1855 Italianate – Victor, NY – $295,000

For Sale
National Register
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home, contact the agent as listed below.
Added to OHD on 4/18/17   -   Last OHD Update: 7/5/18   -   44 Comments
146 Maple Ave, Victor, NY 14564

Map: Street

Price

$295,000

Beds

6

SqFt

5144

Acres

1.2

WELCOME TO THE OSBOURNE-HARRIS HOUSE, AN HISTORIC VICTORIAN ITALIANATE BUILT IN 1855 FOR THE DAUGHTER OF PINONEER SETTLER WM. BUSHNELL OF BUSHNELLS BASIN. DESIGNED BY 2 PROMANENT ARCHITECTS OF ROCH. & WEST. NY, A.J. WARNER & MERWIN AUSTIN. ORIG. FLOORPLAN STILL EXISTS, INCLDS, PARLOR, DAIRY, NURSERY,SERVANTS QTRS,LIB. & ONT. CO.'S 1ST INDR PRIVY. HEART PINE FLRS, 14' CEILINGS, CARR. HSE W/ 6 ORIG HORSE STALLS, HAY LOFT, WKSH W/ ELEC. SO MUCH ORIG. DETAIL, HANDEL FIXTURE, GOLD CANING, PICT.RAIL. HIST. REG, NOT IN HIST. DIST. WORK CAN BE DONE W/O HASSEL. CAN BE OWNER OCC. PROF OFFICE PER VILLAGE
Contact Details
Valerie Clapp, Keller Williams
(585) 364-9654
Links, Photos & Additional Info

44 Comments on 1855 Italianate – Victor, NY – $295,000

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  1. Eric says: 232 comments

    This is an absolutely beautiful home in such a pretty setting. The barn is really nice looking too. The third floor of the home is peculiar with no windows, just a staircase up to the widows walk. Servants bells and the drapery surrounds are amazing original details.

    6
  2. PhillipPhillip says: 147 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    A wonderful property in a wonderful setting. I would prefer less woodwork painted white but considering how much about the house is right i would do some stripping. I think this is one of the best deals that I have seen on this site in a while. Taxes are not insane either by NY standards. Love this one.

    3
  3. SueSue says: 1179 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    I am swooning. I am assuming the windowless third floor is the attic? I wonder what they mean “as is”. No pictures of the kitchen, could that be it? I think it’s just lovely.

    2
  4. Lindsay G says: 591 comments

    The servant’s bells! I love that they have those! I’d take the glass casing off so you could see them better though.

  5. RossRoss says: 2301 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    In my next incarnation I am going to buy a mid-19th-century Italianate.

    I have grown to love/adore the proportions, details, and period furnishings.

    And this house is a knock-out.

    5
  6. Scott Cunningham says: 368 comments

    This one is a gem…Amazed nobody has turned the attic into a built out/furnished area (although the lack of windows may play a part). That cupola is probably interesting to see,

    3
  7. CARMEN says: 9 comments

    WOW!! WHAT A BEUT! I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS HOUSE.

  8. JimHJimH says: 3740 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Wonderful house, important to the history of the community, and apparently very well documented with architectural drawings, old photos and information on the family that owned it for 100 years.
    The original carriage house is great, although other original structures that existed a few years back as part of the neighbor’s property seem not to have survived. Relatively well-preserved, but the fairly recent loss of some details is a bummer: wallpaper from 1870 that was in the home when documented for the NRHP in 1979, and the fine single columns of the front porch with carved urn and acanthus leaf bases that echo the newel post, as seen in this photo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:OSBORNE_HOUSE.jpg
    Built for David Henry Osborne (1819-1905) and owned by his son William Bushnell Osborne (1852-1931).
    https://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=53588333

    3
  9. AndyD says: 30 comments

    One thing I love about Italianate houses are the ornamental roof brackets. WHERE ARE THE BRACKETS? It seems odd this house doesn’t have them. Other than that, just marvelous.

    • RossRoss says: 2301 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Not all Italianate houses had eave brackets.

      Here is another sans-bracket house:

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/03/20/1854-italianate-jacksonville-il/#comments

      And another:

      http://historicbuildingsct.com/?p=3265

      • Eric UnhingedEric Unhinged says: 367 comments

        Style is confusing, to be sure! In many cases houses thought to be Italianate aren’t. This house is an example of the Exotic Revival style as evidenced by its original porch (seen in the archival photo) and absence of eave bracketing. Here are a few similar examples of the style:

        http://architecturalobserver.com/the-exotic-revival-style/

        • Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9338 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Hmmm. I love it when someone will explain why they think (or know) it’s one style as opposed to another and not just say it with “This is not an Italianate…” (really a peeve of mine when someone doesn’t explain why they think it.)

