c. 1699 – Huger, SC – $4,500,000

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Added to OHD on 3/28/19   -   Last OHD Update: 9/16/20   -   36 Comments
For Sale
National Register

356 Middleburg Ln, Huger, SC 29450

Map: Aerial

  • $4,500,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 3.5 Bath
  • 2922 Sq Ft
  • 326 Ac.
Middleburg Plantation is known as one of the earliest rice plantations in America and was once the center of commerce, culture and rice production that provided much of the wealth of Charleston in the antebellum era. The avenue of majestic oaks spans approximately 1500 feet from Cainhoy Road to the front steps of the main house and provides a stunning sense of entry to one of the most historic plantations in the South Carolina Lowcountry. Middleburg was settled by rice planter Benjamin Simons in 1690. The Middleburg house is known as the oldest frame house in South Carolina and the house and property are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The original house had two stories with two rooms on each floor. Sometime before 1717, an addition, with one room on each floor, was Middleburg Plantation is known as one of the earliest rice plantations in America and was once the center of commerce, culture and rice production that provided much of the wealth of Charleston in the antebellum era. The avenue of majestic oaks spans approximately 1500 feet from Cainhoy Road to the front steps of the main house and provides a stunning sense of entry to one of the most historic plantations in the South Carolina Lowcountry. Middleburg was settled by rice planter Benjamin Simons in 1690. The Middleburg house is known as the oldest frame house in South Carolina and the house and property are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The original house had two stories with two rooms on each floor. Sometime before 1717, an addition, with one room on each floor, was added to the house. Simons increased the acreage of Middleburg over time and amassed 1, 545 acres by 1717. Benjamin Simons died leaving the plantation to his 4-year-old son Benjamin II. Benjamin Simons III inherited the plantation upon his father's death in 1772 and increased the tract to 3, 342 acres. Thereafter, Revolutionary War battles surrounded Middleburg and British Colonel Banastre Tarleton targeted the house to be burned. It is unknown why the house was spared, but scars remain. Colonel Tarleton's saber left a lasting mark in a column by the front door and a British general etched his name on a windowpane.John Coming Ball took possession of Middleburg in 1872. He had previously acquired Halidon Hill Plantation and Smoky Hill and merged all three back into one. He married a Simons descendant and once again turned Middleburg into a profitable rice plantation. Ball passed away in 1927 and with him died the cultivation of rice at Middleburg. Marie Guerin Ball Dingle inherited the property upon her father's death. Marie Dingle died in 1963 leaving the plantation jointly to her four nephews John, Charles, Coming, and James Gibbs. John Gibbs was owner of record in 1976. Jane and Max Hill purchased the Plantation in 1981 and began a painstaking restoration of much of the property and buildings as possible.The Hills (Hill Family Limited Partnership) sold the plantation to entrepreneur Howard Martin Sprock III (Middleburg Plantation LLC) in 2015.The 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath main house is accompanied by a two-bedroom kitchen building, three-bedroom servants building and a two-story, 2 bedroom brick and frame structure known as the Commissary Building. Recent restoration efforts were focused on the historic renovation of the two-storied main house with the original Carolina heart pine flooring, cypress paneling and moldings. The house is a splendid example of Charleston's classic Georgian single house . The structure retains the plan of a one-room width, and also the notable post and girt construction of the 17th century, even though it is two stories in height. The kitchen building, servants' quarters and Commissary were also fully restored and are all maintained in impeccable condition today.Of particular interest is the Commissary building which was known as the corn house or plantation store when Middleburg was a working rice plantation.
Contact Information
Richard Coen, Salmonsen Realty
(843) 388-6613
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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36 Comments on c. 1699 – Huger, SC – $4,500,000

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  1. r myers says: 23 comments

    such a cool house! What was the purpose of the tall brick structure? Was it for burning trash?

    11
  2. 67drake67drake says: 284 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    Ok, I’m a little short on cash for this one, but I’d buy that barn!

    9
  3. Amy says: 1 comments

    WOW!! Hats off to the photographer on this one!! Each photo is stunning. . .even the moss on the brick. I sat in awe as I scrolled through them all. Such a beautiful home!

    22
  4. Cindy Logan says: 15 comments

    If only money was no problem………..BEAUTIFUL

    1
  5. Gail Lindeman Noernberg says: 93 comments

    all this needs is a stable of morgan and quarter horses…me and my friends and all our dogs…yee haw

    16
  6. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1704 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    It’s beautiful, so interesting, redolent of the South, and you’d just breathe history there. I agree, the photography is top notch. What a marvelous place to live!

    5
  7. karen Huhn says: 12 comments

    As lovely as the photos are, I still would like more of the bedrooms, baths and kitchen. It is an absolutely gorgeous property….now if I only had 5 mill!!!

    5
  8. CharlestonJohn says: 1093 comments

    I forgot the HABS link with the floor plan and elevation drawings…
    https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.sc0341.sheet/?sp=1

    and the pics:
    https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.sc0341.photos?st=gallery

    5
  9. George Ely says: 9 comments

    Ok so, I’m a yankee, but this is just so gorgeous! I might ask to be traded! I already have my bedroom picked out. As far as horses go, I’m in Middlebury Vt so the Morgan horses won’t be a problem. I am, however partial to Belgians so a couple of them too – (once I hit the lottery….) I’d be very tempted to see what is under the paint on the mantels and other woodwork. Lots of times the decorative pieces were of nice exotic species…

    5
  10. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1068 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    SHEESH! I’m speechless on this one. The photography alone could see this work of art.

    5
  11. Kelly says: 2 comments

    Out of all the beautiful pictures my favorite it the etched name on the window. How haunting is that!! ?

    7
  12. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Cheryl from Facebook shared this link from Bob Vila touring the property:

    https://www.bobvila.com/sections/tv-shows/projects/16-lifespan-house/episodes/197-installing-a-stairway/videos/1100566950001-tour-of-middleburgh-plantation

    5
  13. CeylaClaire says: 268 comments

    Oh my heavens! This place is just gorgeous. Many thanks to the photographer for his capturings because they are beautiful. Now if only I had the millions. . .
    I agree that a few horses would be lovely but if I had this place, they’d have to be someone else’s. To fill it for me I’d put up a cool chicken coop and gorgeous gardens.

    5
  14. MysticMystic says: 104 comments
    Huntley, IL

    I am at a lose for words!!!! Wow

    2
  15. Ozark Dave says: 54 comments

    This is the one!

  16. JimHJimH says: 5244 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I think we’ve seen a few that were like this once but were later updated with big porticoes, dormers, gardens etc. that totally change the character. This is the real deal in a pristine landscape, and it’s wonderful to see!

    2
  17. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1162 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    What are the white stuff flapping from the tree branches that give these southern oaks such a special look?

    • John Celestre says: 1 comments

      Moss perhaps! It grows on most trees in the south. Oak alley plantation has a beautiful alley of oak trees going down to the river . The tree’s are draped in moss during the real humid months

      2
  18. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 824 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    A TRULY magical place!

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