Monmouth, IL – $149,000

Status and price shown on OHD may not be current. Check the links below.
Added to OHD on 6/15/20   -   Last OHD Update: 8/20/20   -   20 Comments
For Sale

320 S 1st St, Monmouth, IL 61462

Map: Street

  • $149,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3498 Sq Ft
  • 0.25 Ac.
Charming Victorian style home on corner lot! Hardwood floors, original woodwork, wrap around staircase. Also, pocket doors, finished attic and updated roof. Outside includes open front porch, enclosed back porch, patio and 2 story carriage house garage.
Contact Information
Edward Thompson, Western Illinois Realty
(309) 426-2165
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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20 Comments on Monmouth, IL – $149,000

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. BethanyBethany says: 3506 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    Tons of potential for a beautiful restoration! And I adore the carriage house/garage.

    16
  2. What a stunning interior! The detail around the archways is amazing. Looks like a lot of original details are preserved. Someone will be very lucky to grab this one up.

    13
  3. MJGMJG says: 2031 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    Wow, lots of great features. Wish they took a closeup shot of the stained glass windows. They Scream of the late 1870s and 1880s with that broken or “crazy ” pattern as some of the architectural records called it. Scientific American Volume 62 Number 22 (May 1890)
    https://archive.org/details/scientific-american-1890-05-31/page/n10/mode/1up

    I love the small pass-through. Looks like there was probably a sideboard in that niche that is now empty in the dining room side.

    I love the heavy nature of the woodwork in this house. Amazing floors and fireplaces! and I love the third floor balcony! Maybe the original “french Casement windows” or doors too by the look of it. https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/5-320sfirstst.jpg Perfect timing as I just had a conversation about these ones with a few.

    Just need some plaster to cover up that exposed brick over the fireplaces!

    12
  4. tcmchickietcmchickie says: 155 comments
    OHD Supporter

    TX

    Golly, this house is really speaking my language!
    In pictures 21, 22, and 32, is that all parquet flooring I’m seeing?!? It’s yummy! And the wood stairs and the gorgeous stained glass in pic #8 are to die for!

    6
  5. JimHJimH says: 5148 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Built for druggist John E. Brewer (1841-1922) about 1884, and his brother’s house is next door to the right.

    Article with very cool vintage photos of both houses – click to enlarge:
    https://medium.com/@jeffrankin/brothers-were-partners-and-next-door-neighbors-ea37d40d25c2

    5
    • MichaelMichael says: 2622 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Great pictures, Jim. Thanks for finding them. It’s always fascinating to see vintage pictures of the exterior and see what has been changes over the years. I can imagine it will come in handy to anybody wishing to restore the exterior.

      1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Wow, those trees totally hide how amazing the home really is!

      1
  6. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    After careful consideration, I’ve decided to return to participate again in OHD discussions and comments on a limited basis.

    Last September, my spouse and I spent several days looking around Monmouth and a couple of nearby towns (Galesburg, Carthage and Quincy) rich with historic homes and architecture. South First, where the two former Brewer homes are located, has a number of lovely period homes. I recall that there was an earlier listing for this house and I believe the photos showed some details not seen in the newest listing. I also had a copies of the period photos that Jim linked to. Both Brewer family homes remain standing but both also have lost some of their period details over the years. Monmouth is a pleasant college town with its historic Monmouth University. The institution has done its part for historic preservation by acquiring several period homes near the campus and rehabbing them for sorority/fraternity organizations. The only negative I found, and its not limited to Monmouth, is the high property taxes found in Illinois. It pays to look carefully at individual tax assessments for specific homes as there is a disconnect between market selling prices and local tax valuations. If Illinois can ever reform their steep property taxes to bring them more in alignment with neighboring states, far more people would likely consider relocating there. I’ll end with a link to some photos I took in Monmouth last year, including this house and the next door other Brewer family home: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157711306273541

    5
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6645 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Glad to see your handsome mug popping up in the comments again. 🙂

      I remember this one too, BTW. I’m pretty sure it was on the site a few years ago.

      4
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Thanks guys! Glad to be back. Jay, was this 2nd Brewer family home ever posted on OHD: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/48926069706/sizes/k/ ? Compared to the way it looked back in the day, it has lost many of its beautiful original details. I’d be curious to see what the interior looks like today. I did check the tax records for this house and it is very low valued. Imagine if it looked again as it once did? As for “limited” participation, there were times when I would post scores of comments a day, especially on weekends. That is unlikely to happen again as I’ve scaled back my computer time. I’ve also lost 21 pounds since my stepping away, so some things have been positive. Now, onward and forward…

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6645 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          >was this 2nd Brewer family home ever posted on OHD
          I’m not sure, John. I don’t remember it.
          Someone really could re-fancy these two up nicely with that pic Jim found as a guide; if they’d the time, money, and inclination.

