1899 Colonial Revival – Wilson, NC

Details below are from January 2020, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 1/25/20   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   26 Comments
Off Market / Archived
National Register

601 Nash St W, Wilson, NC 27893

Map: Street

  • $60,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 4 Bath
  • 4279 Sq Ft
  • 0.47 Ac.
Perfect for investors. Remodeling has started to make this a 3 unit property.
Contact Information
Jay Forbes, The Forbes Real Estate Group
(252) 291-2048
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc: , ,

26 Comments on 1899 Colonial Revival – Wilson, NC

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11890 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Although the NR report said it was another architect, I’m getting a Barber vibe from this one. Super similar to No. 9 in one of the Modern Dwellings.

    7
  2. abevyabevy says: 310 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1857 victorian
    Applegate, MI

    Too bad it will be divided. Not enough pictures to get and ideas of what it will be like. Making it new and modern from what we can see. Good price, but sad in a way.

    11
  3. Woeisme says: 151 comments

    Oh NO! 3 units? She’s too pretty to be done like that.

    33
  4. RobbHRobbH says: 187 comments

    We currently live in Wilson and know a lot about houses here (and elsewhere). Wilson does not have any Barber houses. This house has been listed and relisted many times. This house will take a lot of work. It has been unoccupied for many years. Wilson has many great houses for sale at great prices….for now. Wilson is about 40 miles from Raleigh who may be getting Apple, Amazon and the US Army. This house would be about $500,000 + in current condition in areas of Raleigh. It is a great place for a person with a vision and who may want to speculate on what is to come. Preservation is huge here and many of us will help you with resources for your restoration.

    21
    • Christopher DiMattei says: 268 comments

      RobbH, I am going to have to respectfully disagree with you about Barber houses in Wilson. Barber was actually quite successful in Wilson, even though much of his work there, no longer survives. I have recorded and documented two other extant homes and four non-extant homes, designed by Barber, that were built in Wilson. And those 6 homes do not include this home, the Benjamin Lane residence, as the Lane house is in question at the moment. When you get a chance you should visit 111 W. Park Avenue and 501 Broad Street West, to see those Barber-designed homes. The four razed homes, exist now, only in old photos. Barber’s earliest commission in Wilson was for a Queen Anne design built in 1893, so there is certainly precedence for these later colonial renaissance style homes, constructed around the turn of the century.

      7
      • RobbHRobbH says: 187 comments

        Yes, you are right about 501 Broad St being Barber…I had forgotten about their house. Park Place Consignment at 111 W Park St is truly a debatable Barber. Where did you get your documentation on that one? Love to know so I can put in my Wilson resource file.

        • Christopher DiMattei says: 268 comments

          My documentation is more visual than physical, given that original plans, specifications, correspondence, and the like, for any given structure over a hundred years old, are quite rare at this point in time. And yes, I have read much about how the house at 111 W Park street is another house attributed to John C. Strout, but I believe Strout was more builder than the architect. Back then, contractors often added “architect” to their title because it gave them much more credibility with potential clients. The following passage from the NC Architects and Builders website clarifies Stout’s contributions for me perfectly.

          “By May 1891, Stout gained attention in the Wilmington Messenger for his work as contractor of the city’s YMCA. In 1897 Stout entered into a partnership with Thad F. Tyler, “under the firm name of Stout & Tyler, to carry on the business of contractors and builders” at 17 South Water Street. The announcement of the partnership in the Wilmington Dispatch asserted, “They are both experienced architects.” The partnership was short-lived, however, and by 1899 the two men were practicing separately. In November 1899 Stout advertised that he had “recently made arrangements with one of the best architects in the south, by which no charge is made for plans and specifications, where I am awarded the contract.” (This architect has not yet been identified.)”

          If Strout was really an architect capable of designing detailing the structures he built, then why would he advertise for all to see, that he had made arrangements with another “better” architect, for architectural services, should he be awarded the construction contract? And I would go on to say that given Strout’s relationship with Thomas Kluttz, the “best architect in the South” that he made arrangements with, was likely the firm of Barber and Kluttz. JMHO.

          3
    • Donna Dixon says: 1 comments

      There are two Barber houses in Wilson. See the Walking Tour Brochure put out by the city

      3
    • AmyBeeAmyBee says: 721 comments

      Please tell us more about Wilson!

      • RobbHRobbH says: 187 comments

        A nice city that can use more Preservation people. Lots of great houses to be rehabbed if you take a chance on them. We are about 45 min from Raleigh and about 2 hours from the beach and 3 hrs from the mountains. We are at about 50,000+ people. All major stores here (Target, Walmart, Belks, etc).

