1865 Gothic Revival – La Porte, IN

Added to OHD on 1/25/17   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   128 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
Are you the new owner? Comment below, we'd love to say hi!
National Register

4076 W Small Rd, La Porte, IN 46350

  • $130,900
  • Foreclosure
  • 5 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 4640 Sq Ft
  • 2.99 Ac.
Built in 1865, this Victorian styled home, known as the Orr Mansion, is situated on almost 3 acres. It contains more than 4500 square feet of living area and is on the Historic Landmark registries. This home has great potential for those who have the means to restore it to its prior state of splendor. This is a Fannie Mae Homepath home.
Contact Information
Craig Hinchman, Hinchman Real Estate,
(219) 879-0686

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc: ,

127 Comments on 1865 Gothic Revival – La Porte, IN

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11846 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks Jennifer Riley for sharing!

    The black and white photos are from the National Register pdf, taken 1979.

    3
    • Carolyn says: 1 comments

      I really enjoy looking at these gorgeous homes from long ago.

      4
      • Valerie says: 3 comments

        I feel the same way Carolyn. I love to save my favorites and imagine when I have the funds to buy one and restore the house and property, furnish it…. movein…. and live happily ever after! 🙂

        2
  2. Denise says: 1 comments

    Thank you so much for this page! I love looking at all the beautiful properties and wishing they were within my reach. Thanks and keep it up 🙂

  3. bfish says: 89 comments

    Is there something wrong with it that’s not revealed? It seems too good to be true at this price; of course I don’t know the area or real estate market there.

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11846 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      It’s a foreclosure, it may sell for more than listed.

    • Brittany P says: 6 comments

      It’s actually in pretty bad shape… they just didn’t want to show that in the photos. The back exterior brick is crumbling, foundation issues, all the porches are rotted, holes in roof, and there is quite a bit of water damage in the house. 🙁 Everything needs to be redone basically. It breaks my heart that someone let it get this bad. Still, my husband and I are going to look at it next week and I truly hope we’re able to fight off any other potential buyers for this beauty! I would love to call this gem my home.

      2
      • says: 2 comments

        Hi Brittany, were you and your husband able to take a look this weekend? If so, what is the actual state of it? Wow, an inspection would be priority #1.
        Curious to learn your thoughts and if you have more photos to post?
        Thanks for sharing your insight to this amazing home.

        4
      • Handyman says: 1 comments

        Not true. No holes in the roof. No water damage in the house. I went through it. It needs new wiring, new plumbing,Tear out kitchen,Fix rotted porches, Fix roof. It will take at least $300.000 to get this house up to par..

        2
        • says: 6 comments

          Yeah we went to see it and I feel the realtor had greatly played up some of the issues. It is still in rough shape but not nearly as bad as we were thinking going into it. It will still take a lot to bring it back but it is gorgeous inside and out!

          3
      • Pat says: 1 comments

        The Historical society requires you have $130 k cash sale plus $600 k cash available to fix up. Mold in basement, porches are dangerous with holes and rotting flooring. They check for cash funds before you can see it. Just spoke to realtor.

        2
        • Handyman says: 1 comments

          That’s not true the historical society is only involved if you want to change something on the exterior of the home. Homepath is the one who makes all the decisions. I went through the home no mold anywheres.The porches are shot.You need to check your facts before you post..I see someone put an offer on the home so it is off market. I was a day late! Now I lost this home..Oh well if you snooze you lose..

          1
  4. Franka says: 18 comments

    I want this house and I want it now!

    • RossRoss says: 2468 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      NO! I want this house and I want it now!

      2
    • Lori Powell says: 28 comments

      Don’t tell me I’ve got to leg wrestle everyone for this amazing home!! My hope chest is overflowing with Victorian mantels,marble bathroom vanities,gorgeous wool rugs, period style drapery,gobs of antique furniture….and one German Griffin porcelain toilet just waiting for this perfect house!!! I think it’s time I unpack & im ready to get down & dirty & tackle a restoration. Ok…I’m dreaming along with the rest of you…. I’m still in need a generous husband with that overflowing back acct. LOL!!

      1
  5. TracyTracy says: 93 comments

    The exterior: WOW! Just wow…!

    1
  6. says: 24 comments

    Wow!! Wow!! Wow!!
    Said it three times because once isn’t enough characters!

