Specially selected historic real estate for old house enthusiasts.

c. 1896 Queen Anne in Du Quoin, IL

$110,000

For Sale

Added to OHD on 1/24/23   -   Last OHD Update: 1/24/23

230 S Mulberry St, Du Quoin, IL 62832

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • 4 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 2497 Sq Ft
  • 0.18 Ac.
Here is your chance to bring this former mansion back to life. Beautiful original woodwork will make this a palace when some TLC is given. In its day this home was one of the best in town. Call today to set up your showing.
Agent Contact Info

Steve Cannedy, Shamrock Real Estate :: (618) 357-5333

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Linda
Supporter
6 days ago

If only I was in my thirties.  😥  What a great house and it could be a real get.

Linda
Reply to  Linda | 493 comments
5 days ago

Gem not get.

LindaCalvert
Supporter
6 days ago

Yes this one has so much potential! An doesn’t look,to me, like it needs much, some elbow grease, ceiling fixes in some places and the kitchen. So what’s with the cut up boards in the center of the room in picture # 27?

Morna
Reply to  LindaCalvert | 41 comments
6 days ago

Looks like it might be the right size to have held a grate to allow heat to the upstairs?

Rosewater
Reply to  LindaCalvert | 41 comments
6 days ago

Morna’s guess is a good one; but I suspect otherwise. It would be very unusual to find a gravity heat convection grate between floors in a house of this caliber and late date of construction. You might possibly still see one, but it would surely be confined to the rear service section of the house.

My guess is that the room was likely the master, and also Likely that the panel was originally hidden beneath a rug, and probably under the bed too, and that it was meant to contain a small “strong box”. Of course it could have been cut out later; maybe depression era.

Powers
Reply to  LindaCalvert | 41 comments
6 days ago

I am sure it was cut to get at the wiring below. Pretty sure the light for the room below is there. You pull a few boards up to run new wiring.

Rosewater
Reply to  Powers | 132 comments
5 days ago

Wouldn’t the same or similar cut then appear in each of the upper rooms if that were the case? This would be the first time I’d ever seen an antique, finished, hardwood floor treated thusly for that purpose. Also, it’s most likely that the house was wired from the start, (probably in addition to gas for dual lighting).

Rosewater
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
5 days ago

<This would be the first time I’d ever seen an antique, finished, hardwood floor [in great condition] treated thusly.

Rosewater
Reply to  Powers | 132 comments
5 days ago

If you look here, zooming in on the floor, I’m pretty sure you’ll see what I’m seeing. I’m seeing one single board on center of the room which seems out of place. Looks as if the two center boards were both cut in at equal lengths from (likely) center to allow the new third board along the run to appear as unobtrusive as possible. Most likely the way it was done in finished rooms in yesteryear. I’ve just never paid attention to that detail before. I sure will now. Heheheh. 😁

comment image

Powers
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
1 day ago

My home had gas and electric. Though it was wired already it still had up grades over the years. Depending on how gentle someone wished to be accounts for the sloppy cuts. Also the room in photo 27 I would guess had carpeting even when this home was first built. Also we use boxes or pucks set in the ceiling now by code. Back when this house was built they could drill a small home in the plaster ceiling and just have bare wires hanging for the light. They used an hanger on some if not most early electrical lighting called a “Crows foot” which could mount right on the ceiling. The photo that you reposted shows a better job of running new wire. I use a sharp blade or Drummel tool to cut the sides of a board to disconnect the tongue and grove. I use finish trim pry bars to pull the board out. If my measurements are right I only have to remove a few boards to get new wiring ran. Done this more then I care to think about. Key is I care, the person who cut open the floor in photo 27 probably didn’t care much. Even in attic spaces I am as careful. I just don’t believe in sloppy work, which photo 27 in my opinion is. Still in the end this is not for venting or any other use but to either run new wiring or to fix something. In my last house I think an issue happened with the gas pipe in the ceiling. This ancient repair would also lead to what we are seeing.

M J G
Reply to  Powers | 132 comments
23 hours ago

I had some of that in my home too. Over time you can tell the folks that had an attention to detail with their work and those who don’t really care and just want the work done.

LadyAnne
Reply to  LindaCalvert | 41 comments
6 days ago

If its anything like what they did in my Queen Ann, they cut in the attic and 2nd story floors to run electric wires. Very devastating when I started pulling up carpet, even in the hallway.

Rosewater
Reply to  LadyAnne | 4 comments
5 days ago

How interesting. I’ve literally never noticed that having been done to finished floors for that purpose before; attics yes, most unfortunately and frequently.

Thomas
6 days ago

We had a house with upstairs bedrooms with similar cutouts. In our case it was for rewiring downstairs ceiling lights sometime in the distant past. (Picture 27)

Rosewater
Reply to  Thomas | 65 comments
5 days ago

Uch. How awful. I wonder if these wounds were created by contemporary flipper types who are notoriously lazy and cut corners.

Robert
6 days ago

That huge piece of spindle work is amazing! It a wonder it has survived undamaged all these years. This house has great qualities and will make someone a beautiful home with a little work.

Court
Supporter
6 days ago

If this weren’t a couple hours south of me I would probably buy it. Comparable in size to my home. I wish my floors and woodwork were that fancy!!!! the bordering, patterns, and woodwork are out of this world!!! I wonder what the condition the 3 bathrooms and the basement are in, the photographer let a lot to be desired. Seems like a great price for a great home.

