c. 1900 Prairie – Earl Park, IN

Added to OHD on 2/19/18   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   36 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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8806 N State Road 71, Earl Park, IN 47942

Map: Street

  • $35,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3004 Sq Ft
  • 3.5 Ac.
This is the ultimate fixer upper so bring your tool box & imagination to create the dream home you've always wanted. The home offers over 3,000 square feet of living space boasting 5 bedrooms & 2 baths. The property consists of 3.5 acres, storage barn & two additional outbuildings. The original woodwork, hardwood floors and custom craftsman built-ins are waiting for your restorative touch! Two enclosed porches, full basement & a walk-up attic are an added bonus. Home is sold AS-IS & shared well agreement with neighboring property needed. Cash sale only.
Contact Information
Debby Shufflebarger, The Real Estate Shoppe
219-474-6964
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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36 Comments on c. 1900 Prairie – Earl Park, IN

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  1. John says: 781 comments

    What a shame it was neglected for so long. She was a beauty for sure.

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    • Kim says: 1 comments

      This lady was once the Belle of the Ball. I hope someone isn’t stripping her of her finery and selling it off 🙁 Great house. Now, if I could get her moved from Indiana.. I see lots of neighbors called “corn for miles”. She is SO WORTH saving.

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  2. BethanyBethany says: 3464 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    What a diamond in the (very) rough! She is crying out to be restored and lived in. I love the property with the big barn, too.

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  3. RobynMeRobynMe says: 111 comments
    1907 George F. Barber
    Hamlet, NC

    Please let them be cleaning rather than selling off those amazing leaded glass doors and those radiators!

    This place (from the pics only) does not seem to be in bad shape at all. Much cosmetic work, likely to need a new roof, but with details like unpainted woodwork, built ins, mosaic tile floors and clawfoot tub, plus what looks to be original windows this seems like a deal!
    Not all that far from Chicago or Indianapolis. Not all that close, but hey.

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    • Jason B says: 191 comments

      That could be interpreted as a help, or hindrance, depending on a persons perception. It’s too far to commute to Indy, for sure. I thought this state was small, but this town is almost a 3 hr drive one direction for me. I’d never heard of it until today, (could be a positive) & I’m a lifelong resident Hoosier. I’m making a guess here, but it appears someone has built a new home on the property and wants to unload the old homestead, hence the shared well.

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      • Deborah Burdette says: 5 comments

        If that is true, it is a crying shame! Why would anyone build a new house that won’t be standing in 100 years, let alone be in need of renovation? I would absolutely LOVE to restore this jewel and give her a new life and purpose. Stunning home!!

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  4. Zann says: 517 comments

    I don’t think this is the correct explanation of what is on the walls in one of the bedrooms…. but…. did a child draw all over the wall with markers?

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    • Meg says: 2 comments

      The murals on the wall really touched me–evidence of others who lived there, trying to make it their own, and just live their life–part of what I love about old houses . . .

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7266 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Looks like Cran. I’m imagining what a Psychoanalyst would think of the “art”.

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  5. Kristie Kuenkel says: 1 comments

    Those look like murals painted on the living room walls! Awesome price for someone with money and talent to restore! Beautiful home with a few acres and a barn too!

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  6. Glenn Hahn says: 54 comments

    I was expecting much, much worse based on the broken windows and possible exposure to the elements. I am unfamiliar with the realtor note of “Shared well agreement required” Can anyone fill me in? With electricity there, is it safe to assume internet is there as well?
    I think this one could be a gem in fairly short order.

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  7. JimHJimH says: 5376 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This house has been owned by the Portteus family of local farmers for over 100 years. George Portteus (1829-1907) was born in Indiana to Irish immigrants, and his son Josiah and grandson George Harold lived and farmed here for many years. Great grandson James Josiah Portteus (1926-2014) was born in the house and raised 5 children here, but moved out at some point. The widow and children have subdivided the house from the farmland, and hopefully new owners will give the home the attention it deserves.

