c. 1840 – Rushville, IN

Added to OHD on 8/29/18   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   26 Comments
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314 W 3rd St, Rushville, IN 46173

Map: Street

  • $24,900
  • Foreclosure
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3962 Sq Ft
  • 0.31 Ac.
This Turn Of The Century Home Is Just Waiting For Someone To Bring It Back To Its Grandeur. Huge Living Room And Dining Room. Ornamental Fireplaces. Original Woodwork. Spiral Staircase. Two Balconies To Relax On. Greenhouse On Back Of Garage. Brick Paver Lined Parking Spaces. Fish Pond. Partially Fenced Yard. Some Remodeling Started But Not Finished. Appears To Have Newer Hvac And Electrical Service. Shown By Appointment Only. Buyers To Be Accompanied By A Licensed Realtor.
Contact Information
Ruth Ann Hessler, Infinity Realty
812-662-8779
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc: ,

26 Comments on c. 1840 – Rushville, IN

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11846 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I’m not sure about the large columns out front. Perhaps this was originally an Italianate/Greek Revival combo or were the columns added in the early 1900’s? The staircase and window/door trim alone would make this home worth saving.

    18
    • RossRoss says: 2468 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Agreed. This circa-1840 house got a major exterior Colonial update with the porches. I would tear all that off without hesitation, and work to find evidence of the original facade.

      The interior, blessedly, looks largely original and could be a knock-out so easily.

      That staircase-from-Heaven deserves no less.

      19
    • Kay Rumple says: 1 comments

      The Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for 1887 thru 1913 do show the porch changed after the 1901 and before the 1908 map. The original house was a square 2 story house with a porch across the first story. A one story room was at the back. In 1913 it shows the house as it is now.

      1
  2. Randy C says: 448 comments

    Oh, my. The differences between the view from the front and back are startling. This appears to me to be grandma’s family home someone tried to turn into a Grand Dame. The staircase is very nice though. Not sure, but perhaps there are a couple of original light fixtures left. Could still be a nice, large home with lots of elbow grease and investment.

    5
    • Derp says: 1 comments

      Umm…original electric light fixtures from the 1800s?

      9
      • AndreaS says: 49 comments

        No…if there were original light fixtures, they would have been gas lights. They were usually converted to electric later, but would still have been the original fixtures. I think that’s what the other commenter meant. ?

        5
  3. Eileen M says: 292 comments

    Iwould buy this place for the staircase alone!

    9
  4. TGrantTGrant says: 854 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    First thought this was a Colonial Revival but on closer inspection it’s more likely an Italianate in CR disguise. Either way there’s a lot of possibilities here.

    5
  5. CarolynCarolyn says: 300 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    Wow! What a staircase!! All the water on the floor in photo 5 is kind of scary……..

    11
  6. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    My favorite type of post. ?
    That staircase…*sigh*

    3
  7. Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1749 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
    NC

    Me Too on the staircase, as well as the door frames. The pillars look like somebody’s later inspiration to try to push the old girl up a notch. Still, it’s a place with plenty of potential.

    2
  8. Woeisme says: 142 comments

    Is the shuttered window on the upper stair picture part of the push out on the side of the house?

  9. Julie says: 14 comments

    Party in the front….business in the back.

    The curve of the staircase…..oh my!

    1
  10. DaveDave says: 274 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Queen Ann/Stick
    Des Moines, IA

    Water water everywhere, I think.

    1
  11. Gypsy says: 208 comments

    Google “Columbus Eclectic style” and MS. Lots of antebellum homes used a mishmash of designs, which carried over into the 1900s. You might find a Greek Revival with gingerbread all over it, or a bungalow with carpenter Gothic design features…..it’s an interesting place to drive and ooh and ah at houses.

    They have a Tennessee Williams welcome center that was moved to Main Street from a few blocks away and painted in some odd colors. It was the house that he was born in. In the fall they have a TW festival with home tours of Victorian era, and in the spring a pilgrimage of Antebellum homes. There are also homes open year round for tours.

    You never know what you will discover but you will find something that you will love there.

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 916 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Yeah there were those kind of homes but those particular style columns, the larger ones, are strange for that earlier era as well as being just awkward as heck to the main home, something is off.

      3
  12. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Great value at this low price. Someone had privately shared this house with me a couple of days ago and I commented that the (walnut) staircase might sell at an architectural salvage outlet for as much as $10K. But I caution that to fully restore this house would cost several times the asking price. Funny house dating information; the listing says “turn of the last century” house yet the posted construction date is 1840. I believe unless there is the core of an older house from 1840, the earliest parts of the house would date to about 1850-1860.