    1
  7. StevenFStevenF says: 186 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    🙁 it looks like someone removed the newel post light fixture. Sad.

    2
  8. debbie says: 3 comments

    Looks like someone removed the light fixtures in the hallway and i am guessing other important things are missing… sigh.

    2
  9. JoeD says: 5 comments

    Well, hello Gorgeous!! This. Is. My. Dream. Home. And as-is, it is plenty splendid! Swoon. Curses upon whomever absconded with the wonderful light on the newel post shown in the b/w photo. Hopefully it’s in the storage awaiting the new owners!

    2
  10. Coqu says: 259 comments

    Hoping to read ***lots of comments*** about this house and its design/materials/etc. It is so cool! Looks very good for 1865, wow. I really like those imposing cement fence posts.
    Tell me more…

    1
  11. RossRoss says: 2468 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    The house is in a beautiful neighborhood.

    The house is now one of my top five favorites on OHD. It takes my breath away.

    1
    • Bethany Otto says: 3501 comments

      Me. too. Crushing madly.

    • Cody H says: 133 comments

      I’ve noticed that quite a few of your top fav’s are in Indiana 😉

      Architecture. We’ve got it.

      • John Shiflet says: 5470 comments

        Hi Cody,
        Agreed 100% that Indiana has some very impressive 19th century architecture and this outstanding early post-Civil War era house vividly demonstrates that fact. Given LaPorte’s proximity to Chicago, and the fact that many folks from Illinois (because of much higher taxes) are relocating to less expensive Indiana, I would expect that someone from the Windy City will snap this one up. I would also expect that to fully restore this faded mansion to period perfection, the next owner might be required to make a substantial investment. Still, such a phenomenal, truly “suburban” located Victorian mansion at this price on three acres and near a large cluster of lakes truly is a rare find. A shame the monumental newel post lamp is missing but a suitable replacement lamp might be found from several antique lighting sources.
        Cody, in the by the way category, if I recall correctly, you reside near Delphi and Peru? My spouse and I plan a Spring trip to include these towns and we may look for potential future homes there. Streetviews for both communities are quite limited but I was wondering if you were familiar with Victorian homes in these communities, especially of the towered Queen Anne variety? Getting back to the LaPorte mansion, I’m already envious of the next owner as I’m sure many others are as well. This is one of the finest houses from this era I’ve yet seen on Old House Dreams, regardless of the price.

        2
  12. elhardt says: 33 comments

    Only 80 miles to Chicago. About 20 miles to Lake Michigan. That newel post globe was cool. Looking at the one tiny heat register, houses like this are a great candidate for the upcoming Tesla solar shingles that promise to be very competitive than standard roofing. Since roofing is typically the “high Victorians” kryptonite…hi-tech solar is the future…just ask Germany ( and east/west exposure is as good or better than south)…this is a gem…money pit, but probably worth it!

    2
  13. Wendyw says: 65 comments

    Absolutely stunning. Love the tile floor in the bathroom.

    3
  14. Hopeful one says: 17 comments

    I love the floors and the doors and the windows that nearly go to the floors and the beautiful woodwork around the windows. I love the bathroom tile and the fence and the entrance,so pretty. I think the family that had such a fine home built,surely has an interesting story. Once again,I wish that walls could talk.

  15. Teri says: 74 comments

    It is gorgeous but they can be Money Pits! Taxes are usually low in Indiana so that is good. Nice stove too for the kitchen. Probably more outside maintenance than inside.

    1
  16. Diana says: 1 comments

    This is a beautiful home.

  17. Betsy says: 159 comments

    I am consumed with lust.

  18. Ronda Naifeh says: 22 comments

    The most beautiful home I’ve ever seen!

  19. Kevin O'Neill says: 154 comments

    If it was up to me we would be packing our bags right now. But its not, I answer to a higher power…my wife.

    1
  20. Linda says: 22 comments

    What a beauty! Its so sad to see glorious homes like this to get left behind…

  21. SeanSean says: 159 comments
    1928 Spanish Revival
    Long Beach, CA

    I’m with the rest of you… this house has me in love. Is it love when you ache looking at photos and your stomach fills with butterflies?

    It has all the creepiness I demand in Victorian architecture. And the mild decay on the interior (I assume because the restorations are unfinished) just add to the charm.