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  8. Maureen says: 22 comments

    I expected it to be in worse shape than the pictures reflect to be considered “The Ultimate Fixer Upper.” The price is right leaving lots of room to refinish the interior. The outer buildings seem in decent condition. Hummm, the blue dumpster in the yard is full what are we not seeing in the pictures? Sad for sure, I hope it gets snatched up real soon.

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  9. pinkladywithcats says: 13 comments

    Earl Park is 45 or so minutes from West Lafayette (home of Purdue University). I’ve attended the Fall festival for years. It appears that there has been a great deal of water damage; a new roof would need to be installed immediately. Don’t be alarmed. Prices in rural Indiana are a lot cheaper than big city prices. Second, if I bought the property, I’d check out the brick. I love this style of home. I hope, at this price, someone buys and restores it soon.

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  10. Leila says: 20 comments

    So sad, I hope that someone takes the time to restore this beauty. She is just waiting to be stunning again.

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  11. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Click the “Street View” link under the address up at the top of the page. If you search by Google, the map doesn’t place you directly in front of the home.

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  12. SharonSharon says: 600 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 Contemporary
    Sedalia, MO

    This home reminds me of another favorite abandoned Prairie I shared a while back:

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/01/09/1922-sedalia-mo/

    How I love these homes! They are (were) just waiting for rebirth. Makes me rather sad inside.

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    • SharonSharon says: 600 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Besides that lovely mural, the living room image with the resting radiator and other choice items shows some original stenciled border lines with scroll motifs at the top, in green.

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    • LauraG says: 36 comments

      Sharon,
      What ever happened with that Sedalia house? I was interested in that one, and it is relatively near me, but the price was WAY too high for its condition and location. If they have become more reasonable, I would still be interested in it.

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      • SharonSharon says: 600 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 Contemporary
        Sedalia, MO

        Laura, all I know is that it is off market. A large newer shed has recently burned down near the house. With the broken windows and large hole in the roof of the house, it isn’t aging well. But with lots of love and ample resources, I want to hope it could still be saved, if only the owners weren’t bent on letting it decay and profitting from the potential sale of the land to developers. New roof, electrical, plumbing, heating/cooling, and more are required. Last I knew, the owners were looking for more than $300,000 for the 30+ acres of gorgeous prairie with views to die for–house thrown in. So sad.

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  13. LouB says: 77 comments

    Ah, what potential…..
    If I plunked that house down in my fair suburb on a 1/4 acre lot it would fetch at least 20 times the asking price even in the condition it’s in.
    Darn that location rule!

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  14. Michael Mackin says: 2948 comments

    I can see the beauty in this house, trying to shine through. Sure it need a lot of work but it looks as if it is structurally sound. I’m sure it needs all new mechanical systems, something Ross is familiar with. Sure it will be a lot of work but I keep going back to the price!…..with a barn!……and acreage!

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  15. JB says: 95 comments

    This house seems to have so much potential. It appears alot of the “surgical demo” of things needing removed, repaired, cleaned, or rotted and thrown away has been started. Nice house w/ the addition of some decent outer buildings (I love barns!) w/ plenty of room to roam freely about the property this house could really be a dream come true for someone willing to execute some CPR on her! Remove the paneling from the walls, maintain that painted mural artwork on the wall (I wonder what story may exist behind that item?), restore that AWESOME white tile wall and floor in the bathroom, either restore the button light switch and/or replace the suspected knob and tube wiring/junction box, paint the walls along with continuing a decent running list of other particulars and you’d have one heckuva nice place. I am very appreciative that most of the original millwork has not been painted over. Dear Owner…please cover those exterior broken windows on the second floor!

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  16. Crimson_RooCrimson_Roo says: 113 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Every time I see a house that looks like this, I feel like I’m looking at that abused and abandoned dog at the pound that no one wants and is slated to be put down. I just want to pick it up and bring it home and spend the rest of its life putting it back together and helping it relearn to smile and, um, wag its tail.

    [sigh] I really should have had the presence of mind to be born into a disgustingly independently wealthy family to finance all these lost puppies; er, houses. They’re all so lovely and they all deserve to live again.

