1909 Classical Revival – Moberly, MO

Originally a public post.
This home has been archived on OHD. The sold status is unknown.
Added to OHD on 7/27/19   -   Last OHD Update: 8/3/19   -   47 Comments
Off Market / Archived

801 W Reed St, Moberly, MO 65270

Map: Street

  • $125,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 4 Bath
  • 4022 Sq Ft
The chance to own a home like this doesn't come along very often! You can be the next owner of this stately built home built in 1909. They truly don't build them like this any more. From the gorgeous built-ins everywhere to the original plaster molding to the wood floors and fireplaces, you will fall in love! Any cook with love the kitchen and butler's pantry. The piano in the foyer will convey. The outdoor space includes a large covered from porch, a covered upper balcony and a fenced back yard. Make your appointment to see this beauty today!
Contact Information
Victoria Davis, Century 21 McKeown &, Inc
660.833.8443
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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47 Comments on 1909 Classical Revival – Moberly, MO

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  1. BethanyBethany says: 3445 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    That front hallway is just gorgeous! The whole thing is great of course, but the front entrance is stunning.

    26
  2. SmCreaturesSmCreatures says: 7 comments
    Elizabethtown, PA

    wow from start to finish. love it!

    14
  3. GardenStaterGardenStater says: 171 comments
    1865 Gothic Revival
    Charlotte, NC

    Oh. My. Goodness. What a magnificent home. There doesn’t appear to be much work that needs to be done (redo two bathrooms, maybe some work on the kitchen). I wonder why the price is so low. Is it a depressed area? Are there issues that we’re not seeing, like the whole place needs to be re-wired or re-plumbed? It’s gorgeous.

    18
  4. RobinjnRobinjn says: 257 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1978 Split level
    Columbia, MO

    This is a STEAL. Moberly is a small (13,000+) but very nice town only about 20 minutes North of Columbia. You would enjoy all the benefits of a small farm town community and living, yet be within easy distance of culture, great shops and restaurants, etc. I’m sure this house would get high speed internet service.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the outer brick was all local made, either from A. P. Green in Mexico, MO or Harbison Walker in Fulton, MO.

    I hope someone buys her who truly appreciates quality and will help her glow again; she doesn’t look like she needs that much!

    30
  5. shadydonshadydon says: 2 comments
    london, KY

    how do you save a house on here to go back to I love this home. its beautiful,,, needs some exterior as well as inside work,.. foundation needs to be checked. and does the heat and elec all work. its beautiful

    4
  6. DaisybooDaisyboo says: 19 comments

    Wow. Wow. Double wow! What more can be said? Oh yeah, picture 54, that is the exact light fitting that I am looking for!

    3
  7. OldSoulOldSoul says: 4 comments
    1910 Classic Revival
    Paris, MO, MO

    I live near Moberly, MO and encourage anyone looking for a historic home to consider the area. Small town living with a little hospital, community college, shopping and more. Perfect opportunity for someone wanting to move out of a big city and enjoy a quieter lifestyle. This house is lovely example of how far your money goes in smaller towns!

    15
  8. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2230 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central, NY

    Altogether lovely, but the sunporch over the porte-cochère, the woodwork, and the built-ins were what really jumped out at me. Nice!

    9
  9. JimmyOJimmyO says: 13 comments
    1936 parts is parts
    Omaha, NE

    What is that fireplace/wood-burning-stove looking structure in the corner of the room in pics 25 & 26 with the copper hood? I am dumbfounded.

    4
  10. JenniferJennifer says: 51 comments
    Nashville, TN

    OMG!!! Are you kidding me???? Swoon….

    5
  11. CindyCindy says: 263 comments
    1866 Italianate/Queen Anne
    Brunswick, MO

    Love everything about this house, so gorgeous. Every room has super special features. This house was for sale in 2010 and I believe the price was $69,000. We didn’t get a look at the inside because we were already in the process of buying a house. At $125K, what a BARGAIN!

    5
  12. PiperPiper says: 4 comments
    1995 Ranch
    Braselton, GA

    I am in love with this house! There are some things to be done, bathrooms, kitchen completion, sanding and renewing floors. But this place is absolutely wonderful! Does anyone know when the electrical wiring and/or plumbing were redone?

    2
  13. roxxxroxxx says: 465 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This is an OMG home. I can’t believe the price. I just adore the house and even though I would wish to be in the country a small town would not bee the worst thing, especially as I am a “senior” now. Acreage and the weed control is getting a bit much for me.

