1849 Gothic Revival – Bronxville, NY – $5,395,000

For Sale
Added to OHD on 5/11/19   -   Last OHD Update: 5/11/19   -   22 Comments
50 Crows Nest Rd, Bronxville, NY 10708

Maps: Street, Aerial

  • $5,395,000
  • 9 Bed
  • 5.5 Bath
  • 10442 Sq Ft
  • 1.3 Ac.
This sensational and very impressive Manor House is surrounded by 1.3 acres of hilltop property with distant views of the Manhattan skyline. Extraordinarily built of local quarried stone, its Gothic Revival design, with its romantic ornamental flourishes, remains much the same today as it was well over a century ago.

A welcoming front veranda entrance introduces the 10,442 sq. ft. interior. With elegant, richly designed rooms, 12 ft. ceilings, magnificent hand carved woodwork, Corinthian columns, decorative plaster ceilings and 6 fireplaces, one easily becomes awed by the meticulous period detailing.....a magnificent tribute to a bygone era.

Although steeped in history, Crows Nest is thoughtfully designed for today's lifestyle with inviting and comfortable family living space. The reception room, library, dining room and living room all define a flowing, expansive floor plan. In addition, a large, well designed eat in kitchen opens not only to a fabulous, bright and sunny family room but also to a wonderful, private deck overlooking the lawn, gardens and stone gazebo.

A grand mahogany carved staircase, crowned with a glorious Tiffany window, leads to the upper floors which have a myriad of options.... beautifully scaled family bedrooms , modern baths, a playroom, exercise room, staff quarters and of course. a crows nest.

This rare offering is a great opportunity to acquire a significant Bronxville property of grand scale , exceptional style and architecture .With its private, walk to school location and immense livability this timeless, very special home is Bronxville at its best.
Contact Information
Rita Steinkamp, Houlihan Lawrence
(914) 646-5196
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home.

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22 Comments on 1849 Gothic Revival – Bronxville, NY – $5,395,000

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  1. AvatarJoe says: 635 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1820 Federal
    Baltimore, MD

    Maybe this is a Gothic Revival Free Classical Revival too. The exterior is the only part that looks Gothic revival to me, excepting the columns. The interior all looks like 1890’s or later. Most of my knowledge about these styles comes from this site, so I may be speaking out of turn because I have no idea if I am even right.

    6
    • AvatarJoe says: 635 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1820 Federal
      Baltimore, MD

      After writing the comment above, I went to this week’s link exchange, May 10, 2019. There it is from yesterday as a post from ChrisICU and there are all of the comments that I expected to see here.

      2
  2. JimHJimH says: 4204 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Built as a Gothick cottage as promoted by A.J. Downing for genre painter Francis William Edmonds (1806-1863). Substantially altered after 1880, especially the interiors.

    A good history link here:
    https://www.brownstoner.com/upstate/upstate-homes-for-sale-bronxville-50-crows-nest-road-frank-r-chambers-rogers-peet/

    13
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4549 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Quite an alteration from the original; I have to say for the better considering the quality of the newer interiors. The heavenly and spectacular, early “Arts & Crafts” fireplace is museum quality. I may have preferred the earlier Goth interiors in some of the rooms, but the modified DR and hall are luxe and enviable in the extreme, surely trumping anything that came before. Jeez.

      6
      • JimHJimH says: 4204 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Yes, I didn’t mean Alteration as a pejorative, just a simple fact that changes were made. The original interiors may have been incredible, given the overall quality of the house, and there are so few surviving early Gothic interiors. Like at Lyndhurst, the later work here is very fine and I’m not complaining much.

        • AvatarAJ Davis says: 90 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          Unlike this house, the later work, if I remember correctly, at Lyndhurst was done by the same architect, AJ Davis, who designed the original house. Lyndhurst thus has infinitely more consistency in its overall design than this house does–it is all Gothic revival, although from two different time periods. My only preference would have been that the very fine second and subsequent generations of work that were done in this house had been done in a completely new building or buildings or additions to the original building. We have here a broad variety of architectural styles that have been executed brilliantly in a totally anachronistic Gothic Revival style shell which is consistent with very little of the houses’ current interior. By rebuilding the interior in (and even much of the added exterior to) an old shell, the new designers lost an opportunity to show us what they might have done if given free reign to design a totally new house or totally new wing to an old house. Sigh… their actions cheated them of an opportunity to show more of their own thinking about a totally new creation while destroying the work of the initial architect’s interior design, leaving no one with a complete, unified vision of what they might have accomplished as totally separate individuals.

    • AvatarNighthorse says: 57 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks Joe, for the brownstoner reference. Very interesting and helpful.