          I have to strictly moderate my internet time as well, John. You’re not alone there. Heheheh. 😉

    • MJGMJG says: 2031 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Why limited. I’ve missed your input.

      3
    • MJGMJG says: 2031 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      The Brewer family home’s current state made me feel bad. Lots of the detail missing, and the tower is tilting. Looking on a small screen right now, can’t tell if its asbestos covered or aluminum. In the old photo, its cool to see they actually picked out each shingle layer in an alternating color. Would love to know what colors they were.

      2
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Agreed. The second Brewer family home at 214 S. 1st. (larger size: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/48926069706/sizes/k/ ) was obviously somewhat less lavish than the other Brewer home next door on the corner. The once highly ornamental tower has sagged on one side as you noted. (probably fixable if its a framing issue) I’m almost 100% certain the current shingles on the exterior are cement/asbestos rather than aluminum. I ran across Monmouth historian Jeff Rankin’s period photo several months ago and was astounded to see how many original ornamental details were missing. My guess is probably in the 1950’s-60’s, when all things Victorian were widely despised, the cement siding salesman successfully pitched a modernization plan to the homeowner that would update the aging house for the 20th century. The ubiquitous siding salesman’s emphasis about “never needing painting again” usually cinched the deal.

        I did check the tax records for this house and it wasn’t valued for much. (only $516 for taxes in 2018) Zillow’s property Zestimate of $15,150 was very low as well. However, the property last sold in 2007 for $45K and the current owner may have no desire to sell.

        With the priceless period image for guidance, a dedicated restorer could make the house look as it once did. Assuming one could buy it for a small investment, a full restoration might be affordable. Then again, I have no idea what the interior looks like. It could have had a radical interior makeover in the ’50’s that completely denuded its period character or it could be largely untouched. An intact interior would make a restoration far more appealing. Monmouth, a town of 10,000, has its landmark College (founded in 1853) so it has a college town atmosphere. All the usual big box retailers are a short drive away because wise planners set up a large new commercial district about midway between Monmouth and Galesburg to serve both communities. The only negative, and it impacts the whole state, is the high tax burden the people of Illinois have to pay. When you find an affordable old house in Illinois, if the taxes are also reasonable, then you have a great place to call home. As for original colors, I’m fairly certain traces of the original paint colors remain in protected places like under porches.

        • MJGMJG says: 2031 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Totally. Looking at that picture on my computer it’s definitely the asbestos shingles or cement siding. Great assessment of the town and taxes. Don’t forget this cement siding or asbestos shingle was also touted as fireproof. Lol. Which is silly when I read this in the sales brochures because the whole inside of the house could still burn to the ground but at least the shingles didn’t burn

          If this house has a pretty good intact original interior that would be wonderful. I would love to remove the segment board or the asbestos shingles and do paint analysis on the shingles under it.

          Did you also notice the painted chimneys. Two tones ? Very cool.

          2
  7. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Photos from Mitchell of the door:

    2
  8. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5456 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    I’m trying to figure out if both acid etched (and/or wheel cut?) panes remain but it appears that a lower one may be missing. An acid etched replica might not be too challenging to have made if no wheel cut patterns are required. Years ago, I recall an Austrian ex-pat living in California was doing custom wheel cut glass work. Prices were quoted by the square inch. Still, if one has invested a fair sum of money into restoring a period home like this one, putting back a period detail like the artistic door pane could be the finishing touch. While a few salvage examples show up rarely, finding this exact pattern would be well nigh impossible.
    Such artistic door treatments weren’t always so elusive-back in the 1880’s and early 1890’s almost any regional house parts or millwork supply house published catalogs with these kinds of art glass door panes. Here’s an 1893 example: (Internet Archive) https://archive.org/details/PaineLumberCo.CCA39652/page/n105/mode/2up The period photo of this house shows numerous examples of artistic architectural treatments. Monmouth was less than a day’s shipping by rail from Chicago which after the 1871 fire became a national center for architectural parts. It appears the original builder made good use of the architectural details available from millwork suppliers of that time. Much was still hand made, but in factory settings where production was streamlined. By the 1880’s carving machines had appeared which could produce a huge number of roughed out designs which were then finished out by skilled artisans. That trend continued until the end of the Victorian era with increasing dependence on machine work. This improvement allowed even home buyers of modest means to afford an “artistic” stylish home that before mechanization and mass production would have been prohibitively expensive. Thanks Mitchell for sharing the photos and Kelly for posting them.

    2

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