c. 1740 Georgian in Wiscasset, ME – $1,500,000

For Sale
Listing details may have changed since 7/21/21. Check the links below for the most recent listing information.
Added to OHD on 7/21/21   -   Last OHD Update: 7/21/21   -   38 Comments

4 Hodge St, Wiscasset, ME 04578

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $1,500,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 3.5 Bath
  • 7500 Sq Ft
  • 0.69 Ac.
If you appreciate and seek meticulous restorations of historically significant homes, this one is for you! For the purist, this historic house is an absolute treasure. Upon entering, you are transported to the 1700's. Painstakingly restored with no expense spared, this home is in the ideal location for convenience to amenities and yet removed from the busyness of town. Great care has been taken to return this home to its original state while bringing it up to today's standards. Every room offers special features, from the 9 working fireplaces to the original paint. If you're looking for retail space with excellent visibility and high traffic count AND a beautiful attached home, come take a look. Very large barn with full bath and mini kitchen allow for numerous retail opportunities, currently a successful antiques shop. Large attached well-lit workshop as well. Lovely grounds surround the property, with numerous perennials and planting gardens. Accessible from both Route 1 and Hodge Street, this home and gallery have plenty of parking and easy access.Starting right at the top, the slate roof (2010) caps this magnificent building. The interior walls have been brought back to their original blue paint or plaster. The floors are original paint. The basement has a new poured concrete floor and a newer hot air heating system. A long list of major improvements is available for this property.The Groves-Hodge House sits at the top of the hill overlooking Wiscasset Village at the corner of U.S. Route 1 and Hodge Street. Wiscasset is renowned for its many art galleries, antiques shops and restaurants and overlooks picturesque Wiscasset Harbor. This house, on the National Historic Register and in many publications, is within walking distance of the harbor and the public pier.
Contact Information
Kirsten Ingram, Newcastle Realty
Office: 207-563-1003 Ext 125 / Cell: 207-832-1111
Links, Photos & Additional Info
DO NOT trespass! Schedule an appointment with a local agent to view the home.
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
Features:

38 Comments on c. 1740 Georgian in Wiscasset, ME – $1,500,000

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. absolutely gorgeous!! This place is unbelievable! Such attention detail and perfect sensitive restoration of woodwork. The antiques and artifacts are lovely. The only note that doesn’t sit right w/ me is the granite countertop in the kitchen. Soapstone would be so much easier o the eyes and fit w/ other finishes so much better.
    Kelly you have outdone yourself on the “humpday” Interesting properties from all stripes stretching coast to coast!!! Thank you!!!

    • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1815 Cape

      All of the woodwork was dry scraped back to the original colors. The photos don’t actually do it justice.
      I agree with you about the granite countertops, but the problem with a house of this distinction is where to put a modern kitchen. Bill chose to put it in the 1st bay of the carriage shed (which was reconstructed) so he wouldn’t have sacrifice any of the wildly spectacular room. Once the kitchen is put in a subsidiary space, the issue of the material for countertops lessens.

    • kpfisetkpfiset says: 16 comments
      NY

      Exactly what I was thinking! Soapstone counters would have been perfect. But it is otherwise absolutely beautiful. I don’t usually look at the million plus homes, but a 1740 house is too good to miss.

      • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1815 Cape

        I agree about the Granite countertops. I also would have restored the wood roofs rather than using slate. This house is really one large work of art. I must defer to the artist on these kind of details. I suspect the reason you see Granite countertops and slate roofing is the same reason that all the electrical wiring is in rigid metal tubing – Bill was determined to do the best possible job so his creation would survive for a very long time.
        Les

  2. Andrea SAndrea S says: 60 comments
    OH

    I love this home!! Can anyone tell me if they believe that the staircase newel post and spindles are original? Just curious…

  3. Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 910 comments
    OHD Supporter

    What a property! I love everything about it. Love, love, LOVE!!! All those working fireplaces!! The paintings of tall ships in full sail on the walls (well, tall ships are one of my favourite things!!) I love the feeling of yesterday emanating from everywhere, how some of the doors are allowed to show their age and have not been painted. Everywhere you look there is something to get excited about and marvel at.

    Seeing the hat seemingly tossed carelessly on a hook as if the person wearing it had just strolled in and was about to sit in one of chairs in front of the fireplace (Photo No. 54) brought a grin. I love stuff that brings the imagination alive. The view of the harbour is a big plus. The red barn is charming and who wouldn’t want to hang out in an antique shop anywhere in Maine?

    I have no idea what life was like in 1740 Wiscasset Maine but if this property is any indication of how it was, then I will just continue dreaming. I appreciate hugely all the information provided by the realtor and the photos are many (over 100) and of excellent quality.

