1860 Italianate in Williamsport, PA – $329,000

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Added to OHD on 6/26/20   -   Last OHD Update: 6/26/20   -   31 Comments
For Sale

915 W 4th St, Williamsport, PA 17701

Map: Street

  • $329,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 1.5 Bath
  • 3260 Sq Ft
  • 0.28 Ac.
Millionaires Row beauty. Expertly and lovingly restored over the last 40 years by owner. Incredible value. Completely rewired (200 amp) and replumbed, of course, but the joy is in the details. Even in a city full of stately historic homes, the dining room ceiling alone will be one of the most beautiful you have ever seen. Everything is either original to the period, or authentic reproduction, including rich window treatments, custom British woolen carpets, French and Italian wall paper, etc., etc.. Main second floor bath has blue lapis lazuli tiles. Closets are cedar lined. Wonderfully appointed kitchen true to the period, but with modern conveniences, with butler's pantry, complete with farm sink, dishwasher, marble countertops, direct access to both dining room and kitchen. Virtual tour!
Contact Information
Lawrence Ross, Premier Real Estate
(855) 423-5142 / 907-727-2227
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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31 Comments on 1860 Italianate in Williamsport, PA – $329,000

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  1. BethanyBethany says: 3428 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    I adore a colorful house! Fantastic!

    33
  2. RossRoss says: 2411 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    O Tower, Tower, wherefore art thou top, Tower?

    37
  3. ScottScott says: 337 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    The Filbert-Harrar House. Here’s a link to a page with an early photo showing the cupola.

    http://www.karenfurst.com/blog/genealogy/surnames/harrar/harrar-house/

    27
  4. MJGMJG says: 2157 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    I know some of these homes were built like this, but I do wonder if this had a tower originally. I have seen cases when they’ve needed to be removed.

    6
  5. Did ya’ll see the fence?

    This house is totally not my style, but I love it.

    6
  6. lady-bug02att-netlady-bug02att-net says: 6 comments
    1946 Cape
    Norwalk, CT

    This is a real beauty. I would love to see the rooms without the carpeting. The ceilings and woodwork are beautiful. There’s a lot to love here.

    2
  7. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11851 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    It’s not always that black/white. We usually see a home without knowing the why something was changed. Lightning, originally poorly built, tornado…all sorts of reasons why the tower had to be removed. It may not have been their decision.

    4
    • JimHJimH says: 5098 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I think most towers, cupolas and porches came off when they deteriorated and the owners got an expensive estimate to repair them.

      3
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11851 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Yup, I started to include that too in the list of “why”. I hate condemning (previous) owners on not being able to do EVERYTHING, sometimes it’s just not in our budget. Food on the table (or a new roof, updating whatever) or save or rebuild that what-not?

        4
  8. MJGMJG says: 2157 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    My guess is that this house has wider and plane floor boards to accommodate wall to wall carpet in the day. Wall to wall was sold in strips that were sewn together at the seems. Some people like the rustic charm of them. I find them to be too rustic for such nice architecture.

    3
  9. MJGMJG says: 2157 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    So it DID have a tower like I said earlier. I thought so. It looked a little off to me.

    1
  10. Sandy BSandy B says: 794 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    Thank-you, Rosewater, for the sumptuous photo close-ups…..!!! I would have a difficult time living in the museum quality style of this unique home, but I DO truly appreciate all that it is…!

    1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6679 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      You’re so welcome, Sandy. ๐Ÿ™‚ I’m in complete agreement about the over the top current decor. It’s a lot of look! All of that can of course be changed to suit a new owner’s tastes. I’d be more than pleased to undertake the task for the absolute thrill of owning all of those fine, fine, things.

      1
  11. JimHJimH says: 5098 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Thanks for the tour! It would be interesting to know what was in the house in the early days between its construction in the mid-1860’s and when the owner, attorney John L. Eutermarks (1841-1883), moved out in 1880. There’s some beautiful stuff there!
    One account says Lucy Filbert Eutermarks died early but she moved to Philadelphia after her husband died. The home was rented for a long time and eventually sold in 1907. Lucy died at Atlantic City in 1910.

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6679 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Jim.

      I have my suspicions about the evolution of the interior of this house; but considering that the current/previous owner was likely a collector, it’s hard to say.

      It’s really hard to tell from the grainy, antique shot of the place; but I’m seeing a pagoda like roof on top of that striking, original tower. Just imagine = sigh… ๐Ÿ™‚

      2
  12. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11851 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    New agent and photos, updated and moved to the front page. Comments above may be older and reference the old photos.

