1885 Queen Anne – Hastings, MI – $335,000

For Sale
National Register
Added to OHD on 10/30/18   -   Last OHD Update: 10/30/18   -   47 Comments
321 S Jefferson St Hastings, MI 49058

Map: Street

  • $335,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 1 full, 2 half Bath
  • 5000 Sq Ft
  • 0.37 Ac.
This stunning home is centrally located between Grand Rapids, Lansing, and Kalamazoo. You get the nice home town feel of Hastings while only being a short drive from all of these big cities. This home features 5 bedrooms with spacious closets, 1full bathroom and 2 half bathrooms, 4 fireplaces, and much more. There are so many unique, beautiful characteristics of this home, it is simply a must see! Contact Sarah to set up a private showing! 1.269.578.3515 or staylor10@city2shore.com
Contact Information
Sarah Taylor, City2Shore Real Estate Inc.
616-502-5865
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home.

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47 Comments on 1885 Queen Anne – Hastings, MI – $335,000

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10324 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    This has been on the site before, sold a few years ago. Happy to see it’s still looking beautiful! More photos on the agents site.

    15
    • Avatarpeeweebc says: 856 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1885 Italianate.
      MI

      Not far from us. We walked around this house yrs ago when it was in not so good shape but sure gorgeous now. ☺️

      1
  2. AvatarPWilliam says: 2 comments

    Wow. So much beautiful woodwork, and not even painted on the upper floors.

    10
  3. JimHJimH says: 4197 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Fantastic house and nicely presented! I’m not seeing attribution, though it looks like an excellent design of local architect D.S. Hopkins.

    A few decades ago:
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XWxYRU0UmY4/TzxVbnxTtmI/AAAAAAAAAGA/-7g7jZRvHaE/s1600/strikerhouse1.jpg

    https://www.pinterest.com/bethanyport92/ds-hopkins-architect-1867-1905/

    8
    • AvatarKaren says: 625 comments

      Thanks for the links!

      3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4708 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Jim, I too thought this to be a David S. Hopkins design as his design work was especially popular in his home state of Michigan. In Muskegon, MI, around the same time as this house was said to be built, Hopkins designed the Hackley & Hume mansions (website: https://www.lakeshoremuseum.org/project/hackley-hume/ ) and they are arguably some of the finest examples of his design work. D.S. Hopkins quickly evolved with the changes in architectural fashion and by the early 1890’s started incorporating Shingle and Colonial/Classical Revival details in his new designs with less ornamentation. Thanks for the links. The older photo looks essentially the same as the house does today. In the basement are some ornamental finials that were probably affixed to the roofline peaks. They should either be replicated (ideally from copper) or repaired and put back on.
      By the way, the Pinterest page shared you may have noticed is by Bethany Port. She is the great granddaughter of David Hopkins and has been working for a couple of years to write a biographical book about her Architect ancestor. I have loosely corresponded with Ms. Port for several years and as of a few months ago, her D.S. Hopkins book was getting close to being ready to be printed. She said it will be a limited book of about 80 pages but perhaps that can become a foundation that later scholars can add to in the future. D.S. Hopkins published many house plan books (at least a dozen) with some available online. Unfortunately, ornate designs like this house would mainly be found in his earlier plan books and I’ve yet to find any online accessible versions. The earliest I’ve found available online is his 1891 Houses and Cottages No. 4 (Internest Archive https://archive.org/details/DSHopkinsHousesandcottagesbookno40001 ) but his most creative and ornamental design work dates from the previous decade. If anyone knows of online accessible copies of Hopkins plan books before 1891 I’d consider it a real favor if they would share those sources.

      1
      • JimHJimH says: 4197 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Kelly’s 2011 post had an older photo showing more elaborate cresting along the ridges. It’s often left off during roof replacement – most roofers don’t have a clue.
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/321sjefferson12.jpg

        I’m surprised sometimes how little is known about some very talented early architects, Hopkins being one of them. His catalogs would be considered “ephemera” not usually archived at libraries, though the internet is making finding things easier for researchers. I saw Bethany Port has a D.S. Hopkins Facebook page also:
        https://www.facebook.com/dshopkins/

        https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/116548389/david-sprague-hopkins

        1
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4708 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          “…most roofers don’t have a clue.” So true. However, I have seen some finials on newer high end builds but in the 1880’s there was a whole cottage industry of tradespeople who focused on rooftop ornamentation. By the mid-20th century this whole concept of crowning houses with rooftop ornaments was largely forgotten and it largely remains so today, as you noted. Thanks for the FB link to Ms. Port’s Hopkins page. There’s a wealth of information there to look at. I took notice that she mentioned working on her book so I’m keenly looking forward to that coming out. You’re absolutely correct about the long lapse of recognition for 19th century architects that had a national impact on house designs. Again, by the mid-20th century when all things Victorian were considered obsolete, even few scholars were aware of their existence. This is a forgotten page from our history that is only now beginning to be rediscovered.