    A lovely posting, Kelly, thank you!!!!

    • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1815 Cape

      One of my fears with this house is that a new owner may not appreciate having all the original woodwork with the original paint. This house has been restored the way way a fine 18th piece of furniture is restored. The cost of doing this is much much higher that the asking price reflects. It was a wreck when Bill bought it 40 years ago.
      This house was begun in 1740 and had at lease 14 major additions before 1835 – but no changes after that date.
      Les

      • MichaelMichael says: 3564 comments
        1979 That 70's show
        Otis Orchards, WA

        One addition that you can see clearly was an addition on the end of the house, adding an extra window on each floor to the left side, making it asymmetrical. Even the placement of the two chimneys would indicate this. The addition was done well though as it looks seamless on the roof and siding. It did change the symmetry of the front, though.

        • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1815 Cape

          That addition on the South end of the house was done before 1780. If you look in the HABS floorpan of the cellar you will see that this South chimney base is much longer (on a N-S axis) than it needs to be. That entire chimney was taken down and rebuild about 4′ to the South. The earlier kitchen fireplace in this location probably was even larger with a wood lintel & bake oven in the rear. In the SE parlor & bedchamber, you will see that the paneling steps out about 2″ and there is an extra post on the outside wall. These features indicate the break for the addition.
          Les

          • MichaelMichael says: 3564 comments
            1979 That 70's show
            Otis Orchards, WA

            Les, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with us about this home. It is greatly appreciated. It’s fascinating to see how this home changed over time!

      • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 910 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Hi, Mr. Fossel,
        I am always delighted when you drop by to share you knowledge of some of these gorgeous homes — especially this one!!
        What can you tell me about the barn?

  4. LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1815 Cape

    This is a house that I know extremely well. I would be surprised if there is a better restoration of an 18th century house anywhere. I’ll comment more later, especially about the attics and cellars and how the house evolved over the 1st 70 years of its history.
    Les Fossel

  5. I have no words…….

    • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1815 Cape

      I can answer almost any question you have about this house. It was an absolutely heroic restoration.
      Les

      • NeutraNeutra says: 64 comments

        Gorgeous house, with a wonderful selection of period furnishings. Les, do you know if the original windows were replaced? the mullion profiles seem a little heavy for a home of this era.

        Jeff

        • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1815 Cape

          Only the attic gable end windows survived untouched. They were used as a template for the rest. The window frames were original, and were built for exterior shutters (very uncommon until about 1815). The earliest windows had very wide munitions (1 1/8″) but the sash were generally only 7/8″ thick. As panes got larger (starting with 6″ by 8″ panes), the munitins got narrower, but the sash got thicker – probably to better protect the glass against cracking.
          Les

      • shafer8shafer8 says: 83 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1732 Cape Cod
        CT

        Hello Les. The red color in the I presume parlor, can you recommend a current color that would match this? I prefer Benjamin Moore but would use whatever is best. Thanks!

        • JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
          Seattle, WA

          The fireplaces are all described as “working” and the chimneys look new or recently restored above the roofline. This is a real plus! I really don’t like to have fireplaces that are non functional even if I rarely use them.

          • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1815 Cape

            The rear chimney is a complete restoration – which is why you see so many blackened bricks (originally from inside the flues) incorporated in the visible surface of the chimney. The other two chimneys are intact and date from the 18th century. They were repointed/rebuilt above the roofline. Open fires in period fireplaces are seldom a hazard – unless sparks pop out onto a rug, or some damn fool builds a bonfire with soft wood in a firebox built for small dry hardwood fires.
            Les

        • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1815 Cape

          Paint colors can be an endless discussion. Where you have an original untouched painted surface, it is not really one color, but a variety of complimentary tones – which, very much like the human face, is what gives it life. The “old red” that we admire so much today was almost certainly much brighter (think fire engine red), but mellowed over the years. Did the original owners really want such a bright color – or did they want the color that it would mellow down to in a couple of years? I don’t know. Using a spectrograph you can exactly match a color, but it will be all that one tone. If you have the patience and are dealing with new white pine, the hand plane it and leave it alone for a half dozen years so it colors up naturally. After that, paint it, then rub some of the paint off in a natural pattern. This will get you to something that approached the feel of the original.
          Les

      • JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
        Seattle, WA

        I appreciate your knowledge, especially about the additions ending in 1835 and confirmation of the age of the newel posts and spindles. I don’t know a lot about houses this early and the angled windows in the end wall of the front room is interesting in that it wasn’t just a bay window slapped on but well integrated into the room. Perhaps it’s original but it seems like an evolution to me. I suspected that this was a labor of love restoration and really hope the house gets great new stewards.

        • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1815 Cape

          This is the North wall of the NE parlor. It is a later addition. It was probably added when the Federal period paneling (with ovolo molding) replaced the Georgian paneling. At the same time they inserted a Ct Brownstone firebox inside the larger colonial era firebox.
          This house started as a 2 room c.1740 cape facing South – which included the NE parlor. The house was turned into a 2 story twin chimney house facing East around 1765. The South chimney was rebuilt and moved further South when they added two more bays to the SE parlor. As large as this house is, if is not the least bit formal. The 1st owner was uneducated, and the 2nd owner was an innkeeper.
          This was Bill and Maryann’s dream house.
          Les
          Les

  6. Belladog1Belladog1 says: 275 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Wiscasset is touted as the prettiest village in Maine and it lives up to it. This town is FULL OF WONDERFUL OLD HOMES and a quaint Main st. U.S. Route one runs through the middle of it on to that large bridge. In the summer it is a mess!
    Who could top the collection of furniture and artifacts in this home it’s perfect!

    • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1815 Cape

      The interesting thing is that 18th century antiques as you see in these photos have not really appreciated in dollar value over the last 40 years.
      Les

  7. This house is magnificent. I would never be able to part with it. Is the curved wall original? I’ve never seen one in an old house.

    • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1815 Cape

      Sometimes the best thing we can do with the things we love is to pass them on.
      The curved wall is original to the C. 1835 two story South wing. It replaced an earlier one story enclosed porch that whose side walls connected to the main house at a 45 degree angle.
      Les

  8. JimHJimH says: 5760 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Wonderful old house with 250+ years of authenticity.

    HABS photos and drawings – 1936-7:

    https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/me0100/

  9. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1142 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Charleston, SC

    Aside from the can lights, this is about as perfect mid-18th century house you’ll likely find. Some interesting pics in the HABS file. Note the Greek Revival front entrance that’s since been backdated.

    https://www.loc.gov/item/me0100/

    • LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1815 Cape

      I agree with the cans – but they probably helped Bill sell high end antiques.
      Some of the most interesting things were missed by the HABS file. They did, however, record the one surviving thumbnail molded raised panel exterior shutter set that survived – which was gone by the time we got to see the house in ’81. A Federal period ovolo molded exterior shutter did survive as doors to the upper cupboard in the room with the curved wall. The original ladder for the roof hatch remains in the attic – the only one I’ve seen in place. The rear 2 story ell was quite early. The roofing boards covered by the ell roof framing never had wood shingless. Instead they ran vertical strips of birch bark held in place with wrought nails over the vertical cracks of the roofing boards (roofing boards in rafter purlin roof frames had the roofing boards going from the peak to the eaves, The weathered furrows in the roofing boards were quite striking. This is one of 3 examples I’ve seen that used birch bark to cover the cracks & did not originally have wood shingles. 1st period wood shingles in Maine were white pine and were secured by 1 nail per shingle.
      The Greek Revival front entrance had pretty much fallen apart by ’81. When we took it off we found rot and stain lines that exactly delineated the original triangular pedimented doorway. Such doorways followed a standard pattern much more than is generally relied. I strongly suspect that there were sash and door shops that sold over a fairly wide regional area.
      Les

      • JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
        Seattle, WA

        I’m not a fan of can lights but I can see why they used them. They have very few (I only counted one) modern lamps with large shades. Lots of task light lamps and antique chandeliers using candle power. A few can lights allow them to not over light it and probably created a nice focus for antiques as you point out. I usually want to rip them out but if this were my house, I would keep them!

  10. JeanneKJeanneK says: 39 comments
    1911 Arts&Crafts Foursquare
    Portland, OR

    Wow! What an amazing restoration. Love all the amazing paint colors/treatments. So very cool!

  11. NancygirlNancygirl says: 280 comments
    1962 Ranch
    New Concord, OH

    Wasn’t this just on here? I know I’ve seen this just recently. Beautiful house! Worth seeing again!

  12. kpfisetkpfiset says: 16 comments
    NY

    Thank you to Les for his informative comments. So interesting to look at such an old but beautifully restored house and then to hear from someone who was there and knows the house so well! I too sincerely hope that whoever buys this property will appreciate the incredible attention to detail and the beautiful signs of age.

  13. LesFosselLesFossel says: 124 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1815 Cape

    I suspect one reason the price is so high is that Bill is of two minds about selling it. Anyone who buys it at this price is must be doing it because they the value what Bill has accomplished.

  14. RosewaterRosewater says: 7662 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    All of those can lights seem exceedingly incongruous to me – considering.

    The very gently restored fireplaces, (well used), are my favorite aspect here.

    Hope this guy can find another him to pay up for his baby. Good luck.

  15. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1070 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    Sheesh-o! What a fantastic home!! One of the best and one of my favorites now 😳

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.