    4
  13. PhillipPhillip says: 265 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    What a labor of love someone put into that place. Beautifully photographed and presented. The interior is just sumptuous and magnificent. The exterior also has all the things I love about the style such as quoins and hoods over the windows. Beautiful front porch detail. As some have mentioned all that is missing is the cupola. Still for that price and move in condition I just think this place is a steal. But you would have to lay out some serious money to buy the furniture this place deserves. A great find Kelly and some lucky buyer is going to get a treasure.

    6
  14. MJGMJG says: 2157 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    Just did the virtual tour. What a place. Someone spent a lot of money on recreated period wall to wall carpeting, wall and ceiling paper, and heavy period lambrequins. would have loved to walk up to the third floor. Sad they didn’t let you go up stairs or to the basement.

    8
  15. Wow! What an amazing place! The owners did a fantastic job. Quite a labor of love. Thank you, thank you, thank you for maintaining so many original details and replicating what could not be saved. And that kitchen. What a great job. Detail and simplicity but updated and workable. Whoever buys this place has quite the showplace. This made my day!

    2
  16. RosewaterRosewater says: 6679 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Can not believe the seller left that GORGEOUS Renaissance Revival parlor set! Sure would be a big ole incentive for me to buy, were I in the market in Williamsport, PA.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Harrar-Williamsport-1860-a6.jpg

    Sure am glad I clipped some of the detail shots from the previous listing!!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Harrar-Williamsport-1860-a2.jpg
    You can see more of them in my gallery, which I can’t link directly to: just scroll down, it’s near the bottom;
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/user/318/?profiletab=photos

    Often enough, your “forever home” isn’t forever; so be careful of overspending and over personalizing. ๐Ÿ™ Just sayin..

    5
  17. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5357 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    One can tell when a period home was owned by a historic preservationist-the “good stuff” from the 19th century remains. Here, as noted, the once prominent cupola tower is missing but the interior appears to be remarkably preserved and enhanced with high end Bradbury reproduction wallpapers appropriate to the original period. I also like the functional yet period sympathetic kitchen here. The bathrooms also offer a period flavor yet they are mechanically up to date. In summary, this house represents a successful compromise between period authenticity and modern living. Interiors from the mid to late 19th century were often riots of colors and patterns with few surfaces lacking color and ornamentation. Restorers of this house were able to recreate that showy Victorian look. This is only one of many beautifully restored 19th century homes in Williamsport. I regret not having visited the picturesque Pennsylvania town but it is on my bucket list of places to visit.

    12
  18. JkleebJkleeb says: 294 comments
    Seattle, WA

    I first saw the link to the tour of posted on last weeks link exchange and the realtor mentioned Samuel Dornsife consulting with the owners on the restoration of this wonderful house. I only learned about him last year and enjoyed reading about him and his role in the beginnings of more historically accurate interiors in historic preservation. The link is to the introduction of a book that provides background on him. It must have been a pleasure to have such a knowledgeable consultant (and clearly knowledgeable clients who โ€œgetโ€ this house).

    https://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/toc/14943_toc.html

    4
  19. lrosslross says: 2 comments

    Hello. I’m Larry Ross, the broker on this house. I also liked the original cupola, wish it was still there. I’ve been in real estate for 35 years, and this is just a guess, but an educated one based on my experience: often when a cupola was removed, it was due to water leaks where it met the surrounding roof. Today there are membranes that can be used on a low-pitch or flat roof to effectively flash those types of seams, but back in the day, they were pretty much limited to hot tar.
    On the plus side, in the upstairs hallway where there was once a stairway to the cupola, probably spiral, there is now a wonderful arched bay (behind the window above the front entry) roomy enough for an armchair, a lamp, and a large bookcase on each side wall.

    10
  20. tomdg1-7gmail-comtomdg1-7gmail-com says: 67 comments
    1890 Three Bay Italianate
    Grinnell, IA

    It is very common for a house of this vintage to be sans tower. Once in a great while it would be removed to update the look of the house. More often, it was due to deterioration either due to being under-engineered at the time of construction or weather damage. Many times, the cost to repair versus removal made the decision for the owner. In our neck of the woods, wind and rain have caused the loss of a disproportionate share of cupolas.

    7
  21. DmflaskDmflask says: 45 comments
    1939 Spanish Eclectic
    KS

    Yep. Rebuild the top floor of the tower. And with all the talk about the tower, no oneโ€™s mentioned the truncated front porch. Rebuild it too. Finish by repainting it in a lighter more stylistic palette and it is as perfect as first envisioned. It has been amazingly well preserved.

    6

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