1903 Queen Anne – Burlingame, KS – $185,000

For Sale
Added to OHD on 9/12/17 - Last OHD Update: 9/12/17 - 39 Comments
141 W Fremont Ave, Burlingame, KS 66413
  • $185,000
  • Beds: 4
  • Baths: 4
  • Sqft: 3320
  • Acres: 0.49
  • Map: Street View
Travel the brick streets of historic Burlingame to see this rare beauty. This home has been thoughtfully and meticulously restored to authentic beauty. Detail and expense, including Lincrusta and Bradbury and Bradbury wall coverings, were not spared in making this one of the most exquisite Victorian homes to be found in the region. Magnificence at every turn, from the ceiling medallions, woodwork, and pocket doors, to the leaded glass and massive front porch. Tour to truly appreciate this splendid home.
Listing Agent: Melissa Herdman, Kirk and Cobb // 785-272-5555
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Property details must be independently verified.

39 Comments on 1903 Queen Anne – Burlingame, KS – $185,000

  1. Holy cow this is a killer house.The first floor is amazing.That set-in sitting area under the stairs – wow
    I would de-floralize the second floor quite a bit, but other than that…
    What IS it about Kansas and the houses there !




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    • Totally agree Betsy!! My husband is from Chanute, KS and all his family still resides in parts of KS and there are sooo many beautiful home built in 1800’s throughout several towns in KS.




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      • I agree with both of you. Kansas has some amazing homes. My mom is from Kansas City and all her family still lives there. I wonder if the homes are so wonderful because the heat, humidity and scenery aren’t that terrific and the early settlers had to have something to inspire them to stay.




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  2. Absolutely stunning. I love all the woodwork and pocket doors. The tile work on the fireplaces is beautiful. My home was built in 1904 and the fireplaces have the same type of tiles. Very nice to see. Now I know they were popular at that time.




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    • – What Pete said, (see below). It’s a top of the line intercom / annunciator system, slightly newer than the previous whistle and talk models. The little gizmo at the top is a buzzer which would have sounded when someone on another end wanted to talk. Earlier models had brass whistles which one would blow hard into making a whistling noise thruought the system; then pulling the whistle away from the tube end and talking into it. I will say, it is an odd location for that particular terminal, and one would have to place one’s head very carefully into that tight little corner to use it and successfully avoid injury, knocking tchotchkes of the mantle, or both. Hehehe. Uber cool!




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  3. Oh, if only this weren’t in Kansas! And I really think I should change my name on here to “Complains About Kitchens”, because I feel the need to complain about this kitchen… but I’ll hold off.




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    • If you take the name “Complains About Kitchens,” then I’ll be “Complains About Bathrooms, Carpet and Wallpaper”

      This house is so easy on the eye. Those part of the first floor that have been restored, have been done with care and consideration for the period in which it was built. There are some rooms on the first floor with carpet and window treatments that don’t fit with the rest of the first floor. And the second floor seems to be a work in progress, with some unflattering bathrooms, wallpaper and carpet choices. But these are minor things in my book and can be fixed.




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      • OK, if you two take those names, I’ll be “Complains About Can Lights.” How Kelly puts up with me, I’ll never know.

        This house is a BEAUT. If only it wasn’t in Kansas! (No knock on the state per se, but I must have the Rocky Mountains.)




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        • That makes me “whines about CO real estate but won’t leave”. I love the entry way, don’t mind the kitchen at all, but would have to “de-pinkify” the first floor tower room. Most of the ceiling lights look original and are gorgeous, but the green one in second floor tower looks like a repro to me. Very nice big lot as well.




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    • Goodness you all are cracking me up. Since “Complains About Kitchens” is taken I would have to labeled “Complains About Not Enough Land and the Terrible View.”




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  4. The cover on the bottom is a speaking tube with a cover. It is a rudimentary intercom. It is connected to a tin tube in the wall and most likely connects the kitchen with a bedroom or hall. The button looks like it could be part of an annunciator and servant call.




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  5. Stunning. I grew up not far from Burlingame, in Emporia (I’ve lived in east Tennessee for the last 10 years).

    I’m wondering what prominent citizen lived in this incredible house…in a tiny railroad town in Kansas?




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  6. This is fantastic and Burlingame would be a great place to live since it’s relatively close to Topeka and Emporia. Kansas City would be about an hour and half drive up I-35. Lovely home.




