1926 – Chicago, IL – $374,900

For Sale
Added to OHD on 5/16/18 - Last OHD Update: 5/16/18 - 23 Comments
11842 S Bell Ave, Chicago, IL 60643

Map: Street

Price

$374,900

Beds

4

Baths

3 full, 2 half

SqFt

3061

A TIMELESS TREASURE! STATELY & MAJESTIC DESCRIBES THIS CLASSIC HOME WHICH OFFERS FEATURES OF BYGONE ERA! MEDITERRANEAN STYLE EXUDES THE MOMENT YOU STEP IN FROM IT'S ENORMOUS WOOD BEAMED CEILINGS TO FLOOR TO CEILING ORIGINAL LEADED GLASS WINDOWS THROUGHOUT, SALTILLO FLOORS BEAUTIFY THE LIVING ROOM ALONG WITH FLOOR TO CEILING GRAND FIREPLACE. OTHER NOTED FEATURES ARE SPACIOUS BEDROOMS THAT OFFER LARGE BUILT-INS AND EACH WITH THIER OWN PRIVATE BATHROOM, HARDWOODS FLOORS, BREAKFEAST ROOM, GREATROOM CURRENTLY USE AS FAMILY ROOM DINING AREA. OTHER VERY UNIQUE FEATURES IS A LOFT THAT CAN BE PRIVATE OFFICE OR 5TH BEDROOM AND THERE IS A CATWALK THAT OVER LOOKS LIVING ROOM BETWEEN 2ND FLOOR BEDROOMS, HOW AWESOME IS THAT! YET THERE IS A HUGE BASEMENT AND PLENTY OF STORAGE. ALL THIS ON A BEAUTIFUL TREE-LINE STREET, SHORT WALK TO SCHOOLS, PARKS, METRA AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION.
Contact Details
Tanya Coffman, Berkshire Hathaway Biros
(708) 422-0011
Links & Additional Info
OHD does not represent this home. Property details must be independently verified.

23 Comments on 1926 – Chicago, IL – $374,900

  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8023 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Looking at the neighborhood homes and the interior of this one (got a Tudor Revival thing going on), the exterior is so strange, perhaps something happened and it lost it’s roof/details?




    6
    • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The original architect was Harry Hale Waterman (1869-1948), a well-known local who designed in a variety of styles including Tudor Revival. This one apparently got a Contemporary makeover – the brickwork detail looks 1980’s or later. Yes, a bit strange but they kept something of the old house.




      4
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 461 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Thanks!




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      • Hoyt Clagwell says: 196 comments

        My gut reaction is that exterior is original. It’s a very handsomely proportioned, pared down house. Ignoring the minimal historicist details, the house reads very Early Modern as it is, and the walls are capped with limestone that looks to be original–it has the same color from weathering as the stone on the tops of the buttresses.

        The listing describes the interior as Mediterranean, But I believe it’s meant to be English, with those Tudor four-centered arches. Render the house in pure, minimalist forms, and the interior could be viewed as Early Modern too–the way spaces open on to one another is reminiscent of the work of architects such as Adolf Loos.




        10
        • Signe Johnson says: 30 comments

          When I was a child I used to visit a home very much like this in western Wisconsin. It was built in 1922, still all original in the 1960’s when I would visit with my grandmother, and was a fabulous mix of Mediterranean, Art Deco and Tudor. It also had been custom designed for my grandmothers friend with an inground swimming pool in the living room next to a massive fireplace, seating area, and grand piano in that same room. She called the interior “Moorish”. It had a iron staircase and catwalk, As a kid i thought it would be fun to dive off the catwalk into the pool. The exterior was a coral pink stucco with iron embellishments and it had flat roofs. It was one of my all time favorite homes. I visited it again in the late 80’s and the only thing that had changed was that they had removed the pool (it had always been a humidity nightmare). I don’t know who the architect was, but there were several similar homes in the area built in the 20’s and early 30’s, some were ultra modern on the exterior but the interiors that I have seen were a tudor/deco/Mediterranean mix, very cool and really unique.




          1
        • JimHJimH says: 3296 comments
          OHD Supporter

          One problem with this theory is that the architect has a known body of work, none of which suggests he was an early Modernist in the 1920’s.
          The house originally looked very much like this other one, designed by the same architect, in the same year, right up the street:
          https://goo.gl/maps/1VYXaBxcYo72




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          • Hoyt Clagwell says: 196 comments

            I know nothing of this particular architect’s oeuvre, but good architects evolve throughout their careers, their lives, and are capable of working in more than one particular idiom. You have Lutyen’s early works–elaborate and very richly detailed Arts & Crafts and neoclassical buildings. Then you have his Castle Drogo.

            Could this house not be Harry Hale Waterman’s Castle Drogo?




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          • BethsterBethster says: 533 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1927 Spanish
            NY (house is in VA), NY

            Good point, JimH.

            P.S. I would “like” your comment but I don’t see that feature anymore….




