelly’s suggestion of posting pics as things go on, and genuinely would enjoy having OHD people drop in and drop by. For the first month or so, I’ll be staying in a fisherman’s cabin in town as I work on the house.

    it is an interesting neighborhood, in the bargain. Plus I am about five or six blocks from the downtown which is being carefully renovated and made ready for a business revival. Too, I am about three blocks or four blocks from three churches and about eight blocks from the Library, which for a town of some 12,000 is pretty impressive

    Mississippi has no income taxes in IRAs, pension plans qualified under the IRS tax rules or

    Social Security. Once you turn 65, houses appraised at $75,000 or less do not have property taxes levied. Oh, and did I mention the relative warmth? LOL

    2
  9. RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    That’ll be great John. Look fwd. to those pix of your progress. Sounds like there’s lot’s of benefits for you being in MS; and you’re in a spot where you can take some great Southern day trips, – like Natchez. πŸ™‚

    1
  10. john c says: 435 comments

    Hi, Shari

    I’ll continue to post here, so sometimes my answers or postings will veer off oddly

    The great insurance company consented to pre-cert the same chemotherapy they had previously pre-certified in one day’s time when I initiated it several months ago in Chicago. (I suspect that the doctor’s office here mixed things up.) Anyway, that means I can go ahead for chemotherapy — albeit the earliest was ten calendar days late– on Monday morning, beginning at 9:00 a.m. Still, that helps

    Meanwhile, other news The draft motor on the furnace gave out, giving me (as of 7:00 a.m.) 49 degrees of “heat” in the house rather than 73.
    With my sensitivity to cold, that meant I could do nothing but shiver there. The part is on order or, at least, was to be ordered this afternoon.

    I had a problem with a pretty satisfactory carpenter wanting in effect to advance payments to him, but after discussing with him the situation, I think he took my point that his “problem” was really having to do un-contracted work involving wood beetles. That situation of course precipitated alarm bells when I contacted the agents, asking the today to contact the sellers and the Pest Inspector who performed a “pest free’ report upon inspection, in case there is substantial infestation beyond one local area. That consumed most o today,

    I have had problems making local tradesmen understand that when I say want bids and materials listed by such and such a time, I mean it, and that they must be ready to start almost immediately. Right now my problem is one involving electricians, though I think that will be resolved tonight.

    However, the trees are finally removed and/or trimmed, the yard is beginning to look better (I had three guys working on raking, trash removal, hedge clipping, weed-wacking, etc.) How glorious the house looks now that it doesn’t exist under a forest of swords of Damocles in wooden form! Well, that was true until the cold penetrated through to my bones.

    I don’t want to discourage anyone about the town There are many beautiful homes here for sale at low prices. Because I was attracted to it, I chose deliberately a very low priced fixerupper. The older part of town is beautiful, the downtown is being revived and restored, and although I am under some unusual time constraints, the tradesmen here are very competent, very reasonably priced, etc

    Shari, I cannot emphasize enough how much I empathize with you. The Lord has given me the mercy of this year past, unexpectedly, when was to sit and wait and die Now that I am active again I find my mind and spirit refreshed. Of course that is the Lord’s work, but he worked through you, Shari and so many others to bring that about. I pray he does the same for you and your husband~!

    2
  11. Jim says: 5037 comments

    Am happy somebody linked this one after months. Still beautiful esp. the faux bois and pheasant paper. Godspeed John C.

    2
  12. says: 16 comments

    Congratulations on your new home, John.

    And thank you for posting incidentals of readying your home. It is satisfying for me and other readers I’m sure, to read of such fulfillment through hands-on accounts. I hope as others find their dream houses, they will also share their experiences. Kelly’s site provides so much information and persons’ experiences of new communities Is irreplaceable.

    The warmth of your personal story reminds us of the very real aspects of life in our collective pursuit. What better way to celebrate the glory of these houses than real time accounts?

    Wishing you continued success and much happiness in all your projects!

    1
  13. john c says: 435 comments

    John S, his wife and a friend stopped by Grenada last week. I hope that John sometime will post a link to his photos of the town and my house in particular, as he has a real eye (and an experienced hand) at these old houses. One thing he raised was the prevalence of round gable vents cut either in the shape of Jewish stars or a Masonic star, in the old homes here. I may have a line on two of them, but John suggests that I should display them as folk-art, whereas I want more attic ventilation.

    I am going to spend several days on removing the wallpaper, etc, in several rooms, using 10 foot step ladders for these 12 foot ceilings.

    Then I am going to do a grand turn out of tools in that shed to ready it to become a study. That includes the come-along/crank pulley contraption I used to pull calves during difficult births as a teenager and then used thereafter to tighten chain link fences. My habit of never throwing anything away has to come to an end.

    The infestation turned out to be contained by the actions already taken, in the opinion of two exterminating companies. However, I have to do major changes in the slope of the lot to the south and east, to make sure that water does not seep into the crawlspace, and the put a new moisture barrier down (Luckily, I brought several rolls of plastic down from Illinois with me.) New gutters will also help considerably.

    Several sections of fence — security fence — had been taken out in front of the east side yard. Last night gusts of wind took the rest down. My experience with such fences in Chicago is that they indeed provided security for the burglar! They assured that neighbors and any passerby could not see them in the yard. I will shorten it, I think, in rebuilding it.

    In the next few days we will find out if the “attic” of the front porch and that of the west porch open up into the main attics. If they do, next year I will have screens put on the porches and whole house fans in their ceilings, for summer cooling ventilation.

    John S recommended a 19th Century to exterior paints https://archive.org/details/PracticalSuggestionsOnExteriorDecoration

    Shari, everything seems to go well with chemo, with one exception. I continue to lose weight slightly, although I eat enough for two or three. I am much more active than I was, of course, but the doctor here is upset.

    Kelly, I am alive and well and happy — and you and your wonderful blog and all of your followers are a large part of that. Thanks mucho!