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  7. Now THIS is a house! Wow. That entire first floor is amazing. I could even live with the updated kitchen, although i’d have to do something like change the hardware to something more period-related. And i’d probably swap out the counters for hardwood. The wallpaper in most of the rooms would definitely have to go, but that’s a given in almost any house i’d buy. And that porch! Goodness, it’s gorgeous.




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  8. I love white kitchens. I think this one is great. Ive lived with old and hated every second of that pioneer feeling we have worked too hard over the decades to not have the latest…just my opinion




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    • One can have mod cons in a period kitchen — but they are hidden or disguised yet convenient. It really can be done.

      A white kitchen would be Victorian appropriate, but I’d hide the monster fridge behind doors, plus you didn’t have art-glass-like light fixtures in a kitchen. The space was utilitarian, not decorative, because the only people in there were the servants, or sometimes the lady of the house.




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      • I agree with Sue, you can have a functional modern kitchen and still be period appropriate. I too would change the light fixtures to something more utilitarian, and offering more light to work under. I am a lifelong Kansan, and proud of it! We do have lots of fabulous Victorian, Craftsman, and Prairie style homes, and thankfully, a large contingent of folks who value and restore them.




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  9. I’m dying to see this home. I live in Olathe just over an hour away and am looking for a house like this one. I’ll be working from home now, so can live anywhere in Kansas, as long as the internet connection is good. I had surgery last week otherwise I would have driven out too see this house already. I hope it isn’t snatched up before I recover!! 2 weeks!! I love this fabulous house!! 🙂




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    • Good luck!! It sure seems like a steal. I just moved back to KS and when this job wraps up I’ll also probably seek a work from home job, or one that is mainly travel. I love the area, and you can’t beat the historic real estate prices and opportunities




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  10. Posted in 2015, not sold but recently reduced in price along with more listing photos. Check out the Realtor link in Source section above for even more photos! Move to the front page, some comments above are older.




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    • Kelly, I just wanted to say I have enjoyed OHD for a long time now. Thank you for sharing all of these fabulous homes with those of us that love and appreciate them! I look at almost every home, and read most of the comments to further my knowledge of style and architecture. Thank you, again!




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  11. Great place and the small streets and other old homes makes for a nice rural feeling. Fortunately there are nearby cities of the right size for shopping. Yeah, it it wasn’t for my morbid fear of twisters, I’d be on this in a heartbeat… WOW!!! Check out the main business street! Four plus lanes of brick!!




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    • Tommy, don’t let tornados keep you from this house; it hasn’t been hit in 120+ years. I’m sure it has a storm cellar somewhere and that is all you really need.
      A tornado is over in a few minutes, and usually hits a very small area. When I was a kid in SD a tornado took the barn across the driveway, but the house was fine.
      You can see them coming from a long way off, especially in Kansas. For the very few that happen after dark, a good weather alert radio is all you need.




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      • I agree! Growing up in Kansas, tornadoes were just an expected part of summer time. Most are small and in rural areas, causing no damage. Of course the rare huge ones (Joplin, MO, 2011) are the only examples the rest of the world hears about. I don’t want to discount that kind of terrible devastation, but storms of that magnitude are extremely rare.

        We had a storm cellar but I never went down there – I rather liked watching the storms roll in from the front the porch!




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  12. What an incredible price. They have to be losing money on this. The wallpaper alone cost a fortune. Quite the treasure.




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  13. Love this house, the only thing I would change is the red paint and eventually get rid of the carpet on the second floor.




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  14. This house is very handsome. If only I had a job to support it!

    The sellers must have had a ball decorating it. If the kitchen is less than successful for some of us, it’s not because they didn’t try. For me, the lobster colored bedroom is a bit much, as is the bedroom with the forest green walls and ceiling. I believe that there are stars in the dark sky in the middle of the ceiling.

    The incredible wallpaper and ceiling ornaments are almost certainly by Bradbury & Bradbury of Benicia, California. Their papers are very expensive because of all the hand work in the paper’s manufacture. There must be a small fortune pasted to the walls and ceilings of this house.

    Some new owner is going to get a treasure.




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  15. Just checked the Sanborn maps on this one – it was definitely built from scratch in 1903. That would make the Bradbury wallpaper 15-20 years out of style.

    I believe the house was built for Ella S. Beverly, a widow in 1894 who lost the family farm to foreclosure because of the drought the next year. She started a grain and feed business called E. S. Beverly and Son, and did well. Her son Fred M. Beverly lived here with his wife Alberta and they raised their daughters here.




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