            0
            • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 461 comments
              Admin

              1901 Folk Victorian
              Chestatee, GA

              Temp disabled until I can fix it.




              0
              • BethsterBethster says: 533 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1927 Spanish
                NY (house is in VA), NY

                Thanks, Kelly. I had come to really “like” that feature! (groan)




                1
  2. Karen S. Hinson says: 1 comments

    From the outside, it looks like an apartment building. From the inside? I have no clue what it’s trying to be. Perhaps some of you who are more informed on different styles can comment.




    2
  3. MW says: 598 comments

    At first I got excited thinking it was going to be some kind of remarkable early 1920’s modernist design, except for the couple of odd mini English buttresses. But then I saw the very surprising and unexpected Spanish interior. Maybe if the exterior was all covered over in stucco it would match better. But like bare wood, I’d have a hard time stuccoing over it. I like the brick outside, but it is an odd mix with the Spanish interior. And then the back looks more weekend warrior DIY with a few 6-packs involved than pro level design/construction work.




    3
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 461 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Spanish makes more sense than Tudor, maybe the exterior isn’t so far off from what it was originally, except the brick part.




      0
  4. Joe says: 428 comments

    -Until I read the comments, I thought that this might be some architect’s concept house. There are dramatic elements that are not well presented at all in the pictures. To my eye the biggest problems with this house are also relatively easy to fix if it is going to be the buyer’s home for a good number of years.
    -The landscaping looks generic at best to me. A good landscape designer could create a design that would, over time, take away the stark appearance and soften the lines without taking away the look that was created when it was redone.
    -To sell this house for a good price, I would call a number of staging companies and see what they proposed to accentuate the long windows, stairway, and floors. Properly decorated, it could be a knock out.
    – Since it is not a style with which I am familiar, it certainly would be enjoyable to see the ideas that different designers would come up with.




    2
  5. Priscilla says: 26 comments

    I think the roof was originally flat. I live in a neighborhood that was built in the art deco period and about a third of our houses have flat roofs.I wish we had those dramatic big windows. I don’t know what happened but the inside has lost the deco look.




    0
  6. BethsterBethster says: 533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1927 Spanish
    NY (house is in VA), NY

    I’ve seen a number of houses from the late ’20s whose interiors seemed to be a bit of mashup of Tudor and Spanish. I think that some eclectic “borrowing” was going on back then.

    I don’t know what to make of the outside, but I tend to favor the theory that it was redone at a later date. It bears no relation to the exteriors of other houses I’ve seen with similar interiors. It’s too bad, because the interior of this house is stunning!




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  7. Ashley403 says: 15 comments

    Evening All: I agree I don’t have a clue what is going on here.According to Zillow it was built in 1926 https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/11842-S-Bell-Ave-Chicago-IL-60643/4149149_zpid/ If seriously interested a trip to the Cook county permits department would be in order. If all else fails talk to neighbors who have lived here for a for a long time. It has those late 70’s built ins in the bedrooms. I wish they would show the kitchen or bathrooms. We have seen it on OHD an owner will get a wild hair and change the whole outside of a home. It may just be one person wanted modern and another Spanish. The fake 1970’s red Spanish furniture, I still have bad dreams.
    Looking at the stairs in picture 4 from bottom it even has a little split level going on!




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  8. Annabelle says: 121 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Log Home
    Cross, SC

    The neighborhood looks nice – except for the potholes!




    0
  9. jeff myers says: 33 comments

    My guess would be that this house is largely original. This type of Spanish revival/Tudor/Modern mashup can also be found occasionally in Los Angeles, among other cities. What’s odd is that it’s done in brick rather than stucco.




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  10. LynmariaLynmaria says: 9 comments

    Want! Except I’m in Arkansas




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  11. Mike says: 41 comments

    Interesting that the build date listed here is ’26 – other sources I’ve seen had it dated at 1930. Waterman’s work is spread around various neighborhoods in Chicago but there’s a heavy concentration in this particular one. He’s not well-known. I lived across the street from a Romanesque house he designed in 1893, and he did an interesting knock-off of a FLW apartment that’s in the Washington Park neighborhood. Most Chicagoans on the North Side would best know his work from a building on Sheridan Road which has terra cotta eagles stretching across its entire cornice.




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  12. Ingajane says: 23 comments

    Such an odd little duck, maybe with the right vision could be turned into a beautiful swan. I would like to see it empty of all furnishings and window treatments. Lets go to the bones.




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  13. Charles Kiefer says: 1 comments

    The Style of this house is Art Moderne, sandwiched between Art Nouveau and Art Deco. These nuanced interiors are typical of the style, as they draw from other contemporary styles like Spanish Revival, Tudor Revival and Arts & Crafts. Modern as we know it was not formulated yet. It was creating the modernism of the future, while drawing on the past. Another major architect who worked in the style was Andrew Rebori. You can see his work at Loyola University of Chicago’s Lake Shore Campus, as well as in numerous residences in the Chicago area. Terry Tatum is the local Chicago expert in his work.




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