          This goes to show just how difficult it is to categorize houses when some of them are no longer as originally built. I’m not sure what to do here with categorizing it now. It’s an Italianate in form yet the missing details would have made it Exotic Revival. I do the same for Queen Anne’s when all of the details are stripped but I’m having difficulty with Exotic Revival style in general at least when it was not originally so heavily decorated with Indian influences other than the porch.

          Thanks Eric for your explanation. I look forward to reading what others think about it.

          • RossRoss says: 2301 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            Kelly,

            When I purchased my 1894 house I thought it was a Queen Anne. Later, I realized it was a Queen Anne Free Classic.

            The house in this post is, today, an Italianate. But the archival images shows that it was originally, as Eric astutely observed, an Exotic Revival.

            I, too, love learning new stuff! Thanks, Eric!

          • Eric UnhingedEric Unhinged says: 367 comments

            I empathize with your plight in categorizing houses which are no longer stylistically pure! One way of dealing with that might be to add (altered) behind the style designation, followed up with an explanation or description of the style-changing alterations somewhere in the description or comment section.

            If architecture was always easy to decipher, it wouldn’t be nearly as much fun!

            • Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9338 comments
              Admin

              1901 Folk Victorian
              Chestatee, GA

              The problem is, I don’t have time to sit and do that (as in explain the different styles going on, it takes me a long while to formulate my thoughts into a non-jumbled mess of a comment.) I’ve been keeping track of how many hours I’m already working on the site…60 is a slow week! On occasion I’ll title a house with multiple styles, “Queen Anne/Colonial Revival” when I see that it’s half/half of both but other times if it’s just a porch or a small feature of another style, I’ll go with the overwhelming style. And then sometimes I’m just a dope and don’t see a stylist feature staring me in the face. Even if not titled a style, I do add it to the categories. So this particular home, even though the title doesn’t say “Exotic Revival” if you were to browse that with the browsing drop downs, this house will come up.

              • Eric UnhingedEric Unhinged says: 367 comments

                I hear you – and your solution of categorizing the ambiguous houses is a good one.

                You do an amazing job as demonstrated by the number of ardent readers you have!

        • JimHJimH says: 3740 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Eric, the Dana house in New Haven you posted was designed by Henry Austin, the brother and uncle of the architects of this house. In fact they worked for him before moving to Syracuse shortly before designing this house.
          Obviously the houses are similar and you’re apparently right about the brackets, but note that the other references include the house in the broader Italianate category. The form of these houses is clearly Italianate, and the details are actually Classical or Hellenistic rather than Oriental. Maybe this small group of houses belongs in an Italianate subtype rather than a different style altogether.
          I don’t know if Exotic Revival is really a distinct style at all, but just a catch-all category for houses that don’t fit elsewhere. Besides being different, Swiss chalets have almost nothing in common with buildings based on Moorish, Middle Eastern, Indian or Egyptian forms. Exotic usually means really exotic, like these:
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/natalia_tretiakova/33564614902
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/32432644@N02/3835412528

          • Eric UnhingedEric Unhinged says: 367 comments

            As with many other styles, the definition of Exotic Revival will long be debated by architectural historians and others with an interest in the subject. Virginia McAlester and numerous other prominent authorities do recognize the Exotic Revival as a style in its own right as distinguished from other romantic styles such as Italianate and Gothic Revival. As noted in my blog post, many Exotic Revival houses closely resemble Italianates in both form and detailing due to the concurrent popularity of the two styles.

            I would agree with you that Exotic Revivals seem to be more of a subtype of other styles, but I didn’t make up the rules so I look to those with more expertise. I have always thought of the Egyptian Revival as an independent style rather than a component of a broader category. Further, I would agree that these examples seem tame compared to truly exotic structures, but many fussy Queen Annes are also bland compared to landmark examples of the style.

            Ultimately what is important is that we recognize that not all houses which appear to be Italianate were intended to be bracketed. The past was not always so black-and-white and there are exceptions to every rule.

            • RosstRosst says: 2301 comments

              “The past was not always so black-and-white and there are exceptions to every rule.”

              Agreed!

              2
  10. Michael MackinMichael Mackin says: 1126 comments

    The house is beautiful. The barn is outstanding!

    1
  11. Bennie Ann Runyan Haeberle says: 2 comments

    I’ve never seen a communal privy before!

    1
    • SharonSharon says: 271 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Sedalia, MO

      They were very common, really. I have “fond” memories (LOL) of a double privy 50 years ago on Aunt Fern and Uncle Freddie’s farm up in southeast Iowa—- in the dead of winter with my sister Debbie sitting too closely by my side, giggling and tinkling away as fast as we could—with Peppy her pet rooster waiting for us just outside the door. Fortunately, it wasn’t too far a run back through the snow to the farmhouse. You might not think an old outhouse could bring back wonderful memories but we loved that old farm with its outhouse, windmill-pumped water, a giant cast-iron stove in daily use (wood fueled), and crackling linoleum under our feet. We all still miss that place. With all that said, I do think I’ll keep the inside porcelain.