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Hey John πŸ™‚ I have the solution for your chemo induced weight loss. That’s right – – – – cannabis. It’s nature’s gift to us all, and though MS does not have specific laws providing for medicinal use, It is a “de-criminalized posession” state, such that possession of an ounce or less is an “unclassified misdemeanor”, (if you get caught), punishable by merely a $250.00 fine. You may not wish to embrace the hippy ethic; but trust me, it will quell the nausea, improve your appetite, and relax your soul, providing you with the positive frame of mind necessary to heal and grow stronger. Hoping you feel better! Jeff

      2
  14. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks John C. for the update about the goings on with you and your home.

    Have a wonderful Thanksgiving. πŸ™‚

    2
  15. john c says: 435 comments

    Jeff:Ha, well, as a former flower child, my present day experience was unexpected. I tried Marinol, or whatever it is, the inactivated marijuana oil allowed by the government, and it did nothing but make me sleepy. Then I did the cold-infusion olive oil method, doing the 30 day process. The results varied — one night some on garlic bread might seem to make me hungry, another night the only result seemed to be I was high enough to simply go listen to music etc, I never could depend on it. Too, in a lot of ways, the problem is not lack of appetite, but a continuing aversion to snacks inculcated by growing up on a farm (try telling parents you want to snack instead of doing chores). That points to the problem really being “eating for two” rather than chemo=reduced appetite Thanks, tho, and keep suggestions at the ready.

    Kelly, thanks for your good wishes, and all followers of OHD hope you and your husband have the best of holidays!

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Welllllll, you just go on and do what you need to get by and get better. I should think if you need to take the road previously travelled, a good health food store would be the right spot to make inquiries πŸ˜‰ Government be dipped!

      2
      • john c says: 435 comments

        I agree. Both my mother and an aunt were great adherents of Adele Davis on the one hand and “soapless” Ji Rodale of the other (except that I had to wash). Consequently, when I got the diagnosis, three things ensued. 1) I went directly to Kramer’s Health Food Store, an institution since the 1930s Their knowledge and help is fantastic. http://www.vegguide.org/entry/1547 is only one of many, many reviews and awards. (2) I took the advice of a long-time natural food healer, a chiropractor in Chicago, and a medical doctor in Chicago who believes and practices alternate medicine in conjunction with mainstream treatment, and (3) relied heavily upon the advice of a raw food vegan (whose husband is a spice importer, fortunately). Latterly, I came into contact with Northwestern’s medical staff, where antioxidants and the like are treated seriously.

        2
  16. bfish says: 89 comments

    I won’t say this as eloquently as Nick did, but I too am enjoying the direction this thread has taken — i.e. a personal journey. This house is probably my favorite ever on OHD, to the point where I researched Grenada and did as much internet digging as possible. I LOVE this house and am so pleased that an old house lover, John C, is dedicating time, resources, and most of all caring to restoring its original beauty. Please John C. and John S., do provide pictures, and Kelly, would you consider doing a one-off special feature on this house if these gentlemen can share same?

    3
  17. john c says: 435 comments

    I’m sure Kelly is saying “whoa” already, as my limitations are known to her, I think. I am not intending to do a purist approach as, say, Kelly or John S or so many would. I’m not intending to recreate the detailed “raised profile” woodwork that was taken out, for example; instead, I’m going to place about 300 pictures and paintings on the walls that will, for me, hide or at least distract one from seeing the shadows left by those removals. Although I intend to make the shed the main book area, one room in the house will be mainly books (the one room with the double glass doors). And I plan this Spring to shift a window and a door around to permit wheelchair access (or my own imitation of Lionel Barrymore hamming it up). Meanwhile I’ll leave the kitchen, imitation light fixtures, etc, pretty much as they are. Of course, I hope in a week or so to bring down from Illinois my three whole house fans, etc, and find uses for them. In short, this will be a house suited for me and of little interest, therefore, to others. My rule of thumb is not to harm the place or make things more complicated for the person who next will own it and want to restore it in any true sense.

    Remember that this is, in some sense, a vanity project for me. I’d rather be fooling around with this even though I have little strength to do much myself, than waiting one more cold winter in Chicago for my clock to wind down. The doctors thought I would be dead this last June, and I look at every day as a gift God has given to me to use and indulge myself with as best I can.

    2
    • bfish says: 89 comments

      OK, John, I and am sure others will cool it with the high expectations! I’m not a purist either; availability of money is a bar to that and there are functionally obsolescent things in old houses that sometimes just can’t be lived with as-is, for example. But I do feel confident in saying that what you and most others on here think is just “good enough” is way more sensitive to the history of the house being worked on than the average person would even remotely consider. Selfishly I want to see all of the fruits of your labor because I’m so enamored of THIS house. Best to you!

      2
  18. john c says: 435 comments

    Thanks, and I’ll understand when inevitably something I do provokes brickbat throwing rather than bouquet tossing!

    2
  19. john c says: 435 comments

    I am going to put here the text of an e-mail I sent yesterday, as it brings up to date the discoveries so far. It misleads, this text, in several ways. First, it was triggered by very good advice on related topics about the house, and I omit that since those words aren’t mine and, in any event, they presuppose I am further along than I am. Second, there is some levity on my part bubbling away there in part because it is private correspondence and I can effervesce as I wish; that tone may seem inexplicable. Finally, the reason why there is so much hurry and bustle about the room with the two French doors, is that it is the one room that must be set up immediately to accommodate book cases and books — the other rooms can be left for later

    Today we took down the rest of the wallpaper and ceiling paper in the room with the two French doors. That room shares a common wall with the bathroom which can be entered from the present-day kitchen. We found, finally, the old doorway through that wall, dating back to when the bathroom was a pantry. We have not pulled the drywall out, but it appears the doorway is wide enough for handicapped access. With some revamping in the bathroom, I suspect that one can have one handicapped accessible bath, a handicapped accessible room with a daybed (the two French door room) and the only real muck up being widening the north doorway of that kitchen to be wheelchair wide. In many ways, this was a pleasant surprise, given my prognosis and my sister’s health problems.

