1898 Queen Anne – Dublin, TX – $675,000

For Sale
Added to OHD on 3/13/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/1/19   -   38 Comments
502 W Clinton, Dublin, TX 76446

Map: Street

  • $675,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 3.5 Bath
  • 4508 Sq Ft
  • 18 Ac.
MAGNIFICENT QUEEN ANNE VICTORIAN HOME This 4508 sq foot beauty is stunning with architectural treasures from a by gone era. This home features massive rooms, stunning staircase, beautifully appointed interior with soaring ceilings, lavish moldings & mill-work, wrap around porches that surround the home. This amazing home has been carefully & thoughtfully restored to its original beauty & the home encompasses 5 bedrooms & 3.5 baths. It sits on 18 fenced acres that is suited for a grape vineyard or with the 2 story barn you could have horses or farm animals. This amazing property would make a great bed & breakfast as it is located inside the city limits of Dublin, Texas. The possibilities here are endless.
Contact Information
Larinda Ray, Larinda Ray Realty Team
(254) 968-5750
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home.

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38 Comments on 1898 Queen Anne – Dublin, TX – $675,000

OHD does not represent homes on this site. Contact the agent listed for details including current price and status.
  1. AvatarBosqueNorse says: 191 comments

    I wonder what the history is of this old house?

    3
  2. AvatarTracy says: 102 comments

    WOW! WOW! WOW!

    7
  3. AvatarChiChiPox says: 229 comments

    Well what’s not to love? Talk about perfect. A special stamp of approval for the exterior colors. Could it be more perfect?

    6
  4. AvatarScott Cunningham says: 375 comments

    This is amazing!! What a setup!!

    2
  5. AvatarLindsay G says: 589 comments

    I love everything about this house!!! The wide open spaciousness of it is so wonderful and indicative of Texas. I love the main stairs and the then the servant’s staircase. Kudos to the wonderful former owners who restored this beauty and made it into what it is today. I’d take it in a heartbeat if I could!!!

    8
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Too right! These great big ole TEXAS cartwheel houses are something else for sure; and this one is cartwheels all day! That front door set is super wow. LOVE the also quite decorative door set in the upper stair hall. So cool set into it’s deep niche and with original fixtures! So nice. Great barn! Great hot house! Quality and SPACE galore inside and out. Waaaa Hooo!

      9
  6. Michael MackinMichael Mackin says: 1309 comments

    I keep looking for something I would change about this house and come up with nothing. The Queen Ann is one of my favorite styles and this one is a great example. The acreage and the barn are a bonus!

    I love the fact that they kept the original patina of the tin ceiling in the kitchen!

    I keep drooling on my keyboard…….

    4
  7. AvatarEyesOnYou1959 says: 267 comments

    All I can say is: OMG and WoW!! The only thing I would change about
    this magnificent home is some of the paint choices in the bedrooms. It
    would be an absolute pleasure living in this grand old home!

    2
  8. AvatarMomof9 says: 95 comments

    My jaw is bruised from hitting the floor and that happened before looking at the inside of this gorgeous home!

    3
  9. AvatarWarbon says: 122 comments

    I fell in love with all the stained and leaded glass in the front entrance. It is gorgeous. Just a beautiful house.

    4
  10. Avatarbill whitman says: 252 comments

    I know OMG is overused but
    OMG – I had to check my pulse after I saw this one – for a minute I thought I had died and was seeing my dream house in heaven. well not heaven but. ..

    Somebody tell Ross to breathe again.

    3
  11. AvatarColleen Johnson says: 1260 comments

    Picking my jaw up off the floor …. this house and property is STUNNING!

    3
  12. AvatarMazamaGrammy says: 364 comments

    The greenhouse appears to be a renovated tornado shelter.

    2
  13. AvatarKarey says: 299 comments

    I used to live down the road from this house. The exterior is incredibly beautiful and now I can see the interior is too. I’m pretty sure it’s in the city limits and for a tiny town, the tax rate is really high – at least by rural Texas standards! The main draw to Dublin used to be the original Dr. Pepper bottling plant. The Dublin. Bottling Co. is still operating out of the building but after a Snapple took over Dr. Pepper they can’t sell the proprietary blend of “Dublin Dr. Pepper” any more … very sad for the town. They still run tours and it’s a fun place to visit and have lunch. This house would make an incredible B&B and it’s close enough to Stephenville (a decent sized college town) and Comanche to draw visitors, I think.

