c. 1750 Georgian – Henrico, VA – $5,950,000

For Sale
National Register
Added to OHD on 4/13/18 - Last OHD Update: 4/13/18 - 82 Comments
211 Ross Rd, Henrico, VA 23229

Price

$5,950,000

Beds

4

Baths

5.5

SqFt

7063

Acres

7.77

Privately nestled in one of Richmond's most coveted neighborhoods and among one of Virginia's highest ranking in architectural significance and historical associations, is Fairfield, a grand Georgian plantation house with a special story. First named Rocky Mills, and built in Hanover County around 1750, it was originally the home of John Syme II, half brother of Patrick Henry. Later reconstructed and renovated in Richmond, the distinctive Flemish bond walls and rusticated block-like stonework frames the facade openings. This is an exceptionally rare 18-century home. 7.77 acres, along the James river, 4 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 11 fireplaces, an apartment over the 4 car garage, and separate guest house/pool house.
Contact Details
Franklin Hardy, Frank Hardy Sotheby's
(434) 296-0134
Links & Additional Info
OHD does not represent this home. Property details must be independently verified.

82 Comments on c. 1750 Georgian – Henrico, VA – $5,950,000

  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8339 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    All kinds of links up top under the link section. I included two photos from the Library of Congress, more photos linked up top too.

    This is a reader share.




    19
  2. Laurie W. says: 1350 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Fake Greek Revival!
    NC

    A sublime house! The millwork practically sings. Judging from the HABS photos, it was heading into not-so-genteel poverty — thank God it has been so well and lovingly preserved. May that continue!




    18
  3. MW says: 617 comments

    Well, this place is pretty impressive. Sadly, a little out of my budget though.




    7
  4. Randy C says: 311 comments

    A-MAZ-ING!!! What a beautiful property and house. I’m speechless.




    10
  5. Zann says: 335 comments

    Kelly, I have to take a moment to thank you for all the Georgian/Federal homes you’ve been posting. They really are fascinating to me, and I seriously appreciate everything you do.

    Now, the house…. When I saw the price, I said “Oh, boy. This is going to be a good one!!!” and it definitely is. I know this is America, but I had a moment of feeling like I was in a BBC Jane Austen adaptation. I’ve never really understood why someone would spend millions on a house unless it was a castle (and I do lurk on European real estate sites to look at the ones that go up for sale.) This house is making me reconsider that thought heavily. If I had the money, I could see spending it on this home. The history is as priceless as the house itself.

    The old photos of the home is disrepair would be hanging in the house if I suddenly became a shmillionaire and could afford it. They’re quite pretty in a very Edgar Allan Poe way.




    23
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8339 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Glad you are enjoying them, I’ve got a good sized list so not sure why I keep skipping over them.




      10
      • Zann says: 335 comments

        It’s like when you’re eating dinner, and you save most of the serving of your favorite side dish for last. Or that is going to be my current working theory. It sounds good, anyway. 😀




        0
  6. MajolicaDavidMajolicaDavid says: 44 comments
    1914 Colonial Revival.
    CO

    So amazing that it was completely dismantled and moved from Hanover County Virginia, and slightly modified and totally rebuilt in Henrico County Va in 1928.




    9
    • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1927 Spanish
      NY (house is in VA), NY

      Wow! That’s incredible. And it made it through both the Revolutionary and the Civil wars!




      7
      • Zann says: 335 comments

        Yes! That is what I meant when I said this home was priceless because of the history. We’re very fortunate here in the U.S. because we don’t fully comprehend what it’s like to have a war fought in your own home country. We can imagine, but we don’t *know* what it’s like to have your home state become a battle ground. Consequently, when we see homes like this one we tend to not fully comprehend that this house is in an area that saw two wars.

        It’s too early on Monday morning to have that kind of enthusiastic yet theoretical rant, so I’m going to go get a second cup of coffee and shush. 😛




        2
  7. dkzody says: 222 comments

    An absolutely fabulous house with lots of room for staff that I would need to keep up such an estate.




    4
  8. TGrantTGrant says: 298 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    Oh my word! If you’ve ever wanted to live in as close to a museum house as possible this magnificent example would be it!




    12
  9. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1439 comments
    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central , NY

    A grand house on various levels.




    5
  10. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 598 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    Everything everyone above said. Holy cats.




    8
  11. BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1927 Spanish
    NY (house is in VA), NY

    I wanna see the guest house and the apartment!