    There’s some residual early Italianate window trim in one photo as well as the two-over-two pane sash; then you have the winding staircase and some arched hearth Italianate mantels. The Classical Revival columns likely date from the end of the 19th century or early 20th. (matching the “turn of the century” listing information) I sense that the next owner is not going to be too picky about exact dates but will be faced with the challenge of restoring a house with a long history of changes. Balcony porches (below the columns in front) are a nice feature for outdoor comfort so if it were mine I’m probably keep the columns. Rushville is slightly under 50 miles from downtown Indianapolis so if work is on the east side of Indy it would be possible to commute. A number of period Rushville homes have been posted on OHD over the years but none priced this low that I can recall. If someone isn’t intimidated by a major renovation/restoration project, this might be a good candidate.

    4
    • Ron G says: 170 comments

      John S: The stairs are a beautiful contribution from an experienced crew of craftsman from a time that is hard to reproduce in the design of a house now. The stairs are commonly referred to as an open-well, semicircular with winders and scrolled brackets.
      Because of the building codes being adhered to in most jurisdictions, this design style won’t pass code specifications. Most notably, the winder treads. The treads are to shallow on the left side and presents a safety hazard. Most jurisdictions recognize the value of historic preservation and will allow a certain amount of restoration work to be performed but they would probably push back on a removal if the stairs required structural repairs.

      1
  13. Kevin stevanus says: 1 comments

    The 2 story porch on the front with the big columns needs to go!!! It does not match the house. The addition on the back of the house needs a lot of attention to make it match the main house. So, do you get rid of it or keep it? I would love to get my hands on this one

    1
  14. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Stylistically, I think making the back sympathetic to the front of the house visually would tie everything together better. The house needs to anchor itself stylistically around a period theme and since Classical Revival makes the strongest statement from the street perhaps building on that would be the most satisfying. Removing the columns would greatly diminish the visual presence of this house. Besides, since they have likely been in place for over a century, they too have acquired the patina of time. Of course, the next owner(s) can do whatever he/she or they wish-I’d be very curious to see the “after” results.

    1
    • Ron G says: 170 comments

      One of the concerns I have with the upper roof projection is the capitals and the bases the columns rest on. The top capitals look more like shims. Plus they are square and they don’t match up with the architecture of the house nor the capitals on the lower porch. The same can be echoed with the square bases. The house really stands out in the neighborhood but there’s a lot more that could be done to give this home more curb appeal. If this house was in a little more upscale part of the community its possible a larger economic investment would be possible then where the house presently sets. There are a lot of nice homes surrounding this house but there’s a lot of commercial just steps away. Houses like this can be a challenge to a novice who has dreams of stepping back to a time that we only read about now. I would never want to discourage a newcomer to stay away from a house like this but its also important to understand that it takes time, investment and many people who have a track record in restoration. To restore a home of this size and bring it into the present century and want it to stand and be admired for another century, it most likely will require taking it down to its framing for a complete inspection, the opportunity to make repairs and bring all the mechanicals up to date. If this house survives and doesn’t meet the wrecking crew, I hope the lucky person that buys it, has a dream, a vision, and the ability to see it all the way to completion.

      2
      • RossRoss says: 2468 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        Old houses, ideally, should not be taken down to the framing.

        Old plaster walls have value.

        Also, a house like this is best suited for somebody retired with a large skill set (and tools!) but without a lot of money. For an absurdly low purchase price, and likely not much more to make the house livable, a person/couple could steadily work away in making this house a beauty again.

        Another potential buyer would be just the opposite: a young person or young couple, without a lot of money, but with a passion for old houses, a desire to Do Things Right, and a lot of energy. I was like that in my twenties, and I suspect a few such people still exist.

        I also have no doubt that if the non-original porches were removed, the exterior carefully restored, and period-correct colors used, the exterior would be a knock-out.

        What makes this house a worthy restoration candidate is the treasure of the staircase, and the remaining original interior trim and mantels.

        3
      • Nona adams says: 1 comments

        I have been raised around this neighborhood an it’s a shame to c this in the condition An b let go An not taken care of or redone yes it b costly but worth it love staircase shame the floors An ceiling would love to c when it’s redone An stripped whose ready to buy cheap price but think it could hopefully b worth it a dr was in this home years ago use to b an office An home

  15. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Well said, Ron. I too hope the outcome for this house is favorable.

    1
  16. ann says: 94 comments

    Spectacular Staircase!!!! love it

    1
  17. Kayla says: 1 comments

    This house used to be absolutely beautiful!! When I was a little girl my grandfather owned the property across the street and I lived there once upon a time… An older lady named Ruth lived in this home she collected porcelain dolls she had them lined all the way down the straicase on both sides of each step!! I remember it like it was yesterday I absolutely loved this house and would visit her everyday the last time I went to visit family in rushville I stopped by for a look at the home but there was not so great people living there and were running some sort of yard sale/junk house out of it it really is a shame they let it get this bad.. I know Ms.Ruth is turning over in her grave Rest her soul?

    3

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