  4. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 458 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1980 board & batten modern

    I love the exterior paint colors, it brings out the structure and details. I also enjoy the design on the doorway frames in the grandest room, like dark punctuation points, delightful. What a grand home.

    10
  5. AvatarL Adams says: 64 comments

    Unrelated to this beautiful, stately home – could we have a certifiably haunted/cursed house sampler for Halloween? Pretty please??? Ghosts must convey.

    XD Happy Halloween, y’all!

    4
  6. AvatarNancy C says: 122 comments
    OHD Supporter

    abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

    An outstanding house! It is almost too much to take in . . .

    3
  7. AvatarL Adams says: 2 comments

    What are the architectural pieces in the basement?

    5
    • AvatarRandy C says: 422 comments

      I don’t know but I sure would love to channel Ross McTaggart (Cross House) and try to figure out how to put them back where they belong. This is a beautiful house for sure.

      8
      • SharonSharon says: 406 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Sedalia, MO

        That dome shines like a new penny! I too want to see the architectural roof pieces shining brightly back on top of this gem.

        4
      • RossRoss says: 2405 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        The roofing finials are……confusing.

        They are shown in this 2012 Streetview image:

        https://goo.gl/maps/vFfM1Gs1zbs

        You can also see them in SOME of the images which Kelly posted above, but not in ALL the above images! So, my guess is that the finials WERE there not long ago but have since been removed (why?????) and are now in the basement.

        Very curious.

        1
    • AvatarKaren says: 625 comments

      I was wondering if they are fancy lightning rods?

      1
    • Avatarkmmoore says: 299 comments
      Weatherford , TX

      I think some of the pieces are lightning rods. You can see them in place on the first link posted by Jim H.

      1
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 854 comments

      I guess that’s finials, but Ross’ Cross house’s finials are not pointy like that, so maybe lightning rods like Karen said? It would be cool to put them back in place up there!

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4708 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      They appear to be metal finials that were once affixed to the roof to highlight gable ends and roofline changes. If this were my home I’d have to find a way to put them back. Some appear to be damaged so replicas might need to be fabricated or the originals repaired if possible.

  8. AvatarBeth says: 6 comments

    Wow! It’s AMAZING! Did I miss the butlers pantry?

  9. AvatarQuiltingWitch says: 26 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 split level prisoner
    Great Falls, MT

    The Eastlake pieces are perfect for this house.

    4
  10. RosewaterRosewater says: 4542 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Outstanding! The interior is a nearly flawlessly preserved gem. Encaustic tile inlaid with parquetry is a first for me. Pretty cool!

    Good time to mention Michigan’s Hackley / Hume houses again for new folks or those interested in re-visting a masterpiece.

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/67/3f/f3/hand-carved-bat-in-the.jpg

    https://www.lakeshoremuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Hackley-1st-Parlor.jpg

    https://flic.kr/y/AX9ZNg

    https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=QerYW5e3IKWPjwSVrJkQ&q=hackley+hume&btnK=Google+Search&oq=hackley+hume&gs_l=psy-ab.3.3.0l7.1573.5750

    9
    • AvatarKaren says: 625 comments

      Thanks for the links! That second picture…I love the prisms on the wal. I once looked at a house that had beveled glass in the two front rooms. The agent showed it to me, at that time of the afternoon when the sun was shining through both windows. It was stunning! Prisms all over the place. I almost bought that house on that basis alone. But, it had no driveway!

      4
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 854 comments

      wow, stunning! thanks for the links!

      1
  11. AvatarKaren says: 625 comments

    I love this house! For all the reasons listed by everyone above, but also, I’ve never seen a fireplace in a sunroom! Great for when the sun is out in the winter, and you want to catch some rays, but not freeze.