    6
  12. Flowerlady says: 59 comments

    As elegant and classy this house looks, it still looks warm and inviting. Not real stuffy but very homey. Love the wood planked wall and fireplace in the one bedroom. Maybe if I win a couple of lotteries, I will be able to afford it.




    6
  13. azdi says: 22 comments

    If the walls could talk!




    3
  14. JRichard says: 199 comments
    1763 center-chimney cape
    Biddeford, ME

    Let me add my voice to the chorus. It’s very beautiful. What fabulous details.




    2
  15. Elaine says: 71 comments

    I’m amazed at that tunnel! It is so strong, and has lasted so long. This house is SO bright and cheerful and homey! This is why I almost went into interior design; to make places like this (nothing modern thank you)! I can’t stand it when people take beauties like this and put ”new stuff” in it; it ruins it. And that rocking chair in that one bedroom! I want one of those SO badly! I had ancestors from Henrico county. 16 or 1700s. Every time I see one of those counties where some of them were from it makes me perk up and look really hard! I’ve forgotten who; now it’s going to drive me crazy! Kelly, I think this is my favorite of all time!




    6
    • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1927 Spanish
      NY (house is in VA), NY

      That rocking chair caught my eye, because I have one very similar to it that my grandmother left to me. It’s a gooseneck rocker. I love it!

      P.S. I had ancestors in Henrico, too! One of the last names was Mayo. I had others in the area, some in Henrico and further west, and some in Richmond. Other names I recall are Cabell and Carrington.




      2
      • Elaine says: 71 comments

        Hah! After seeing this I HAD to look up who was from Henrico Co. The Harris line was in the 1600s, and Maj Wm was Burgess there in 1656-1658. Now I’m going to have to look up what a burgess is! and also it looks like my Womack line started there and in Goochland Co. I haven’t looked at all this in years, so have forgotten some. But every time I see one of the counties they were from, I notice it right off! I guess this house, if built in 1750, was built AFTER my ancestors were there!




        2
        • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1927 Spanish
          NY (house is in VA), NY

          Oh, Goochland! I had ancestors in Powhatan, across the river from there. They reportedly had a house on the river. I wish I could have seen it! Unfortunately it burned down years before cameras were even invented.




          0
          • Elaine says: 71 comments

            I had ones in Powhatan county too! Saw them while I was looking for the Henrico. Also Spotsylvania and Mecklenburg and Amelia. OH! And New Kent. Actually, this was really cool! One of my ancestors, Josiah Chambers, owned almost the whole city of Farmville (I think that was New Kent county). He had two daughters (which were both direct for me) who married brothers (who were both also direct for me). That was a couple of wild lines there! My VA ancestry was really fun!




            0
            • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1927 Spanish
              NY (house is in VA), NY

              That’s really cool, Elaine. I have them all over the state. But the ones in the Richmond area are the ones that were traced furthest back. I have them in Orange County, Caroline, Prince William, Lee, and Wise, too. None in Farmville that I know of, but my mother went to college there!




              0
              • Elaine says: 71 comments

                Caroline, I forgot that one, and forgot who, but I have that one too! About half of my lines moved from Virginia to Georgia. Now that I have retired, I hope to go back into all this more. Before when I did all of it I was young and energetic and hadn’t had kids yet!




                1
                • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1927 Spanish
                  NY (house is in VA), NY

                  Yes, I want to look into it more, too. I did a lot of work on our genealogy when I was much younger, but trails petered out. I’ll be retiring soon myself, and I know there are a lot more resources available now than back when I did it before, so maybe I can make more progress. By the way, I grew up just a few miles away from this house, further west in Henrico, right before you hit Goochland. 🙂




                  0
                  • Elaine says: 71 comments

                    Found two more I had forgotten! Albemarle and Prince Edward Counties! My grandfather’s family lived there; my grandfather was born in Charlotte Courthouse; I always thought it was so strange that his mother popped a kid in a courthouse! So I guess he must have grown up in Charlotte county! Wiki says the population was 96 around the time he was born. Sheeesh! Looks like the land is gorgeous up there! You grew up right in the middle of my families up there. I lived in Woodbridge for 6 months back in 2000, but didn’t get to do any traveling to see any other places.




