Streator, IL – $13,000

Status and price shown on OHD may not be current. Check the links below.
Added to OHD on 2/22/21   -   Last OHD Update: 2/22/21   -   36 Comments
For Sale

404 S Sterling St, Streator, IL 61364

Map: Aerial

  • $13,000
  • 2 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 1400 Sq Ft
  • 0.16 Ac.
Extreme Fixer Upper. Looking for a challenge. Check out this 1400 sqft 2 bedroom 2 bath.
Contact Information
Shawn Sell, RE/MAX 1st Choice
(630) 664-7085
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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36 Comments on Streator, IL – $13,000

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12216 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Kelly, why are you posting this? There’s nothing architecturally special about it. If or when it’s torn down, not many, if anyone, will miss it. I can’t even tell you why I decided to look into the history but I did and the more I read the more interesting the home became. It was like peering into the lives of those that lived here through the house itself.

    I’ve changed the names of the Jenkins family because a few of them are still living. I did include photos but the page I’m linking to shouldn’t show up in a Google search. I did not share their story to embarrass anyone, I genuinely found them interesting. There was so much more not included, I tried to narrow it down to what this home may have experienced (not that houses have feelings of experiences but as in a way that gives life to the home.)

    I’m not a professional writer, my grammar isn’t strong and there will be typos, please excuse any hiccups. I may have rushed this a bit or else would have spent even more time on it. (I see many typos but the way I’ve uploaded it, those are staying as typos!)

    link to the homes occupants/stories

    +28
    • CoraCora says: 2074 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      “Not a writer…”

      You ARE a writer! As you know, I’m obsessed with old abandoned houses and I LOVE THIS!

      I’m serious, it’s so fascinating I’ve got to read it at least two more times.

      ❤❤❤❤❤❤

      +7
    • CoraCora says: 2074 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      Dennis Jr….
      He was a hooligan his entire life, and died a sad death at a young age.

      Amazing stories.

      +2
      • DoreenDoreen says: 258 comments
        1907 "Classic" Victorian
        Youngstown, OH

        More likely Benny was the hooligan–met an early demise, though. So sad. It’s odd how old time married couples will pass within days of each other, though…5 days? Holy smokes!

        +3
        • MikeMike says: 377 comments
          1886 Queen Anne
          IL

          I’ve know several instances of elderly couples dying days apart; a friend of my grandmother’s died on a Sunday morning (heat-attack on the church parking lot), her funeral was on Wednesday afternoon. Her husband then died on Thursday evening (heart-attack, sitting on his porch with his daughter), and his funeral was on Sunday afternoon. I can’t even imagine how the family must have felt…

          0
    • EricEric says: 4 comments
      OHD Supporter

      fascinating research!
      this is why i love old houses i’m sure they all have histories worth learning about.

      +2
    • JimHJimH says: 5382 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks! Humans are fascinating creatures. I just wish they’d take care of the their old homes.

      The “Jenkins” family is buried at Riverview Cemetery, across the Vermilion and near the little farm where Grandma Rose lived out her days.

      +3
    • PoncholeftyPoncholefty says: 29 comments
      1870 Hoping to learn!
      Culpeper, VA

      Kelly, thank you for that amazing history! As The Hubs and I looked through the pictures, we both agreed it was a tear down. Then I read your history and part of me wants to buy it just for the memories. That aren’t even mine!! So much living (and, sadly, dying) inside. If it were my family, I’d be heartbroken to lose it.

      This is part of why old houses are awesome – we so often get the construction history, but there’s so much human history that can get lost. I often think about that when our place creaks and groans, or when the draft comes up under the couch in the living room, or when Zebediah makes his presence known. I don’t know if Zeb is real – I’m a skeptic – but I just apologized to him. Can’t be too careful!! 😂

      +4
    • Andrea SAndrea S says: 56 comments
      OH

      So much history for this one simple house! Thanks for taking the time to do this research and for sharing it all!

      +4
    • Amazing and wonderful to read the history. Great job!

