1889 Church in Valley Falls, NY

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Added to OHD on 2/23/21   -   Last OHD Update: 4/9/21   -   29 Comments

12 Emily St, Valley Falls, NY 12185

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $149,000
  • 8000 Sq Ft
  • 0.9 Ac.
Unlimited potential in this late 1800's brick church building.This space will capture your heart & imagination. All stained glass is still in superb condition, all pews & wood furniture as well as massive pipe organ all in tact. Over 4,000 sqft on main level & another 4000 plus sqft in lower level. Slate roof needs repair in a couple of sections, this roof leak is what has caused the ceiling & moisture damage. Otherwise, the building is in excellent condition. Solid brick with remarkable sound quality. Nearly an acre of flat lawn right in the heart of Valley Falls. This location is an ideal venue as it is less than 30 minutes from Saratoga & Albany, NY & Bennington, VT. Paperwork could be submitted to the historical district. The old antique church bell is waiting to be rung once again.
Contact Information
Lillian West, Maple Leaf Realty
Office: (802) 447-3210 Cell: 802-384-3210
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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29 Comments on 1889 Church in Valley Falls, NY

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  1. hearsetraxhearsetrax says: 246 comments
    VA

    🤯🤯🤯🤯🤯🤯🤯🤯🤯
    Purr-fect church to carve on and turn into a nice private residence
    complete with sweet organ, pews & bonus points for the intact confession booths
    😏😏😏😏😏😏

    roof probably needs a bit of work & double check the plumbing, electrical and Hvac system/s

    +1
  2. BethanyBethany says: 3467 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    Gorgeous! I wish I could buy it and gift it, with upkeep funds, to some local church plant that needs a home.

    +2
  3. oh for goodness sakes! someone fix the roof before it does any more damage to that lovely pipe organ! what a lovely building!

    +10
    • MichaelMichael says: 3371 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Ditto on repairing the roof! I slate roof can last quite a long time but only if all the slates and flashing are in place. In the meantime each day it’s put off costs more in damage on the interior.

      +5
  4. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1061 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    First things first. Get the roof, ceilings and plaster repaired before it gets worse. Second would be to take all the can lights and their attached tightropes down. Open the windows back up. Glorious!!

    +10
    • MichaelMichael says: 3371 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      I’d be in favor of getting rid of the can lights but the tightropes you see are actually steel rods, most likely holding the building together. I don’t know if they are original to the building or put in place after it was built but it has structural significance that I wouldn’t remove without a structural engineer’s approval. If you look closely, you can see the conduit applied to the underside of the steel rods. It was painted all white to allow it to blend in.

      +3
  5. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2335 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central, NY

    What pretty stained glass and organ pipes. But yikes, someone get that roof fixed!

    +3
  6. MJGMJG says: 2726 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    I wonder if the original interior colors and stenciling looked similar to what you see on the pipes of the organ. Would be nice to see an old interior photo.

    +3
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2335 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      I kind of doubt it. But only because the church I was brought up in was probably built just a little bit later than this one. Its organ pipes were originally a brass color (or are they actually brass? dunno), but were later (1970’s maybe? Can’t remember now) painted in a very similar manner to the ones in this church.

      0
      • MJGMJG says: 2726 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        But the style of painting on pipes in church organs from this era is very similar to this so it’s possible if this isn’t the original pipe paint, then it could be a pretty close replica. Tertiary colors with the color of choice during this era. Some churches if there pipes were peeling I’m sure it was easier to paint them one solid color and maybe that’s why the pipes in your church were painted one solid brass color. It’s just a thought. I was more thinking about the blue ceiling and the white walls which appears to be pretty 20th century looking.

        +1
  7. snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 586 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1782 Quaker Georgian
    Worton, MD

    It really would be sublime with an interior scheme that matches the organ and windows. It appears it was given a Colonial Revival makeover.

    +2
  8. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5731 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Two details really stand out beginning with the glorious painted stained glass windows. By painted, the design was hand painted on glass, then fired and fused between another clear sheet. When done properly, the painted designs can last for centuries. The second detail is the pipe organ with the stenciled and painted pipes which look to be original to the Church and if possible, it should be preserved and kept for the future. A residential conversion should be carefully done in a manner respectful towards the original Church and in a way that doesn’t destroy original features. Even a confession box can be adapted for other uses although some alterations inside will likely be necessary.

    +3
    • MichaelMichael says: 3371 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Who ever gets this fine place should also keep in mind there is a whole lower floor that we haven’t seen a picture of. There are a load of windows to the lower floor, according to the street view. Plenty of room for bedrooms and bathrooms while keeping the main floor space unobstructed…..the ultimate open concept!

