1904 – Rose Hill, MS

Details below are from April 2018, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 4/2/18   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   28 Comments
Off Market / Archived

4595 Hwy 18, Rose Hill, MS 39356

Map: Street

  • $40,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 2093 Sq Ft
  • 4 Ac.
Home is 115 years old according to tax records. Very nice older home place. Home has 14' ceilings , interior is basically all wood ceilings, floors, and walls.
Contact Information
J.E. Smith, J.E.Smith Real Estate
(601) 670-5170
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: | Misc: ,

28 Comments on 1904 – Rose Hill, MS

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  1. Betty Sheidler says: 8 comments

    Love everything about this house, especially those high ceilings and that kitchen. What a gem.

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  2. Lynne Berghoff says: 2 comments

    This is a sweet home.

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  3. Shannah302 says: 39 comments

    This house looks to be a lot older than 1904. Either way, I am in LOVE!!!

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  4. TGrantTGrant says: 954 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    Oh my God, I’m hyperventilating! This is the spitting image of my great grandparent’s house! It’s not of course, being it’s in the wrong state. But right down to the art deco waterfall furniture and the room colors this is identical to their house in North Louisiana! Oh I wish I was retired right now so I could take this on!

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    • LisaLou says: 99 comments

      TGrant, I was raised in west central Louisiana, between Leesville and Alexandria. This is so much like the house I grew up in. It was my great-grandparents home. We did not have the 2nd. story, but had the same front porch, the dog trot hall down the middle and a small porch at the end of the hall that connected to the well. I always wanted to restore the home when I grew up, but my parents finally bought a trailer and moved out. They ended up selling the house to a couple that wanted to tear it down for the lumber. My heart was broken, but I had married and moved away. All hopes for my childhood dream was gone. Man, to this day I get a lump in my throat when I think about the old home place, or look at pictures of it.

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  5. Annabelle says: 115 comments

    The price is really good. I am pretty sure there’s no HVAC and I would have to redo the kitchen – nobody faint! But it’s only $40,000!!

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  6. Jennifer HTJennifer HT says: 739 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Anthem, AZ

    Yay! Glad this got its own posting. I know it was on one of my weekly share posts, I just couldn’t get over the wood and charm. This is a great home. The price is a steal too!

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  7. Debbie fish says: 15 comments

    This is like a time capsule and reminds me of the old home places I visited as a child and I’m 65! I suspect it was once a dog trot.

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    • I agree this house is a time capsule and an absolute treasure! It so reminds me of the places I visited with my parents in the 1960s, in some very isolated areas of West Virginia.

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  8. kmmoorekmmoore says: 418 comments
    Weatherford , TX

    Ummm, yes please! I’ll take you and promise to love, honor, and cherish you ‘till death do us part.

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  9. Jeanne Smith says: 67 comments

    I love that unfitted kitchen.It is my dream to one day have an old house and create a beautiful unfitted kitchen.

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  10. Jean Spencer says: 122 comments

    Yes, classic Greek Revival, so probably 1850s or earlier. This is my favorite kind of house. No need for HVAC with those high ceilings, double-hung windows, and space heaters. And I love the kitchen just the way it is. Just some cleaning and painting (not the bare wood), bring back the fire places and done.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I would not call this a Greek Revival and definitely not 1850’s or earlier. The posts out front, the whole porch looks oddly attached (I looked again, just certain parts of it that look off, not the whole thing) so may not be original. I’m seeing a circa 1900 home here. Plenty of southern homes of that time had center halls (center halls were almost mandatory in the south, to help with air flow) with that particular door surround design. All the beadboard, the doors and mantels are c. 1900. The only thing about the home that is making me look at it twice is that super steep roof, perhaps the photos are making it look steeper than it actually is.

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    • Julles says: 522 comments

      No HVAC? Have you ever been in Mississippi in the summer where it is 95 degrees in the shade, 100% humidity and not enough breeze to stir a gnat’s wings? I have and even having grown up in Georgia it was miserable. There is a reason when you see movies about the old South the women all have fans and fainted regularly. They had no HVAC!