      +1
    • Americangothic95Americangothic95 says: 4 comments
      1810 Colonial
      CT

      What great research! Very interesting history. Houses can tell many stories. I’d love to know what my house has seen.

      +1
    • BoobtubeBoobtube says: 305 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1984 Post and Beam saltbox
      NY

      What an interesting history. I imagined the home as a very old person lying in their hospice bed reviewing their tumultuous life. I liked the obit of Mrs. Oliver where she is described as “a very large, fleshy woman.” Certain members of the Jenkins family certainly enjoyed their drinking and driving. The expression, “if these walls could talk” seems to have happened.

      +3
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 1109 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        That’s what got me started reading more into things. Roundabout way of calling her fat, strange they pointed it out in a death announcement.

        +2
    • Every old house is a treausre because of the memories they hold of the lives and dreams lived in them. Their value cannot be quantified by merely architectual details. Kelly, this is exactly what I look for in every one of your posts. So, please, post away. 🙂

      +3
    • HeidiHeidi says: 160 comments
      OHD Supporter

      IL

      It’s hard to believe it was lived in 10 years ago.

      The stories were fascinating. I did this with my house and oh boy were there some interesting stories. #murder!

      +1
      • dhemstockdhemstock says: 47 comments
        1950 Montgomery Ward kit
        Santa Rosa, CA

        Oh, wow, I would love to hear the stories of your house! Every time I’ve been in old, historic, even rundown homes, besides the architecture, my mind goes on and on wondering about who had lived or died there, what their lives were like, etc.

        0
  2. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5540 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    I can only “speak” to the house. It can apparently be restored but it lacks the kinds of period touches that would motivate people to buy it and embark on a lengthy restoration. Since the house does have a history for the sake of Preservation I hope someone can save it.

    +5
  3. JosephJoseph says: 34 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1868 Italinate
    Bellefonte, PA

    One house, many lives.

    +4
    • BethanyBethany says: 3466 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      . . . and many deaths! These days people seem to be freaked out if someone has died in a home but it was so normal back in the days of poor health care and much less available hospitalization for the end of life. I know my great-grandfather died in my grandma’s home, and it never bothered me a bit even as a child.

      +2
  4. this looks like a salvage job….couple clawfoot tubs and the light fixtures….maybe a door or two, then let it go! sorry, it hurts to say so, but thats it…

    +1
  5. I first looked at this, and thought ‘tear down’. But then it’d likely remain an empty lot.

    Then I read your post, Kelly, and it really does give me different eyes. It makes me think of my Grandma’s little house in Omaha, circa 1921. I Google streeted it years ago and it made me so sad, sold for $16K in 1991. I looked again just the other day, and it’s been saved and transformed! Still not worth much, but Grandma’s house will now be there a good while longer.

    So I looked through these pictures a 3rd time. Wouldn’t it be grand if HGTV would come through this one? Much as they can be maligned, this is good for that. Or Habitat for Humanity, I’ve been on those crews. Just as the Jenkins’ needed this house, so does someone else. A lot, really quite a lot of life happened here.

    Bet Dennis stuck that big ladder thing on the front after the chimney fire, maybe doubling as a tv antenna.

    +2
  6. LindaKLindaK says: 87 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Thank you Kelly for taking the time to write all that up, it was fascinating. Even the most modest house can have so many stories to tell. As Poncholefty said, so much living and dying in that house, so many family milestones. I think her work is done & it’s time for this old house to be laid to rest.

    +1
  7. SusNelSusNel says: 25 comments

    This is really sad, so much water damage and mold. I mean, you would have to go down to the studs on this place, most likely all new wiring and plumbing. Roof, everything. I know nothing about the area, but you would never get your money back on that house.

    The plus side, its practically free, and it is small. so less money to save it.

    0
  8. TomasczTomascz says: 120 comments

    Thank you Kelly. The house now appears to me to represent the accumulation of it’s tenants historys’, distilled into it’s present state. There is a story here, or a novel or a play. You might enjoy Jim Harrisons writing. tinyurl.com/4dg52w7f
    The trees, iron, copper, lime, portland, labor and so on that became this house have done their duty for well over a hundred years to shelter the fallible creatures it housed without complaint.
    I would remove what usable contents remain; let the bones of this old girl sink into the basement she sits over and release her spirits with a match and some kerosene. I’m sure the city of Streator would have something to say about that but she deserves a clean and decent ending.