    It does seem like it’s been through a lot. I saw another article that the house was in court in 2002 because the owner wanted to hold public events there, but the neighbors objected due to street parking, etc. In 2002, the neighbors won, but from the 2006 article linked above, it looks like the owner eventually got his way and opened it up for events, but it didn’t make enough money and it was foreclosed upon.

    Poor creepy girl really needs some love and caring… and I’d be just the guy to do it!

  22. Sunflower & Poppy says: 50 comments

    Gosh! What a beauty! Elaborate Gothic Revival mansion in a great town and a reasonable commute into Chicago. How could it be bad? I guess it needs some initial investment and I would have thought any owner would need to have a secure income just for upkeep — but WOW what a house!

  23. Jerry A. Crabtree says: 1 comments

    I want to see a structural report before I make an offer on it.

    2
  24. John says: 77 comments

    Wow- great house- love the architecture! If my wife shared my taste in houses we’d move. I live in Indiana and would buy this in a heartbeat.

  25. Michael Mackin says: 2554 comments

    Maybe it’s just me but I don’t see a lot of project on this house that are overwhelming, even for a first timer. Perhaps some attention on the exterior roofs and soffits but there isn’t much I would change about this house. Seems like an incredible house for the money. Kelly may be right, It may well go for more than listed.

  26. Sue S. says: 277 comments

    Can this be the Old House Dreams official clubhouse?

    • Paul Price says: 200 comments

      What a fantastic question Sue! We could meet for a summer get together, picnic, hobnob, fix-up??? Am I daydreaming again?

      • Lori Powell says: 28 comments

        I’m in!!…just let me put on my work clothes…and pack my picnic basket & bring my tea cup & saucer!

        • Jerry says: 38 comments

          While y’all (yes I’m from Texas) get the house in order I will get the grounds all manicured. It will be a showplace indeed. A picnic is in order and do it up right.

          1
      • Sunflower & Poppy says: 50 comments

        We’ll fly in from London to help out with that endeavour — try to make that daydream a reality!! It is a fabulous place!

        • John Shiflet says: 5470 comments

          This house reminds me of the late Beatles guitarist George Harrison’s Friar Park Gothic mansion although admittedly its at least a level or so below the English version. (I can hardly imagine the staggering costs of maintaining the rambling Friar Park mansion let alone the tax bill) But for a small fraction of the value of the English Gothic version, one can have a semi-rural retreat that at least shares some stylistic similarities with Friar Park on expansive, nearly 3 acre grounds.

          1
          • Sunflower & Poppy says: 50 comments

            Yes, I can see that, and as you suggest the enormous scale of Friar Park could only be sustained by a major rock icon or an oligarch of some description! Certainly the far more compact (and less expensive) house in La Porte Indiana would provide the excitement of owning a Victorian ‘gothic mansion’ (for most of us lesser mortals) without the financial terror that something like Friar Park would present! You probably know Friar Park features a wonderful lake and rockwork gardens — just about as good as it gets! Maybe a Victorian style rockery and pond in the grounds of the Orr Mansion could be laid out — but it could also spoil it if it wasn’t very well done. I would be interested to see how much of the original layout of the Orr Mansion garden survives — it looked like there were some quite mature trees. I would love to walk the grounds.

            1
            • John Shiflet says: 5470 comments

              Thanks for your comments and U.K. perspective. Stateside, during the period from 1860-1880, very formal gardens and elaborate landscaping were often features found to complement the grand mansions of that period. Here’s a color plate from a plan book by Saratoga, NY, architect Gilbert Croff showing the type of formal landscaping commonly found around American mansions of that time: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=umn.31951d007994819;view=1up;seq=19

              1
              • Sunflower & Poppy says: 50 comments

                Hello John — actually I was born and raised in America but have lived in the U.K. for the last 37 years– it’s very nice to have a foot in both camps so to speak! I so enjoy looking in on OHD and more particularly the diverse commentary fills me with a sense of nostalgia for my early life and family in the States– and especially your own highly informative perspectives are always a ‘must read’ for me — and others I’m sure! Thank you so very much for the excellent link to the illustration of a formal American mansion garden of the period 1860-1880. What strikes me of course is the similarity to much earlier formal parterre gardens that can be seen immediately around great houses in England in the late 17th and early 18th centuries — influenced very heavily by the fashion for these types of gardens in France and Holland (each country in turn led the way). All of this evolved from the earlier gardens of the Renaissance in Italy and of course travel to Italy (i.e. on The Grande Tour) by French and English (as well as Dutch) royalty and aristocracy played a big part in this. In England in the 18th century the taste for high formality gradually gave way to more ‘natural’ forms in gardens (at first at an elite level) and many an expensively contrived parterre from the previous century was swept away in favour of the more ‘parkland’ settings for the bigger old houses — and new houses too. Of course the very formal gardens returned in England in a very big way — especially in the mid to late 19th century — and by then I’m not so sure that America was very far behind (if at all) in the Revival fashion stakes! I wonder if the American gardeners didn’t have the upper hand in some instances! All best

