1866 – Lewisburg, PA – $695,000

For Sale
Added to OHD on 4/10/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/10/19   -   42 Comments
135 S 3rd St, Lewisburg, PA 17837

Map: Street

  • $695,000
  • 6 Bed
  • 3.5 Bath
  • 2874 Sq Ft
  • 0.24 Ac.
This exceptional Gothic Revival brick home was built by Dr Justin Loomis, the 2nd President of The University at Lewisburg. The hardware and doorknobs he brought back from England remain. Beautiful woodwork, 11ft ceilings and original light fixtures, once gas fired, adorn this unique 6 bedroom home. The curved walnut staircase is the focal point of the home's interior, spanning all three finished levels. Recent restoration and updates too numerous to mention. Situated on a spacious corner lot with a fenced yard, on coveted South Third Street. Three exterior porches, a free standing screened living room and the original brick outhouse enhance the outdoor living space. Own a piece of borough history! See 3D video tour under photos tab.
Contact Information
Sabra Karr, Villager Realty
570-428-5765 / 855-565-5284
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home.

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42 Comments on 1866 – Lewisburg, PA – $695,000

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  1. MJGMJG says: 504 comments
    1887 Queen Anne
    CT

    Anyone else think the back part of the house was the original 1866 or earlier and the front was done later? Inside the dining room and back rooms have low ceilings and almost colonial looking interiors. The woodwork around the doors and windows are also very different in this back wing.

    That spiral staircase is spectacular! May I slide down that banister? I like the color scheme on this house and the sawed balustrade on the porch.

    This house looks artificial to me. Something odd about the really extreme and dramatic peaks and unusual cone on the top of the octagonal section.

    14
    • AvatarStevenF says: 731 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      I think you’re onto something. There are some things that just don’t add up. As you noted, the dining room millwork is extremely simple. Then there’s the amazing staircase. Also puzzling are the entrances from the entry hall into the living room and family room in front. Why are the entrances into these room through narrow, bedroom-like doors? One would expect an arch or something less constricting as an entry into these rooms. Was this converted into a boarding house and these rooms let? The only problem with this theory is that these bedroom-like door surrounds look old. I could also potentially see this being done in a far northern climate, like Maine but not PA. There’s a story here but I can’t figure it out.

      6
      • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        Look at picture, 29,20 and 32 versus 34 thru 37. The the ones starting at 29 I believe could be the bedrooms at the back of the house. Again simple doors. While 34 on are in the new wing. Heavier moldings on the doors and windows.
        It’s an enigma. I want more!

        2
      • AvatarKathy says: 10 comments

        Lewisburg is a college town. Perhaps the house was a boarding house for students?

        3
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 807 comments

      The original owner was an amateur architect fond of the Gothic Revival style and credited with the design of this house, his prior 1855 residence, and this church: https://www.google.com/maps/place/51+S+3rd+St,+Lewisburg,+PA+17837/@40.9633183,-76.8836642,3a,75y,228.29h,107.74t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sNvy5fahaboMalzJ8yCnPCA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x89cf13b1dbdf52d1:0x62a409dd90f6f4e8!8m2!3d40.9631193!4d-76.8840301

      I didn’t see any mention of a remodel, but I agree that there appears to be something a little unusual here. The earliest Sanborn I see dates from 1885, and shows the same plan with the extant tower and porches evident then as well.

      8
      • JimHJimH says: 4115 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Perhaps the lack of training of the owner had something to do with the irregularities of the house. I thought at first that the tower might have been added to a simple 3 bay house – the front door and dormer are tight against it and the rest of the plan conforms. What we can see of the trim there seems to match the period of original construction, so maybe it’s just untutored design. Same with the funny witch’s hat roof.
        I’m pretty sure the rear ell was contemporaneous or later because of the matching brickwork. An undetailed 1868 city map shows the house facing as the main block does without the ell, though that could be a mapmaker’s oversight. I’d guess dining was originally in the front room, and the rear was built as more utilitarian space.
        A bit odd perhaps but the stair and details make up for it!

        I’d like to spend more time looking at the virtual tour, but that Matterport site freezes my Mac every time! Anybody else have that problem?

        2
        • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
          1887 Queen Anne
          CT

          Definitely good points jimh. A definite conversation piece. I too would love to walk around this house and learn it’s history.

        • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
          1887 Queen Anne
          CT

          Looking more at it this morning. If they added the back on, is it possible that the brickwork in the front as to match the brickwork on the back? It just looks so “colonial” in design. Unless an addition was made in the 20th century.
          In the end, this guy was an amateur architect. Who knows, maybe he just wanted the back wing to have an historic colonial feel to it. While making the front of the house his own dramatic unique style. Dramatic it is.
          I really enjoy looking at all this stuff and figuring out the history.
          The house is unique. Which is why I keep coming back. Its not like your typical home. It has its own unique expression for the period.