    Likewise, we took down the wall paper in the living room today. That was a mixed bag, to be frank. Your surmise that the short end of the living room appears correct. The short walls from the Wast end of the room to the columns were in the same finished bead board style (with the profiles removed). The other side of the columns, to the bay in the East end, provided the surprise, because under the wallpaper there were again the plain tongue and groove boards, thus appearing to either side of the fireplace on the south wall and either side of the curved windows (with stained glass) in the North Wall. For my purposes, this is no problem, as those areas will be great for pictures etc On the other hand, how odd. There was no sign that those areas had been wallpapered before the highly ornamented parts, BTW.

    We then went to that room with the plaster stuck on the beaded board in that one corner. First the good news: that “Awesome” cleaner takes that plaster stuff off! I begin to think we should bring this up in the present arms negotiations with Iran. Now the bad news: one corner o the room, for about four feet from the ceiling, shows the ravages of termite infestation: old, but it makes the corner a brittle mess of bored wood. We next have to take the paper off the ceiling — pray at this point,

    Tomorrow, in addition to the ceiling in the last mentioned room, we will attack the latex on the cornice in the North bedroom and then proceed to remove the wall paper there. If we can remove the latex there, then we will try the cornices in the room with the College Avenue entrance and then the “center” room that links the kitchen, the College Avenue Room, the two-French door room, etc, much the same as a hallway, removing wall paper and paneling where ever they appear.

    Now, some new questions. Due to the press of time of getting books and pictures down from Chicago amidst chemo, I don’t have time to laboriously remove tack-nails in the French door room where two layers of muslin result in a lot of nails and trailing cloth. Any suggestions? I begin to think of burning the strands of muslin with lighters (water at the ready), hoping the heat expansion of the nails would make them easier to remove. Then I could clean, stain and shellac the tongue and groove plain walls, put on some varnish, and let that room go. Luckily, the book cases and pictures will cover most sins, and I could always claim a temporary lapse of my brain back into the era of distressed wood. I am thinking of a cherry stain or mahogany stain gel-style, as the book cases are oak.

    The living room, fortunately, had far fewer nails and muslin cloth. I think that is doable, in other words, and I might go there for some golden oak stain on the tongue and groove, to lighten up the picture display areas.

    I think that as to the once infested corner in the one room, the only thing to do is remove the bored up wood and replace as best one can to match.

    1
  20. john c says: 435 comments

    Some college friends of mine wrote about possibly buying and renovating a home elsewhere in their home state. I tried not to discourage them but help them plan a resource guide for the town they are interested in.
    ******
    If you are thinking about renovating a home in a given town, I would go out and buy an old fashioned address book. Use your real estate agents and, say, antique mall vendors to locate things like the following: carpenters good with old homes, insurance agents willing to insure old homes, home inspectors, plumbers, etc. I would get cards, if possible, and then staple those to the corresponding alphabetical page: ” c” for carpenters is an example. Tree removal went under T, to give another example. I had very limited time here to do that, when I came down with Henry, my cousin, but the time I spent doing that was invaluable. I also went by the Chamber of Commerce and tourism/new resident services: often their membership rolls and glossy magazines have additional resources. Local historical societies and museums may suggest more resources.

    Part of my address book is taken up with other kinds of services. When I become Ill, how do I get transport to appointments, etc? Is there a grocery that delivers, a drug store that delivers? How about air and rail travel? Taxis?

    List in the book (Under” U” utilities such as water, etc — phone numbers etc (and, later, account numbers, billing dates, etc).

    Staple in (under “L”) the local library rules and hours. Oh, and when they have book sales.

    Under “R” list the restaurants that seem to reflect the sort of meals you both like (and whether they deliver, have pick up etc) Cards are great!

    One thing to check is hardware stores and lumberyards. The area you are thinking about should have a number of them, and that is always helpful.

    Several things I wish I had had time to research beforehand come to mind. The services that come out and tell you how to make a home handicapped accessible is one. Of course, in my case that would have been of limited help because two covered over doorways are really the trick, but such services can point out where, say, things should be in the bathroom in terms of grip bars and the like.

    If you know the approximate neighborhood you are interested in, try to go to local diners, etc, for three days running to get advice from locals.

    1
  21. john c says: 435 comments

    Yesterday I spent my time laboriously removing muslin-tacks from walls, only to come home and find that a friend suggested I buy and use an upholster’s tack remover. My jaw dropped as I read that on my computer scheme and I recalled what a farmer once told me: There is a tool for everything, if you are smart enough to think of it and find it. Or, I guess, if one has patient friends.

    Meanwhile, more wall paper and paneling comes down.

    1
  22. john c says: 435 comments

    Last night, I received and accepted an offer to do extensive repairs, This allows me to leave as early as tomorrow for Chicago, there to gather up the rest of my stuff to take back down here. Consequently, I won’t be posting comments or consistently answering comments for the next ten days or so.

    One question. A friend raised to me a question I have had for years: Is there an electro-magnet sold which one could use to remove or even merely loosen tacks and nails in wood?

    1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I’ve had dreams about the elusive “electro magnet nail remover”! lol.. If only Edison and Tesla were alive to make it so..

      1
  23. john c says: 435 comments

    Just returned to Grenada with another truckload of stuff yesterday afternoon, Here is what wrote a friend:
    The trip was without incident until its very end. We pulled up at Anthony’s Soul restaurant and then parked the truck on the edge of his wife’s day care parking lot across the street. We did so at her son’s suggestion. However, the asphalt was there, at least, bandaid deep on the ground, which meant that the truck promptly sank to its rear axles. With chains, trucks and prayers and pushing and much shoveling of broken asphalt into the ruts, we got the truck out. I continue to be amazed at the goodness of people hereabouts: one man, hearing the commotion, walked several blocks from his home, turned and went back, retrieved a heavy gauge (and heavy) piece of steel to use as a prop for getting out of the ruts, only to arrive with it held over his head just as the truck was pulled out. With a merry smile, the man waved, congratulated us, and turned around with that metal over his head to go home. The thing was a grill like affair about two inches thick with heavy solid plate metal all the way around; I do not know the intended use of that object, but I think one could have built a portable bridge for tanks with such panels.