                    1
                    • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      1927 Spanish
                      NY (house is in VA), NY

                      Hi Elaine. I went on vacation and have missed so much here. And I was in Henrico County! I was hoping maybe I could go to where this house is—I thought maybe I could even drive on the property, unless it’s got a closed gate—but I didn’t budget my time well so I never got a chance to try. 🙁

                      My father was born near Charlotte Courthouse, in Keysville (which is in Prince Edward County). We used to visit my grandparents there when I was a kid.




                      0
                    • Elaine says: 71 comments

                      Bet we are kin some kind of way, with the area and the Womack. Actually, there were Watsons, too, I forgot. One of my ancestors was James Watson Womack. Josiah Chambers was married to Mary Watson; their kids and spouses were the ones that got all entangled!




                      1
                    • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      1927 Spanish
                      NY (house is in VA), NY

                      Maybe, Elaine! I don’t remember any Womacks, Chamberses, or Watsons in the genealogy stuff I worked on. But there are so many unexplored branches, you never know!




                      0
        • Sonja says: 10 comments

          Elaine I am a Womack. I wonder if we are related somehow




          0
          • Elaine says: 71 comments

            Hi Sonja! My Womacks were married to Allens and Watsons. The original I found was Wm Womack b 1690 living in Goochland county. He and descendants lived in Goochland, Amelia, Henrico, Cumberland, Halifax and Pr Edw counties. My grgr grandmother was Paulina Jame Womack Hogshead (b 1825) (her mother was an Allen). I don’t have where they lived. But my gr grandmother was Willa Anna Hogshead who was married to Henry Thweatt Anderson (who reportedly captured the first yankee in Va!) and they were married in Charlotte county. Would be way cool if we were related. These lines were about the most interesting ones I investigated! Oh! PJW was married to Rev William Henry Hogshead, and also my grandfather was a reverend; they were staunch Presbyterians!




            2
            • Sonja says: 10 comments

              I wish my dad was still alive he traced us back to King James of yes the bible. I do not know all the lineage though. The particular ones of immediate I know were from Arkansas but before that not sure.




              0
              • Elaine says: 71 comments

                Hi Sonja! My aunt was the big one in our family. She made a trip to Europe in the 70s, and traced our family from Germany in the 1600s, to Switzerland in the 1100s. She also traced a couple other lines, and found some people from one line living in Italy whom she visited, which was way cool. Pa did lots of digging, but he went thru a bunch of sidelines. He even did a long involved paper on one of them, which I went off on him about because this guy was not in our direct line! (He cared, too!) But these were on Pa’s side, which is our ”commoner” side. My mother’s line we traced back to Henry I, II and III, and Edward I, II and III of England, as well as David and Margaret of Scotland. (We also went thru King John–I used to tell everyone HE was my favorite! HAH!) The thing with them is, if you can find ONE that you can trace back to the royalty, you can really find a lot with that, because so much of it is written up in the books. We had this one line that we had drawn a deadend on. My grandmother’s aunt who did a lot of genealogy (bless her soul) and we found her papers, stated that she was a Gentle Woman from South Carolina. And that was all we had for like 45 years. And all of a sudden, I FOUND it! (She had been born in 1796). We found 6 generations back where they had come from Scotland. Father and son fought for Charles II and were captured by Cromwell and exiled to CT in 1652 as indentured servants. There was even a book on them, but I have never found that. So always PERSEVERE!




                1
  16. Lisa says: 35 comments

    Amazing in every way.
    So Historical – half brother of Patrick Henry.
    I’d feel like a princess, but it’s far out of my budget. I love the brick arch thing in the basement? Wow!




    4
  17. Kim Herron says: 1 comments

    I’m literally sitting here with my mouth agape! If there were ever a dream home, this has to be it!




    3
  18. SuzyQ says: 43 comments

    What a grand place. Breath taking however not sure I would turn loose of my 6M to live in or around Richmond, Va.




    0
  19. Betty Marvin says: 6 comments

    So…what about the basement, and that amazing tunnel? When they moved the house, did they move the original basement, too, or rebuild this over another basement? That’s not a 1928 basement, surely!




    3
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 138 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      I wonder if that tunnel had anything to do with smuggling alcohol, as 1928 puts it smack in the middle of prohibition…?




      2
      • Zann says: 335 comments

        Ooooooooooh………. You may be right! That is a great catch! Wow. Now I love it even more.

        Reconstructing a house would be an excellent way to hide what else they were building.




        0
      • KarenZ says: 651 comments
        OHD Supporter

        That tunnel caught my eye, too! I would definitely want to explore (it looks like it is quite long from the pic)!




