1868 Italianate – Pulaski, NY – $229,900

For Sale
OHD does not represent this home.
Details must be independently verified for the most recent changes.
Added to OHD on 3/21/19   -   Last OHD Update: 10/14/19   -   37 Comments

19 Lake St, Pulaski, NY 13142

Map: Street

  • $229,900
  • 6 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 5208 Sq Ft
  • 0.56 Ac.
EXPECT TO BE IMPRESSED BY THE GRANDNESS AND IMPECCABLE CRAFTSMANSHIP OF THIS REGISTERED HISTORIC VICTORIAN HOME ON A LARGE VILLAGE LOT IN PULASKI. ENTER THROUGH THE VESTIBULE AND BE GREETED BY SOARING CEILINGS THROUGHOUT AND THE ELEGANT HALL WITH ORIGINAL HARDWOODFLOORS AND ORIGINAL STAIRCASE & BANNISTER GIVING ACCESS TO THE AMAZING DOUBLE LIVINGROOM AND THE PARLOR BOTH FEATURING THE ORIGINAL FIREPLACES. THE LARGE KITCHEN HAS BEEN UPDATED WITH CUSTOM CHERRY CABINETS AND LEADS INTO THE GRAND DINING ROOM W/ ORIGINAL BUILD -INS. FULL BATH DOWNSTAIRS. UPSTAIRS OFFERS 4 TO 5 BEDROOMS, DRESSING ROOMS ETC. THE MASTERSUITE FEATURES A SPACIOUS UPDATED BATH. FORMER ' MAIDS QUARTERS' MAKE AN IDEAL GUEST WING WITH ANOTHER FULL BATH ALREADY IN PLACE. SO MANY POSSIBILITIES HERE,... HAVE YOUR OFFICE DOWNSTAIRS , LIVE IN THE UPSTAIRS, IDEAL FOR LAW FIRM. B&B AND SO MUCH MORE. THIS HOME IS A DREAM COME TRUE!!! LARGE CARRIAGE BARN AND EVEN HORSE CARRIAGE STEP STILL IN PLACE! CALL US TODAY!
Contact Information
Birgit Kleinschmidt, 1st Carriage House Realty
(315) 298-2212
Links, Photos & Additional Info


State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
Features:

37 Comments on 1868 Italianate – Pulaski, NY – $229,900

OHD does not represent homes on this site. Contact the agent listed for details including current price and status.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11723 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    A few extra photos here: http://www.1stcarriagehouserealty.net/Listing/ViewListingPhotos.aspx?BackEmailTypeID=NONE&ListingID=262399646

    There are two addresses for this home, Richland and Pulaski.

    2
    • Ryan says: 562 comments

      Pulaski is a village in the town of Richland so they’re both correct. It’s worth mentioning that this area has had some of the highest snowfall totals in the US. When I lived in Oswego County I thought the snow was bad, but after I moved away I realized I’d been lucky as the winters I spent there were relatively mild. Several years ago Oswego got more than twelve feet of snow over a period of eight days. So if you buy this wonderful house, be sure to bring a shovel ? Spring and summer up there are really beautiful. There are lots of lovely old homes, and there is some great fishing around Pulaski, too.

      13
  2. Oh golly, this is absolutely GORGEOUS <3

    4
  3. Michael Mackin says: 2043 comments

    Finial from the cupola in the last picture?

    2
    • John Shiflet says: 5392 comments

      I would agree that is what it appears to be. This is a very formal example of the Italianate style which peaked in popularity in the 1860’s and ’70’s. I’m pretty sure it was considered a local mansion when it was constructed. Bet it has some interesting history as well.

      9
      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 406 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Yes, the less formal, asymmetrical, often-towered Italianate “villas” of the early days advocated by AJ Davis and AJ Downing gave way over time increasingly to the “palazzos” of the later days of the 19th C. These were supposedly inspired by the urban palaces occupied by the urban (vs. rural) Italian elite in Renaissance Italy throughout (particularly) northern Italy. Whereas the villas tended to be rambling and informal, the palazzos were intended to be urban, sophisticated and formal, by comparison, and were essentially cubic in form as they developed over time. So, the palazzos invaded even relatively rural areas like Pulaski as these matters were generally taste-driven and not driven by the theories of principles that Davis and Downing had advocated for. The cupolas, belvederes or lanterns, as they came to be called were adopted to give a tower-like appearance to the structures as a sort of compromise between the two aesthetic traditions.

        1
  4. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1036 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    There is absolutely nothing about this house I don’t love, it is everything. I wouldn’t change a thing even, really! Impressive.

    4
  5. Ryan says: 562 comments

    It’s a treat to see a pic from the attic with those little windows. And the house appears to be largely original throughout. My former neighbors recently moved to Pulaski, which is pronounced puh-lask-EYE for some reason.

    7
    • Beth H. says: 217 comments

      I was pretty thrilled to see the attic as well… oh the plans I would have for that space! (It would involve a really large and probably insanely expensive quilting machine and frame, but I can dream, right?) Lots of light up there!

      1
  6. RossRoss says: 2524 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    PLAN:

    1) Buy house.

    2) Put finial back on.

    3) Live happily ever after.

    47
  7. JRichardJRichard says: 220 comments
    1763 center-chimney cape
    Biddeford, ME

    All those arched windows on the second floor make me imagine that if this house could speak, it’d be saying, “Whoops!” Though I didn’t find a sign, the church across the street has to be Episcopal. It has the ‘look.’