    6
  14. kathkath says: 214 comments
    saratoga, AR

    Whats not to love, so gorgeous, wo uld love to know the history

    2
  15. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5657 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    An architectural enthusiast friend of mine often calls houses of this type “Greek Revival, Revivals”. Perhaps true in the temple type form but the interior is decidedly different from Antebellum era Greek Revival originals. Those early 19th century examples often lacked indoor plumbing and kitchens while post 1900 Classical Revival examples were up to the minute modern for their time with bathrooms and usually at least a rudimentary kitchen. Modern type kitchens didn’t really take off until the post WWI period brought housewives into the kitchen as domestic cooks became rarer except in high income households. The ceiling plasterwork inside this home is phenomenal and giving it the gilding treatment is correct for the period in many cases. As others have commented, for what is offered here, the price seems to be quite reasonable. With some additional TLC to finish out the rooms, this house could be a real showplace again.

    3
    • darladarla says: 130 comments
      Commerce City, CO

      in some pics, the gilt is overpainted. is that part of a process, where they then go and clean up the surrounding areas?

      2
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5657 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        The ceiling gilding does seem to extend beyond where it should. The best restored gilded plaster ceiling I’ve yet seen was in a 1902 George Barber designed house in Osawatomie, Kansas owned by a state senator. The tour was set up by Ross in Emporia and I’m indebted for his help. Here’s two ceiling photos I took showing what I mean: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/15458672700/in/album-72157646670849453/ and this one showing the plaster ornament picked out in white: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/15458389600/in/album-72157646670849453/ Not sure if the owner ever intends to gild it at some future point or not. He wearily said the house had been a labor of love lasting decades and I completely understand where he’s coming from. Many decorative artists and tradespeople were employed during the Victorian era. Afterwards, the stripped down houses of the 20th century had little need for embellishment as it was this absence of ornament that was celebrated as the new direction ideal for modern architecture.

        2
      • Kindaoflikeit2Kindaoflikeit2 says: 10 comments
        1909 Victorian
        Belleville, IL

        I believe that it is just primer, if you look at the finished dining room ceiling you will see how it turns out!

        1
    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 404 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      John–
      You started out possibly making a point that I’ve decided to pick up on, and that has to do with the fact that I think houses such as this 1909 example are in fact more accurately classified as Colonial Revival than they are Greek or Classical Revival or even Greek Revival Revival.
      Beginning with the American centennial in 1876, American architects started being inspired by early American architecture. In general, they adopted one or even a few key characteristics of it and fully exploited that characteristic stylistically, but applied it to houses that were way out of proportion to anything that ever existed before in America. Thus, architects of shingle style houses deliberately picked up on the early American tradition of shingling houses, but built such enormous and elaborate mansions out of this one material that no one who lived in the 17th or 18th C would possibly recognize these buildings as being houses. When it came to imitating later colonial buildings in the Colonial Revival style, the very same thing happened. Americans in 1909 still were a bit fuzzy about what Colonial design really looked like and when the colonial period really ended, and both houses and furniture that were ostensibly Colonial Revival often incorporated features and designs that were from as recent as the Empire period and even the 1830’s in some case. Just look at old Wallace Nutting photographs and you’ll see just how “off” his carefully-researched assessment of colonial clothing, furniture, houses and architecture could be.
      As a result, Mt. Vernon became almost the standard or archetype for all too many ideas about what colonial revival houses were, even though it was not finished until after the end of the Revolutionary War. Finely detailed plaster ceilings (like those in this 1909 house, mimicking what is found at Mt. Vernon and other very grand houses of its period) abounded, as did mahogany paneling, extremely elaborately carved balusters on staircases, two-story high columns, etc. (all of which one can see at Mt. Vernon, albeit often painted) And the houses these details were applied to looked they were on steroids in size and actual scale, just as Shingle style houses had when compared to the houses they were inspired by.
      So, what I am suggesting is that I think this house, and many more like it, are really much more examples of Colonial Revival architecture and their furnishings (or even Greek Revival Revival architecture) than they are of Greek Revival architecture per se and should be classified as such. These houses are inherently trying more to emulate American colonial houses than they are trying to emulate Classical architecture and Classical houses, their interiors and their furnishings. The original Classical Revival beginnings in Europe followed upon contemporary archaeological discoveries at Pompeii and Herculaneum, and both women’s fashion and a number of furniture forms (like the recamier, Klismos chairs, etc) developed alongside attempts to copy some of the newly discovered architectural remains, while simultaneously heightening interest in old ruins such as the Parthenon and the Pantheon. No such inspiration accompanied the revival that led to this 1909 house–it was solely a product of rediscovering American homes from a century (and sometimes only 70 or 80) years earlier.
      Consequently, I’d be far more inclined to call this house what it really is–Colonial Revival, even if it is a colonial house on steroids and all out of proportion to its primogenitors. But it is Classical Revival only to the degree that late colonial and early 19th C American houses and furniture were to a degree being inspired by recent discoveries of long lost Classical forms; it is therefore fundamentally Colonial Revival at heart and only very distantly related to the Classical Revival.