                1
  27. barbs says: 2 comments

    I wonder how it’s heated ?

    2
    • Jimbo says: 7 comments

      Probably burns pure paper money (yeah really…a case of pure sour grapes, just out of reach). Unbelievably beautiful. I’m with all the people painfully commenting, “Why can’t this be mine!”

  28. jeklstudio says: 1114 comments

    This is packed with beauty and potential–and Victorians aren’t even my fav. The missing newel post light is a sin. When the hubs and I bought a fantastic Tudor style home in southern Oregon in 1995, the owner had removed the newel light (the figure of Diana) and a huge bank of stunning, casement stained & beveled glass windows, in hopes of selling them! He let it slip and we pursued that and finally got them back. People should not take precious things from old homes.
    This house is so lovely and I hope that whomever gets it will treasure it.

    2
  29. Maudy says: 2 comments

    I live just down the road from the Orr Mansion, and always slow down to admire it when I pass by! It is simply a breathtaking home, and I hope a suitable caretaker is found soon. The county has this property valued at around $350,000, so the asking price is an astonishing deal! (and, very tempting…..) I’m trying to talk the ‘ol hubby into this one. I am keeping my eyeballs peeled for an open house.

    It’s had its share of owners over the past decade, as one of the earlier owners had really tried to make it into a wedding/event destination, but was met with much resistance by the local government, citing parking issues, and other red tape. The John Garwood Mansion (of local apple orchard fame) is SUPER close as well. (bonus!)

    1
  30. CharlestonJohn says: 1127 comments

    What a fantastic example of Victorian architecture. The Gothic Revival details mix with a form and tower typical of the Second Empire Style. The left side roof almost looks like a mansard in the second B&W pic. There’s definitely a Italianate/ Second Empire feel under the Gothic Revival detailing. What a great restoration project for somebody.

    2
  31. Maudy says: 2 comments

    Our county GIS has a nifty aerial feature, where you can zoom in and see the property from all angles. You just use the compass toolbar in the upper left. Super cool!

    https://beacon.schneidercorp.com/Application.aspx?AppID=205&LayerID=2736&PageTypeID=4&PageID=4267&KeyValue=460632400006000042

    1
    • says: 2 comments

      Thanks for sharing this, Maudy, this is a very cool look at it from various years and seasons.
      Wish I could drive by and see it. I did ask my mom to drive by. I live in San Francisco now and could never afford an old Victorian here. Maybe I could get one back home in Indiana.

      1
      • says: 21 comments

        Hi KellyV. Just saying hello, a fellow Hoosier from Indianapolis and Dubois County, also relocated to SF, also in love with this La Porte stunner for the price of a parking stall in SF, lol. Nick

  32. Victoria says: 134 comments

    Looks solid and other than the flat porch roof, can probably handle the snow well. I lived for 3 years about 45 min. away in South Bend, Indiana. The state has so many fabulous old houses like this that should be preserved. Here’s another link to information: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/orr-mansion-gains-new-honor/article_1ab8fb4b-9749-5180-a9ac-4238de13d928.html

  33. WeeSuzie says: 1 comments

    Thanks for sharing this old gem of a house. I am from not far from where it is. Loved looking inside.

    1
  34. JimHJimH says: 5127 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Spectacular house and a bargain at a few times this price.
    I’ll assume that in 25 years of ownership the guy did some necessary preservation work, and he should be given credit. But the house deserves much better than mere survival, and hopefully the next owner can put some real money and effort into it.
    It also needs some over-the-top Eastlake furniture like Rosewater was raving about:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1339-Clara-Brown-Rd-55.jpg

    3
  35. maplehill says: 10 comments

    Meant to be mine! I LOVE EVERYTHING HERE! The house, the fence, that it has a bit of land, that it is big. YES to the OHD clubhouse idea.