          3
          • JimHJimH says: 4115 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Some of what you’re seeing may be the Pennsylvania vernacular coming through. Victorian era homes often look like they’re older homes with a roof and/or some trim added on later but were built altogether that way:
            https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/216-Main-St_Leesport_PA_19533_M46978-41390
            https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/37-E-Main-St_Strasburg_PA_17579_M45407-77670

            1
            • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
              1887 Queen Anne
              CT

              Yeah I get that. But what made this one different was the fact that contrast between front and back is very sharp. Many homes from the period have a kitchen wing with a bedroom or bedrooms above it. And the kitchen many times i’ve seen a cheaper wood (thought I’ve seen some examples where this isn’t the case) but this one is an odd duck.

              • AvatarKimT says: 72 comments

                It seemed to me like the kitchen might not be original because of the coffered ceiling, but it does have the stairs (servant’s staircase?). Coffering might have been put in later to cover wiring etc. Would that be a hot water spigot above the stove? Amazing room…one of many in this place.

                Top of tower seems to make a bit more sense after viewing church steeple, but only a bit.

                Another mis-match is that there is an engaged tower, but the staircase is somewhere else…adjacent to it? Maybe they planned to put it in the tower but wound up wanting something too big to fit in the tower. Architecture students would have fun with this one.

                Lucky children to grow up in this house. Would be hard to find another place like it for the imagination. Makes me want to watch ‘The Secret of Moonacre.’

                • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
                  1887 Queen Anne
                  CT

                  I agree the kitchen ceiling was most doubt newer. Probably the kitchen was just remodeled over time and back stairs left in place.

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 4410 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Thanks John. IMO the tower of bays is a bit amateurish tacked on to the house as is. Your info makes me suspect even more strongly that it was probably a very early addition. It seems to squish the front door more than it might have if part of the original plan. The cap is beyond rad; so points to him for that move. 🙂 I have a feeling the current main stack is probably 1/4 of it’s original size, as it would have likely contained many flues for room stoves, etc.

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 4410 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          I’ll add that it IS possible that this house always had central heating. I’d kill to see in the basement! I’m sure the original boiler was/is magnificent considering.

          3
      • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        CharlestonJohn, that stone church is BEAUTIFUL! Isn’t it?

        • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 807 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Charleston, SC

          It is beautiful. If you spin the Streetview around, the c.1890 Beaver UMC is also very nice and unusually ornate for a Methodist church.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4410 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Looks right to me M. A more demure service ell.

      1
    • AvatarKarenZ says: 917 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I actually thought about sliding down the banister, too! Actually, really about how many kids have done that since it was built!

      • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        I used to do that as a Child in my home growing up. My mother used to get so mad. Then I mastered sliding down face first. Then in a sitting position facing the ceiling legs out. I was a crazy. I would have loved to live here. I could only imagine the fun I would have had on that stair. Although I’d probably have broken a bone.

    • MichaelMichael says: 1268 comments

      I think you have a good point. Other than the fact the rear ell was built in brick, there isn’t any part of this that makes any effort to tie in with the front. The window trim on the exterior, the lack of overhangs or soffits or brackets point to this being done at a different time than the front. The uniform paint on the exterior hides any clues as to if the brick may have matched.

      I do love the staircase and especially how they brought in the windows to light it up. I love the kitchen sink and the wood cookstove in the kitchen!

      • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
        1887 Queen Anne
        CT

        Yeah it’s an enigma. I’m not convinced yet it was all built at one time. I’d need to do more research onsite. All the things you point out are valid points. Old photos from early on May have clues. But pre 1880s I would presume.

    • OurPhillyRowOurPhillyRow says: 95 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1852 Greek Revival Rowhouse
      Philadelphia, PA

      I believe that both the front main house and rear “L” were constructed at the same time. The lower floor would have been the kitchen and servants quarters above. The simplicity and lower ceilings of the rear portion is because it was for the servants. You can see the separate door off the spectacular main staircase to the second floor of the rear (bedroom with blue ceiling) in images 26,28,44, and 45.

      My 1852 Philadelphia row house has a similar (albeit smaller) set up. The rear “L” portion has lower 7.5′ ceilings on both floors. Originally, the first floor was one large kitchen, but in the 1890s it was divided into a dining room (with simple woodwork) and kitchen. Our second floor rear is accessed via a landing about 3/4 of the way up the stairs, it’s like an entirely separate wing of our house.

  2. AvatarPatty says: 8 comments

    Totally and completely in LOVE.

    4
  3. AvatarJMK says: 2 comments

    This is where the Melissa Joan Hart version of Sabrina the Teenage Witch should have been set. Period.

    4
  4. AvatarFanshaweGirl says: 369 comments

    Sexy staircase!
    Wonderful kitchen!