    0
    • NeutraNeutra says: 56 comments

      It’s sad so many think “tear down” while perhaps not having the knowledge or experience
      to make such decisions. 40% of a wood frame buildings cost will be used in constructing
      a foundation & framing the shell. So even if everything were removed you still have the
      excavation, foundation, and framing ready to go. It appears the original windows are
      still there & ready for another 100 (or more), years of service. You can’t buy any wood
      replacement window today that is equal because of the inferior quality of the wood, compared to this house, same goes for the wood frame, unless you want to build a frame with LVL’s. Yes, its had fire damage, but a lot of the plaster can be repaired, and the main stair seems decent. The bottom line is, it can be a great little house, for someone who is undaunted. If your careful, you might even come out ahead. Jeff. architect, builder, preservationist, realist

      +5
  9. Anything you post Kelly- I am always facinated or interested in it-I am the type of person that sees THIS house and thinks…” well maybe?” LOL I dont give up on a house, an animal or people. Kelly, you are awesome and a excellent writer.

    +1
  10. DreamOnDreamOn says: 76 comments
    OHD Supporter

    It is good to know the history of the people as it adds so much to the history of a house. In this case, both the house and the Jenkins leave me feeling very sad. Raze the old place and let both rest in peace.

    0
  11. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1223 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    Thanks for posting Kelly – this is my kind of place. : )
    Sadly, it appears that the water damage is ongoing, which isn’t good news, but I still see possibilities… I’m also thinking that all – or many – of these old wrecks probably have similarly fascinating stories, and all deserve to be remembered.

    0
  12. Hey, original tub, sink and light fixtures

    +1
  13. A good cook never reveals his or her secrets on how to make a delicious meal, but you need to tell us all Kelly, how in the world did you amass all this information? It is nearly a novel in itself. Unfortunately, if we were taking a vote on saving this old house, I would not be able to cast one in favor of it. But I am very interested in knowing how you did all the detective work.

    +1
  14. BethHBethH says: 238 comments
    1999 Dutchess County, NY

    How sad that this once loved house deteriorated this badly in only 11 years or so… to the point that you can now somehow smell the mold just looking at the pictures. So many full lives lived here! Thank you for sharing your research, Kelly – I’m sure the connection to previous owners is what draws so many of us to old homes. I used to sit in the living room of my old 1889 farmhouse and wonder about the owners. Finding one’s signature under some 1940s wallpaper was like a treasure find for us. (And Benny sounds like he was trouble with a capital T…)

    +1
  15. Wow. Just wow. Thanks for digging up all those shards of evidence of the lives that have been lived in that house. All these details laid out like trinkets from the past, jumbled in a heap like yard sale treasures.

    I realize the story is distorted from being built out of the evidence that was recorded (traffic records, marriage/birth/death announcements) but how did Jr. ever get a job as a school bus driver after all those accidents? Was the fact that dad drove a taxi enough of a recommendation?

    Fantastic digging job, Kelly! There is so much beauty in the everyday residue of living.

    Now I really want a gold bike with a leopard print banana seat.

    +1
  16. PunwitPunwit says: 18 comments

    My wife and I belong to a historical home society in our town. Once you do the historical research and are approved you get a plaque with pertinent info and a saying of your choice. I think the saying we came up with is relevant here; “Old homes are windows into dreams of the past”.

    +2
  17. dhemstockdhemstock says: 47 comments
    1950 Montgomery Ward kit
    Santa Rosa, CA

    Thank you so much for the detective work, Kelly. I love doing some of that myself, but have never dug up as much as you did for this one house & family.
    A lot of you are commenting on the neglect and the mold. Am I seeing remnants of fire? Some of the photos look like fire damage to me.
    I’d love to see every old house get back its beauty. I have to wonder if that can happen here.

    +1

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