      2
      • RobinjnRobinjn says: 257 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1978 Split level
        Columbia, MO

        A question was brought to mind based on your post @AJ Davis. Were these homes the McMansions of their day?

        1
        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 404 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          No, Robinjn, I don’t think so. See John Shiflet’s corrective and well-articulated comments on my own assessment (below) for a more thorough and complex analysis as to exactly how well educated and talented the architect who designed this house likely was–this was not an unsophisticated house created by a locally trained tradesman who was improvising as an architect in the absence of a truly competent one. This house was clearly well thought out and not a cookie-cutter type project like the McMansions that I think you are referring to of today–it goes quite far beyond a Sears catalogue house in the level of its detailing and craftsmanship even if it may have been designed by an architect who sold his designs through catalogues, as many extremely talented American architects had essentially been doing since at least the early 1840’s (and many highly competent British architects had been doing long before that).

          4
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5657 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        AJ,

        Thanks for your dissertative argument in favor of Colonial Revival over Classical Revival or Beaux Arts. I’m not too concerned about precise stylistic definitions but here we see Classical (Hellenistic or Greco-Roman if you want to be more precise) details in abundance on the house’s exterior. The full sized fluted columns topped with architecturally correct Corinthian columns, an architrave and pediment, acanthus leaf corbels, dentils, and egg & dart moldings are classical inspired works of art. The porte cochere on the side has a sunroom features square shaped transom windows called Roman Windows that were favorites of the Beaux Arts style. (not usually seen on Colonial era houses) Even the carriage house turned garage is quite unique with its pediment and columns fronting it.

        The classical element themes carry on inside. The newel post is decidedly not Colonial Revival (with it characteristic spiraling volute terminus of the railing with a small diameter turned post under it.) but the square partially carved newel has Greek design decorative elements. The main parlor mantel is decidedly classically derived with the two supporting Caryatids and beautiful framed Classical inspired plaque above it. Many of the ceiling decorations and treatments could be described as “Adamesque” or reminiscent of the Scottish Adams Brothers who themselves were inspired by examples from antiquity.

        In summary, the Classical flavor here is much stronger than the (authentic) “Colonial” appearance although I’ll hasten to add it may have been described when built as Colonial or more likely, Georgian Revival because formal Colonial era Georgian homes relied heavily on ancient classical design elements imported from English publications. Some designs are more closely associated with the Regency period which would correspond to our Federal period.

        Mail order architect, George Franklin Barber, often described homes of this kind as Colonial Renaissance. I think the longer conversation we should be having is why a house with this many fancy whistles and bells should be selling at this bargain basement price? (I can speculate about some of the reasons but still, this house is in the Wow category.) AJ, I appreciate your input.

        1
        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 404 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          Thanks, and I totally appreciate your input, particularly in clarifying all the beaux art elements that I did not comment on and which are really not Colonial Revival at all (although they may be of the same period historically and may even have gotten fused at times in the eclecticism of their era). Just goes to show how complex this house really is when you get down to being very thorough in assessing it–I feel you’ve done it more justice this way, and I, for one, can appreciate it even more by understanding how much more complex it is than I had presented it as being.
          I think it is exactly such a lack of architectural sophistication that causes many if not most folks to fail to appreciate this house for all that it is and not to value it (even financially) accordingly. Which is why education in architectural history (like art history) is so important in saving these houses–an uneducated public that cannot really appreciate these houses will see no value in saving them, whereas people like yourself who do understand them, will appreciate them and the reasons (if the not the need) to save them. In answer to your question about why this house is selling at a bargain basement price, I think that is at least part of the reason. I’m sure there are many other reasons that we are agreeing not to speculate on right now, but I think we already have discussed some of these reasons in reference to various other houses, specifically in terms of their local economic contexts, just for starters.

