1893 Queen Anne in Bremen, OH

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Added to OHD on 8/28/20   -   Last OHD Update: 10/19/20   -   57 Comments

304 Walnut St, Bremen, OH 43107

Map: Street

  • $224,900
  • 4 Bed
  • 1.5 Bath
  • 2667 Sq Ft
  • 0.14 Ac.
Welcome home to this one of a kind historical home in Bremen. Built circa 1890. It features original intricate woodwork throughout, large pocket doors, 4 fireplaces all decorative, stain glass window, 2 balconies off the master bedroom and another bedroom. 5 different hardwood's in the parlor, a turret of your own. Both bathrooms have been remodeled, two staircases, very large bedrooms, many original light fixtures. Entire home has been rewired. Two furnaces, newer hot water heater, large walk around porch. This house sits on three parcels. Each parcel is 40 x 140, 86 x 140 and 45 x 140. This home has been owned by the same family & has not been the market in over 71 years!! If you have always wanted to own a part of history, now is your opportunity. This majestic marvel awaits you!
Contact Information
Sam Cooper, HER Realtors
(614) 864-7400
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
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57 Comments on 1893 Queen Anne in Bremen, OH

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  1. MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    BUYING THIS HOUSE IN 3, 2, 1…

    Can’t even imagine how happy I’d be to pick this house up for this price with all this perfection left!!! I want to own a house with a tower.

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  2. MrsLKTaylorMrsLKTaylor says: 57 comments
    OHD Supporter

    What a pleasant place! Pure joy to scroll through these pictures.

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  3. RosewaterRosewater says: 7448 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    NOOOOOOO! You’ve GOT to be kidding meeee. Cereal? No attic/tower shots eh? Ugh…. πŸ™

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    • MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      AGREED! Such an unusual feature like this should be photographed. I wish they did a virtual tour! I’d be all up on that.

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    • says: 75 comments

      Me too! Where’s the view from the turret? The house is awesome but ….I want to climb up the Turret to see the view.

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      • We are the buyers for this home. The third floor/attic space is completely unfinished, as is the turret. When we move in, we will post more pictures of it, however that probably will not be until late October.

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        • RallyNova350RallyNova350 says: 25 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Mason, OH

          Congratulations on the purchase. You’ve got a GREAT house!!!

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        • RosewaterRosewater says: 7448 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Unfinished atiic spaces, towers, turrets and such are my favorite parts of old houses; as are basements, barns, carriage houses, summer kitchens, etc. They tend to be the spaces which are mostly untouched over many years where you can most especially experience a house as it was originally. Those are places where you can also appreciate the construction of a house; as well as old arcane mechanical systems and the like. Love that stuff.

          I for one will be thrilled if you post a bunch of shots of those sorts of spaces in this great house. Good luck in closing! Hope we hear from y’all again soon. Cheers! πŸ™‚

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  4. cardstackercardstacker says: 81 comments
    OHD Supporter

    TOWER ON STEROIDS!!! MY CRUSH! Ok. Calming down. This is more than a tower, this is an observation deck. And besides, tower or no tower the TIMELESS beauty that has survived in this house is just making me nuts. Those spindled fire place surrounds and and and and …….. gush gush.

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  5. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5661 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    The bold design here makes this an impressive example of the Queen Anne style. Tower top open balcony porches as seen here are not very common but from my own experiences of sitting under one, they command panoramic views of the surroundings and fetch cooler breezes when at the ground level its dead calm. This house is calling out for a period appropriate exterior color palette. Nice interior as well. This Queen awaits a shining knight to address the lonely damsel in the tower. I’d like to see the outstanding results that someone could achieve with this fine house. The house design is surely by an architect either locally/regionally or perhaps from a published source. I wish there were an easily accessible database of published design homes that could be compared with houses that may be a match.

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    • julie A.julie A. says: 144 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1914 foursquare farmhouse
      New Germany, MN

      I was thinking the same thing about the exterior. There are so many cool details that would come out with colors. Make the outside as spectacular as the inside. Love this house!

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    • Matt ZMatt Z says: 111 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1893 Shingle Style
      Mamakating Park, NY

      John,

      This is a variation of a design published in Scientific America, and republished in the Dover Publications book, “Victorian House Designs in Authentic Full Color” If you have a copy of the book and look at plate 49, it is labeled as a Residence at Mount Vernon, NY. Unfortunately I couldn’t find an online version of the book to share but this house actually still stands https://goo.gl/maps/iifNWRKkDsoHSNbQ6

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      • MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Look at that one too. Though this one you posted appears to have been unkindly altered and the roof tower balcony enclosed. Very cool find.

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      • MichaelMichael says: 3249 comments
        1979 That 70's show
        Otis Orchards, WA

        Thanks, Matt! The key words here are “Authentic Full Color.” This home is stunning as it is but it would look even better with a proper paint job. I share Jay’s frustration in not seeing more of the tower on the inside. It is one of the outstanding features of the house. With few exceptions, the interior does not disappoint. I’m wondering about the floors under some of the carpet spaces. Are they as nice as some of the other floors we see?