Rosewater
Reply to  Court | 38 comments
5 days ago

> location X3

Hence the price. Heheheh. If this were anywhere near a still prosperous urban center it would of course be worth $$$.

I looove this great little-ish house. If it’s not a George Barber it’s a damn good ripoff. I take John’s word for it on such matters. Really want to see MUCH more of it too.

Nothing would give me more pleasure than ripping out all of the 70’s attic finish down to the studs and replace with beaded board and such. Would be a fab opportunity to really study and play with wood finishes and how to achieve them.

homebody
5 days ago

So much to love here!

LUCINDA HOWARD
Supporter
5 days ago

This is wonderful. The fretwork is heaven. I’m with you Linda, wish I were younger.

Powers
5 days ago

I am a sucker for fretwork. I keep coming back to admire that panel. Fretwork sold me on the house I bought lol.

Rosewater
Reply to  Powers | 132 comments
5 days ago

Check out the detail in the below linked house. That ‘Victorian electric’ style with the wavy sun bursts is Uber rad.

[click on the small TVplay icon top right-ish for best viewing]
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk2qUgP7

This detail, (From a house I believe was recently posted), is the raddest detail I’ve seen in forever, and would fit in that house like a glove:

comment image
Maybe flipped as a transom.

Powers
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
1 day ago

yeah that is some nice stained glass work. Just think some people have work like this taken out and trashed!

M J G
Reply to  Powers | 132 comments
23 hours ago

It is horrifying. Even early 20th century when people were updating their homes sometimes removed these masterpieces and trashed them. When I was researching Thomas Edisons house Glenmont, several of the 1881 transom windows were removed and replaced with simple clear designs or just glass sadly. Hard to imagine such elaborate George Payne works of art discarded in 1914.

Komiza
Supporter
5 days ago

Love this house. Woodwork is stunning.

Greg in TN
Supporter
5 days ago

Really love this one!!! The first thing I would do – take that giant mirror off of the wall in the “den”. Replace some fans/lighting fixtures. So many great details and wood! Great price too!

John Shiflet
Supporter
5 days ago

No one has broached the “Barber” design possibility, so I will. The exterior configuration is similar to several plan designs in George F. Barber’s Modern Dwellings series of catalogs. The lavish interior accords with Barber’s fondness for fretwork as do the fine inlaid patterned parquet floors. Cleaning up the overgrown shrubbery around the front and removing the aluminum siding could do much to bring this one back to its late Victorian appearance. Not sure about photo No. 18 as the photo (taken with a bull’seye lens?) gives the Kitchen a cramped appearance. The kitchen and a couple of other rooms inside could benefit from some tasteful updates. A nice house here for the money, IMO.

Rosewater
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
5 days ago

Is cutting into antique, finished floors so crudely for the purpose of running wire a thing you’ve ever noticed, John? I’m going to be watching like a hawk for similar examples from now on. Heheheh

John Shiflet
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
3 days ago

I’ll try to answer two questions from your comments in one reply. Typically, if wires run below flooring it was usually installed from below the flooring through small openings in a ceiling, basement, or crawl spaces. Electricians are usually careful about flooring but now plumbers basically let the plumbing tell them which way to go. Horror stories abound about folks finding bathroom floor joists being cut and drilled to where they’ve lost structural support. Plumbers will tell you they are not carpenters and if floor joists need more bracing after they’ve cobbled through them, that’s a carpenter’s job. (not all plumbers have that attitude but some I’ve known, did) Early wiring was often run on the grooved back side of special baseboards and window/door trim made for running wiring. (featured in many of the old millwork catalogs)

As for Mr. DiMattei, his Cottage Souvenirs website looks inactive and he very seldom makes comments on Facebook. I hope everything is alright. There are two George Barber themed groups on FB I belong to so I’ll try to get some feedback on the Barber attribution. (and post it here later)

Rosewater
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 day ago

Thanks John. I concur about the reno. construction; and also hope to hear good news about Mr. DiMattei.

Rosewater
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
5 days ago

Has Christopher DiMattei commented recently? Seems like I haven’t read a comment from him in a good long minute.

Powers
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 day ago

The bathroom in my last home had the floor joists cut up so bad around the toilet I had to pull the floor up cut all the plumbing and sister new ones all across. From several new toilets and plumbing being ran everyone just kept hacking. You sat on the toilet and it leaned every which way and the floor ‘bounced’. I was shocked it did not fall into the kitchen. They also filled the space between the joists with trash from every job done in there lol. In the two homes I re-wired I have always seen the boards cut such as seen in photo 27. I am 100% sure it was done because of wiring or gas pipe work. What im not 100% sure about is the building practice of the day. I have had my hand in some modern home building and before we drywalled the plumber came in and electricians to at least begin wiring. I often wonder did some of these homes get capped off and plaster and lathe put in and some angry electrician showed up or plumber to start or finish the work? One thing thats not old is the trash talk between the trades.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Powers | 132 comments
20 hours ago

The problem with 19th century homes is that many were originally built without indoor plumbing or electrical wiring. That meant retrofitting these systems into the house which sometimes involved a lot of cobbling through joists, walls, and ceilings. I have no personal issues with plumbers; I was merely recalling the apparent lack of care in routing plumbing (especially drainage/sewer lines) through structural supports on the way downstairs. That old cartoon about the heavy iron bathtub upstairs falling through the floor into the downstairs is not as far fetched as some may think.

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