Specially selected historic real estate for old house enthusiasts.

1886 Queen Anne in Quincy, IL

$149,000

Off Market / Archived From 2022

Added to OHD on 11/29/22   -   Last OHD Update: 12/12/22

822 N 6th St, Quincy, IL 62301

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • 4 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 3033 Sq Ft
  • 0.20 Ac.
This elegant home is a rare opportunity to own a piece of Quincy history. Built in 1886, this Queen Anne style home has been restored to its original beauty. Boasting spectacular woodwork and hardwood floors throughout, with impressive features including a massive 6 foot wide pocket door separating the homes foyer and front parlor. Beautiful stained glass windows adorn the entry and can be found throughout the home. The exterior features decorative stone and brickwork with elegant swags and borders attributed to prominent Quincy architect. The home has been completely updated including a new roof in the last 6 years, lead pipes replaced with copper throughout the majority of the home in last year and all wiring updated. Basement includes large workshop and lots of storage. Large walk-up attic could be finished into 3rd floor. This spectacular home is a must see for anyone looking for historical charm.
Agent Contact Info

Valerie Greving, Bower & Associates Inc. :: (217) 224-1598

Additional Links
Listing details from November 2022, sold status not verified. DO NOT trespass to verify status.
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Karen S
Supporter
2 months ago

This gorgeous house and it’s furnishings are exactly everything I have always wanted.

Yoceeoman
2 months ago

If this beautiful Victorian was here in my neighborhood in NY ? Well over 2 million dollars. Probably more. Amazing.

nsteiner71
2 months ago

I suddenly crave black cherry ice cream.

M J G
Reply to  nsteiner71 | 28 comments
2 months ago

wow, i’ve not eaten that in years. Makes me hungry for it.

M J G
Supporter
2 months ago

This house has a very strong presence. The details are heavy and bold inside and out. I’d work with a house like this. Has so much potential for easy back dating. For me, the kitchen would need to be completely replaced. The second thing I’d do paint the exterior trim and third floor more earth tone colors. The third thing is I would exchange all of the pink for more historically accurate interior paint and or paper details. I would remove and discard all of the new leaded glass added into the front doors and side lights and replace with clear glass. In fact, I don’t believe any of the stained glass we see here is period. I’m personally not a fan of modern stained glass quality or the design.

Greg in TN
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
2 months ago

What he said!!……………

Wonderful overall! What a price!!

JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
2 months ago

Yes, it’s a fine house and I’m sure you could do a great job backdating it. The original Aesthetic/Eastlake details are totally lost in a sea of pinks and floral wallpaper typical of the late 20th C. B&B craze. I’m not as picky or knowledgeable on decor as you, but I’d like to see something more authentic.
The pressed metal details on the exterior are interesting; I would have guessed terracotta. I agree it needs a better paint job but please don’t highlight every detail with different colors as we often see.

The house was built for retired farmer and landowner Samuel Brown (1834-1911) who lived there with wife Jane and widowed daughter Mary Travers.

M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
2 months ago

I think what has happened is, when the average person thinks Victorian, their mind goes to THIS style of decoration. The 90’s, early 2000s, pink floral explosion with dried flowers and tiny floral borders and stripes and dolls everywhere. That was how my house was decorated when I bought it. I did kind of enjoy the destruction of all that remaining stuff.
(Did you just call me PICKY!)  🤓 

Some houses did highlight every detail back then with different colors. But if it is done with the right colors, it isn’t garish in my opinion. Not so circus-like. Like the old San Francisco painted ladies with all those hot neon colors. Not for me. Actually this exterior could even look nice with just a few colors. Like a trim color, color for the gables and a sash color. Then perhaps the rosettes and small details picked out in one of the contrasting colors selected may do it nicely.

The woodwork is a little dark for me actually. It looks like it was re-stained. I would have liked it as the medium stains. Do you also think that fretwork is replicated? Doesn’t look as authentic to me at a second look. I still have to read the documentation in the photos. Maybe it will shed some light on that new stained glass and the fretwork and stained wood.

JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
2 months ago

I was going to ask you the same question about the fretwork and the detail above the stair in #21. I don’t know, but it does have a home workshop feel to it. I’m not a big fan of trying to replicate details like that unless you know it was there and have a good pattern. I agree on the stain – the different woods on the newel post should be clear finished.

M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
2 months ago

Oh yeah, I didn’t even see that little rail in #21. I would bet money that it is not original but just a modern purchase. It is pretty flimsy modern replica looking.