    • AvatarNighthorse says: 57 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Whoops, I meant JimH

      1
    • AvatarKateSheldon says: 26 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 N Hollywood, CA

      Jim H: Thank you for the interesting link. I love the colors in the reception room.

      1
  3. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 848 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Charleston, SC

    It doesn’t bother me at all that this is mostly Gilded Age mansion with very little 1849 Gothic Revival. There are so many great details, and the setting is just as lovely with the drive up the hill reminding me just a little of Frederick Law Olmsted’s Biltmore approach road.

    7
    • AvatarAJ Davis says: 90 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Please don’t take offense at my comment or see it as contentious, because I’m just expressing an alternative opinion and nothing more. I agree that the renovated house is quite amazing, but I also wonder what the original would have looked like had it survived. I sometimes wish (hopelessly, I know) that people would leave old houses as they are and create their new interiors in their own new spaces so we could at least see what the vision of the original architect was (even adding a new vision as a major addition to a house would, I think, be infinitely preferable to a major renovation or series of renovations). In this case, Alexander Masterson’s vision apparently only survives in a drawing by the original owner of the house, the artist Francis W. Edmonds c 1851 wherein even the bargeboards are indiscernible, if they existed at all when the house was built (the drawing is available through another comment). I must say that I do find that exterior view of that house immensely more pleasing than the one that exists today, which is all that the majority of the human race will ever see of this privately-owned residence…. but I also know that even that is largely just a matter of taste. At least we don’t do to the castles and cathedrals of Europe what we do to the houses of America, tho I know the comparison may be unfair. But I am glad that architectural history is growing as a recognized and legitimate field (just as art history has been for ages) and that architects, in particular, are learning to contextualize their new work with a sensitivity to the environment, the past and any number of other variables that also do matter.

      2
      • AvatarGardenStater says: 63 comments
        1865 Gothic Revival
        Charlotte, NC

        While I understand your desire to see a “pure,” unsullied original, most people wouldn’t want that. After all, the original house probably didn’t have indoor plumbing, toilets, hot water, showers, etc. And the original kitchen was probably a fireplace and a wooden table (again, no running water, sinks, refrigerators, etc.). There are plenty of museum houses and even entire villages (Colonial Williamsburg, etc.). But most people don’t want to live in a museum.

        • AvatarAJ Davis says: 90 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          I know that most people wouldn’t want to live in a “pure”, unsullied original c 1850 house with no indoor plumbing, electricity or other amenities that are essential for health reasons alone to life in the 21st C. And I wouldn’t want that either. But that is not what I’m arguing for, nor would I want to live in a house museum. But I’ve seen too many mid-18th C Victorian houses by renowned architects “Georgeanized” with towers lopped off and other changes inflicted on these houses such that the old houses completely disappear. That makes me wonder if a new house by the new owner might probably have been cheaper and that we’d have a much broader variety of architectural styles to look at than we currently do. What we have lost is all in the name of what a new owner wants to live in, the past be damned. I also realize this is why we have house museums–because these houses are a desperately threatened species of which there are very few survivals. In addition, house museums show how life was once lived in times past without today’s amenities. But many if not most of the comments from viewers of this website commend the restorations that return once greatly neglected and/or “modernized” houses that have been altered almost beyond recognition back to their original condition. Or express a desperate hope that the new owner won’t needlessly damage a house when he or she acquires it in a relatively original condition. It is the love of old houses as they are or were (and hopefully will be one day again) that is the whole point of this website, isn’t it?

          2
          • AvatarAJ Davis says: 90 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1850 Italianate, classical
            New Haven, CT

            I meant to say 19th Century, not 18th Century, in the above diatribe. Sorry!

  4. AvatarNighthorse says: 57 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This is my idea of perfection minus the gingerbread. Love the nod to art nouveau in the stained glass the carving and the bronze doorknockers. The woodwork is delightful. And the working fireplaces! The doors to the wardrobes in the bedroom are sublime. But I must amend the motto over the doors to the library to “For God and Country and The University of Texas”.

    6
  5. AvatarMansion Grade says: 48 comments

    What a Regal Mansion! Hope good caretakers purchase it and keep it as is!

    2
    • AvatarAJ Davis says: 90 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Just joking, but why should they keep it as it is, given all the past changes that have been inflicted on it? Why should they not think that they could improve it even further?

  6. AvatarCate says: 182 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Milwaukee, WI

    A very regal home. Oh wow, Kelly!

    2
  7. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1881 comments
    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central NY, NY

    An amazing house, inside & out.

    I may be wrong, but I *think* this house was posted sometime in the past. The reasons being: I remember the stained glass and fp carving portrayals of the parent bird and chicks in the nest. The lion acting as a sort of newel post and the chinoiserie illustrations on the bedroom closet doors are also ringing bells, albeit fainter ones.

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