1886 – Manchester, NH – $299,900

For Sale
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Added to OHD on 12/3/19   -   Last OHD Update: 12/3/19   -   35 Comments

278 Myrtle St, Manchester, NH 03104

Map: Street

  • $299,900
  • 6 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3106 Sq Ft
  • 0.26 Ac.
Once upon a time...Homes were built like this Stately Colonial with Carriage House and a Victorian flare. You can just imagine the horse-drawn carriage pulling through the "carport of today" and almost see the well-to-do family disembarking.The good news for the lovers of "the old" is that the interior and exterior are almost all original. However, it does come with a need for major Restoration. Once you see the grand foyer with a chandelier that makes a statement and imported Marble topped Radiators that look more like furniture you will fall in love with this home and all of the detailed craftsmanship. There are hardwood floors, some of which are parquet with inlay borders and details. The hinges (yes the hinges) for the doors are a work of art and there are many Pocket doors, one with stain glass. Some of the high ceilings are hand painted and the casings and crown moldings are amazing. Fireplaces, light fixtures, and a mirror you won't forget! So, at least come take a look and imagine for yourself...the days of the past and all their glory! Sale subject to court approval!
Contact Information
Ron Butler, RE/MAX On the Move & Insight
(603) 952-4655
Links, Photos & Additional Info


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35 Comments on 1886 – Manchester, NH – $299,900

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  1. MikeMike says: 288 comments
    1886 Queen Anne Victorian
    IL

    Wow…did not expect that interior! I am amazed…and I wish there were more pictures!

    28
  2. Tommy QTommy Q says: 464 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Eastlake
    Ione, CA

    What Mike said. This house needs the love it should get and will repay the owner handsomely. I’m in love…

    7
  3. dwr7292dwr7292 says: 339 comments
    1930 carriage house
    Bethlehem, CT

    Such a fascinating time capsule. Thanks to Cora for finding it!

    7
  4. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5252 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    This is one of the most intact homes I’ve seen on this site in a while. I think it may be a few years older than 1886 because it has some stylistic references to the Aesthetic Movement with its emphasis on “artistic” design. At least on the Eastern Seaboard, by the mid-1880’s homes with strong Aesthetic details were starting to fade. The price seems quite reasonable considering what’s offered; however, Connecticut has a high tax problem. In more tax friendly states, often the assessed value is considerably lower than the listed price but here the assessed value is almost $100K over asking. If this same house were in the Midwest I would expect taxes to be considerably lower. Otherwise, I love this house and almost everything in it. Nice for the agent to mention the ornate door hinges!

    16
  5. AVoegAVoeg says: 28 comments
    Craftsman, Prairie WI

    Definitely was not expecting that interior! Beautiful woodwork, stained glass, and what a cool radiator! I’ve never seen one like that before!

    18
  6. RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    I’ll second John’s opinion here. This house is probably older by at least 10 years or so underneath rather substantial later additions, and a nearly complete interior update. I’m thinking this house started out as a rather standard, 3 over 3 with ell, bracketed Italianate, at about +or- 1875. The original back porch, and (possibly) the depicted mantles, are likely from that original date; and are among the few original details which remain.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/16-278myrtlest.jpg
    https://m1.cbhomes.com/p/851/4782136/Bd024eD74f6d4f3/pdl23tp.jpg

    The BEAUUUUUTIFUL, (cherry?), wood work, (love, love, love love, love those yummy sunflowers in DEEP carved relief
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/12/03/1886-manchester-nh/ ;
    the remaining, converted gasoliers; depicted art glass; RADiators
    https://m1.cbhomes.com/p/851/4782136/31B4C21885e042A/pdl23tp.jpg ;
    dormers; etc.; are from an obviously deeeeluxe, seemingly, nearly complete, Aesthetic period, re-do at +or- 1885. In that regard, I sure wish the agent had posted pix of the “hinges (yes the hinges) for the doors are a work of art”; among 100+ other likely fascinating details left to the imagination. Sigh.

    The front porch is from about 1905 or so; as, I suspect, are some of the additions and modifications in the back.

    This is a super rad house; though you’d never guess from it’s disjointed, plain Jane facade, (as Mike rightly noted).

    Es necessito MAS FOTOGRAPHIAS por favor! 🙂

    12
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Oops. Sunflowers =
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/21-278myrtlest.jpg

      3
      • ScottScott says: 298 comments
        1951 Grants Pass, OR

        That radiator is pretty rad.

