1915 Prairie in Mount Horeb, WI – $649,000

For Sale
National Register
Listing details may have changed since 5/2/21. Check the links below for the most recent listing information.
Added to OHD on 5/2/21   -   Last OHD Update: 5/2/21   -   26 Comments

312 S 4th St, Mount Horeb, WI 53572

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $649,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 3376 Sq Ft
  • 0.42 Ac.
COME SEE this Claude & Starck Prairie Style Design brick home on the National Registry of Historic Places that has been carefully maintained in it's original splendor. Foyer w/ beveled glass doors, Parlor w/quarter-sawn wood-beam ceilings, 27' Great Rm w/8 foot fireplace. French doors to formal dining room with coved artisan ceiling, quarter-sawn oak floors abound, exquisitely preserved leaded glass built-ins. Walkup attic w/finished 47x13 room. Owner has taken great care combining period styles & modern conveniences throughout this home. Updated kitchen w/stainless steel appliances. New boiler, central AC, new water heaters. Tile roof rated for 100yrs installed in 2006. Maple floors on 2nd floor. Newly restored 2nd bathroom. Sunroom for evening relaxing. Attached 3 car garage.
Contact Information
Alex Pfister, Century 21 Affiliated Pfister
608-576-7222
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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26 Comments on 1915 Prairie in Mount Horeb, WI – $649,000

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12519 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Old listing (only OHD Supporters can see that link): https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2020/04/21/1915-prairie-in-mount-horeb-wi/

    But there’s currently still a virtual tour from the old listing: https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=H795E6aXhLm&mls=1

    +4
  2. homebodyhomebody says: 117 comments
    1992 Victorian
    Dousman, WI

    Mt. Horeb is a charming town filled with trolls!
    This house is warm and charming! I could live here!

    +2
  3. Everything about this house is AMAZING!!

    +2
  4. The Midwestern states do Prairie beautifully. This house has been loved and preserved.

    +3
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 543 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      I agree that Prairie Style houses outside the Midwest tend to look lost (like a Pueblo Revival house in New England). The aesthetic was deliberately fine-tuned to the landscape and local culture, and it makes sense this Wisconsin version would be more chalet-like in MOUNT Horeb than the horizon-stretched houses of the open prairies. I suspect there’s a wink toward traditional Norwegian architecture going on here too considering the large population there (thus the troll comment above). Even just a glacial wrinkle, the low swell of land must have felt like a mountain at the edge of the prairies when the town was founded.

      +2
      • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 922 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I’d like to visit the Driftless Area someday. It includes 24,103 square miles, covering all or part of 57 counties in southwest Wisconsin, southeast Minnesota, northeast Iowa, and a small part of northwest Illinois. The region’s distinctive terrain is due to its having been bypassed by the last continental glacier. I only learned of its existence, and the glacier-free past which gave it its name, about a year ago. A description that I’ve enjoyed:

        The Driftless Area seduces with its natural beauty, but also its name. It sounds mysterious. Poetic. Removed of scientific context, it implies inertia, but that’s not accurate. After all, its terrain constantly shape-shifts. You could drive in and out of valleys for 20 miles, then come to a plateau as flat as Kansas. The water here tends to move as well, in countless rivers, cricks, and falls.

        The citizens of the Driftless mirror its vitality. You’d have to in order to survive in this rugged place, whether a sculptor in one of those artsy little towns on Highway 35 or a farmer who partners with the billion-dollar Organic Valley cooperative based in La Farge. The area’s hard-working streak goes back a ways. Frank Lloyd Wright, that avatar of American ambition, was born in the Driftless hamlet of Richland Center, and later returned to nearby Spring Green to build his famed Taliesin studio. The Ho-Chunk people were forcibly removed from their native Wisconsin in the 1800s, but they came home, too. Today, the tribe manages a casino in the Dells and parts of the Kickapoo Valley Reserve.

        Raw landscapes. Exotic ecosystems. Artists, slow-food acolytes, and Christian conservatives living in relative harmony. The Driftless challenges every stereotype you might have of rural Wisconsin. And isn’t that why we travel in the first place? As a humbling reminder that we know nothing at all?
        https://mspmag.com/travel-and-visitors-guide/and-you-may-ask-yourself-well-how-did-i-get-here/

        +1
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 543 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          Yes! That may be one of the most poetic narratives of a landscape I’ve ever encountered. Thank you for that KEYLIME. And it does embrace all those creative and various cultures from what I understand: drifted and rooted into the topographical creases that never drifted with the glaciers and windswept ice each winter. that’s a deep mental image of those who survive on their own creative terms.