    1
  24. john c says: 435 comments

    From an e-mail sent to relatives and friends:

    When we got back to Grenada with the truck mainly full of books, the back axles promptly broke through the thin asphalt of a parking lot next to a friend’s restaurant and we had to use chains and a truck to tow it out. The next day during unloading the truck again sank into the ground — this time in the greenway in front of the house. Then, as the books came off, it tilted to one side. However, when emptied the truck under its own power was able to get back on the street. I cannot emphasize enough the kindness and help provided by neighbors and strangers during these events. Their laughter shared the fun with me. All thanks are due Anthony Obannon and his wife, who in this as in so many ways, put my feet, my belongings and my affairs and plans on a sound footing. It is Anthony who pulled the truck free the first time, and it is his lovely wife Rose whose smile at my predicament made sure my plight was a pleasure

    Of course I came back before the scheduled time of completion of many of the repairs and changes That dictated that the books are for now ensconced under the car port carefully wrapped in plastic in case of any passing rain storms. Some time today (the 12th) the shelves in the study-shed should be up and the books can begin to be unpacked.

    Likewise, the walk-in closet I am having made out of a bathroom created awkwardly on a porch should be done tomorrow. That means that the clothing, etc, shipped down both with the first load and this second load can then be put away and two smaller closets used temporarily freed up.

    The utility room is nearly redone. I have had the plumbing worked on throughout the house, the tubs etc scrubbed clean, etc. By tomorrow afternoon all the plumbing should be made operable again. I had put copper in the long horizontal stretches, leaving galvanized uprights (connected with dialectic connectors to the copper).

    The living room is filled to the bottom of the chandeliers (which hang from 12 foot ceilings), with “stuff” That will be a big and enjoyable task in coming weeks, as most of the things have been packed for three yearsEvery day of that unpacking will be like Christmas.

    The last several days I have spent pulling tacks and nails from the plain wood walls of the old dining room, the room with the French doors. Bookcases I had made in 1976 and 1977 by Kevin Blackall in Moline, Illlinois, will go up in that room, beinng used this time to display objects, etc.

    As I say, I am singing while working in that room. The life extended to me day by day is good, and the Lord’s mercy has been freely given to me to enjoy them. Inevitably there were will be days of pain and sorrow ahead, but life on earth is a mixture of the sour and the sweet, and right now I indeed savor the sweetness.

    1
  25. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Sounds like you bought a house that’s in a great neighborhood and great town. Thanks for keeping us updated on the goings on, we do enjoy hearing from you. πŸ™‚

    1
  26. john c says: 435 comments

    Kelly, it is you who brings each of your followers so much pleasure and so much knowledge of what is available, that we should do homage to you. You have created a great repository of information, a cyber-village of like minded folk, and admirers of you everywhere!

    1
  27. john c says: 435 comments

    Yesterday tack pulling continued, while the contractor finished the walk-in closet, finish painted the inside of the shed, readying the shelves for the books, and the 1001 miscellaneous points on his punch list. High among those points was replacing the glass in five broken windows (as well as freeing up all windows, replacing missing latches and locks etc). As I worked in the tack-pulling business myself, a friend came over to help and, as friends do, sat on a narrow window ledge to talk. So soon as he did so, his posterior ever so lightly touched the glass, which promptly shattered into large sharp shards. By a miracle, he was not injured. My contractor,of course, now had a sixth window to replace, meaning another trip to the glass-cutter, etc. However, that is as nothing as compared to the fact no one was hurt.

    With that, the friend and I went outside, deciding we would be luckier there. And we were. We filled his pickup’s bed with pieces of picket fences left from long-ago fences, what appears to be CB radio antenna that had fallen into the ground and had to be pulled up, and then a woven wire and barbed wire fence that sagged perilously inside a wooden fence — along with the metal fence posts. Luckily, as a former farm boy, I am never without my fence or field pliers as we call them, which made all that easy. Then off we went to dump the stuff — promptly running out of gas before we did so, which necessitated yet more time.

    Throughout all this, my friend was baffled by my smiles. Again, the main thing was that no one was hurt by glass, flying wires, etc. Still, the whole late afternoon reminded me of so much: backing my own posterior through the kitchen’s storm door in winter when I was nine with consequent damage to my childish dignity, working on the farm building fences and taking them down, running out of gas in a John Deere 40 tractor when I was 12 or so. in the middle of a field in the back of the farm, necessitating a long walk and a long face. Perhaps old houses such as these are not put here before us as projects, but serve as memory-prods. All of these memories were things I had carefully. I thought, discarded. That is because, I would say, I agreed with Mr. Doyle’s creation, Sherlock Holmes, that the mind has only so much storage. Largely, however, what motivated my amnesia was anger and shame about my many stupidities and mistakes. Through this house, however, these memories are revived and, now, come to be richly enjoyed.

    1
  28. john c says: 435 comments

    After what seemed excruciating effort (not on my part — I hired it done), some photos of the house are now posted at FACEBOOk. The house is called “Grenada House” and I believe my name shows up somewhere (John Clifford).

    At this point, I have had posted some of the real estate agent’s photos, along with photographs taken by my cousin Henry while he helped me house-hunt . Those photos were taken prior to purchase and any work. Additionally, there are a few photos of the exterior of the house (without the trees that threatened to topple on the whole thing), a picture from the side of the truck stuck outside the house, etc, Posting the video of the truck being stuck atmy friends” parking lot has proved so difficult a task we have passed it up for now.

    I did this in response to people wanting photos , More will come, but that limited objective means: I may respond to comments, if I do so at all, individually, via e-mail, and not through written postings at FB; I won’t respond to likes or dislikes, and discourage you from leaving them (I don’t understand whether that sort of action refers to photographs as art, the underlying subject, or what, anyway);and I am not going to bounce around FB looking at other “pages”.