        2
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Sure is, Scott. Don’t know how efficient that design is; but the look is really outstanding. The decorative motif is inspired Asian, with a basket weave motif and more yummy sunflowers: further evidence of a once glorious, Aesthetic Period interior. I’ve seen them a few times, but have no info. about the maker or origin. Rad for sure.

          4
    • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 90 comments
      OHD Supporter

      In the first picture of the fireplace (https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/28-278myrtlest.jpg) you can get the barest hint of what the hardware is like. To the left of the fireplace you can see what must be the pull for the pocket door. Not clear enough to see details, so feel free to let your imagination run wild! Any idea what that horizontal piece of hardware just above the vertical pocket door pull might be? Some sort of lock?

      Most fantastic house and I would love a peek at all its nooks and crannies.

      3
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        I did see that, prettypaddle. SUCH a tease! Heheheh.

        Looks like a pretty spectacular art glass window on the main stair landing. You can get an idea of the scale if you look closely here:
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/15-278myrtlest.jpg
        and closer; (also – don’t miss the lightning rod on the dormer!);
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Manchester-nh-1886-d1.jpg
        There is a hint of it’s likely extravaganza of floral fabulousness glimpsed from it’s reflection in a small mirror in the hall, seen here:
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/21-278myrtlest.jpg
        and closer;
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Manchester-NH-1886-adetail.jpg

        I’m hoping the agent sees all of these comments and decides to post MORE PIX!

        Toes crossed! 🙂

        3
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5252 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          I completely agree with you, Jay. Such a tantalizing tease to see the wonderful details (the stained glass!) reflected in that (Federal era?) mirror still suspended from the picture rail molding above it. Seeing the cupola really ties this house to its Italianate roots but it was subsequently improved, rather than merely added to, during the fleeting early 1880’s Aesthetic Movement period. I think many of us who appreciate the artistic beauty of this rather brief period in time would love to live in a house like this. But alas, in my case I’d literally have to win the lottery to give to this house all the TLC it justly deserves. Funny thing…when I woke up and turned on the squawk box this morning there were two shows on different channels about Lottery winners. Perhaps an omen of things to come? Nah, probably not, but if we weren’t “dreamers” of sorts we probably wouldn’t be here, would we?

          2
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Buy that ticket, John! Heheheh. 🙂

            I’ll tell ya; I could VERY happily live here – as is. As long as I could afford to keep the place ship shape, (and I could, because I do nearly everything myself), it could SO work for me. I hear you that it would look great with a lavish resto-mod and full of antiques and period goodies: but it would also look great with a thorough cleaning, (seemingly barely necessary), and full of a hodge podge of old, vintage, and the esoteric. Heheheh. It pains my soul to imagine living in a phenomenal place this choice – so I tend not to. I’d have to find some cool roommates too, because a place this big for just me, dude, and the dogs would be sinful: – though the luxury of big, empty rooms is appealing. 🙂 The barn+ on the other hand c o u l d be bigger. 😉

            Still agree with you about the progression here. I’ll bet Jim’s guy Dodge was responsible for the early re-do; but the clues to an older structure, (though faint), are still pretty convincing.

            1
  7. JimHJimH says: 4756 comments
    OHD Supporter

    A curious mix of styles – can’t fault anyone for not putting a label on it! It needs some paint and who knows what else, though it doesn’t need a heavy-handed remodeling to obscure its wonderful period details!

    The early resident was Dr. Clarence M. Dodge (1847-1909) who first appeared in the city directory here with his wife and a servant in 1885.

    We’ve seen some fine homes at OHD in Manchester NH:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/?s=03104

    6
  8. Barbara VBarbara V says: 604 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    This was shared a couple of days ago in the link exchange by tcmchickie, and has been on my mind ever since. I actually love the exterior, including the jumbled add-ons which look to have been there quite some time – But that interior! Original-looking wallpaper and ceiling stencils, antique gas/electric lighting, antique marble fireplace and inserts, loads of lincrusta, stained glass in the doors and dormer windows, and at least a couple of very unusual radiators, the style of which I have never seen before. Not to mention the inlaid floors and wonderful woodwork…

    Considering the original look of this incredible place, I can’t help thinking/hoping that the lack of kitchen and bathroom photos mean these areas – usually the first to go – are equally untouched…

    This is a house which deserves preservation and protection, which I’ll be praying for…

    12
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ tcmchickie!

      This one will be in my head for a minute as well, Barbara. 🙂

      On top of everything else; the extensive, attached, barn complex peaks my envy.

