1850 Italianate – Cambridge City, IN – $149,000

For Sale
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home, contact the agent as listed below.
Added to OHD on 10/10/18   -   Last OHD Update: 11/21/18   -   29 Comments
210 Meredith St, Cambridge City, IN 47327

Map: Aerial

Price

$149,000

Beds

6

Baths

1

SqFt

4072

Acres

3.82

You could be the owner of one of Wayne Counties Hidden Treasures! This home has been in the same family for over 60 years, and was built in the 1800's by Joseph Kimmel. With original hardwood throughout, the wood trim was milled from trees on the property. 4, 000 Sq. Ft. of living space with just the main floor currently used as living area. 2, 000 +/- sq. ft. on the 2nd floor that could be finished. The main entry way opens to a spiral staircase leading to the second floor and attic area. The ceilings are decorated with classical plaster composition medallions and ornate handmade cornices. This house could be used as a family home or a great bed and breakfast! If you want to see this home just give Bob a call at 765-969-8317 or email bhobson@sellshomes.biz This home is sold as is .
Links, Photos & Additional Info

29 Comments on 1850 Italianate – Cambridge City, IN – $149,000

OHD does not represent homes on this site. Contact the agent listed for details including current price and status.
  1. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 367 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1918 Bunkhouse
    WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

    Beautiful! This house is loaded with interesting detail. I’ve always been intrigued with “blind” windows – and this house has four of them! Given the detail elsewhere, it would be fun to see what the front porch looked like.

    8
    • SueSue says: 175 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Are “blind” windows created after the house is built to create more wall space or are they intended in the original design?

      8
      • Steve H says: 153 comments

        Blind windows were original design features that were used to maintain the symmetry and balance of the exterior facades. The were often covered by fixed shutters. In this case, however, I wonder if these really are blind windows, as it looks like there is an actual sash (missing glass)in each opening. It almost looks to me like the “brick” infill is really just brick pattern asphalt siding. You can see that some is missing on the bottom of one window.

        9
        • Zann says: 518 comments

          I saw houses like that when I was a child, and I honestly thought those “windows” happened when people bricked in windows versus replacing the glass. Now that I think about that, I realize how not cost effective that would actually be. I never revisited my decision, I guess. Yikes. So once again, this site has taught me something.

          Meanwhile, this house is great. I love the exterior. I love what glimpses we see of the interior because original elements are still there. Italianate is always a style that gets me excited, but this one is pitch perfect.

          I’d like to see inside the room with the 16 paned window.

          5
        • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 367 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1918 Bunkhouse
          WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

          I don’t think that any brick is “missing” at the bottom of the window you refer to; rather the gray area appears to be a patch or repair of some sort. The window above it appears to retain shards of painted glass. It is more than highly unlikely that any asphalt “brick” siding would exactly match the brick exterior of the rest of the house. Clearly, the brick inside the recess of the blind windows is original. These really are blind windows.

          5
      • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 367 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1918 Bunkhouse
        WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

        They are original to the design – their purpose was to create symmetry in the facades even though the interior didn’t have that many real windows. Sneaky, but effective!

        5
  2. SueSue says: 175 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    This house seems so sad to me. It needs a family, gardens and many family get togethers.

    7
  3. JimHJimH says: 3740 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Wow! I’d love to walk around this place. Is that a brick carriage house at the rear?

    The Rose Hill mansion of brewer Joseph Kimmel (1828-1890). The state file gives a build date of 1878, although Kimmel’s home here appears on maps a few years earlier.

    6
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9338 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Not the right house. This is as close via street view as can be gotten: https://goo.gl/maps/abHTrUyTFXF2

      4
      • Laurie W. says: 1471 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Fake Greek Revival!
        NC

        Street view looks like the neighborhood ghost house, especially at this time of year! The house is so full of attractive elements; bringing it back would be a real joy. I’d buy it for the staircase alone as well as the exterior front, which is just exuberant.