    Quite frankly, I view this as an interim step. There is something called Flickr or the like that allows one simply to post photos.
    That strikes me as my kind of site, and if anyone out there has some knowledge of how to post things there, and wants to help, I have a friend with a number of photos of the house to post.

    1
  29. says: 72 comments

    Hello John C – it’s very nice to meet you, and to learn about your old house dream purchase, fixing process & progress, and your health journey. I have really enjoyed reading all your posts here, and just went & checked out your Grenada House’s FB page too so I could see what you have shared about. The little video about the stuck U Haul truck is very funny, knowing that the outcome was positive.
    I’m Sandra, an old house lover from rural northern MN. Pleased to make your acquaintance! I’m so pleased that you were able to purchase this house and go on this journey.
    I also loved so many points that you have shared here, but especially love: “Perhaps old houses such as these are not put here before us as projects, but serve as memory-prods. All of these memories were things I had carefully, I thought, discarded. That is because, I would say, I agreed with Mr. Doyle’s creation, Sherlock Holmes, that the mind has only so much storage. Largely, however, what motivated my amnesia was anger and shame about my many stupidities and mistakes. Through this house, however, these memories are revived and, now, come to be richly enjoyed.” So beautifully put, and so very true, I think. Thank you.
    I look forward to whatever else you feel like sharing here. Cheers, and I wish you well.

    1
  30. john c says: 435 comments

    Thanks for the compliments, Sandra, but inevitably brickbats are just as familiar to me as bouquets. That is because life sends the makings of the former more often than the latter. I must immediately amend that: I make more bricks than I do flowers.

    That is what is confronting me now. For many years — some 15 or 16 or so — I have used plastic milk crates as much as I can for storage and packing. They are stackable. They are the ideal size to hold books neither too heavy nor too light. The plastic raised bottom keeps things dry off the floor absent real flooding. The see through holes on the side allow easy determination of contents. Outdoors, all sorts of garden tools and sprinkler heads, etc, can be stored in them. However, their real use comes in moving. Breakable objects can be stored in them, and objects that break other objects — such as a bench-grinder and the like — can be rendered harmless to other objects. By adhering in Chicago to buying only milk crates that came with a receipt, those which were from defunct dairy operations or where the color/logos had changed, etc, I avoided charges of theft and acquiring stolen property, even while I patted myself on the back on saving the environment.

    But what to do with the things now!? I have given away 20 or so to a daycare that can use them for colorful storage for kids, and I may be able to give another 20 or so again to them. A neighbor will take six, and I am in hopes that her gardening club members may each take some. That leaves, from the crates now freed up from book hauling, some 40 sitting without use in the driveway under the carport, and I have perhaps another 69 or so in the house holding objects of various kinds.

    Civilizations begin to founder, as do individuals, when their previous successes prove their undoing. (And, of course, horses feed and watered too much literally founder thereafter.) If anyone has a use for these things now, let me know. Free while supplies last! A giant size lego house for your kids?

    1
    • says: 72 comments

      Hi John C – a quick response re: your plethora of plastic milk crates (which I also used for years to hold & cart around my stuff) – I just checked out recently sold ones on ebay and wow – depending on the dairy name (I’m guessing) a person can get from $8 – $30 for one crate…. might help out with some of your reno costs…?? Just a thought. Cheers.

  31. john c says: 435 comments

    Meanwhile,the book shed comes along. The shelves put up are almost filled. I could put up enough additional shelves to increases the capacity again by about half. About five milk-crates of books remain to be unpacked, along with four small boxes and one slightly larger box, and the reason is my dithering. These remaining books represent subjects such as gardening, landscaping, farming, home improvement etc., and I had in my mind’s eye envisioned those sorts of books as being in the house. In part this reflected my habits in winter I like nothing better than looking over bright colored photo plates of flowers, etc, and thinking of spring. Too, my limited notions of hospitality enter into it: guests will pick up gratefully enough to peruse a gardening book but they will leave such as they cross the threshold to return to their home, while a man or woman who with a seemingly careless eye examines a book about, say, Anglo-Saxon law of the 13th Century while attempting to manifest interest only in the binding, is a person put in peril of losing his or her immortal soul by means of book-theft while jeopardizing my own salvation by severely testing what I possess of forbearance, forgiveness, etc. By putting the remaining books in the house, then, I could tell myself that I am helping my fellow human beings refrain from theft; on the other hand, my cynicism tells me that by creating two repositories, I merely halve my powers of effective guardianship as to each book and double the opportunity for taking. Dithering indeed!

    This turns out to be an event filled day. The principal contractor ends his work today, and he and I have to walk through with a punch list to make sure he is done. Additionally, I have to take and put on a night train to Chicago the son of a late friend of mine who has been helping around here for the last week and a half. In the middle of that, I have to obtain my new driver’s license and voting card and then resolve a niggling question in my mind about my property tax exemptions , pick up some willow blue plates I bought yesterday, meet with someone at Walgreen’s about reproducing some large pictures, etc. These no doubt seem to others trifling activities of a trifling mind, but even the trifles, given to me this day through the Lord’s kindness, delight me, just as the dithering over book placement delights.

    1
  32. john c says: 435 comments

    Yesterday I got rid of about 60 unpacked crates. That leaves about a hundred to be unpacked.

    Several of you suggested selling crates. I am reluctant to do that for security reasons. Since I am sleeping at a motel, any ad to sell invites people at all times no matter what you say to the house; once there, they can inspect through windows to see if there are more crates and, of course, see what else is available to take. This is a wonderful town and this is a magical house, but …..

    Meanwhile, a dear friend I will call Ms. K. S., somehow remembered and retrieved a back article and photo from Sydney Australia

    Photo
    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://theboldcollective.com.au/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/9-Breakout-booth-1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://theboldcollective.com.au/blog/tns/&h=816&w=1224&tbnid=7yBjlNyePLttkM&zoom=1&tbnh=183&tbnw=275&usg=__4GF4F21kbo9tzC8Gww4DzphEQL4=&docid=hiC1ILjTaBXixM

    Article: http://theboldcollective.com.au/blog/tns/

    WOW!