          +2
  5. MichaelMichael says: 3279 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Wow! Beautiful home. I love the style and the materials they used. Of course I want to take a peek up in the attic on the 3rd floor. Do you suppose they had a ribcage shower in the bathroom? (picture 28)

    +1
  6. ctmeddctmedd says: 554 comments

    What a fantabulous house! Absolutely incredible. The street it’s on is pretty wonderful, too. wow.

    +1
  7. SharonSharon says: 482 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 Contemporary
    Sedalia, MO

    Dreamy. It would be great if the dining room set stayed. Those chairs are perfect. What a warm home.

    0
  8. oldavmanoldavman says: 28 comments
    1972 Bi-level
    Jerseyville, IL

    Nice. I like it. Looks like it would “fit like a warm glove” on a cold WI day.

    +1
  9. snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 543 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1782 Quaker Georgian
    Worton, MD

    I love this house too. It’s the perfect complementary feast of Prairie, Arts & Crafts, and Tudor goodness in a home. And, the owners really seem to “get it”. Well done!

    The beautiful plaster ceiling in the dining room is my only point of hair-split contention: it’s just too chalky pure-white for all that rich woodwork. Prairie/Craftsman designers advocated for natural hues that would bring-out the wood grain and evoke a deeper autumn mood (like golden wheat colors). In the 1920’s Elizabethan room at the Ladew House & Gardens near Baltimore, Ladew had the new plaster ceiling “antiqued” with smoke to give it a proper moody authenticity. My cooking would create the same affect come to think:
    http://darkroom.baltimoresun.com/2013/12/christmas-at-ladew-gardens/for-a-dark-room-photo-gallery-we-will-be-shooting-the-indoor-holiday-decorations-at-ladew-gardens-10/

    https://ladewgardens.com/

    +2
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1070 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      I tend to agree on the stark white which was apparent too in the front rooms, living area. I think that might be the only thing I would change, so warm golden color for the walls to compliment to astounding woodwork details. This is a lovely home and boy I wish it was here in Oregon 🙂

      +1
      • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 543 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1782 Quaker Georgian
        Worton, MD

        Thanks jeklestudio. It’s often the only criticism I have when I see an Arts & Crafts era house on here: all that white or gray paint to “brighten it up” for modern tastes. If you’ve ever been inside such a period house, it’s remarkable how your mood relaxes and there’s a sense of calm and harmony in all that depth of tone and wood. Everything seems to glow with warmth. I do love how the bathrooms and kitchens tended to be a contrast of stark white to be bleach-sanitary clean:
        https://news.usc.edu/83864/safe-bet-youll-enjoy-a-new-book-on-the-gamble-house/

        +2
  10. PhillipPhillip says: 303 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    Hard to beat a nice prairie house. The woodwork is gorgeous, as is the ceiling in the dining room and the tile surround on the fireplace in the living room. I like the interesting trim running on the underside of the eaves. Also the attached 3 car garage is sweet and was done sympathetically. Having a new tile roof put on in 2006 is a huge bonus. About the only thing i do not like is the trim being painted white upstairs. It baffles me why people ever paint beautiful stained trim. I mean you can paint the walls white if you want white light and bright. But covering stained woodwork with a coat of white plastic is just sad. But that aside this house is stellar and whoever buys it has just acquired a treasure.

    +1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12519 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      It wasn’t unusual to find homes like that originally. People spent money on the woodwork downstairs that everyone would see and saved money on the woodwork upstairs by using cheaper materials and then painted over them. I’m not saying this home was like that but it’s a possibility.

      +1
      • PhillipPhillip says: 303 comments
        1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

        yes that is true, although back at that time the cheaper upstairs trim would have still been heart pine, which I love stained as well. For interior trim it is hard to beat your find in Fall River MA. That woodwork is some of the best that I have ever seen. It’s still on the market, I guess 900K is steep for there, it would be sold first day on the market here in B’ham.

        0
  11. DoreenDoreen says: 284 comments
    1907 "Classic" Victorian
    Youngstown, OH

    Beautiful as it is (and it IS gorgeous), the painter in me is just cringing about that ceiling in the dining room. Oy. So very pretty. Let’s hope they never have to paint it.

    0
  12. KarenKaren says: 46 comments
    1955 MCM
    Rockwall, TX

    Oh, my heart. This has to be in my top five ever. So perfect.

    +2
  13. RanunculusRanunculus says: 235 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Tucson, AZ

    Just casually browsing as an antidote to jarring news updates & scrolled to photos 3 & 4, put down my phone, turned to my cat & said aloud, “Oh my gosh, this house is BEAUTIFUL inside!!” I love true craftsman houses & this one is magazine-worthy, even the updated/backdated kitchen. So livable. Still has its SOUL. Gorgeous. What an honor it will be for someone to become its next steward!

    +1

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