        0
      • BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1927 Spanish
        NY (house is in VA), NY

        The tunnel runs between the house’s basement (where the kitchen used to be) and garage (which is where the servants’ quarters were). I don’t think that suggests alcohol smuggling. It just seems like a matter of convenience. I’m picturing a cook getting up on a cold morning and going over to the kitchen via the tunnel to make breakfast. Probably pretty handy during a rainstorm, too.




        0
  20. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 681 comments

    What a magnificent house. The NRHP registration form does a good job explaining exactly what we see here. The house is even more amazing when you consider, in 1928, it was completely disassembled, moved twenty miles, and rebuilt on a new site. The house isn’t completely original, as it features interior elements from several different periods, but the end result is spectacular. Southern plantation houses in the Georgian, Federal, and Greek Revival styles are my absolutely favorite, and this one ranks up there with the best.




    9
  21. Connie Murray says: 118 comments

    What to do if you actually win the lottery — buy this place!




    2
  22. Karen says: 201 comments

    Can’t you just imagine all the brides who came down that staircase and may have been married in that center hall?!! I love that center hall-I don’t think I’ve ever seen one that looks that Wide. I was wondering if the house ever fell into Declerks me, when I saw the last night two photos. I’m so glad someone saved it!




    2
  23. Frank D. Myers says: 58 comments

    It’s an amazing house, known in its original location as “Rocky Mills.” As others have pointed out, the NRHP nomination form does a good job of explaining modifications made as it was being reconstructed. It’s believed the stone in the basement may have come along with other elements of the house. The kitchen of the 1928 reconstruction was in the basement; the kitchen wing added in 1936. The 1928 tunnel led to servant quarters and garages and is in no sense original to the historic house. Many modifications were made in the reconstruction — the structure was thickened to allow bathrooms to be inserted and the stair hall front greatly reconfigured with additional windows, etc. So the final product is not historically “pure,” but wonderful none the less.




    5
  24. Karen I says: 86 comments

    Love the staircase and love even more the placement of the staircase. It doesn’t hit you in the face as soon as you walk in the door, like most other floorplans.




    4
    • Elaine says: 71 comments

      Karen, that stairway just took my breath away. It is just amazing how beautiful some of them can be, and this one tops them all for me.




      1
  25. zoomey says: 312 comments

    I remember when Richmond houses could be had for a song (a few decades ago). That old photo looks like this may have been one of them. Wow, what a gorgeous house. It could be a museum. Wish they’d kept the old tile in the bathrooms, and I’d update the kitchen, but otherwise, it’s absolutely stunning.




    3
  26. DavidDavid says: 35 comments

    worth the price of admission.




    2
  27. Boxwood says: 31 comments

    If I lived here, I would certainly need to upgrade my traditional attire of yoga pants and tee shirts to something more formal – dare I even say….a dress!!!!! That would be a hard one for me…..live in breathtaking grandeur and wear semi-formal garb (anything without an elastic waistband) or keep my comfy “mom clothes” and prop my feet up in my 1914 craftsman???




    9
    • Elaine says: 71 comments

      come on Boxwood! If you can afford this one, you can keep them BOTH! Maybe you could compromise by having some comfortable buy chic looking dusters made!!!




      1
    • Teri W says: 36 comments

      Haha! Great visual…I’m picturing myself making ramen noodles in that kitchen while wearing old navy sweatpants. I’m not regal enough for this masterpiece!




      0
  28. Maxine says: 9 comments

    A lovely American estate, now only if it came with a lovely American Mr. Darcy! A girl can dream…




    2
  29. BethsterBethster says: 571 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1927 Spanish
    NY (house is in VA), NY

    I’ve been enjoying reading the NRHP registration form, partly because I find so much of the terminology intriguingly arcane—which somehow makes it particularly delightful to me! For instance, “The arch has an architrave archivolt….Above the arch on both sides is a full Doric entablature with triglyphs and metopes.” I would love to be able to take a tour and have someone knowledgeable point these things out to me. Since that’s not likely to happen, I suppose I could start reading up on these terms. 🙂




    2
  30. kim says: 9 comments

    OMGAWD!!!!!! I was nearly brought to tears over this one.




    2
  31. Piney says: 20 comments
    New York, NY

    I remember sharing this one a while back! Still one of my favorites 🙂
    I’m from Henrico and never knew that we had grand old houses like this.