        3
    • Dean Johnson says: 2 comments

      No, that is the General Solomon Meredith House. We almost bought that house about two years ago. While we were in Indiana looking at the Solomon Meredith House we looked at the neighboring Kimmel House exterior and asked the realtor to find out if it was available,it was not at that time. The Solomon Meredith House was fantastic and move in ready, but the Kimmel House was more to our style. It is quite rough, but a gem all the same. I need to think about this again, maybe take another drive down to Cambridge City.

      3
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 3964 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Yes – you certainly do. This house IS a true gem waiting to shine. It makes me sad to see it so predictable, pedestrian, unloved, and forlorn.

        2
        • Dean Johnson says: 2 comments

          From what I heard I don’t think it was/is unloved, just been overwhelming in maintenance to the current owners.

          2
  4. Mirka says: 1 comments

    Two different staircases? Always in love with curved staircases!

    3
  5. Bethany otto says: 2337 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Escondido, CA

    I don’t have enough superlatives in my vocabulary for this treasure. Just dying out here in Cali.

    6
  6. tim hildebrandt says: 32 comments

    blind windows? Wow!

    2
  7. tim hildebrandt says: 32 comments

    The concept of Blind Windows is curious as heck. I can’t understand what economic or aesthetic value they would provide. To what purpose are rooms without windows, both upstairs and down? Seems like a design problem that wasn’t solved.

    3
    • JimHJimH says: 3740 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Actually blind windows, doorways and arcades are architectural staples going back to ancient times. I know the Romans used them often, probably the Greeks and Egyptians before that. Usually it’s obvious when you go in the building why the wall was solid, the presence of a stairway for example.

      5
    • Qabbott says: 25 comments

      Symmetry, symmetry, symmetry!!!

      6
  8. Porch Freak says: 42 comments

    In doing a quick bit of research on the very first owner of this house, Joseph Kimmel, the local newspaper The Cambridge City Tribune reported that he died of typho malarial fever on August 26, 1890 at the age of 62. His obituary further reported that he married Amanda Worman in 1852. They had four children two of whom died in infancy. His wife and one married daughter survived him. Another married daughter had died suddenly in June, leaving behind her husband and five children.

    The local newspaper described Mr. Kimmel thus, “A man of great energy and push, very active and persevering in business, impulsive in his nature, extreme in his likes and dislikes, of strong convictions and imperious will.” The nearby Richmond newspaper, The Richmond Item, was less kind, “He was for a great many years a member of the firm of Kimmel Bros., who carried on a large malting business at Cambridge City. He at one time was quite wealthy, but lost much in later years. He was a man of contentious disposition and gained much notoriety by being constantly engaged in lawsuits, principally with his own people.”

    Amanda Kimmel died in 1909. The local newspaper reported, “Mrs. Kimmel was a most excellent citizen and aside from her duties as a wife and mother, she found a place in the church, where her mind was active and her heart devoted.”

    For both of their obituaries it was noted that they died at their home, Rose Hill, the house Kelly posted. So now we know the rest of the story.

    6
  9. sir douglas rice says: 15 comments

    i couldn’t believe there wasn’t major water damage inside. the roof overhang is badly deteriorated…from the built-in gutters leaking. someone needs to attend to that ASAP. very cool house. i would imagine there was some sort of porch over the front door at one time? looks like even the side entrance had one as well? maybe someone can dig up an old photo?

    2
  10. Janet Vodder says: 122 comments

    Interesting about the built in gutters. Great house and I am abhorred by the condition of house under eves. Someone save her! Before it’s too late!

  11. stephen vassar says: 3 comments

    I love this house wish it was mine

  12. Unheard Uv says: 31 comments

    Yes, there is something about this home that really captivates me. I love the trim and ceiling medallions. I’m a sucker for high ceilings and brick exterior. I can already imagine what this place Could look like with period appropriate wallpaper and the trim stained dark vs painted white. Itd be nice to be financially capable of tackling this project too, LoL.

  13. Becky says: 1 comments

    Just toured the old place. An architectural gem. A definite diamond in the rough. Had this property been available when we were 25 years younger, we would have snatched it up! The back of the house, which apparently was in part,a carriage entrance in its heyday and has huge additional living space, is completely deteriorated and must be torn off. So sad to see its present state. Only copious amounts of time and money can bring her back to her former glory!

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