    4
  14. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments

    Odd thing…I’ve been through Dublin, Texas, maybe half a dozen times and for some reason I do not remember seeing this house. I do recall back in the early 1980’s there were still a half dozen or so nice gingerbread laden houses in a row on the main highway going through the town but by the 1990’s they were gone. I’m certainly glad this mansion grade Queen Anne did not suffer a similar fate. I have to side with the opinion indicating the house was from the late 1890’s rather than 1880’s because the stained glass designs, mantel tiles, and plaster “wedding cake” ceiling ornamentation would not have been found on most Texas houses in the 1880’s. The designs in the plaster are Colonial Revival in style another indication of a late 1890’s date. The columned and beveled mirrored Oak mantels were also 1890’s mainstays. The Queen Anne style was barely emerging in 1880’s Texas but there was an explosion in towered Queen Annes towards the end of the 1890’s in many Texas towns as general prosperity spread across the Lone Star State. Perhaps because they were so common in almost every Texas town of a few thousand or more residents, it was not long into the 20th century before folks started calling them “White Elephants” or worse. In 1960’s the wholesale demolition of these large late Victorian homes became widespread and by the 1980’s only isolated pockets remained where once there were solid blocks of grand homes. Now, well into the 21st century, rare examples like this one are far and few between. A few places like Waxahachie, Calvert, Gainesville,and Honey Grove, still retain a fair number of 19th century examples but they are the exception. I read in the listing language about this house being “settled” on the 18 acre site. Would this house have once been closer to the main business/residential district of Dublin and then was later moved out to this site? I know of at least one similar Queen Anne style house (the Sam Burk Burnett House-Mr. Burnett was a legendary cattleman in the 19th century) that was until the 1970’s on the edge of downtown Wichita Falls at 1500 Burnett Street but was moved in 1974 out to a rural setting where as far as I know it remains. In any event, grand Queen Annes like this one are now uncommon in Texas, especially one so well preserved and restored. All the way back in 1981 a book came out titled GONE FROM TEXAS was published (a used copy on e-Bay http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Gone-from-Texas-Our-Lost-Architectural-Heritage-by-Willard-B-Robinson-Pape-/391470865785?hash=item5b257b5d79:g:3asAAOSwdsFXTdL9 ) and it chronicled the loss of significant portions of historic Texas architecture. Regrettably, that loss still continues…I personally know of several Victorian era homes here in Fort Worth that will be demolished in coming weeks for new apartment construction. I’ll post a link in the weekly discussion page about a towered Queen Anne that is offered for a dollar to be moved. Sorry to veer off topic but I did want to convey the reality that houses like the one above truly are an endangered species even today in the Lone Star State. In summary, I truly like everything about this Dublin house, it has all the whistles and bells that appeal to lovers of Victoriana.

    14
    • AvatarKathryn Bell says: 57 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thank you so much for your continued research in this and all your comments. As a former Dallasite and now living in the Panhandle, I have often wondered why there are so few old houses still present in this area. So many exist in the Northern parts of the country, it is a shame these houses were torn down in the name of progress here.

  15. AvatarDenise1953 says: 31 comments

    OMG!!! Amen. End of story.

    3
  16. RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Good eye. That is curious for sure. A simple access to dead space under the landing for utility purposes is highly unlikely opening into such a formal space. My guess is storage for the HUGE tureen and HUGE charger one must have had to go along with one’s HUGE TEXAS house! Heheheh. 😉

  17. RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Has GREAT shot of the upper stair hall door set, (albeit photo stamped). Thank you!

  18. AvatarDonald C. Carleton, Jr. says: 249 comments

    I’m not seeing “seven custom fireplaces imported from Bulgaria” here, whatever those would be (my guess is the Bulgarians were more likely to have gone in for elaborately-tiled stoves).

    Would love to hear the origin of that tale–did the realtor just throw it in for effect?!

    1
  19. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments

    Donald, Both the mantels and tiles are domestically made; here’s a 1900 millwork catalog from the giant Foster-Munger firm in Chicago: https://archive.org/stream/TheFosterMungerCo.CCA114238/The%20Foster%20Munger%20Co.%20CCA114238#page/n347/mode/2up (they shipped nationally) and the tiles may be from the equally large American Encaustic Tiling Co. (New York, with their factories in Zanesville, Ohio) https://archive.org/stream/artistictiles00amer#page/n0/mode/2up I have no idea where the Bulgaria connection came from but its not unusual for some old house seller/owners to pass down lore about a home’s details that make it sound more exotic or romantic. Another Texas house featured here in the past mentions in the listing that it had “Cypress doors from France” but its more likely if made of Cypress they came from Louisiana as it had a robust market for millwork products. Here’s an 1891 Roberts & Co. Millwork catalog from New Orleans with many items available in Cypress: https://archive.org/stream/IllustratedCatalogOfMouldingsArchitecturalOrnamentalWoodWork/MouldingsDesigns0001#page/n3/mode/2up There are a few houses where imported items were incorporated into the decor but they are relatively rare. Almost any house part you can think of was available American made in the second half of the 19th century.

    6
  20. AvatarJennifer HT says: 796 comments

    I love it all! The land, the house, all of it.

    2
  21. AvatarTonimar says: 61 comments
    OHD Supporter

    David Cassidy immediately comes to mind when looking at this home! “I think I love you!”

    1
  22. Avatarpamibach says: 120 comments

    a victorian dream house

    2
  23. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10360 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Moved to front page, comments above may be older.