    3
  32. Jennifer HT says: 803 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Anthem, AZ

    Oh. My. Wow. This is FAB! One of my favorites ever posted.




    2
  33. VMaloney says: 83 comments

    This is really gorgeous! I too want to thank you for posting more Georgean/Federal homes. I really enjoy looking at them and dreaming….




    3
  34. Elisa Y says: 29 comments

    Okay Old House Dreams lovers – I say we pool our moolah and buy this baby and use it as a wedding venue. Can you imagine? This place is amazing – perfect, if you ask me!

    Who’s with me? I know….not in this lifetime!!




    1
  35. JimHJimH says: 3395 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Built by hand from English planbook sketches by nameless early American craftsman, many of them slaves no doubt. Beautiful and awe-inspiring.




    6
  36. MarthAllenaMarthAllena says: 86 comments
    1921 Craftsman
    St. Paul, MN

    So grand and beautifully decorated and photographed! I especially like the pillar photo overlooking the yard.




    1
    • Karen I says: 86 comments

      Isn’t that a cool shot. You can just imagine yourself standing there overlooking the landscape.




      0
  37. Natasha says: 1 comments

    What’s the deal with the tiny staircase and narrow doorway?




    0
  38. MonChiChiPox says: 196 comments

    Worth. Every. Penny.




    1
  39. Alice says: 52 comments

    Now that’s a mansion! My taste doesn’t usually swing towards Georgian but this home is stunning. For all that history and detailed woodwork $5 million doesn’t seem like a very high price for that location.




    0
  40. Kate says: 6 comments

    Does anybody else look at a place like this and wonder what’s the story with the people selling it? I wonder this with many of the beautiful places on here. Why are they leaving? Are they sad to go? Where are they going? Somehow, for this one, what sprang to mind was “You must retrench.” “Retrench? Retrench! How may I retrench? A baronet must be seen to live like a baronet!” (from my favorite Jane Austen movie, Persuasion)




    0
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8339 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      That’s my favorite Austen movie! Sometimes I watch movies or shows when I’m posting, there has been times I’ve watched the Amanda Root version every single day.




      0
      • KimT says: 63 comments

        Mine too, especially the Root/Hinds version. I often think of Jane Austen when deciding whether a house is ‘happily situated’ or might be better off moved. It’s sad that she never got to have her own house. I’m sure she had plenty of dreams other than the glorious Pemberley. She would have appreciated this site and probably would have engaged in the discussions.




        0
    • JimHJimH says: 3395 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The owner died last year after living in the home since the 1950’s. Her grandfather William T. Reed bought the house in 1934 from the man that moved it. Eighty-four years in the family is a pretty good run, and I think they did a fine job of preserving it.
      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93514643/alice-burwell-preston




      3
  41. MajolicaDavidMajolicaDavid says: 44 comments

    here is a article about the sale and the family that owns it.
    https://richmondbizsense.com/2018/03/06/7-acre-fairfield-mansion-listed-6m/




    1
  42. Colleen J says: 1341 comments

    Very impressive, way out of afforadability for me but wow what a property and house and out buildings!




    0
  43. jseizi says: 13 comments

    This is the home I’ve been dreaming of.




    0
  44. Mystic says: 23 comments
    Huntley, IL

    Wow, what a home!!!!!




    0
  45. KimT says: 63 comments

    This house has got to be related somehow to ‘Charming Forge’, the one in Womelsdorf, PA:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/274-Charming-Forge-Rd_Womelsdorf_PA_19567_M44090-82338#photo3

    The broken pediments in the entrance/stair hall made me think of it, but there’s also the ornamentation of the square arch (is it an arch if it’s not arched?!).

    May have been on this site at one time.

    These must be some of the most monumental domestic Georgian carpentry examples.

    Does anyone know the origin of the broken pediment?




    0
  46. Amy P. says: 124 comments

    I love this…just need a whole lot more money and I will gladly move there…




    0

Comment Here

OHD Supporters: Log in to have your comment tagged. Not registered? Do so here.
Not an OHD Supporter? Become one!


*


Comment bug! When the page refreshes after submitting your comment, it may disappear upon refresh. Do not worry, it was submitted but you may not be able to edit after submission. Be patient, the developer is working on a fix.
Think before you type! Keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents. Comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner may not appear publicly. Comments are moderated and do not appear public right away.

Click here to read the comment rules, updated 5/6/18.
Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified.