1930 French Eclectic – Mansfield, OH

Added to OHD on 4/4/17   -   Last OHD Update: 11/1/20   -   34 Comments
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800 Woodhill Rd, Mansfield, OH 44907

  • $159,789
  • 5 Bed
  • 3101 Sq Ft
  • 0.5 Ac.
Restore a piece of history with this stately Woodland classic. It awaits a labor of love to revitalize it to its earlier prominence. Crown molding, cathedral ceiling, fireplace & french doors leading to an enclosed sunroom all add character to the great room. The dining room brings the outdoors in with wall length sliding glass doors. Kitchen offers a breakfast nook. Main floor laundry room & office w/ fireplace. 2 stairways up to the spacious 4-5 bedrooms & 2 full baths. The lower level provides additional living space with a family room/game room & bathroom. Backyard has stone paver patio and an amazing huge oak tree. It will be easy to fall in love with the nostalgia & charm of this home.
Contact Information
Lori Holden Sjostedt, Haring Realty
(419) 756-8383

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc:

34 Comments on 1930 French Eclectic – Mansfield, OH

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12425 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Be sure to check out the 3D Virtual Tour. I wish more agents would have it for houses.

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    • Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 1041 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1905 Neoclassic & 1937 Deco

      Kelly, thank you for bringing 3D Virtual Tour to our attention. I had never used it before — it’s dynamite! Incredible how much more perspective it provides. I noticed a lot more details — and I covet much of the owners’ furniture! This house is a beauty. But as always, there’s something about Ohio and its great houses!

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    • Scott Cunningham says: 396 comments

      Any idea what camera/software setup is used for this kind of 3D tour? Its remarkable!

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12425 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Maybe a 360 camera they move at certain distances in multiple locations? As for the software, I have no clue.

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      • CharlestonJohn says: 1090 comments

        This is the 3D product I’m familiar with. Truly the cutting edge in real estate photography…
        https://matterport.com/how-it-works/

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      • GeoffreyPS says: 102 comments

        Not sure about what camera model and software, but you can see its reflection in the living room. Go to the center point and pan around to the fireplace. It’s staring back at you in the mirror.

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      • says: 23 comments

        We had this done in our home which we just sold. A tripod mounted camera rotates around each room and hallway, then stills from the stream are stitched together to enable the walkthrough. Pretty cool. And really helps figure out the flow of a home like this. I am in love with that attic! And wife likes it too. Hmmm. Is she thinking about buying it? We want a restoration project and this one looks like mostly sweat equity and updating. I hope there is hardwood under those tired carpets. If we buy it, we’ll have a carpet stripping party and you’re all invited!

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  2. Kristin says: 28 comments

    I really like this house, And your right make sure you do the 3-D, The mint green half bath
    is wonderful, Yea this house could use a little love ,But what a fun project it would be.

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  3. RitaB says: 105 comments

    Love the green tile, sink in the bathroom. Can’t figure out the picture after that one, which looks like a window with glass block but with some kind of light over it. I would live in the attic.

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  4. Bethany Otto says: 3492 comments

    Looking at the pictures, I feel like I wouldn’t want to change a thing; I love it just the way it is! If I actually moved in I suppose there are some things that need to be done, but it reminds me a lot of my Nanna’s house and I am just crazy about it!

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  5. Delaine Zody says: 232 comments

    This home appears to have been lived in by the same people for a very long time. People who loved the home and cared for it until they probably no longer could. I hope it passes into the hands of people who will continue to love and care for it.

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  6. Karen_the_bookworm says: 19 comments

    I loved the mix of era’s in this house. I found myself recognizing era’s when the house was remodeled. This is truly a time capsule, everything from the 50’s to the 80’s.

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  7. Tony says: 75 comments

    Looking good….I see nothing wrong than a little elbow grease and just a little cash. The bathrooms are awesome. The price is what sweetens the deal.

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  8. John Nevitt says: 104 comments

    Love the 50’s fish wallpaper in one of the bathrooms. I was expecting this to be a total fixer upper from the first paragraph in the listing, but it’s not. Personally, there is very little I would change if this were mine. I don’t mind most of the wallpapers or the colors. I would rather have a lot of bright, vintage colors and vibrant patterns than all the depressing, whitewashed grey and brown color schemes that seem to be everywhere now.

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  9. John Shiflet says: 5638 comments

    Mansfield, Ohio, southwest of Cleveland, is chocked full of Victorian era homes in all styles but of course the town continued after the end of the Victorian era. A community tradition of fine residences continued into the 20th century as evidenced here. The setting looks picturesque and the French inspired exterior has a dramatic presence. If the interior were more unified I think this house could be outstanding.

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  10. Don from Manassas says: 41 comments

    A lot of dated modifications to be removed but all in all a really nice house. Love the attic.

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  11. StevenFStevenF says: 178 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    As John noted above, this house could be a stunner if the interiors were unified and some of the 1950-60s embellishments removed. I think it’s interesting that the home has a door at the top of the stair and wonder if this was to prevent heat from right . Odd choice to glass brick the accompanying window, then curtain and then artificially light it. I’d remove the glass bricks and replace with a period appropriate window. I’d also remove the 1950s paneling and hearths in both the dens and replace with something more aligned with the original design of the house. The sliders in the dining room would go and be replaced with a muntoned window. This is a great house and would be a fun project. Wonderful price. The 3-d tour is very helpful.