    2
  8. Connie Murray says: 125 comments

    Gorgeous, reasonably priced house. Super safe area to live too! But sadly it looks at a huge parking lot (yuck) and is located near the Great Lakes (lake-effect snow — double yuck). But for snow lovers, this could be a plus?

    2
  9. Jujube says: 47 comments

    Absolutely stunning…..hope someone will treasure this home.

    3
  10. JimHJimH says: 4867 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This house was built for James A. Clark (1821-1887), a merchant and founder of the Pulaski National Bank. It’s part of the Pulaski Village Historic District on the NRHP. From a 1902 souvenir book of Pulaski, here’s a bio and portrait of Clark, and photos of his bank (designed by Archimedes Russell) and the house, then owned by his son:
    https://archive.org/stream/cu31924028782063#page/18/mode/2up

    7
  11. JoAnn G says: 102 comments

    I wonder why there are holes in the stairs. And why all the tops of the toilets have been removed. Lovely home in good condition but I do think that red bathroom would be a little much for me.

    9
  12. Linda says: 66 comments

    I was wondering about the holes in the stairs my self and thought perhaps it good be blow in insulation ? Wonderful history about this house thank you !!

    3
    • Dennis says: 10 comments

      Linda,

      I think the holes in the stairs are air conditioning “duct” tube work. The tubes are used for blowing AC in places that would be hard to put traditional duct work.
      I’m not positive, but I’ve seen AC tubes in older homes that look identical to the ones on the stairs.

      3
      • David Sweet says: 286 comments

        They call it the “UNICO SYSTEM”. Very pricey, but if you have radiators and no registers for air conditioning, this is the gentlest way to do it.

        2
  13. Bethster says: 933 comments

    Another person here who wondered about the holes in the stairs!

    Overall, it’s a wonderful house. I loooove the arched windows, and also the little windows in the attic. But I would have to re-redo the kitchen and bathrooms!

    5
  14. Gemma says: 125 comments

    I am unofficially dubbing this house “Doily Manor”. The minute I saw the roof line, I thought of my late mom and her fondness for paper lace doilies.

    1
  15. Gregory K. Hubbard says: 446 comments

    Is it possible that James A. Clark used Archimedes Russell as the architect for both this beautiful home and the Pulaski National Bank? Russell was very creative working in a number of popular revival styles. The one biography I have of Russell is dismissive and condescending, so I am no wiser for having it.

    As for the snow, you become accustomed to it. In Maine, I used my snow blower a lot, and avoided shovels – didn’t need a bad back or a heart attack! I don’t know if it’s true for most small and medium cities, but I was never expected to be on time at work if the roads were dangerous. And in the ice storm that lasted on and off for two weeks, mostly because it never warmed enough for the ice to melt, I got to know my neighbors really well. We traded canned chili recipes, how many ways you can serve green beans, and hot soup. My memories of a Maine storm are probably more romantic in hindsight than the situation was in reality.

    12
    • Glorybe says: 146 comments

      The arch windows are a reminder of my grandmother’s home in western New York and they look so romantic. I love the snow and returned to western New York after 20 years of living in sunny Colorado. All small towns in western New York have many friendly folks that become like family, especially during stormy winters.

      3
    • JimHJimH says: 4867 comments
      OHD Supporter

      It’s very possible the house was designed by Archimedes Russell. He was active in the area at the time, early in his career. He is known to have designed Italianate houses similar to this – this design is actually more sophisticated than the Crego House:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mrs._I._L._Crego_House

      1
  16. Roz Brown says: 8 comments

    I loved the red tile in kitchen and bath, and also wonder about the holes in the stairs, great home.

    3
  17. kmmoorekmmoore says: 389 comments
    Weatherford , TX

    Gorgeous house. The Mona Lisa over the mantel cracked me up. Nice touch ?

    2
  18. Dayne says: 1 comments

    There’s something really warm and authentic about this house. Almost like landing in a movie, or a fantasy.

    1
  19. Miss-Apple37 says: 1124 comments

    What a nice house, with plenty of original features! I love both the interior and exterior with its white details over red brick.

    1
  20. Larry E says: 15 comments

    Why are there two doors hinged to the same door frame in pic #19 (the pic just before the stair pic)? Looks like the doors adjoining hotel rooms. Wonder what the reason was for this.

    3
  21. MarthAllenaMarthAllena says: 87 comments
    1921 Craftsman
    St. Paul, MN

    Brick itailianates are a favorite. The exterior is fabulous

    3
  22. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11723 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Went off market for a short time, back on so moved to the front page. Comments above may be older.

    1
  23. allan says: 74 comments

    Bing maps are just so blurry. It took me a bit to find it but here is a Google street view. https://goo.gl/maps/69iGFmFBvrK2

    2
  24. Ed Ferris says: 311 comments

    Flemish bond, with the mortar in very good shape.

    1
  25. Stephanie Ryder says: 2 comments

    We live in Oswego and drove by this house to get a better look at it. The home appears to be in nice shape, but the carriage barn is in serious disrepair. A large hole in the roof and a very obviously sagging roofline. It is huge though!

    1
  26. Stacy says: 322 comments

    Gorgeous home & I don’t think I’d mind being snowed in, snuggled up to a warm fire here!!

    1

Comment Here


Think before you type! Keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents.
Comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved.

Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.
Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified but please do not call the agent unless you are actively looking or interested in the property.