    And words fail me on this one especially; it’s almost heartstoppingly lovely if you have it in you to see it.

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    • Ashley403 says: 76 comments

      Beautifully said: The eaves outside look pretty good but in a few spots. I was just thinking locate a good structural engineer and inspector that has worked on older homes before(may be asking for to much).Then have it gone over top to bottom. That will limit surprises later on. If it is structurally sound the rest could be dealt with. The roof and broken windows first to get it weather tight. Then have several good friends come over. The ones that actually show ever time you move. The ceiling tiles will have come down to see what is under them. They could have helped saved this house worse damage, the backs do absorb water. Then get several gallons of Murphy’s Oil Soap mix with mineral spirits(do not smoke during this) put on some Patsy Cline doing one room at a time and it may soon look like this house on OHD today https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/02/22/1913-craftsman-oshkosh-wi/ the 12th picture down. It will still be far from livable but at least the house will know help has arrived.

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  17. Wild Billl says: 5 comments

    Amazed and saddened that this lovely, once loved and farm house and land have languished with neglect. Ouch. Who broke the windows? Why?

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  18. Jane says: 2 comments

    Does anyone happen to know who owns this property? I would like to obtain permission to metal detect around this property. Thanks!

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  19. says: 2 comments

    I purchased this property, closing on May 31. The roof has now been replaced, all the broken windows repaired, and we are working on the infrastructure (which had been mostly removed by vandals) to make it habitable again.

    This home was designed by architect Fred Friedline, who worked in nearby Kentland and also had an office for a time in Chicago.

    The homestead has been on this site since the 1860s, but was completely redone when the house was built in 1916. The property makes extensive use of reinforced concrete, one of the earliest examples in Indiana. The original house was moved west, the interior was gutted, and it was placed on a new foundation, repurposed as a shop. There is a very early hand-hewn post-and-beam shed on the homestead, as well.

    The wall murals in the living room and library, as well as intricate stenciling, were done by a local artisan family business, the Diedams. The son of the man who did the original work refurbished the interior walls in 1946, which was the house’s 50th anniversary and the 60th wedding anniversary of its owners.

    The estate was named “Sunny Crest” in 1896, and was intended to be entirely self-sufficient. It had an architect-designed electrical system, based on a “Delco plant” affixed to the basement wall. There are two complete water distribution systems, one for hard (well) water and the other for soft (rain) water. It has a huge (6000 gallon) reinforced concrete septic system, and a literal brick shithouse, a 3-seater with beveled-glass windows.

    I have put together a website, http://www.sunnycrestfarm.org, and on that page, at the bottom, is a link to an album of photographs of the property.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks for the update! Belated congrats!

      Everyone should check out their photos, look at those details we didn’t get to see from the listing pics! This will be an exciting restoration to keep watch on.

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  20. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5527 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Congratulations, Brian. Earl Park is the proverbial wide spot in the road but as others have noted, it’s not too distant from the city of Lafayette (home of Purdue University) There’s a large wind turbine farm just outside the town. I was completely unaware of this house but in the tiny town itself only two things stood out, the impressive early 1900’s Sumner House which I was privileged to see and photograph: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157629894166708 (I believe it sold for a paltry $60,000) and, the town’s public Library which is one of the smaller Carnegie Libraries still active and open to the public.
    This Prairie style “farmhouse” (because in the city it would be near mansion status) shows the Sumners weren’t the only local family with considerable wealth. Mention was made on the Sunny Crest Farm site about interns for the restoration. I’m not sure if Purdue has a department for historic preservation studies (Ball State U. in Muncie does have such a program) but surely there would be students at Purdue who would be interested in helping with such a project. Here’s wishing you the best as you bring this formerly grand farm back to its original condition. Nice to see there are still some earlier structures on the site that have been repurposed over the years.

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  21. says: 2 comments

    SUnny Crest has an Earl Park address, but actually sits just north of the little berg of Raub, southwest of Kentland. It’s right on SR71, just south of the Newton/Benton county line.

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