      2
      • SharonSharon says: 271 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Sedalia, MO

        Something else about outhouses and privies. They were frequently used as garbage pits for household “trash,” like empty bottles, jugs, crocks, etc. Broken porcelain and pottery also often ended up there. Today, hunters ask permission to dig up old privy sites (now just composted soil) and discover wonderful primitive treasures. Take a look: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-WTGElXlKo

        • BrendainWI says: 63 comments

          We had some treasure hunters come ask to dig up our outhouse area in Richmond, IL. We would till our garden which ran across the same area and each year would find ‘treasures’ as my children called them! Porcelain handles, broken bottles, pieces of plates and other dishware, hinges, hooks, you name it. Super fun.

      • Bennie Ann Runyan Haeberle says: 2 comments

        Many of my relatives in NM and AZ still had an outhouse; for me, the fear of black widows was my main memory! A multi-seater was rather elite! When I was in grade school, I went to a store with a friend and her Mom. Her Mom had recently divorced from a prominent family; another woman snubbed her and walked away Mrs. N said, loudly, “Well, she acts like she’s got a two-seater out back!” and everyone laughed–

        3
  12. Lin says: 48 comments

    I Love this home !! If I could have it swooped up and flown to Tennessee, Florida, Texas I would take it in a heart beat !! NY sucks you dry on taxs fines tickets blood any thing they can get out of you

  13. HollyLiz says: 53 comments

    The red drapes look original!

    2
    • SharonSharon says: 271 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Sedalia, MO

      Yes. Look closely. They are beyond threadbare and a breeze away from shreds.

      1
  14. Colleen J says: 1284 comments

    Want for nothing in this house and property. Beautiful.

    1
  15. julie@lamedia.tv says: 133 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1914 foursquare farmhouse
    New Germany, MN

    I expected the house to need some work, but it’s perfect! I could move right in, I bet if you took down that attic suspended ceiling, there could be an amazing attic bedroom with your very own widows walk. The barn is really impressive too, Very lovely home.

    1
  16. montana channing says: 223 comments

    NICE in-house outhouse. my old place had a 4 holer too with boys and girls and mens and womens cause in case all you architecture buffs haven’t noticed, we’re shaped different.
    those doors are pretty darn spectacular and GIGANTIC. i sure wouldn’t look forward to putting one back on the hinges. they must weigh a ton. this place is so Italianate perfect from the impossibly high ceilings to the picture rail and the light fixtures on their lonnnngggg poles to get them down to people level.

  17. JullesJulles says: 534 comments

    Kelly, one of the most beautiful Italianates you have shown us. I will never forget the red draperies and carved wooden pelmuts. Most of the furniture is spot on for the house. In another vein, have you ever noticed that some of the styling cues in this house and other Italianates look very similar to the homes of the great FLW?

    1
  18. Valerie Clapp says: 1 comments

    The draperies are original, two original bedroom sets exist within the home, pictured. Also, original, to scale renderings of the columns exist along with hand drawn floor plans by the architects. I love this home and wish it in the hands of its next owner to be loved forever!

    1
    • JimHJimH says: 3740 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks Val! You did a great job on your presentation and website for the house. I wish more old houses were as nicely marketed!

      2
  19. gordon william reed says: 68 comments

    i rented the upstairs apartment in the former servant’s area(VERY STEEP STAIRS), during 2015-2010. it is a great original house with lots of history and original details. what kitchen there was, on the first floor, was crammed in the end of the dining room and an alcove. however there is plenty of original space including the unrestored original kitchen at the rear of the house for a new full kitchen. attached to the main house through a breezeway is a two-story original brick privy that can be entered through the original kitchen and from the outside; there is a full brick dividing wall for complete separation. the carriage barn has the original horse stalls trimmed in mahogany. there is probably a lot of work still to do, but worth it. LOCATION< LOCATION< LOCATION!

    2
    • Gwenn says: 21 comments

      Wow! This house is awesome! I’ve never seen the “indoor outhouse” lovely that so much was preserved.

      1
  20. gordon william reed says: 68 comments

    in the front parlor with the red draperies, don’t miss the original bright brass mouldings on the walls!

    1
  21. DH Osborne's granddaughter says: 1 comments

    Very neat to see my grandfather’s old home on this web site. I enjoyed reading the comments and links too. There is also a 2014 newspaper article about the Osborne house —

    https://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/local/rocroots/2014/05/21/victor-home-goes-back-s/9199759/

    It was sold out of the Osborne family in 1959 when I was only 3 years old so I never saw it until many years later. Mrs. Harris who owned it then, was using most of the downstairs as a nursery school and she kindly showed me the house.

    I remember the state of NY had published a booklet on this house back in the 1970s or the 1980s. I have a copy somewhere and it was interesting with a lot of old photos.

    A grand old house and I hope the new owners will keep it original as much as possible.

    3

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