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      • Jean Spencer says: 122 comments

        Yes, I’ve lived in Georgia for 40 years, the first 20 of it without AC and I still rarely turn it on. I guess I like it hot!

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        • Shirley Denmark says: 8 comments

          lol, you said it… we had a great old farmhouse growing up outside Dallas, NO AC but had an old swamp cooler and of course space heaters…. Mississippi is very humid and hot! That’s why people would have sleeping balconies or porches.. Then of course here come the skeeters!

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          • Julles says: 522 comments

            When we were kids with no A.C., we would take a shower and then wrap our wet bodies in our sheets in hopes that a bit of air would cross the wet sheet and cool us down. But then you would hear the buzz of a mosquito and knew you would have 10 bites before morning. GOD BLESS the person who Invented AC!

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  11. Renita Lankford says: 3 comments

    I’m in love!!

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  12. Anne Hamilton says: 202 comments

    This house is very, very similar to my home in SC. We date my home approx. 1870. I would suspect the date listed may have been when they added something or it was sold, since most homes,were not court recorded before the 1900’s. They were often parish recorded before and directly after the war durring reconstructuon.
    I suspect the porch pillars have been replaced at some point. The brick post foundations on the outside of the porch are most likely original. This is a typical Carolina porch construction which was usually built before the 1900’s generally in early to late 1800’s.
    The only thing which might make it date later or at 1900 is the chimeny’s are internal. Most of the older home of this style have external chimneys on either end.
    This home is such a steal at this price it makes me faint.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      If this dated to the 1870’s, that would explain such a steep roof…not to say roofs like this didn’t exist in the early 1900’s but it’s Gothic Revival steep.

      Anne, I really want to see your home now! 😀

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7266 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Houses like this were still being built well into the 20’s; even later in rural areas of MS such as this. Though there is no specific decorative detail or other defining architectural element to reference here; The uniform size of the windows is distinctly smaller than they would have been even only a few years earlier. The date is spot on.

      I think it was something like only 5% of rural MS had electricity service even as late as 1940. Things tended to change VERY slowly down there; and they were famous for holding on to “the old ways” in many respects.

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  13. KentDLDKentDLD says: 17 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Were I able to depart my present circumstance, I would be down there in a flash. I see no work that I couldn’t do myself to make it highly livable. The attraction of 4 acres with the house makes it a verified bargain.

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  14. Zann says: 517 comments

    My thoughts when scrolling were that this was older than the posted date. I have zero professional knowledge to back that up, so let me stress I really don’t know what I’m talking about. Homes around here, particularly those built in rural areas by more conservative or “thriftily old fashioned” folk, were built in a way that would have looked out dated, so I can see *some* of the aesthetics falling under that category, but not all of them. I’m going to throw my inexperienced two cents into the ring and say I think this was an older home with an addition in the early 1900s.

    If we were going on the outside alone, I would say I’ve seen homes in the Deep South that look to be of the same ilk and were built well into the 30s. It’s the inside that is making me pause.

    Regardless, this one is easily livable. I would HAVE to have some kind of air conditioning before Summer, though. I can smell the stuffy, warm, old house smell right now just thinking about it. No air circulation would be worse than the heat. Based on what I see of the window units, it looks as if whomever has been living here mostly uses the front part of the house.

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  15. Laura Thornton says: 65 comments

    From the outside, I would have never suspected rooms with ceilings so high. It’s really charming.

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  16. AbMellyAbMelly says: 39 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Craftsman

    I can’t stop staring at this house. Is it possible that it dates to the same time period as the house you posted on 04/18/18 in Quitman, GA? If this one had azaleas out front, I might confuse the two!

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  17. Alexander says: 5 comments

    I was making arrangements to drive down to make offer or buy. The listing agent sadly told me it just sold to a California buyer. I’ve been here before; keeping my eye on this one. I would not change a thing; this place is amazing. I’m looking for a winter getaway for January Thur March.

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