          1
          • Kindaoflikeit2Kindaoflikeit2 says: 10 comments
            1909 Victorian
            Belleville, IL

            The price reflects the work that’s needs to be finished, also local economic . If it were Located in a larger town such as Columbia the price would be reflected of that!

          • Kindaoflikeit2Kindaoflikeit2 says: 10 comments
            1909 Victorian
            Belleville, IL

            There are very interesting things that you can’t see about the home ! Like the glass doors are zink lined not lead. Also the Design on the doors you will find on the newel post and in the glass windows it has been carried out through the house.
            The home originally had a colonnade dividing the front parlor from the library, it also had French doors going into both rooms, but someone decided to take them off and put them in the basement to rot
            They could be rebuilt using the original glass and hardware.
            Also the plaster work was Done by the company in St. Louis that worked on the worlds fair plaster work, there was still a box of original plaster work packaged ini it’s shipping crate with saw dust unused.
            which has been turned over to the Moberly historical Society for safekeeping as were the original blueprints for the home.
            Originally it had a green tile roof a Widows walk it also had dormers with bullseye windows
            The stain glass windows in the stairs has fused or bent glass!

        • Kindaoflikeit2Kindaoflikeit2 says: 10 comments
          1909 Victorian
          Belleville, IL

          The owner was transferred to another state for his work !
          Also the price is reflected of the work that still needs done!

  16. darladarla says: 130 comments
    Commerce City, CO

    I love this enough to truly buy it, but I would rattle around in so much space, and in a small town I don’t know how easy it would be to find roommates.
    DARN!

    1
  17. MichaelMichael says: 2273 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Simply a stunning house and a real bargain for the lucky person who buys this house. It looks as if the house originally had a green tile roof, based on the garage and porte cochere roofs.

    3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5657 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      “It looks as if the house originally had a green tile roof, based on the garage and porte cochere roofs.” As in Ludowici green tiles? https://www.ludowici.com/colors-textures/colors-of-ludowici/vintage-green/ Here in Fort Worth we had a terrible hail storm come over some old areas of downtown several years ago. One of the old 1920’s mansions had Ludowici green tiles and the estimate came back to replace in kind the heavily damaged roof: over $300,000! Not sure how much the total repair bill came to but the house still has the classic Ludowici’s in green. A purist would probably want to put the classic green tiles back on this house but undoubtedly they would cost more than the selling price. This fine residence might make for a good episode of “My Lottery Dream Home” on HGTV.

      3
      • MichaelMichael says: 2273 comments
        1979 That 70's show
        Otis Orchards, WA

        Thanks John. I figured it was a pricey tile based on the shape and it was a glazed tile. I didn’t realize it was brain-damage expensive though!

        3
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5657 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          The house looks like it has a decent asphalt shingle roof on it so even without the fancy glazed tiles, it is still a very nice house. Doubtful someone who could afford Ludowici tiles would be looking to live in Moberly, MO, but you never know…

          2
      • Kindaoflikeit2Kindaoflikeit2 says: 10 comments
        1909 Victorian
        Belleville, IL

        This also had Ludowici tiles original!

    • Kindaoflikeit2Kindaoflikeit2 says: 10 comments
      1909 Victorian
      Belleville, IL

      Yes it did have a green tile roof originally!

  18. GypsyGypsy says: 202 comments
    wrong for my taste

    What a beauty. I’m stunned by all the beauty inside. I especially love the leaded glass double doors.

    3
  19. WishingAnDreamingWishingAnDreaming says: 136 comments
    Longview, TX

    I normally don’t care for homes with the big columns out front. But I just love this one, especially the green/white stripe awnings and the porte cochere.
    It has kind of a shabby chic feel about it. The only changes I would make is finish the redo of the bathrooms and replace the glass shelves with wood in the cabinets.

    1
  20. RobinjnRobinjn says: 257 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1978 Split level
    Columbia, MO

    Curious about the price, I looked at the Moberly market. Look at this house for a whopping $29.5k. Now it needs work, but there is a lot there: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/510-S-4th-St-Moberly-MO-65270/231531426_zpid/

    Here’s another for $79.9k: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/217-S-4th-St-Moberly-MO-65270/91913950_zpid/

    There are other homes ranging up to $300k, but not beyond. So for the area and town, this is not as underpriced as you would think. Missouri also has very low property taxes. Thirty miles South in Columbia, that house would probably be a minimum of $450k, as is.

    3
  21. EdwinaEdwina says: 23 comments
    Orient, OH

    Is this amazing home still available for sale? Zillow listed that it is not available.?

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