    3
  24. AvatarBethany otto says: 2663 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Escondido, CA

    That dining room is one of my all-time favorites! And the whole house has that Texas-inspired Victorian thing going on–wonderful!

    2
  25. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Nothing has changed in my feelings towards this house since I commented a couple of years ago. Since I have, uh, lived to my senior years, I can remember back to my childhood when ornate houses of this kind could be found in almost every small Texas town of more than a couple of thousand residents. Such gingerbread palaces often lined both sides of the main thoroughfare going into and out of the town. Fast forward fifty years or more and now such finds are few in number. A house arguably of even higher caliber from roughly the same period is this magnificent brick mansion in the town of Gainesville along I-35 just before entering into Oklahoma: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/10248604855/in/album-72157632685147361/ There are times I wish my recollections weren’t so vivid as I’m deeply saddened by all of the Texas homes like this one that disappeared in the 20th century. This moved-from-downtown-Dublin house is representative of the sometimes palatial homes built in Texas during the post Civil War era. The Lone Star State still has problems giving proper respect and due credit to its high end Victorian homes.

    6
    • AvatarKeith Sanders says: 104 comments

      Pardon a couple of aphorisms. Seeing the Gainsville house, I am forced to remind myself, “Thou shalt not covet…” Despite the lost elegance of a better age, take solace in, “Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.” Up here in the frozen wastes of western Canada, there is much too little of such to be had.

      2
    • AvatarTony Bianchini says: 4 comments

      This house was never moved; not sure why you say that (The ‘settled’ comment from the real estate ad is insufficient to start jumping to a conclusion). It was built in this location, in 1898, on the 18 acre parcel it’s currently on, all per Erath Co. appraisal district. Also, in the attic is a photo showing there were 3 of them on similar size parcels on W. Clinton (additionally, the half dozen ginger bread homes you previously alluded to are still extant, on Patrick Street, the main drag into town, in fact at least a couple of them have been featured on this site. You can do a street view and see they’re all perfectly fine) Also, look at this house on Google maps and you’ll see it is perpendicular to Patrick street, in what was an ideal location for the ultra-wealthy of the town to place estates. This house appears at the rear of that photo I mentioned… the first house (in the foreground) was truly a sight to behold, I think it had a 5 story tower. Also, a massive conservatory. The photo was lying in a corner and curling up from water damage, its frame in pieces. The names of the original owners were printed on it too. I thought of taking a picture, but didn’t. I thought I could locate something online about the long gone houses – alas, despite my considerable research prowess, nothing. There’s presently a subdivision where the first one was, and a 1950’s ranch where the second was. As mentioned, the other homes rivaled this one. If the Harris House hadn’t survived to the present day, one wonders if anyone would’ve even known they were there? I questioned local folks and all I got was drool out of the mouth and crossed eyes.

      2
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Tony,
        I’ll politely back away from my previous comments because in the absence of being able to prove anything to the contrary I’ll assume that your comments are factually correct. The overhead “drone” view does show an alignment with Dublin city streets making it more likely that the house has always been right here. 19th century Texas towns seldom had paved streets and/or sidewalks or at least until after the end of the 19th century. There was a large Queen Anne style house on a gravel road that burned on the outskirts of Calvert a few years back (Kelly posted news of the loss) but despite having made a personal visit to the town, I had apparently completely missed it. I strive to be accurate in all of my comments and hope no one would mind informing me of any (unintentional) mistakes I’ve made. If you happen to be able to photograph the water damaged period photo you mentioned in the attic, I’d consider it a real favor if you could share it. Thanks for setting the facts straight on this house and property.

        1
  26. AvatarPaula Libby says: 33 comments

    This house rang a bell in my head…I kept thinking of the movie, Giant, with James Dean, Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor the whole time I looked at the pictures. Then I had to wonder if I remembered correctly..and sure enough…in the movie they had a big ole Victorian house, but it was a set. Evidently, they used the stone front of an old mansion and erected it in a field where it stood for many years. https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39607/ Too bad they didn’t shoot the movie in this house. What a beauty.

    2
    • AvatarTony Bianchini says: 4 comments

      The inspiration for the mansion in “Giant” was “El Castile” or, “Waggoner Mansion.” It’s in Decatur, TX. Google it, quite impressive. It’s sadly nearing the final stages of collapse due to benign neglect on the part of the owners. They won’t sell it and won’t let anyone look at it. I went by it last week, and more masonary walls had collapsed, the porches will probably rot off completely in the next several years. Nothing has been done to it in decades. Pretty tragic, but that’s the world we live in.

      1
  27. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Sad indeed to hear El Castile continues to decline (hence my comment about Victorian era homes not getting the respect they deserve in the Lone Star State) Here’s some low resolution photos taken of it over a decade ago: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157601354238162/with/1077864816/ I guess we should be glad that Chip and Joanna Gaines bought the Cottonland Castle in Waco recently. While it may become modernized, at least it will remain standing.

  28. ErnieErnie says: 217 comments

    In photo #43, the formal dining room, what is the wood panel above the open door, to the left of the fireplace.

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