1827 Federal in Caledonia, NY – $79,900

Status and price shown on OHD may not be current. Check the links below.
Added to OHD on 8/6/20   -   Last OHD Update: 8/6/20   -   25 Comments
For Sale

3092 Main St, Caledonia, NY 14423

Map: Street

  • $79,900
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 2880 Sq Ft
  • 0.19 Ac.
Stone Colonial built in 1827, listed in the National Register of Historical places in 2007. Has housed a tavern, post office, bank and library. Utilized as a residence since the 1920s. Home needs total rehab. Agent is looking into Historical Landmark grants and will post when/if any findings. Built by Clark Keith.
Contact Information
Rhonda M Sweet, Your Home Sweet Home Realty
(585) 730-8024
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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25 Comments on 1827 Federal in Caledonia, NY – $79,900

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. JimHJimH says: 5261 comments
    OHD Supporter

    James R. Clark stopped at Caledonia looking for work on his trek west in 1817, and soon was appointed Constable and Collector. The tavern was built of native limestone a decade later and served various purposes for a century, before restoration as a home with minor alterations by Frederick F. Keith.

    HABS drawings and photos from 1936:
    https://loc.gov/pictures/item/ny0260/

    History and lore:
    https://cdn.loc.gov/master/pnp/habshaer/ny/ny0200/ny0260/data/ny0260data.pdf

    Caledonia seems like a lovely little village, and this handsome Federal house would be a rewarding project.

    16
    • AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
      Lockport, NY

      JimH,
      So wonderful to have the HABS with the floor plans! I was wondering if there was a ballroom upstairs, and there was! O believe taverns being the most public business in a commu6 typically would have a ballroom for public entertainment. I know the owners of the Forsyth-Warren Tavern near me, and they have a ballroom upstairs as well (http://www.forsythtavern.com/). It would be partitioned into men’s/women’s guest sleeping quarters with a curtain.

      1
      • CarebearCarebear says: 1184 comments
        OHD Supporter

        This area of Niagara County, NY, has a history always overlooked in the history books. I attended Lockport schools, (the county seat), and I do not recall ever hearing of Niagara County’s role in the War of 1812. The area around Lewiston, was first settled by a French trader, in the early 1700’s. Lewiston is up river from Fort Niagara, which sits where the Niagara River enters Lake Ontario. Lewiston is probably halfway between the fort and Niagara Falls. Today, it is a lovely town, full of antique shops, great restaurants (I ate dinner at The Gryphon just yesterday!), boutiques, and Artpark, a concert center that also has a number of Native American sites of interest, and the site of the original French trading post. The British took Ft Niagara from the French, during the WAr of 1812, then went upriver, and landed just north of Lewiston. From there, they marched along the river, and burned most of the village, along with farms and houses they came upon along the way. From Lewiston, they marched along Ridge Rd (Rt 104), still destroying property, and killing people. The nearby village of Tuscarora Native Americans heard the gun shots, and hurried down the Niagara Escarpment, to help villagers and farmers to get out of the area. There is a very talented sculptor in Youngstown, NY, where Fort Niagara is, who has sculpted a wonderful piece, showing the Native Americans helping people to run from the British. She also has another sculpture in Lewiston, along the river, which shows escaped slaves getting ready to go across the Niagara River to Ontario, Canada. The people fleeing from the British, went along Ridge Rd, until they got to Cold Springs, in what is now Lockport. There, some continued on to Batavia, and others kept going along Lake Ontario, to Rochester. The British were stopped at the area of Dickersonville Rd, which intersects with Ridge Rd in the town of Cambria (I think its Cambria there, and not Lewiston, yet), where local militia had a bunker of ammo and weapons. The British then turned back to Lewiston, and made sure Fort Niagara was secure. American troops then made it across the river, where there was a battle, and General Brock (British) was killed. There is a very nice park in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on the site, with a very tall monument to the general. The Americans then marched north, to the Canadian side of the mouth of the Niagara, to the town of Newark (now Niagara on the Lake), and burned it. Some historians say, this is why the British burned the White House, in revenge for burning Newark. The British did chase the AMericans back, capturing and killing many. Most of Lewiston’s inhabitants eventually returned to that area, and a few families still remain there today. The Forsyth/Warren Tavern, I passed just yesterday, on our way to Lewiston. There is also an antique shop there. I’ve never stopped, but I will, one of these days, as I love antiques!

        6
        • AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
          Lockport, NY

          Carebear,
          Wonderful history lesson!
          You must stop by the Forsyth-Warren Tavern and check it out inside! It’s amazing! Also stop into the antiques store! They have all manner of interesting things! .aybe we can meet up there sometime!

          2
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1198 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      That’s great information, Jim! And, to follow up on the realtor’s comments, the Landmark Society of Western New York is just up the road in Rochester, and is an amazing resource for both preservation and funding sources – not to mention sponsoring a fabulous annual preservation conference: https://www.landmarksociety.org/

      1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1184 comments
      OHD Supporter

      What a wonderful house this could be again! Thank you for the pdf-very interesting, to read of the original owner’s history. If I eon the lotto, this would definately be one of my lottery houses! I noticed that most of the pictures on the photo slide, were from Genesee Country Village, which I have mentioned before in here. I haven’t checked their website, so I don’t know if they are open or not. Every summer, I try to get there at least once. As you can see from the photos, they are pretty meticulous in their care of the “village.” A visit here,is a day well spent.

      1
  2. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Nice early and relatively unaltered Federal style house. It has the signature elliptical transom with leaded glass as well as the sidelights. Even more textbook Federal style is the toothpick type newel post which here appears that it could be made of American black Walnut and displays nice woodgrain. Amazing that it was never painted. (or was more recently stripped of paint) Caledonia, which I believe is the Latin name for Scotland, does seem like a charming locale.