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5661 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Many thanks, Matt. I knew I had seen this design before but just couldn’t place it. I have a copy of the Dover reprint but it has been in storage for some time. Scientific American-Architects and Builders edition, expanded the readership of the popular Science magazine which informed Victorian era readers of the latest inventions and changes brought on by progress. As I understand it, readers who liked a published design in the magazine could send off for house plans created by the magazine’s publisher. A number of different architects shared their designs in the magazine so both publisher and architect benefited. I sincerely appreciate you sharing that find. A number of times, I’ve speculated that as many as one third or more of homes built between the 1860’s and 1910 originated as published house plans. This is a still a fertile field of study. I wish there were a database of published designs so by using pattern recognition software someone inquiring could put a house image up and have it processed and compared to tens of thousands of known published designs for probable matches. If that were possible, I think that 1/3rd guesstimate might prove to be an under count. It sure would be a useful feature for many of us old house buffs.

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  6. Just going along…and WOW look at that floor with the Inglenook! LOVE LOVE LOVE! this home just gets better as you keep going. What a jewel. If I was buying it, I would ask if they ducks stay πŸ™‚ I love ducks.

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  7. JimHJimH says: 5577 comments
    OHD Supporter

    James Ernest Purvis (1853-1917), known as Ernie, was a local farmer whose hunch and dogged exploration led to the discovery of a large oil field known as the Bremen Pool. Purvis later sold his Bremen Oil Company to Standard Oil and retired to a sprawling Texas ranch.

    Probably the finest home ever built in little Bremen deserves careful preservation. Fantastic!

    Bio:
    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66292596/james-ernest-purvis

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  8. TheDaringLibrarianTheDaringLibrarian says: 316 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Coastal Cottage

    Joining in on the gushing praise about this beautiful gem of a house. I was absolutely gobsmacked by this foyer!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/21-304walnutst.jpg
    I mean, the floors! Like what kind of crazy details are those? They’re wonderful and mesmerizing, that’s what!

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  9. The Game MasterThe Game Master says: 8 comments
    gurpsgm@gmail.com Harrisonburg, VA

    Great Caesars Ghost! Who was the photographer who missed the best part? Give us some scenes from the Tower!!!

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    • DianeEGDianeEG says: 583 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1896 Farmhouse W/Swedish roots
      Rural, IL

      The old picture explains why the railing on the porch looked not quite right, it’s missing the bottom portion. Might not have detailed pictures of the tower porch but a lot of wonderful drone pictures that allow us to see details. Pretty awesome house both inside and out and wonderful that so much of it has been cared for so well. The colors of the interior wood glows. Lots of perfection for the asking price.

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      • says: 75 comments

        Our house is an 1855 Victorian with a large front porch. The railings are lower than today’s standard because people were shorter 165 years ago. There is always something you discover missing in an old house.

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        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12498 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Not that much shorter. I’d say that’s just another old house myth.
          https://ourworldindata.org/human-height

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        • MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          That’s not correct. Railing height had nothing to do with peoples height. It had to do with perspective of the overall house design as well as a lack of regulations. This is a myth. Some homes will even make second level railings a little shorter or taller based on the overall house perspective. No different than the Greeks adjusting the columns on the Parthenon to make it look correct. Railings heights are all over the road back then. Some are even below the knee cap. Just look at old photos where people are standing next to the railings and are clearly shorter. This is an old rampant myth for years. Same with the myth that chairs are lower because people were shorter. Another rampant unsubstantiated myth. I went through old chairs at the Met with some colleagues years ago and we measured chair height and it was all over the place. Some the same height as today and some not.

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          • says: 75 comments

            Well thank gawd for modern building codes because the railings (regardless of perspective) are unsafe for some individuals and or pets.

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            • MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
              OHD Supporter

              CT

              I think the modern height requirements are way to high looking and make buildings look silly. I think its overcompensation. And though knee high railings are way too short, the original railings on this house don’t look to have been dangerous. Their just missing all of the bottom details that need to be reproduced. But with all of those curves I can’t imagine that being cheap.

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      • MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Yeah I thought that the railing were clearly missing something.

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  10. Nevcity1Nevcity1 says: 43 comments
    1894 Queen Anne
    Nevada City, CA

    Great looking house. Love the woodwork, only thing that would worry me is the paint job, having just gone thru one that had 4 guys working full time for 6 months and mine had a lot less surface area.

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  11. RallyNova350RallyNova350 says: 25 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Mason, OH

    Wow, what an amazing house! Looks great as is, but as others have said, imagine how it would look with some exterior color.

    The interior is beautiful. Amazing woodwork, and love the floors, doors, fireplaces, etc. Gorgeous!!!

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  12. timhildebrandttimhildebrandt says: 94 comments
    1927 arts and crafts
    Indianapolis, IN

    what a house. I would strip all the white paint on the exterior down to original wood, apply good exterior primer, then repaint with three of four carefully placed shades of warm grey and whites to accentuate the shingle designs. bring in a muted complimentary color on some of the gingerbread around the windows and porches…Then take a week off, and start right in on the duck cage.