    Is that a brick outhouse? If it is, how fancy to have one with a window! 😀

    Looks like someone put the witch’s hat in the dryer too long. Would that tower roof have been originally built like that?

    6
  5. AvatarEric says: 301 comments

    Great to get two beautiful Gothic homes in one day. This home is very grand and seems built around that beautiful spiral staircase. I love when builders use a great staircase as the main focal point, especially when it’s a 3 story staircase.

    4
  6. Avatarbill whitman says: 243 comments

    yep you can slide down that banister but you’ll be doing 300 mph when you hit the bottom so wear a seat belt.
    this place is great. I bet they have bedrooms that haven’t even been slept in yet. a great look, love the stain on the staircase, kichen is way beyond spectacular. the gazebo, shed, playhouse – this place has it all.

    6
  7. AvatarPatricia Flick says: 2 comments

    Wish we could see the Sanborn Fire Maps of this house. It is interesting.

  8. Avatarpeeweebc says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    I don’t care- this is a GREAT house!!! WOW !!!

    4
  9. jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 923 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1947 Ranch
    OR

    Outstanding stairway!

    2
  10. AvatarKmmoore says: 296 comments

    Several things:
    1. How I wish to be the one who gets to choose Halloween decorations!
    2. I mean, that kitchen!!!!!! 😍😍😍😍 Too fun!
    3. It’s been a while since I’ve been turned on by a staircase, but, well, ‘nuff said.
    I don’t care what the experts say, this house is amazing, inspiring, and pure joy for me. Thanks for posting.

    6
  11. RosewaterRosewater says: 4410 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Wowwwwhhhhhh. What a house! A real mansion for sure. THAT – is a real witches’ cap if there ever was one. What a look! And that gable – my God. This place has comanding presence from any angle. Very, very impressive.
    The tower of bays (?) doesn’t quite work with the main body of the house IMO: almost as if it was either an afterthought, or a very early addition. I imagine that bit or roof work has been fun for owners to maintain for a very long time. Heheheh. https://www.google.com/maps/place/135+S+3rd+St,+Lewisburg,+PA+17837/@40.9623237,-76.8826553,3a,15y,282.95h,110.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s3aYd6xDRWIa1tMNWvRTfSA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x89cf13ae2da6a4f7:0xc19e8ff01bb7b754!8m2!3d40.9623478!4d-76.8830181 Looks great now mind. I’m sure the whole thing is tight as can be. Sad, but I don’t see a single working fireplace; not unusual for the style and period. This house would have been full of stoves. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/d7/fd/ae/d7fdaedb9d32d724d8209339b48f4f67.jpg The kitchen would have had an impressive coal range inserted into the large hearth where the (seemingly functional!) wood/coal stove projects from now. Check out the raddest range ever, (double sided!), in this PA Italianate: https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/10/16/c-1870-italianate-columbia-pa/ The kitchen in this house is stuuuunnniing btw. Expensive kitchens rarely impress me, but – damn; that one is just SO well done; and I love the colors. A personalized, expensive kitchen only has value at re-sale if the buyer likes it; or the market will bear it. Just love the amazing spaces in this home. The stairwell is thrilling. All this, and a privy and a chicken coop too! MEOW! Purrrrrrrr. Yes pleasse!

    And the spectacular Italianates just keep coming.

    6
    • MJGMJG says: 504 comments
      1887 Queen Anne
      CT

      I can’t believe these stoves are still in situ!

      1
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 4410 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        My bad. Link is just a rando example of a period parlor stove from the internets. Sorry for any confusion. If you’re talking about the gonzo, double-sided deal in Columbia; that is hopefully still there. If anyone is interested in seeing more of it, LMK and I’ll post pix to Flickr. The beyond awesome Lancaster John snapped some shots for me when he toured the house.

  12. CLMCLM says: 127 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1940 Cottage
    Bradford, TN

    Love the kitchen ceiling! That stairwell is beautiful, too!

    1
  13. SharonSharon says: 387 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Sedalia, MO

    Just took the virtual tour. Amazing! Do the tour! It’s an adventure–and a beautiful one at that.

    1
  14. AvatarSarah says: 7 comments

    The most beaut stairs EVER!

    1
  15. AvatarKay says: 8 comments

    Wonderful, wonderful house. The inside is so much more than the outside. My mother used to live kitty corner from this house, so it’s especially marvelous to see inside.

  16. AvatarKathryn Bell says: 43 comments
    OHD Supporter

    But the staircase, my dears.

  17. OurPhillyRowOurPhillyRow says: 95 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1852 Greek Revival Rowhouse
    Philadelphia, PA

    The mindblowingly stunning staircase equates to half the value of the house. What a knockout! I can’t even wrap my head around the stairs, and I love that the door to the rear portion of the second floor is so casually blended into it (image 26 and 45).

    The rest of the house is pretty damned amazing as well.

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