    • says: 72 comments

      Hello John C – I’m just checking to see how you are doing today? How was Christmas in your new old home? What have you been up to recently? Cheers.

      1
  33. john c says: 435 comments

    Apologies to one and all, but in particular to Sandra. I have had one heckuva time and consequently have pretty much been laid up since the Sunday before Christmas. No, not the cancer, but instead day long bouts of back pain of the screaming and moaning level, followed by days of exhaustion, etc. Now, this coming week, I must deal with what I suspect are various side effects and consequences of the bouts of pain. As you see, I am up and around and now reading new e-mails and the like, but going slow Every day remains a victory, but I can’t pick and choose the battlefields.

    1
    • says: 38 comments

      My dear John ~ I am at a loss to express my sorrow at my own absence over such an extended period of time, especially after promising faithfully to check communications and emails and such from you. I have no excuse that I feel I can reveal here for seemingly falling off the face of the planet. Reasons ~ yes. But nothing I care to talk about.
      I have been reading through your posts here since the last time I came to this page, and am pleased to read of all your progress with the house refurbishing, amused at the tales told of sinking truck axels and your rescue, relief that no one has been injured by posteriors being put through friable glass windows, and glad that journeys to retrieve precious possessions from the frozen north were accomplished without incident.
      I am extremely sorry to hear about your recent bouts with such severe back pain, and I am hoping that it’s the result of extreme overwork, and will resolve itself soon with whatever therapies your doctor’s can prescribe or that you can find for yourself. (I will keep my secret fears to myself, hoping that not mentioning them will render them powerless and not worthy of discussion.) I am, however, happy to see you on the upswing of them since you are reading and responding to posts.
      Something I noticed in a previous post regarding getting local workmen to take you seriously in the need to respect deadlines in submitting estimates for repairs and to follow up with immediate response in beginning the work ~ years ago, my parents moved from Virginia to Wabash, Indiana for several years, and then to Tifton, Georgia for several more years. The reasons are complicated and don’t serve to embellish the story I propose to tell you. The upshot is that changing locations from the mid south to the far north to the deeper south showed the propensity for the deeper southerners to be on their own time schedule in relation to the rest of the world. As in, “fast food” is usually not at all fast the way you and I may think about it. They would rather lean out the window and have a chat with you than move the line along, believing that to be more friendly than the rush-rush-hurry-hurry of the northern ways. They will get around to it, in their own good time, so don’t you worry your head about about a thing! It will all be fine! That goes for grocery stores, and gas stations, and bank tellers, and just about everyone else you will encounter. Now, they’ll give you the shirt off their back, or the dinner off their dining table, or anything else you need, but it will be a leisurely process, unless the house is afire! And then they’ll be sure to grab the banana pudding out of the ice box on the way out the door first, because you simply cannot deal with an emergency without a big bowl of banana pudding! And anyone they find the need to criticize in any way will always be followed up with a “Bless her heart!” Or his heart, as the case may be! As a former southerner, raised, but not born, I thought I would pass that information along to you in case you might find it of some use!
      Please keep on the upside of things, and continuing to make progress with the home and your own wellbeing. I am always around, even if you don’t see me for a while. And you are always in my thoughts as a wonderful acquaintance and in my prayers as a like-minded friend. I am now off to find your Facebook page, and see if I can find those pictures I have been looking forward to seeing for so long!
      I have something to share with you, regarding your wheelchair usage. My husband found it the other night and shared it with me, and when I came back here and read about your need for wheelchair accessible options in your home, I was reminded of it. As soon as I can find it, I will share it with you.

      All my best to you always ~
      Shari

      1
  34. john c says: 435 comments

    Sorry — I have been very ill, though not due to the cancer. We are trying to determine whether it is due to the chemotherapy or a virus. No progress since December 20 or so on the house.

    1
    • says: 72 comments

      dear John C – I am truly troubled that you have been so ill, but am relieved that it isn’t due to the damned cancer….it’s OK that there hasn’t been progress on your house since Dec. 20th or so, but am thinking that it’s probably bugging you that there hasn’t been any. πŸ™‚ Or maybe you’ve been too ill to care about that.
      I truly wish that I lived close to you – if all right with you, I would pop in with homemade soup, or whatever is good that you would eat, and read you a chapter a day of “Wind In The Willows”, or whatever would be interesting and comforting to you. Cheers, dear man, and I fervently wish you well.

      1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Sorry John to hear about your illness. Prayers your way.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Jeez John, sorry to hear you’re in such a funk. I’ve been busy as 10 beavers and have only recently had time to catch up to, (and I kid you not), 450+ emails, 200+ OHD comments alone. Sounds like all that moving of “stuff” put a kink in your sciatic. My X had that problem. Hope it’s not viral.. When you are feeling better I’ll be happy to help you out with Flickr. I’ve used it for years, and though the service has been through some rough times recently, I still like it and use it all the time. Here’s my page; https://www.flickr.com/photos/regulusalpha/ If I was the prayin sort, you’d be high on my list. You’ll be in my thoughts; and hope you’re feeling better promptly. With love and hope for healing http://api.ning.com/files/npyg*ggs3YORL*AkGRXrFpTdu-pGJ*r6YTu9YqD3pJxNfXVi-IgnyaoM9fbU1ooq59olkvRzzVswjDpb*TGog-dLHDTk7G-f/Askandyouwillreceive_StGermain_.jpg

      Jeff

      1
    • says: 38 comments

      John ~ so sorry to hear that you have been unwell lately. I just wanted to let you know you are in my thoughts and prayers, and hope to be hearing happier news from you soon! We have been through an evil cold spell here in central Indiana over the last few weeks, complete with ice storm, and I am very jealous of what I hope for you are much warmer temperatures!
      Please take care, and my best regards always ~
      Shari D.