    9
  3. sweylmansweylman says: 2 comments
    OHD Supporter

    JAX, FL

    I love this house! I grew up in the area and a bonus for this place is that the Genesee Country Village & Museum (https://www.gcv.org/) is just around the corner (actually it’s just under 3 miles) so if you’re the next owner and you get a little burned out you could just take a day off and spend it there. Instant inspiration!
    I sure hope someone who knows what they’re doing grabs this baby.

    6
  4. PuristaPurista says: 177 comments

    I agree with John that it’s one of the rare houses we see these days that have come down through time relatively unscathed historically. Let’s hope another purista gets his/her hands on this one and preserves rather than renovates it.

    The street view shows that it is a little hemmed in and is on busy Main St. But the good news is that among the brick, limestone, and Fire Department across the street you can leave the house with the kettle on and STILL not burn it down.

    The even better news is that if you get tired of the virus, responsible Canada is just down the road.

    8
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1184 comments
      OHD Supporter

      We can’t go into Canada yet. Only essential vehicles, like trucking, can go across the bridges right now. I wish this pandemic would do a mutation into something harmless, like what the 1918 pandemic did. I am about 20 minutes or so from a few of the bridges, and I’d love to spend a day n Niagara on the Lake ( lots of beautiful boutiques that I can’t afford there) or, spend a long weekend in Toronto, just a few hours drive from the border.
      Just a note…when the governments of the US and Canada do open the border to tourists, you will need a passport to cross.

      2
  5. JeanJean says: 124 comments
    1975 Traditional
    Athens, GA

    I hope the awesome oval rugs convey!

    1
  6. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1046 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Surprisingly intact! Truly a rare gem.

    3
  7. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    Beautiful 1852 map of Livingston County, showing the town/village of Caledonia.
    https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3803l.la000514/?r=0.37,0.165,0.066,0.089,0

    1
  8. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    More history:
    http://www.historic-structures.com/ny/caledonia/clark_house.php

    1
  9. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    Quaint Caledonia:
    http://www.rochesterwomanonline.com/index.php/2018/08/10/welcome-home-to-caledonia/

  10. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    My husband and I took a drive over there yesterday. What we found was far worse than the photos convey. I may not be a structural engineer, nor is my husband a licensed claims adjuster, but the severe issues in the west side of the house were very obvious. One corner was practically disintegrating. Additionally, building code violations, such as a crumbling chimney and needing painting, will have to be addressed simultaneously with the exterior masonry (with its underlying structural) issues. According to the HABS from 1936 there was mention of water flowing underneath the footings. I can’t be sure if it’s a downspout issue, but that front corner of the house had serious standing water. Accidentally stepping into it, I got water over my sneaker. I couldn’t even see it on the surface!
    This incredibly intact historically house needs immediate and extensive attention in order to save it, let alone make it habitable. I can only pray that person appears very soon!

    • JimHJimH says: 5261 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks for the report, although it’s a bit discouraging. It appears the water issues begin higher up, at the parapet and gutters, and haven’t been addressed over many years. Repair and/or reconstruction of historic masonry can be a difficult and expensive restoration task, but its very doable!

      https://goo.gl/maps/TPW1NNWfW8p83mDHA

      1
  11. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    JimH,
    I’m sure you’re right about the water coming off the roof contributing to the standing water issues. Fortunately Rochester has some excellent professionals to assist in this house’s rehab, including engineers and stonemasons familiar with historic buildings. As with most things in life, it’s just a matter of money.

    I sent some photos to Kelly if anyone is interested.

  12. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12134 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    From Amy:







    1
  13. PuristaPurista says: 177 comments

    Thank you Amy for providing those very informative shots and Kelly for posting.

    I know that cracks in masonry seem very dramatic. But for those of us who have worked closely with early houses, including masonry ones, what we see here is, relatively speaking, fairly mild and eminently fixable with re-pointing and, critically, identifying the source of the water that is saturating the ground and causing the subsidence. If that is not eliminated the same thing will happen again with time. That said, this house is not going to fall down anytime soon due to masonry failure.

    The roof leak is another story. That will destroy the house quickly if not addressed, from the inside out. A stone can last billions of years; a timber that is constantly getting re-saturated, a decade or less. So the preservation priority here is to stop the water from coming into the house. I don’t know if the water that is causing the masonry subsidence is coming from within or without, but it’s conceivable that fixing the roof leak might also stem the subsidence. The water leaking through the roof might be making its way all the way to the cellar, where it pools and undermines the footings. It’s important to remember these footings were laid at a time when there was no reinforced cement of the sort we use today in foundations.

    The good news is that unless this house were built by mistake in a bog or swamp, which is unlikely given the better judgment of our ancestors, keeping water out and/or redirecting it with roof repairs, proper grading, etc., will allow it to survive centuries more.

    2
  14. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    Purista,
    I love masonry houses and this one is just so exceptional! I don’t know if my photo is clear enough (#2), but that SW corner seems to be pulling apart. The exterior cracks may be an easier fix with a skilled stonemason.

    The roof is second only to the foundation in priority. I agree it’s replacement would go a long way in correcting many of the interior issues.

    Certainly water infiltration is the biggest threat to a structure’s stability.

    Interestingly, it is across the road from what was once a huge spring-fed pond. The Big Springs Museum is directly across the street! (https://bigspringsmuseum.org/2019/01/12/shaping-a-community-exhibit/)

    I have other photos that may better illustrate these issues which I would be happy to pass on to Kelly if anyone’s interested.

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