  36. Roolight says: 1 comments

    Since JimH hasn’t yet provided his (much appreciated) history of the property, I couldn’t waitI had to dig up my own. Here’s more about William Orr, a well respected and prosperous farmer, and the beautiful house he added to his 1100 acre farm in 1875. I agree, this one is a lead contender for best old house. ( Thanks in advance for any extras, JimH, I love your histories). https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Orr_House

    1
    • JimHJimH says: 5127 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks, Roolight. This one speaks for itself and I’ll only add that a build date of 1875 is stated in the NRHP info and seems more appropriate. Italianate and Second Empire styles with the Eastlake detailing seen here came together for a time in the 1870’s. The design has been attributed to Chicago area architect Willoughby J. Edbrooke, without definite proof that I see. He’s better known for his later government work such as the Georgia State Capitol and the Old Post Office in Washington, recently altered by some guys from New York.

      1
  37. Roger says: 47 comments

    Another gem from Indiana. I am a transplanted Hoosier (A person from Indiana) who loves these old houses. I am stuck in a 1950’s ranch style house, but my heart is in these old homes! Even a home that is sixty years old has a lot of maintainance costs, I can only imagine how much a person would spend on one of these classics!

    2
  38. kathy stokes-phillips says: 197 comments

    o wow, look at that one, looks like right out of a movie

    1
  39. Paul W says: 470 comments

    This house was on a tour I think back in 2006. Its since lost its grand light fixtures and that is 20-30K to locate ones worthy of the house. This is the second time I know of that it has caused someone’s financial failure. All that aside. Its still a great house. It’s not a house for a ‘dreamer’, it needs someone with fairly deep pockets, who have maybe done a couple of homes, to bring it back to what is deserves to be and that should include period restoration. It really needs someone who will do it right. I’ve seen so many houses sit an languish bought by people with good intentions but neither the skills, money, or resources to properly restore it. I hoping maybe this time the right person comes along who can afford the 3500 a year property taxes, the cost to heat and cool it and the restoration work it needs. Great house.

    1
    • MW says: 902 comments

      Only $3500 in taxes per year?! I could only dream our taxes would be that low. They probably have use beat by a large margin on the heating bills though.

      2
  40. PhillipPhillip says: 267 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    Well like everyone else I love this one. I think the roof and soffit work and porches are going to be significant and you are going to be working at some real height on this one. Probably not a project for a beginner, unless you have the cash to pay for all of that and then do the inside yourself. The setting of the house is superb. All in all one I would consider buying seriously were I looking to move.

    1
    • Jeff Myers says: 130 comments

      I was thinking the same thing! And the soffit/gutter problems go back before 1978 when the BW photos were taken. Lord knows what you’d find when you got inside the eaves! Prom the pictures it looks like they are using the electric that was installed near the turn of the century, except in the kitchen. But for this price definitely worth it if you want a true Addams Family Victorian mansion.

      1
  41. chris32chris32 says: 96 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Canton, GA

    Just…….wow. My second favorite Indiana house is now the one at auction in Greendale, because this new one is just gorgeous….and no tenant to remove, either.
    I love the comments from my fellow OHD fans, and my favorite one is, “It has all the creepiness I demand in Victorian architecture.” Me too, Sean.
    I am also imagining the wonderful gardens I would put in around this beautiful property.

  42. Sherry says: 4 comments

    It has American Horror Story written all over it.

  43. Devon Hoerner says: 50 comments

    So lovely.. I wish they would take better pictures of the interior. Love Indiana. They have some stunning old homes.. We have looked at a few in the state..

  44. LUCINDA HOWARD says: 248 comments

    I don’t have an amusing comment so I’ll just say YUMMY.

  45. Jim Siegel says: 4 comments

    Wow. I also love this home and it is amongst my favorites. Just don’t think I can’t handle the cold winters but would use my 40 years restoration experience to make this beauty shine.
    All the best to whoever becomes the lucky owner!

    1
  46. PhillipPhillip says: 267 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    websites showing it off market. Is that due to foreclosure proceedings?

  47. LorenN says: 94 comments

    Yes, it appears the previous owner “ran out of money” but did do a lot of fixing up inside. For those of you who have been “swooning over it” & can live in the area & have lots of money and experience – this place is just screaming for YOU to take her on! What a place! I vision it fully restored with wonderful gardens, paths and grounds. WOWZA! from California!