      1
  35. john c says: 435 comments

    Apologies to one and all. I have had another horrible week or two with continuing jaundice, horrific bouts of back pain, etc. The good news is that so far tests and endoscopic techniques have not revealed that all this is due to cancer. It now instead appears that this is likely due a soft gall stone, described by one surgeon as the largest he has ever seen. Still, I have been off chemo, weakened, and, as I say, in pain. Shari, your warm words encourage and you and your life inspire.

    1
  36. john c says: 435 comments

    And reading Peter Dickinson’s “Perfect Gallows,” BTW.

  37. says: 38 comments

    John ~ I am sorry to hear of your continued issues with jaundice and back pain, but encouraged to hear that their source has been traced down, located and identified! That is encouraging! Has your back pain been up rather high, to the right, and located almost up underneath your shoulder blade? If so, I’m sorry I didn’t know about that before, because combined with the jaundice especially, they are textbook classic symptoms of a gallstone blocking a bile duct! If not, then I probably wouldn’t have been able to guide you as directly, but perhaps it might have been enough to go on had I known a little more. I have had those horrific pains myself in the past, but without the stones. It was traced at the time to biliary colic, more of severe spasms in the duct than an actual blockage, but I understand from some folks who have had both that the pain is very similar in either case.
    Off of me now and back to you! Have you been offered surgical resolution to your situation? Is it possible even in your weakened state from the chemo? Glad you’re feeling well enough to read! Hope it provides a useful diversion for you since you can’t likely get anything of a physical nature done! Do you have work going on around you, or anyone helping with your own chores? Who is taking care of your personal daily needs ~ meals, medications, cleaning, laundry and so forth ~ since you’re “down and out” for a while?
    Nothing much new here to report. One day is pretty much like the next around here. Except one day last week I summoned up enough energy to get myself thoroughly groomed and dressed, went to get a badly needed haircut, took care of some tax issues downtown at the courthouse annex, found a parking space right up front in the handicapped zone with a battery cart sitting right next to it with a FULL battery, and knew that was my day to take care of some personal shopping I had been putting off for a couple of weeks at the local Hellmart. I treated myself to three new nightgowns and matching robe, and a couple of other girly things. They are off the new arrival rack of spring things, but I wear one of those odd sizes they always get damn few of, and if I don’t snap them up when they are first delivered, I will not have them at all!
    Anyway, enough of shopping and girly stuff! Oh, but I really did pay dearly the next day ot so in increased pain levels for all my extra activities, but I considered it worth it all things considered. It was the only way these things were going to get done!
    Hope dearly that all your temporary issues are seeing some kind of resolution coming at you soon! Take care, and do keep us in the loop as you can, of course!
    Best regards always….

    1
  38. john c says: 435 comments

    Shari, you and i live similar lives. I too ventured to Walmart (at 7:00 a.m. to avoid crowds, park near the doors etc), went to our courthouse to thrash out the property tax exemptions, etc .Every day since last Friday, when I had the procedure to install the bile duct stent that ultimately was deemed unnecessary and so not installed, I have been slowly regaining strength, Avoiding fats, using lemon juice and lemon tea, putting tumeric on food, etc, sure helps. I talk to the surgeon today about what to do

    So far I have not needed the kind of help you describe. Perhaps I merely disguise reality, however. I mostly eat at a nearby restaurant owned by a friend, He also helps lift or move things beyond me, Neighbors and other friends check in at different times of day. I stay at a motel. Indeed, I am reminded, now that I think about, that my life has become much like that of two old duffers, resident in the same nursing home as my grandmother, who would once a day start up a car one of them owned, and then slowly proceed to the tavern across the street, where they consumed a beer each. To them that seemed still a normal life!

    I must close. I need to catch up on business phone calls, etc, today, as the last month was one of inactivity,

    1
  39. says: 38 comments

    Glad to hear of improvements! And your day did indeed sound similar to my own, sans the hair cutting and styling! You sound like things are coming along, and your needs are taken care of adequately. Glad to hear that.
    As for your “two old duffers”, it sounds to me that for them, living in a nursing home yet still owning a car and able to get out together, that starting up that car, and going to the tavern for a beer each, really is their “normal” life for now. The word “normal” has always had relative connotations to me. After all, normal is pretty much what you make it, and what’s normal for one (or two, in this case) may be quite abnormal for someone else, such as your grandmother perhaps! I hope I get to the point someday when that sort of a day is “normal” for me!
    Cheers!

    1
  40. john c says: 435 comments

    I am glad to say that by the grace of God I have come through a terrible time of a massive gall stone causing me no end of grief. However, it appears that, although I have not had chemotherapy since mid-December, I now am pronounced fit for it. Happily enough for me and this old house, I have time left, I think, to get things finalized and done.

    John S and his wife kindly provided some photos as of November of the house and some of the other houses and sights in town. https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/sets/72157651197211857/

    I am in Chicago, leaving for Mississippi in the next few days. I will begin updating things here again with news. I thank you all for your patience, John S and his spouse for their great kindness, and Kelly for her provision of this blog.

    1
  41. john c says: 435 comments

    I beat a temporary (I hope) retreat of some months. This has nothing to do with the house. However, although I evaded the clutches of a crazy doctor here (not the crazy cancer doctor presently confined to the State’s Institution for the Criminally Insane after being determined to be such following his hiring of inept killers to assassinate his wife’s attorney), by transferring to another doctor some miles away, that proved unavailing. That second doctor wanted me to undergo tests (first only one but with the prospect of others) to explore why I had low platelets before giving me chemotherapy. Unfortunately in northern Mississippi they only perform one such test a day, three days a week, holidays permitting.
    I therefore returned on a hasty trip to Chicago, to have the test performed there. However, my Chicago doctors — armed with medical records going back several decades — determined I needed no such tests, as my platelet count has been low due to liver disease while I was on a liver transplant list years ago.

    Back I went to Mississippi, considerably bucked up, but my new and sane doctor refused to give me chemotherapy, insisting he still wanted the tests. As we were nearing the time I had originally planned to return to Chicago, there seemed nothing for it but to return to Chicago and undergo chemotherapy there.