      +2
    • MJGMJG says: 2726 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      I own a few painted glass windows. But they aren’t fused between another glass. So you can feel it to the touch which of course makes it susceptible to all sorts of scratching, fading etc. I also agree with you that a residential conversion can be done in a way that is cohesive to the design. I see conversions I love and some I loath. Some are careless with their conversation and treat it like a regular house and simply make rooms while others make custom designs that flow with building. And those pipe with their original paint scheme make my eyes crazy with joy.

      +3
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5731 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Thanks MJG for your input about painted stained glass-I have a smaller oval shaped Art Nouveau painted piece and it has both faded and is showing wear. I may have confused painted stained glass with fused glass (very popular in the colored wheel cut to clear pieces) although my less than 100% reliable memory seems to recall somewhere reading about Cathedral painted glass pieces being painted and put between fused glass pieces. No matter, we know that some very old Cathedral painted glass panels are almost a millennium old and the images still survive.

        By the way, one of the best Church conversions/adaptations I know of is of a Victorian era Church in Ventura, CA: http://www.victorianroseventura.com/ It was featured in the defunct Victorian Homes Magazine some years ago. It too has some outstanding art glass windows.

        +3
        • MJGMJG says: 2726 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          But I know some times they did fuse the two glasses together. I know that La Farge and Tiffany loved to use layers of glass too, even painting designs within. 🙂

          As far as your link? NOW THAT IS HOW YOU DO IT!!!! Learn folks… Learn.

          +3
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 586 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          Even better, that church in Ventura was unraveling (almost beyond the point of no return) before it was “saved”.

          +1
  9. cardstackercardstacker says: 81 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Well, I reached out to some good folks I know at the Dobson Pipe Organ Company in Lake City Iowa to ask if they can identify the quality or age of this organ and if it might warrant a panic rescue from its situation. We will see. I know all of you would be awestruck by the pipe organs that Dobson builds. They build them from scratch, including every pipe and wind chest and all. Their work is stunning and they’re arguably the most renowned organ builders in the world. They even built the massive, beautiful organ at the Cathedral of Our Lady in Los Angeles. When I happened to walk into that building the organist was practicing and I just froze in my tracks as the lowest notes seemed to shake the (concrete) building. A must-see and hear by the way. If you go to their website (www.dobsonorgan.com) be sure to check out the woodcarving link on the organ they built for St Thomas Church in New York City — WOW!!

    +1
  10. cardstackercardstacker says: 81 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Ok, my pipe organ expert friends have identified this organ as a circa 1890 Woodberry and Harris instrument. The verdict is that the organ would be a sweet little organ if it has not been too damaged by the water or humidity. And supposedly there is a small glut of used organs out there, so the sale value would be minimal. But, even if damaged could be repaired — at a cost of course.

    +1
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 586 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      Cardstaker, thank you for doing some legwork on this pipe organ. I know nothing about these instruments, but it’s clear this one has some magic still left in it. I too have experienced the awe-some pipe organ at the Cathedral of our Lady in Los Angeles, and you’re not exaggerating in its sublime power and beauty. Holy cow!

      0
      • MJGMJG says: 2726 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Growing up in a Catholic church when I was young there was a pipe organ that looked like this probably twice as big though. And when the organist would play it, she would hit from the deepest notes all the way to the highest note and it would send shivers through your spine and up and down your arms and legs. But there would be some times where they would be a substitute organist who would play it and it would sound like a cheesy horror movie. If these organs are played the right way they can be absolutely stunning. If they are played the wrong way they could be horrific.

        +2
  11. JimHJimH says: 5645 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The church was built in 1889 but shortly after it was damaged by an explosion at the nearby gunpowder plant. Services were held in the basement for a few years, and the church wasn’t fully repaired until 1895. Perhaps that timeline can explain some of the “redecorated” look.

    It’s a wonderful big space, though I have no idea what use would make sense in Valley Falls at this point.

    +2
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 586 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      Now there’s a new history line: damaged by explosion.

      0
    • MichaelMichael says: 3371 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Thanks for the information, Jim. Do you suppose that’s why we see the steel rod ties through the building? Seems logical as I wouldn’t have thought they were original.

      0
      • JimHJimH says: 5645 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I’d expect to see star washers on the exterior if they were structural, but I really don’t know.

        0
        • MichaelMichael says: 3371 comments
          1979 That 70's show
          Otis Orchards, WA

          Based on where the ties are placed on the interior, it would be above the height of the brick. They tie into the beams above the wall line. They are obviously there to stabilize the building and preventing the beams and roof from placing too much outwardly force on the exterior walls. To me it looks like something that was added after the building was built.

          0
          • JimHJimH says: 5645 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I’m sure you’re right, Michael. I hope they had a real engineer do the calculations because it doesn’t look very robust.

            0

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