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  12. Donna says: 10 comments

    I would have loved to have seen this as it was furnished. I bet it looked like time stood still. I may want to add a bathroom rather than redo the vintage bathrooms. I also love the vintage stove in the kitchen. It looks like a lot of love and happiness filled this home through the years.

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  13. Annabelle says: 82 comments

    It’s a time warp! I think it’s charming. However, my dog’s dirty feet on that lovely light blue carpet. Ugg!

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  14. kathy stokes-phillips says: 172 comments

    love circle drives, outside style is cute. now i know what french eclectic is. just needs a privacy fence in bkyard, looks like the owner took good care of it

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  15. Colleen Johnson says: 1042 comments

    I love the courtyard (if that’s what it’s called, it just looks like one) … pretty house that obviously was loved and probaby many a story to tell of the kids who grew up in it!

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  16. Warbon says: 101 comments

    A wonderful house. I wonder if the floors under the carpet are hardwood? I love the 2 French doors. The house kinda has that old “Hollywood luxury” look about it. I wish I wasn’t so rooted to where I am, I would love that house.

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  17. SueSue says: 1106 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    I wonder what is under all that carpet. Wood floors perhaps?

    I love looking at these houses that have all the bells and whistles. Now everyone thinks it’s amazing to have granite counters, stainless appliances and ugly brown tile in the bathroom. This house has bells and whistles that make it charming and so functional- huge laundry room, key cupboard, dutch door, built ins everywhere, the pine rumpus room, an office with built in desk, so much storage…Love, love, love. Even so called “mansions’ that are being built don’t have such touches. Nice neighborhood too. Gem of house.

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  18. bigrog says: 157 comments

    I’m from Mansfield, and we used to take Sunday drives through Woodland to look at all the beautiful old homes. I always dreamed of living in one of these homes. Problem is, you better be rich, or retired with a good income because Mansfield no longer is the industrial town that it was at one time.

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  19. Miss-Apple37 says: 1167 comments

    Can someone explain why it is classified as a French eclectic?

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12425 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Steep pitched roof with through-the-cornice dormers, half brick half half-timbering (the white paint kind of blends the details away.) I think the 1970’s changed the front doors. I’m having a hard time telling if some of the windows are original or replacements that attempt to duplicate casement (they look like replacements but I hate to say 100% for sure.) No front facing gables, the side gables threw me a bit but I read it happens on occasion.

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      • Miss-Apple37 says: 1167 comments

        Thanks for your detailed answer Kelly! I had not noticed the half-timbering. The roof looks green and is grey on the 2012 streetview, so this doesn’t help. I must admit that my French eyes see nothing French except what looks like casement windows with muntins (but is in fact sliding windows, you can see it in the 3D tour), so it’s interesting to know what makes it look French to Americans. Especially as I had figured out that the French Eclectic often have a tower and this one had not. Thanks again!

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        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12425 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Well with the side gable form, it’s probably more on the Tudor side but then it’s got French Eclectic details. I don’t think the American French style is 100%, more like “inspired” rather than in true form.

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        • CharlestonJohn says: 1090 comments

          American residential architecture between WWI and WWII featured a number of styles with European influences including English, Spanish, Italian, and French designs. French Eclectic style houses in America are typically a blend of the French Provincial and Norman styles. The rounded tower is typically considered a Norman feature and is not always present with Eclectic style houses, although it sometimes is. All of these styles were simply a romanticized version of what American house designers in the 1920’s and 30’s thought French countryside homes looked like. It is interesting to note there is still quite a bit of this influence that can be found today in some current designs…
          http://www.acadiana-design.com/
          https://fillmoredesign.com/

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          • John Shiflet says: 5638 comments

            You nailed it, Charleston John. Well stated.

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          • Miss-Apple37 says: 1167 comments

            Thank you for your explanations. I’ll try and read more about what features define this style. On the Acadiana website, i can feel a bit of Frenchness, but as you said, this is eclectic and is therefore a mix of various styles. Front-facing gables and columns are not a feature here for instance. In fact what is maybe unknown or little known is that in France there is no French style. Everything in France is regional (architecture styles and materials, food, cheese, wine…). If you’re curious, just look for the regional style of buildings in the cities or region names on the Acadiana houses and you’ll see that Lille and Bergerac and Marseille have totally different styles. Last example, the 1939 Spanish Revival of 04/04/17 could very well be French (outside, not inside), this kind of 1-story low profile house with rounded tiles is very common throughout the south of France, scattered between west (region of Poitiers) and east (Lyon) of the southern half of the country, with regional subtleties. Anyway, sorry for the long explanation, i’m just trying to explain why this is not obvious to my eyes (and maybe arouse your curiosity on our regional styles?) 🙂

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  20. prettypaddle says: 196 comments

    We found that exact same yellow/orange/green floral wallpaper in our house! If we had been able to remove the subsequent layers of wallpaper without damaging it, we totally would have kept the floral. Love how it looks in this lovely house.

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