    1
    • MW says: 902 comments

      If that newel post light really is worth $20-30K as suggested above (seems absurd but I am no expert on that), I wonder if when the previous owner was running low on cash they decided to sell it off. That would really be a shame. But if so, maybe it could at least be tracked down as to where it is for possible future reacquisition. If super lucky, maybe it was just removed and safely stored hidden in the house so it wouldn’t just disappear.

      1
      • AudreyAudrey says: 104 comments

        They mentioned ALL the historic lighting was removed to the tune of a replacement cost of $20-30k. So sad, it seems people have done so much to keep the house going strong without being successful!

        2
        • MW says: 902 comments

          Thanks for the clarification on the lights. I didn’t catch the “s” on the “fixtures” when I read it and just assumed they were talking only about the newel post light as others had. $20-30K for multiple main fixtures though doesn’t seem out of line at all. Just one big nice chandelier or a couple smaller ones could easily add up to that and more. So even more sad that they all are gone. That kind of stuff is really morally distressing.

          1
  48. Arkham says: 70 comments

    Be still, my beating heart!

  49. AudreyAudrey says: 104 comments

    Due to a worrisome fb comment and the property being removed from active listing, I called the agent.
    The secretary said it’s being removed because of necessary repairs and should be back on the market next week. ‘Renee’ is supposed to calling me with more info. I’ll update if I hear back.

    1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11846 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks Audrey!

    • Signe Gronbeck-Johnson Grandeur Restorations says: 45 comments

      We immediately called to buy it last week. However, we needed info on the zoning first because we have horses. The lot size is just 2.99 acres, and the county/township requires a full 3 acres per horse, so sadly we had to past on it. The realtor also told me they were going to be pulling the listing, and relisting it as a 21 day auction soon. She said it will be cash only. I hope one of you OHD fans will get hold of it, it would be horrific if a remuddler got hold of it and did the open floor plan neutral color death to the gorgeous interior.

      2
      • Naomi Bowman says: 1 comments

        Hi there! I too called..Found out that it’s a cash only sale and be prepared for a bidding war and you must have 250k in the bank for repairs that were already assessed and determined by the national historical association AND you cannot take occupancy until the work is done 🙁
        Roof, porches, and pipes need replaced and repaired… I visited the property…absolutely beautiful!!!

        2
  50. Claire says: 3 comments

    Ok.theres enough of us to crowd fund or whatever you kids do these days to raise money.we all own it .we can all have holidays there.i think we can all agree we all might expire if someone lovely doesnt buy it a.s.ap

  51. Amanda says: 50 comments

    Best yet but I keep saying that oh be still my heart I would never leave and could have all my family come visit from across the pond and the gardens oh heaven please if anyone bids and purchases let us know I would but still helping with university fees but he has promised to buy me an old Victorian once settled with a job. He knows I dream too much….

  52. SueSue says: 1130 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Husband took one look and said ‘Nope, bodies still wander those halls. I would never be able to sleep.” He cracks me up. He knows a home like this would be my dream. I point at homes that are just waiting for someone to love them again and say how much I want to buy them and bring them back. This beauty clearly is well loved by all of us. Let’s hope it is bought by one of us or someone that loves it for the gorgeous work of art it is.

    1
    • Cathy says: 2218 comments

      I appear to be the odd one out (other than your hb!). Though I can understand why many people would love it, it looks kind of creepy to me, esp. the exterior. Maybe it’s simply because most of the windows have no dressings/coverings, so they presently look very dark from the outside??

  53. Amanda says: 50 comments

    Oh my sister Claire has seen it too I knew she would love it we have an ocean between us….

  54. sapphy says: 390 comments

    I think I’ve found my soul mate house. I don’t even like brick houses, but this one is wonderful! And on 3 acres?!!! The kitchen is in serious need of backdating.

    1
  55. cheryl plato says: 178 comments

    oooooooooh!!!!! (thud) wow!!be still my heart..

  56. sam says: 5 comments

    Most amazing house ever!! Gobsmacked. OHD joint venture?!

  57. Tommy Q says: 463 comments

    This is the scariest looking house ever on oldhousedreams. Spooky… and now off the market it seems.