    I admit to feelings of defeat. I hope the Lord gives me the ability to return in the Fall and do all I want to do with this house.

    Oddly enough, I have discovered how to do the tack removal. I have one very powerful magnet (not electro). If I first squirt Lemon Oil on and around the tack, and then take the magnet and wave it very closely in and around the tack in different directions, the tack is very easily and quickly removed with one slight push of a screwdriver or tack remover. By this means I leave a very clean and small hole.

    It is providential I did happen on this. The decorative wood, John, is surprisingly brittle. Too, a surprising number of tacks are to be found in one or another of the five rows, or on the lip over the tongue of the next board. If one presses hard, the wood begins to break. Indeed, even in the middle of the boards, if that middle happens to be far away from upright studs, the board begins to bend and break, if much pressure is used. Given these circumstances, I will be reluctant to use nail sets to drive tacks further back in, even if there is no muslin or fabric sticking out.

    When I arrive in Chicago, back in my old haunts, I am going to see if a friend who owns an independent hardware store will work on creating an electromagnet for me. It should be an easy matter. Using a flashlight as the outer casing, for the sake of its hard plastic shell, one could create a solenoid with curled wires around an iron core, pop it inside, and use the switch to turn it on and off. I talk to electricians and shops here without result; perhaps they are merely used to my eccentricities in Chicago, but I honestly think minds are more inquisitive there.

    1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      John, if you can make that thing work you win the MacGyver award for the century! You can then produce and market the thing and I’ll be your first customer. πŸ™‚

      1
  42. Shari D says: 38 comments

    John ~ Greetings! So glad to hear your gallstone troubles have been overcome, you have avoided the clutches of crazy cancer doctors, and that we are hearing more from you again! Wow ~ I thought for a second you were joking about the “crazy cancer doctor” until you provided more actual detail! That’s frightening! I wonder what has happened to that fiend’s poor patients?!
    I too hope you can get back to working on the house again, sooner rather than later. I’m sure with you on one place and it in another, its going to miss your inventive ministrations. I will be anxious to hear about your foray into the MacGyver end of the universe, as I’m sure will others. And I’m sure you’re right about your Northern friends and acquaintances being more receptive to your eccentricities than the folks down South who don’t know you nearly so well. Good luck with that as well, and please keep us informed to your progress. You may indeed be on the right track to the invention of the year!
    Nothing much new with me. One day tends to melt into another around here, and if we weren’t waiting with rapt anticipation for the imminent arrival of Grandchild #6, (and Granddaughter #2,) there just wouldn’t be much to report on here at all!
    This is only the second grandchild of the six where we have known the gender beforehand. The first grandchild we were privileged to know about in advance, and I especially was gifted with the opportunity on my birthday to attend that ultrasound appointment, but the others since then have been the old fashioned mystery-until-arrival type deliveries.
    This one is different in a way, in that last summer my daughter and her family moved from their fairly bursting three bedroom cottage into her in-laws three story with basement five bedroom home that they sold to them. At the time, believing their family to be complete, all the maternity and baby clothes were discarded, along with most all the other items of baby care. Well, about 7 months ago, SURPRISE! My daughter blames it on a change in her thyroid medication dosage which affected other medications, and allowed the entry of one more child into the family.
    No matter how or why it happened, since everything for the new baby would have to be reacquired, they figured it would be a good idea to find out, if they could, just what sex they were buying for! Since that’s no big deal any more, they did, and we have a granddaughter on the way. The only other girl amongst the brood of boys is thrilled no end that she will have a baby sister, and really the boys are too. It will lend a little balance to that lopsided count! Anytime in the next couple of weeks we anticipate the new arrival. They have made it a tradition of not announcing the chosen name until after the baby arrives, and also not to let too many people in on the alert of imminent delivery. Even us, we get the phone call to let us know it’s all over with. I suppose that helps cut down on so many people making “is it here yet?” phone calls and such, but I find it a little disappointing to not be let in on the news, being the maternal grandmother! Ah well, such is life. I suppose if I knew, lots of sleep would be lost to anticipation and worry, but I could deal with that!
    Anyway, that’s about all there is to tell from here. Again, glad to hear more from you on how things are going, and I will be looking forward to hearing more soon. Now, back to go check out those pictures!
    Have a marvelous Spring day!
    Shari D.

    1
  43. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    With a heavy heart I must tell you all that John Clifford passed away today.

    2
  44. bfish says: 89 comments

    Kelly, thank you for passing on this sad news. Needless to say I am very sorry to hear it. I appreciate it that you have a long-term house diary of sorts here (with all of the posts and comments combined). My condolences to John C’s family and friends, and I hope that his wonderful house goes to someone who loves it as much as he did.

    2
  45. John Shiflet says: 5473 comments

    Very sad news indeed. John put up a courageous battle against his illness that provided him with a couple of years time beyond what his doctors expected. My spouse and I were privileged to have met him last November and tour his lovely well preserved Victorian cottage seen in the photos above. I’m not sure what will happen now with his elegant period home but I believe he mentioned he had already made arrangements with some of his family members regarding its disposal. He was a Harvard Law School educated lawyer so he was very thorough about taking care of the details. I regret that he did not live long enough to see the house painted in the period colors he had selected from the 1898 John Lucas & Co. paint catalog. I’m not very good at dealing with occasions such as these but John Clifford was an extraordinary individual who always made a positive impact on people. As a friend and fellow old house enthusiast/restorer, he will be missed.

    1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks John, indeed he is already missed. Prayers to his family, I know he has a sister and nephews. The most humble man, wish I had gotten the chance to meet him.

      1
  46. John Shiflet says: 5473 comments

    The late great John Clifford’s home. Now back on the market for $51,000 and John did a lot of work on it before his untimely passing. Nice neighborhood and friendly town.

    1
  47. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Closing comments on this post, visit the new post if you’d like to comment there.
    link to new post

Comments are disabled for this post.