I almost always will buy original materials from salvage if I need to fill spaces of missing items. Replicas have a cheap look to them I find or if they are of a better quality, people use modern techniques or design trends to create them which always affects the design. Or they even come up with designs that are modern adaptations of what someone would think is from the decade. I had rosettes recreated for example on my old house which were 7 inches wide for the third floor exterior. The design profile was complex with round grooves, sharp groove, thin groove and wider groves. The first drawing the guy sent back to me had everything rounded. I rejected the pattern. I rejected it and told him the blade needs to be designed exactly how it was. Another reason I was being so particular, was these rosettes were originally two toned. Olive green with dark reddish brown on the central ring. That sharp groove created a sharp cut that would have been visually wrong and almost impossible to paint on had he left it the generic rounded edges. He had the audacity to say we don’t need to guild the lily and no one would see it. First of all, in the 19th century they most certainly do “guild the lily” and second of all, every detail counts for accurate recreations. This stained glass is also an example. While they did a nice job, the design, glass used for texture and color is wrong for 1880s. A modern adaptation if you would.

JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
2 months ago

I think good craftsmen understand that attention to detail. That’s what I meant by picky, being uncompromising and doing it right. Otherwise it can be just a cartoon of the original work and not worth the trouble. I’d rather a guy say “Yes, we can do that but it will cost more” and let me decide if it’s worth it.

BTW, the text says the stained glass was homemade by the man who restored the house. I’ll give him a star for effort but …

M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
2 months ago

I’m only kidding about the picky. I’ve been called that 1,000 times. I prefer “particular” as it sounds less negative lol.

Yes. I agree totally. I’m hiring you to do a job. You should just let me know the additional cost and keep your gratuitous comments to yourself.

JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
2 months ago

“dried [or plastic] flowers … and dolls everywhere”

lol.

M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
2 months ago

Or plastic! Right! Mostly plastic. I sometimes tell people my house is 19th century on the interior and avoid the word Victorian because so many people think to this era. I remember my exes parents buying these gross flowery things as gifts for our house because it was “victorian”. Yeah, more like 2005 Victorian wannabe

LUCINDA HOWARD
Supporter
2 months ago

I agree with Karen, this house will do just fine, and I can even afford it.

Booker2118
2 months ago

Woodwork and stained glass are outstanding. It’s a bit too floral for my taste but a relatively easy fix. Removing wallpaper is much easier than stripping woodwork. The kitchen and baths are passable, so the house is move in ready.

nyoldhouselover
2 months ago

I love this house! And so affordable! Wish it was closer to me but as noted above, in NY, I would never have been able to afford it!

Mary
2 months ago

I appreciate older houses, but I am not a purist. I would not change the glass window features right away, maybe never. I’d live with them first then go from there. I would change much of the decor, to allow my eyes to settle on the space and details. I think there is a way to reflect style without going full tilt. Can you tell I do not like to dust furniture every other day? All in all the home looks to be in good condition and maintained well. The price seems more than fair.

M J G
Reply to  Mary | 12 comments
2 months ago

… this isn’t “full tilt”. This is someone idea of it but it’s early 21st century “Victoriana”. Very different from the real thing.

I’m sure most people could live with that stained glass. As a collector of actual art glass from the era, I couldn’t live with it. I love the original designs and glass from the era much better. Kudos to whom ever made these. It’s not easy work.

Powers
1 month ago

Amazing wood work. Definitely would change up the colors. As pointed out in other comments people do seem to go to this style when thinking victorian. I have done alot of study and reading on Victorian design. To sum it up though its almost impossible to pin point how “everyone” was designing at any given point. Though there are styles yes such as Eastlake and so forth, but this was a time when mass producing was a common thing. I often call cast iron the plastic of the victorian era. Everything was made out of it, even foot stools (stub your toe on that!). So basically items were affordable for many classes of people. I love seeing simple little Victorian cottages overflowing with Opulence. Not all over crowded there parlors though. As for fret work, it looks like photo #11 is either missing fretwork for the set of windows or at least it needs it. I am not against adding features but yes they need to be done right. I am not completely a purest except on the outside architecture. Colors can change from the original but I feel its important to put it back to as it was. I absolutely cannot stand additions on a home. The only two donts for the interior is blowing out walls for ‘open concepts’ and taking down original features such as woodwork. The other issue about putting a house back to original ‘everything’ inside is the lack of photos. The exteriors are often captured but early interiors are hard. You can take off woodwork to see if wall paper was snuck behind or some paint but the homes I working on this was rare. So I try to stay ‘period friendly’. Thank God for Pinterest because I find many period pictures to look at design and the items they filled there home with. Well thats my rant.

clawhammerist
Supporter
1 month ago

What a fantastic house for a bargain price. Plenty of room for one to make gradual aesthetic improvements while living there very comfortably. I would not hesitate to buy this house and chip away at making it my own without feeling pressed for time or money to do so.