    1
  12. AvatarCarolyn says: 259 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    I used to drive by this house back and forth to college in the 70’s and it was a wreck. I was smitten because of that and always dreamed of buying it. Someone did a magnificent job restoring it. The only downside is a huge gas station right in it’s backyard. If you like small town life Hastings is a wonderful place.

    3
  13. jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 948 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1947 Ranch
    OR

    What a beauty! My goodness, even with all the (requisite) wall paper, it’s a stunning home and packed with great Victorian/Easlake furnishings. I love the exterior color scheme, it seems well thought out and well done. Fantastic curb appeal, how could anyone not love it?!

    3
  14. AvatarCindy says: 142 comments
    1866 Italianate/Queen Anne
    Brunswick, MO

    Gorgeous, just a dream house. The woodwork is unusual, but beautiful. The open staircase is great. The butler’s pantry is phenomenal, the kitchen is not original but has that old time feel. Nice lot size and the exterior has so many great details everywhere you look.

    2
  15. AvatarAnnalise Fiebiger says: 29 comments

    This home is so gorgeous! Many rare features and well cared for. I wonder if anyone here knows what the beautiful wood structure is in the bedroom with the light grey carpet and rust color area rug? It looks built in, rather than a piece of furniture.

    1
  16. SharonSharon says: 406 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Sedalia, MO

    My eyes must’ve been playing tricks on me. The first photos show the roof ornamentations/rods on but the latter exterior photos do not show them, so things recently changed.

  17. AvatarJohntique says: 28 comments

    Although it’s not “my style” – this house is spectacular, both for detail … and condition! ….. hat’s off to the current owners. The “fireplace” in the sun room is not a working fireplace ….. it’s a “fake” – used where ever you like for effect.

  18. AvatarKeith Sanders says: 104 comments

    Striker – striking! They don’t come much better than this.

    1
  19. RossRoss says: 2405 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    A surreal juxtaposition:

    https://goo.gl/maps/kNdyd7GCPN92

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10324 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I’m imagining the awesome carriage house that sat there once.

      2
    • AvatarStevenF says: 757 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      At least they don’t have to go far for gas and lotto tickets.

      1
    • AvatarDianeEG says: 486 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1896

      The neighborhood is almost “the elephant in the room”. It took someone who simply LOVED that home to make it so perfect and spend that kind of money in an area that lost the charm of what it once must have been. Here’s hoping there’s a buyer who feels exactly the same way. A little thoughtful landscaping for privacy might help. I’m a bit confused on the parcel of land running between the two fences at the side of the house – does it belong to the property or to the town?

    • AvatarKeith Sanders says: 104 comments

      The yard is just a Shell of its former self…

    • AvatarMJG says: 528 comments

      Wow. Even more reason to go and look at a house in person. I would have never expected that.
      You know i love this house so much i’d still buy it. But that corner would be heavy in plantings and fences!

  20. AvatarStevenF says: 757 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    The window and door surrounds in the entry hall and front parlor are very elegant. I don’t think I’ve ever seen Victorian surrounds I like as much as these. They really enhance the verticality of the rooms.

    2
  21. AvatarPathways_Past says: 41 comments

    WOW. Just… amazing.

  22. Avatarmontana channing says: 252 comments

    so, after he saw this, what convalescent home is Ross in so i can send him a get well soon card.
    they really pulled out all the stops with this one. from the fantastic front door with cast iron mailbox at the bottom of the steps to that amazing woodwork in every and i mean every nook and cranny in the entire house.
    and i have never seen tile highlights in parquet floors before either but i love it. and then, the crowning glory. in the kings and queen bedroom (my aunties Queen Anne had these matching bedrooms where the Kings bed reached almost to the 12′ ceiling)where the beds match the woodwork, even the picture frames match the woodwork. and the closet with built in drawers and finished woodwork, not just shelves. this place embodies every twist and flourish in the Queen Anne catalog. it should be used as a teaching tool for budding Victorian restorers. A – MAZE – ING !!!!!!

    2
  23. AvatarGambaccini says: 528 comments

    Look at all the roof ridge and finials in the basement.
    This house is a dream loaded with all sorts of heavenly Victorian design.
    God, if I had the money and lived closer, I’d buy this in a second. Why can’t this house be where I live.

  24. Avatarpamibach says: 120 comments

    Very happy to see period furniture,I like thyis house a lot thank you for not painting the woodwork!

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