        2
  5. Christopher DiMattei says: 268 comments

    The NRHP nomination form is dated 1979, long before any of the recent Barber documentation became public. It is quite possible that the Stout attribution was simply speculation, based upon other attributed work in the area. If there is documentation that links Stout to the design of this home, then the Barber attribution is likely incorrect. I say this because of the timing of this home. If this home really was constructed in 1899, as previously reported, then it was likely designed in 1898, which happens to be the same year that Thomas Kluttz began working in George Barber’s office, but 2 years before Barber published this design. Perhaps Stout was the commissioned architect and he was still in close contact with his mentor (Kluttz), at that time? This scenario could have produced this design which was later modified and published by the Barber firm, in 1901. It is also possible that the Barber firm published this design in 1898, with the first edition of the “Modern Dwellings” series of pattern books. Unfortunately, I don’t have a copy of that edition, so I can’t verify this possibility. If there is any documentation that links Stout to the design of this home, then that would surely clarify the attribution. If anyone knows of the existence of this documentation, I would love to learn about it.

    2
  6. TXJewelTXJewel says: 354 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Thurber Brick 4 Square
    Strawn, TX

    The first thought that came into my mind and repeated as I scrolled through the photos was, “poor, poor house”. ?

    5
  7. Angelsbleed says: 10 comments

    I really hate to see old houses divided into apartments. The work that I see done is modernizing them not restoring them. I know it saves the structure, at least for a while, but it looses it’s soul or uniqueness. All for the almighty dollar. I hope someone will save it from this awful fate.

    13
  8. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11890 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Posted 2018, still not sold, moved to the front page.

    3
  9. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5358 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    The location may be problematic based on streetviews. A number of former residences on this street have been converted to commercial uses (law offices and such) so that limits the immediate area’s appeal for single family use. Might be best if this house too was converted for office or commercial use. Disappointing that it hasn’t sold yet. Here’s hoping that it doesn’t remain unsold for much longer.

    3
    • RobbHRobbH says: 187 comments

      I agree John, our house is at 900 Nash St N and our store is at 406 Nash St NE and this is at 601 Nash. At about 800 Nash St N is Barton College (Barton-Graves House- Presidents resident). This house could be a residence or a business or a mixed property such as a coffee shop or art gallery or book store and live at property. It is an area that should be annexed to the downtown district in the next few years. To add, many of the mansions in the area have been torn down long ago. We kept our store as a place that can be business in the future or made back into residential if someone may want to do so. It is an unaltered 1883 cottage Victorian house that we saved. It has been a business since 1933 and most past owners lived on site and did business there. Last owners ran it as a frame and gift shop. Mixed use of these houses has been common here.

      3
  10. RobbHRobbH says: 187 comments

    I agree John, our house is at 900 Nash St N and our store is at 406 Nash St NE and this is at 601 Nash. At about 800 Nash St N is Barton College (Barton-Graves House- Presidents resident). This house could be a residence or a business or a mixed property such as a coffee shop or art gallery or book store and live at property. It is an area that should be annexed to the downtown district in the next few years. To add, many of the mansions in the area have been torn down long ago. We kept our store as a place that can be business in the future or made back into residential if someone may want to do so. It is an unaltered 1883 cottage Victorian house that we saved. It has been a business since 1933 and most past owners lived on site and did business there. Last owners ran it as a frame and gift shop. Mixed use of these houses has been common here.

    1
  11. Hello, so it seems there are a few locals here that know the city and collective spirit of historic neighborhoods. With respect to this structure, are there contractors readily available for roofing, plumbing and heating, painting, carpentry? The conundrum here is of course cost per sq ft. vs. comps. A note of interest here is I notice the housing stock is “subdued” there isn’t much i’ve seen that says im loud and proud. I lived in a transitioning historic district to which I painted my Queen Anne with high coloring and succeeded in what i call a cascading effect whereas the housing stock had enough architecture to support following along. I would say this house supports rehab due to its exterior detail and should use the high visibility of the street to its advantage and bring attention to the area. But anything over 300k plus cost of house is in the non pragmatic area I suspect. And not sure what relevant detail is missing on upper and lower porch. Thanks

    2
    • RobbHRobbH says: 187 comments

      I will say right now the Wilson Historic house inventory is low right now was many have “found” Wilson as they know the services they need are here and they are not paying Raleigh prices. We have people who have come to town and are buying up houses and restoring them and either moving in or selling them. Many houses do not need much to bring them to that next step. Houses lately have gone on the market and be sold/pend the same day. This particular property is on a busier street..as is our house and store. It is a very visible house. It does need a lot more work than most houses here. What happens with this house is that the listing Realtor has “sold” it to people who can afford the price of the house but not its restoration. They then try to get a conventional mortgage which they do not qualify so the house keeps going on and off the market. The property is not perfect. It needs love but we have many trades people here who can do it. Some are inexpensive and others see a large house so they inflate their prices in my opinion. You will find the same everywhere you go. I personally think this place is a good investment. I know a lot that is going on here and will be happening here and I know anyone who buys this place and does it wisely will get their investment back. You just need to do it wisely like any property anywhere. Just ask any local on the place and trades. We are friendly people 🙂

      5

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