While Quincy is a familiar town-name to many OHD followers, I wonder how many people have BEEN there. Let me give you my impressions from a 2020 visit! The town’s primary historic district around Maine Street (not a typo; the east-west streets in this area are state names, and this grandest street of the bunch carries the cleverest name of the bunch) is most impressive in terms of size (I would estimate 50 blocks), architectural quality and diversity, state of preservation, and obvious pride of ownership. Seriously one of the more beautiful and well-maintained historic districts in the Midwest. A significant storm passed through several years ago, with the tree canopy sadly taking a big hit; the “before” and “after” can be experienced via Google Streetview’s archive, but the neighborhood still has a wonderfully verdant look and feel in person. Other residential sections of town, like where the posted house is located, are more hit-or-miss but still boast many outstanding individual structures. Downtown Quincy has a small footprint, an inconsistent built environment, and fewer amenities than I wish that it did, but it is functional and not unattractive. The local park system boasts a couple of biggish green spaces that include some very nice blufftop views of the Mississippi; a large historic parklike cemetery is adjacent to one of these parks and could function as a sort of extension for walking enthusiasts.

Quincy’s topography beyond the very close-to-river bluff line is flat and unexciting, and much of its commercial development is more suburban in location and aesthetic. In my estimation, these qualities together make Quincy appear on the surface to be inferior to regional old-house meccas Burlington and Dubuque, Iowa, both of which have much lovelier hilly topography and denser downtowns. All three river towns developed at a similar pace in the nineteenth century, however, so there is less of a difference in quantity of historic architecture among them. Both Dubuque and Burlington, which I visited on the same trip, have more of a quintessential “old town” vibe than does Quincy, but neither boasts a historic district or an overall inventory of historic residential architecture anywhere near as large and cohesive as Quincy’s. Any of these communities would be wonderful places for an old-house lover to live, but Quincy strikes me as the most under-the-radar of the bunch and priced accordingly. Well worth a visit, and well worth considering for relocation, especially for retirees or others not dependent on the smallish local economy (although it offers any and every useful and enjoyable amenity for comfortable day-to-day living, certainly moreso than Burlington and not much less so than Dubuque).

John Shiflet
Reply to  clawhammerist | 31 comments
1 month ago

A few years ago, I visited this region of Illinois (Galesburg-Monmouth-Carthage-Quincy) to see what 19th architectural gems might still be around. What I found was very impressive in all of the aforementioned towns. Quincy was both sad and exciting. Sad that there were so many fine homes and buildings needing TLC. Exciting because of what remains in this old Riverport town. Despite relatively high taxes, much of that is offset by the low prices homes sell for. I had an extended conversation with an experienced realtor during my visit and he explained there are a number of steps homeowners can take to help make their tax burden more bearable.

As for this fine home, it is fairly typical of the higher quality mid to late 19th century housing stock remaining in Quincy. Given what the owners have accomplished including saving other endangered homes around them, I have nothing but praise for their efforts. Interior colors and decorating choices are there for the homeowners to make and as noted, most people would see this current interior as “very Victorian”. Purists, though, perhaps visualize what this house may have looked like originally inside and wish to take it back. I think the majority of potential buyers would accept what is there without changes while keeping in mind that furnishings usually do not convey with the sale.

For anyone with spare time, please go to streetview and look around this area- scores if not hundreds of Victorian homes, many built of brick or stone, can be found for blocks and blocks. With more investment and caring homeowners, this could be a very desirable area to live in.

Karenfryxell
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

I grew up in another Illinois river town, Moline, in an 1870s era house at the top of the bluff. It was not elaborate, but many of the neighborhood homes were. Many are still there. The land is cut with ravines that make the topography more interesting. That house and many others in the area are extant; unfortunately, many have been altered. However, alterations aren’t limited to our time, however. The house I grew up in lost its original porch around 1910 (probably because the original had rotted). Owners since have made more alterations, but the original exterior fretwork on the eaves is still there. My 1910 tiny bungalow in Portland, Oregon, had its original front and back porches enclosed in the 1920s. Because the house was so small (690 sq. ft.), I wasn’t about to restore the original layout. I kept what original features there were (kitchen cupboards and sink) and tried to do everything else in a period sympathetic way. Compromises because of budget or other concerns are sometimes necessary.

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