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Barbara, this house reminded me in many respects of the one I linked below . If you haven’t seen it before, you’re likely to enjoy seeing it now. 🙂 It is one of my very favorite finds which I posted on the old forum to ever be posted on OHD: and I’m sure glad it’s still around, because I lost my copies of the pix.

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/07/10/1889-queen-anne-new-london-ct/

      4
      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 604 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        Oh Gosh, Jay, that is quite a beauty as well! Any idea what happened with it (or maybe we’re better off not knowing…?).

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Unknown, Barbara. It’s in a tough neighborhood in what I’m given to understand is a tough town – so. I always hope for the best. 🙂

          I noticed when I was looking at it again that Kelly had added a new banner =
          “Are you the new owner? Comment below, we’d love to say hi!” ; so toes crossed for future happy info..

      • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 339 comments
        1930 carriage house
        Bethlehem, CT

        Boy, it seems like we had a wealth of opportunity just waiting in that thread, I might have to do a driveby next time I’m in that area, which isn’t all that often. From a cursory glance at the online assessor’s database, it doesn’t appear that the person who was interested in it bought it. The appraisal value is still almost $280k 4 years after it was purchased for $70k. I have no idea why a homeowner wouldn’t have immediately had an appeal done to get their taxes down. Happens pretty regularly. This particular database doesn’t list any current building permits so it’s impossible to tell if any work has been done. I have to say, of all the Victorian details, Aesthetic movement flourishes always seem to be the most graceful, somehow combining a masculine and feminine sense together that is quite appealing. I hope this New London house has found a proper caretaker since it is one helluva house.

        1
    • dwr7292dwr7292 says: 339 comments
      1930 carriage house
      Bethlehem, CT

      Oops, thanks for the correction, I had posted it was Cora, but indeed it was tcmchickie.

      2
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11504 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        It was both, Cora and tcmchickie but on different link exchanges. This is why I had to stop thanking, it’s very hard to keep up with. 🙂

        2
  9. GabrielGabriel says: 12 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Who would have thought that interior was in this house? I’m stunned. The fireplaces alone are works of art….incredible.

    2
  10. BethanyBethany says: 3207 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    And in addition to the previous comments: CUPOLA!!!

    2
  11. CindyCindy says: 242 comments
    1866 Italianate/Queen Anne
    Brunswick, MO

    This house is amazing, never expected such a beautiful, intact interior. Like Barbara V listed above, all the original details are so special. Hope the new owner will appreciate and take care of the lincrusta.

    2
  12. BethHBethH says: 196 comments
    1999 Dutchess County, NY

    All that and a baby grand…. O.M.G!! I’d move to NH in a heartbeat, but my husband would be heading south at the same time. What gorgeous details in this house!

    2
  13. tcmchickietcmchickie says: 56 comments
    TX

    Oh, I’m so happy that so many of you found the same things to love about this house as I did! Being a newbie here to Old House Dreams, I still fret over what the right things to post are, but when I saw the interior of this one, I *knew* I had to bring it to y’all’s attention! And I’m so glad you all have been naming the things I’m seeing in this house, and debating the potential build and revision dates, and talking about the Aesthetic Movement, etc.; I always learn so much from your posts. Thank you, everyone!!

    6
  14. MichaelMichael says: 1900 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Not much I can add to the comments already stated. The house deserves a period correct paint scheme on the exterior to make it really shine. Thanks to Jay (rosewater) for his comments about the porch and time line of the build dates and remodel. I was wondering why I was seeing colonial columns on the front but italianate columns on the rear and side porches. Looking at the pictures makes me want to explore this place even more!

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 5380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I forgot to mention the front entrance which also dates from the addition of the porch. Oddly, the front hall, and especially the stair, have a very Edwardian feel, despite the overwhelming likelihood that it dates from 1885-ish, owing to the decorative motifs.

      SUCH a fascinating house!

      MORE, more, more – please. Heheheh. All I want for Christmas is for this agent to post a link to a PhotoBucket with 250 pix of this house. 😉

      3
      • JimHJimH says: 4756 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I found some deeds on the house which suggest it had a troubled early history. It was sold in 1881 to the Dr. Dodge I mentioned by the widow of another doctor who died in 1880 and never lived there. The lot was purchased a few years before, so I’d guess construction began before 1880 but the house wasn’t completed for about 5 years. Maybe that explains the disconnect of exterior and interior styling rather than an early remodeling just a few years after construction.

        3

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