  58. PhillipPhillip says: 267 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    A nice newel post light worthy of this house could be had for 1500. Chandeliers would run anywhere from 2500 and up. Paul, the gas wizard, at quality lighting would be the best source. You can see some of his pieces on ebay. But lights would be the final icing on the cake. This place needs major exterior work and that is no job for an amateur. I would want to have a minimum of 600K to take this on and even then you would be doing lots of the work yourself. But look what you would have.

    2
  59. John Shiflet says: 5470 comments

    Paul, a/k/a “Gas Wizard”, has an impressive collection of vintage photos and trade cards showing period lighting on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antiquelighting/ As you noted, Phillip, lighting would come last in the restoration process as part of the cosmetic finishes inside. I think the general figure you mentioned is valid but the truth is a buyer could spend almost an unlimited amount to realize their vision of what this house and grounds could be. It’s such an impressive house and grounds well placed in a suburban or semi-rural location that the term “grand estate” would be apt. I hope that the next owner has very deep pockets so he or she can reward this former mansion with the period restoration it deserves. The Culbertson Mansion (a museum house from the same period) in New Albany, Indiana, has the kinds of period interior decorative treatments that this house would have originally had.

    1
  60. dmobeck says: 44 comments

    The number of comments attests to the gem this house really is. It’s stunning even in it’s current condition. What a labor of love it will be for some lucky buyer.

    1
  61. Zoomey says: 533 comments

    It’s even more gorgeous on street view. The neighborhood is lovely. It is in a perfectly beautiful setting that shows off the house wonderfully.
    We’re all swooning because this house has nearly everything an old house dreamer wants. It’s in good but not perfect shape, but no muddling that I can see. It has high ceilings, large windows, gracefully-designed spaces. The exterior is a fantasy!! So much wonderful detail that it’s breathtaking. The interior is as beautifully detailed as the exterior. I don’t usually like Gothic revival houses, but this one is extra special.

    1
  62. Diane says: 68 comments

    Question: are some of the walls covered with that rough plaster that is used in my area only when you are trying to hide problems (I know it is fondly used in some other regions because of regional differences in taste) that is so difficult to remove, or am I just seeing walls with wall paper removed or paint that my eyes just aren’t registering correctly? I’m not at all sure what I am seeing with some of the walls.
    Not trying to be insulting about the rough plaster if you’re in a region that loves to use it! Here, its used when you are trying to hide something. Regional difference.
    Love the house and would gladly share with others, but you have to accept the parrots!!

  63. AudreyAudrey says: 104 comments

    Ok, so I have the full story on the house. The current safety issue with the house is there is only one door being used to enter and the floor in front of that door is not safe. The house will be relisted after the floor is made safe. The house is not in the great shape it seems to be in the photos. It will not be able to be financed. The house currently has a bad roof that is leaking and needs to be replaced. There is a large amount of rotting wood on the exterior, such as the porches, and many windows have been cracked and broken. The have had the property since last fall, and have been dealing with a flea infestation that they think they now have under control. They estimate $100,000-120,000 in repairs. They said that ‘they’ (state, local, unsure) have the first right of refusal on the property. I am unsure if this is actuality, since she said the federal preservation program does, but that is not how that works. They will not be deciding on offers til mid february (I forget the date she mentioned). So there you all go! Hope a true preservationist gets it!

    1
    • JimHJimH says: 5127 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks Audrey!
      It’s a good thing IMO that the house “can’t be financed”. A buyer that’s strong financially has money or can get it for the project, but eliminating borderline buyers that hope to buy and restore it on a shoestring is a good thing for a great house like this. Dreamers are great, but you need cash and expertise! Lack of funds has been the problem for the last few owners, and the last so-called “savior” hasn’t even owned the place since 2007!
      With exposure on OHD and other sites, a unique property like this in an accessible location should attract the kind of truly qualified purchaser/restorer the house deserves.

      1
      • Johnny Case says: 6 comments

        I disagree Jim. Time and time again these sorts of sales do not go to “qualified” people they go to business elites that do not care one lick for old houses. They will have the money up front but they will cut corners and try to sell it back at a high premium. We have seen it time and time and time again on this site. All the interest drives the price up and then a great house gets “updated” beyond recognition. Money is not everything. These houses need smart people who will love it as long as it takes. Yes, it is true that people should not take on more than they can handle but money is not the only thing, or even the best thing these houses need.
        I could list 45 homes on this site that have been purchased by people with money and each and every time they have been destroyed never to return. Money does not buy people smarts or taste. Especially not taste. Being able to afford to hire other people to do your work for you is not really a great thing for these old houses. Doing the job right is much more important. These houses need dreamers, with vision, drive, passion, and skill.