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  13. EXCELLENT price and hone! I can see the potential for a stunning garden with trees and bricked pathways! It does need a good paint job, however. They painted over old, chipping paint. Also, I am wondering if the chimney showing in one pic is up to code. All worth dealing with for this fantastic homne, huge lot, stunning interior!!!

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  14. cardstackercardstacker says: 81 comments
    OHD Supporter

    What is the proper way to strip exterior wood down to nothing, so you can prime and start over? And then apply oil? Latex? Seems that oil is more work but actually preserves the wood better? True?

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7448 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Those are good questions, and a good conversation, for the Friday share. πŸ™‚

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    • MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Just be care too that you leave some areas on the northern side of the house for research in stripped just in case someone wanted to research the original color schemes.

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  15. Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 783 comments
    OHD Supporter

    What a house! Love the tower, the entry way, the stairs, the woodwork and everything else. Wish we’d been able to see the inside of the tower. It is, after all, such a hugely important part of the home’s appearance. Would love to be up there in a moderate wind/rain storm or wind/snow storm! How exciting would that be?

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  16. PhillipPhillip says: 300 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    there is no easy way to strip wood. I am now doing that on the exterior of my 1910 tudor. I have a paintshaver, an infrared speed heater, and a regular heat gun. I use all 3 depending on what i am stripping. I avoid using any heat upwards into the soffit as that is just asking for a fire. I have tried peel away but was not impressed plus you then have to neutralize the wood, at least with the version of peel away that i bought. For one person to strip that exterior down to bare wood and repaint would be a 4 year project IMO. I figure about a year a side. It is super slow and tedious, and you will work your forearms to death. But it is the only way to really do it right, and thereafter subsequent paint jobs will be much easier. A younger man than myself might do it faster. Oh yeah and if you are afraid of heights forget it.

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  17. MJGMJG says: 2636 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    I added a picture of the similar design discussed in New York. The original color plate.

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  18. KarenZKarenZ says: 1174 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I have to say that I’ve missed reading all of the comments! I have been really crazy busy and am so behind looking at just the homes that I’m backed up on! I got June done, now to get July and August! Thank you for these two beautiful Queens back to back, Kelly!

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  19. We are the buyers of this house, and cannot wait to dive into it!! The third floor/attic space and turret are completely unfinished. They have never been touched except to install the furnace. We will post more pictures after we move in in late October 2020.

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  20. I have attic and turret pictures, but I cannot figure out how to post them!

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7448 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Excellent! Can’t wait to see them. An early Christmas present. πŸ™‚

      The easiest way to share them is to post them in a pictures gallery on your OHD profile page. All you have to do is click on your username, which will take you to your profile page. There you will see a “photos” tab. Click that; then click “+ new album” when it comes up below. Create a new album; then upload your photos – please! πŸ™‚

      After you have uploaded them, copy the url; come back to this page and paste the link here; or just leave a message and I’ll do it.

      Thank you SO much for indulging us / me. You have a fantastic house, and I look forward to seeing attic and basement. Happy to answer any questions you may have.

      Here are my galleries as an example.
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/318/?profiletab=photos

      Cheers! J

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7448 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Outstanding! That’s a custom bit of work there. Nice! Hope you put some Christmas funnery up there. Heheheh. What a phenomenally fun thing that tippy-top, turret balcony is. There certainly are not many of those around – anywhere. You should feel lucky to have such a VERY special antique detail on your FINE home.

      Fantastic attic too generally. Looks perfectly preserved. Wonderful. Hope you’ll post some more pics of it if you get a chance sometime.

      Nice, BIG, dry basement! Lucky. Make sure to keep the exterior drainage in top form so that it will remain that way. Would love to see more pix down there too if you’ve a mind sometime. πŸ™‚

      Did you find your fireplace grates and summer screens stored somewhere about?
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/23-304walnutst.jpg
      Fingers crossed for you!

      Maybe you might enjoy making a YouTube video tour? Heheheh. Not that I’m begging – but.. I’d sure enjoy seeing the whole thing; as would many others no doubt. That connecting bit between the bedrooms to the balcony is SOOOO cool!
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/4-304walnutst.jpg

      Anyway, thank you SO much for posting the pix! Merry Christmas! πŸ™‚

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5661 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Nice photos. The lack of ornamental and finished details indicates these spaces were probably more for architectural effect than for frequent use. Our recently purchased home in Cadiz, OH, has a cavernous attic with a floor, but open roof rafters and the lack of any finish details indicates at most it was for storage originally. Often times, one reads about third floor “ballrooms” in larger Victorian homes but in my experience such bona fide ballrooms are uncommon. Here’s a house (Sumner House) I visited in the tiny town of Earl Park, IN, which actually has a finished out third floor ballroom (complete with finished flooring, a cloak room, and rare surviving original wallpapers throughout: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/7270592734/in/album-72157629894166708/ Just as I plan to eventually finish out our attic space, it would certainly be possible for you to finish out your attic and the wonderful balcony porch on the turret. Thanks for sharing the attic/porch photos and best wishes as you move forward.

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