        1
        • JimHJimH says: 5127 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Johnny, I said it needs money and expertise, and it goes without saying that the buyer’s heart has to be in the right place. If the house was in a major market, I’d worry about a flipper/developer type who wouldn’t care about the result, but I don’t see that happening out there.
          This isn’t a fixer-upper house for the weekend warrior with a few tools either, and it’s going to take more money than most DIY guys have access to. I think you’re wrong to assume that buyers with money are clueless and without taste. (Some are!) Very few of the well-preserved and/or restored houses we see here were done without substantial investments in cash. Some guys can finance part of it with rehab loans and grants, but only an fool would buy this house without six figures in reserve.

          1
    • says: 3 comments

      Audrey, have you been told it was $100K-$120K to be available for repair, or $200K-$240K as claimed by Naomi Bowman above?

      1
  64. BungalowGirl says: 141 comments

    I am rather awestruck by this one’s beauty. Wow.

  65. Maeve says: 1 comments

    My husband and I just looked through this beautiful home. The historic preserve is involved and they have estimated the exterior repairs to be between $100-$150k. These repairs must be completed within 18 months of purchase. We were told that the buyer does not have to use a contractor for these repairs though, so that could lower estimated costs. The inside of the home is incredibly rich in history. The butler’s pantry and servant’s stairs and quarters are all still in place. The home does have some mold issues and there has been leaking from the skylight in the kitchen addition.The basement is expansive and the cobblestone floor is intact. I could go on for days! This is a beautiful home and I truly hope that someone with the means and passion to restore it is able to purchase it.

    1
  66. Linmarie says: 1 comments

    Love the photos but the black and white one on the bottom…the set of windows on the right side, left window looks like a person standing there of another era. Maybe it’s just me but it looks like an older man looking out the window.

  67. MarkP says: 2 comments

    I used to visit this home in the 1970’s when it was owned by Irene Richter. My grandparents owned a farm between LaPorte and Westville (I still own it) and I would spend the summers there. I was fascinated by the house and my grandmother and I used to visit Mrs. Richter. I even did an oil painting of the house and gave it to Mrs. Richter as a gift. I lost touch with her after I left the area to go to college and I have no idea when she passed away. It’s sad to see the place in this condition. When we visited the house was stuffed with antique treasures from Mrs. Richters home in Chicago and in fact seemed almost like the domain of a hoarder (if hoarders collected priceless period furniture and artifacts from around the world). I remember the dining room table being entirely covered with silver tea sets, tureens, goblets, etc. And in the Library were two savonarolla chairs that Mrs. Richter claimed had come from the Doge’s palace in venice! Who knows. It was certainly the stuff of my budding theatrical designer fantasy. I hope whoever has purchased the place restores it to it’s former glory. I know it has gone through some complex legal issues in the past few years and suffered some indignities. Not the least of which was someone having painted all the glorious dark woodwork in the house white. It will certainly require a lot of loving care so let us hope it is done in service to the house’s spectacular architectural past.

    1
    • says: 3 comments

      MarkP, do you have any photos of the interiors? Anything that could’ve helped to understand how the house used to be?

      1
      • MarkP says: 2 comments

        Unfortunately I don’t. Too bad we didn’t have smart phones back then or I certainly would have. However I do remember that Mrs. Richter kept the house quite dark with the full array of 19th century window treatments; closed shutters, sheer lace curtains and heavy draperies. I’m not sure there would have been enough light to really capture the full glory of the place. Looking back at the photos i see that some of the window casings and moldings have not been painted and I remember all of the woodwork being in those same dark tones. I also realize looking over my own post that I miss-typed the time I used to visit there. It was the it would have been between 1960 and 1966 not the 70’s.

        2
  68. Phil says: 1 comments

    My friend (town native) drove me by it today. It certainly sticks in your head. I had to research it, ended up here.

    1
  69. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11846 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    A reader said that they drove by yesterday and it’s not being worked on, just sitting there. Anyone know what happened? I was hoping this was being worked on all this time.

    4

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.